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HARPERS' LATIN DICTIONARY 



J± NEW 



LATIN DICTIONARY 



jTotmkfr on % ©ransktxon of 

JFreuntr's Hat in* German HexUfltt 

Edited by E. A. ANDREWS, LL.D. 



REVISED, ENLARGED, AND IN GREAT PART REWRITTEN 
By CHARLTON T. LEWIS, Ph.D. 

AND 

CHARLES SHORT, LL.D. 

PBOEESSOB OF LATIN IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE, N. T. 



Migite*. 




Nero Uork 

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS 

PRANKLIN SQUARE 



(DxforO: At thk Clarendon Press 
1891 



Copyright, 1879, by Harper & Brothers. — Copyright, 1878, by Harper & Brothers. — Copyright, 1877, by 
Harper & Brothers. — Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1850, by Harper & Brothers, 
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Southern District of New York 



PUBLISHERS 1 ADVERTISEMENT. 

The translation of Dr. Freund's great Latin-German Lexicon, edited by the late 
E. A. Andrews, LL.D., and published in 1850, has been from that time in extensive 
use throughout England and America, It has had for competitors, indeed, in the 
schools and colleges of both countries, only works which are substantially reprints or 
abridgments of itself. As it has thus been the standard book of reference of its kind 
for a generation of scholars, its merits need no description here. 

Meanwhile, great advances have been made in the sciences on which lexicography 
depends. Minute research in manuscript authorities has largely restored the texts of 
the classical writers, and even their orthography. Philology has traced the growth 
and history of thousands of words, and revealed meanings and shades of meaning 
which were long unknown. Syntax has been subjected to a profounder analysis. 
The history of ancient nations, the private life of their citizens, the thoughts and be- 
liefs of their writers, have been closely scrutinized in the light of accumulating infor- 
mation. Thus the student of to-day may justly demand of his lexicon far more than 
the scholarship of thirty years ago could furnish. The present work is the result of a 
series of earnest efforts by the Publishers to meet this demand. 

It was seen fifteen years ago that at least a very thorough revision of the Lexicon 
was needed. It was therefore submitted to the author of the original work, Dr. 
William Freund, who carefully revised it, rewrote a few of the less satisfactory arti- 
cles, corrected errors, and supplied about two thousand additions, mainly in the early 
pages. The sheets were then placed in the hands of Professor Henry Drisler, LL.D., 
to be edited ; but that eminent scholar soon advised us that a reconstruction of the 
work was desirable, such as he could not command leisure to make. They were after- 
wards delivered to the present editors to be used freely, and in combination with all 
other appropriate sources, in compiling a Latin Lexicon which should meet the ad- 
vanced requirements of the times. The results of their unremitting labors for several 
years are now given to the public. 

The first 216 pages (w T ords beginning with A) are the work of Professor Charles 
Short, LL.D., of Columbia College. The remainder of the book, from page 217 to 
page 2019 inclusive, is the work of Mr. Charlton T. Lewis. While each editor is 
alone and wholly responsible for the pages which he has prepared, Mr. Lewis requests 
us to acknowledge the indebtedness of the book to contributions from other scholars, 
incorporated by him with his own collections. It is proper to refer, in particular, to 
the valuable services of Gustavus Fischer, LL.D., of New Brunswick, whose learning 
and research have given to many articles a fulness and thoroughness hardly attempted 
before in a Latin Lexicon (see, for example, the words contra. 2. cum. sic. sieto. solvo, 
suus, turn, tunc, volo, and others); and of Professor George M. Lane, Ph.D., of Har- 



tv PUBLISHERS' ADVERTISEMENT. 

vard College, who has kindly examined a large part of the book in proof, and has 
freely communicated, in his suggestions and corrections, the ripe fruits of his scholar- 
ship. Every effort has been made to avoid errors of the press ; and, through the pa- 
tient skill of the proof-reader, Mr. George W. Collobd, exceptional accuracy in this 
respect has, we believe, been attained. 



HARPER & BROTHERS, 



Franklin Square, New York, ) 
September 1, 1879. \ 



ORTHOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



A list of the principal words wliicli are variously spelled in MSS. and editions. From Brambach's "Aids to Latin Orthography." 

(In most cases the form approved by Brambach is that preferred by recent editors; but there are still several words 

on which" high authorities differ from him or from one another. For particulars, see the Lexicon.) 



ab in compounds before i (for j), K &, d y Z, 
n, r, s ; abs before c, q, i ; as before p 
(asporto) ; a before m and v ; au before 
/(aufero, aufugio; but afui, v. absum). 

abicio, better than abjicio. 

abscisio, better than abcisia 

absum, afui,. afore, etc. (not abfuf). 

ad in compounds before i (for j), h, 6, d,/, 
m, n, g, v; ac before c, sometimes q (bet- 
ter adquiro, etc.) ; ag or ad before g> but 
a or ad before gn, &p, sc, st ; ad or al be- 
fore I ; ad (less prop, an) before n ; ap 
(less freq. ad) before p; ad or ar before 
r ; ad or as before s ; at before t (rare- 
ly ad). 

adicio, better than adjicio. 

adsimulo, better than adsimilo. 

adulescens (subst), better than adolescens; 
so adulescentia, etc. 

aeneus, aenus, better than ahe-. 

aequipero, not aequiparo. 

alioqui, better than alioquin. 

aliunde or alicunde. 

alluciuor or hallu- ; old form halucinor. 

ancora, not anchora. 

antemna or antenna. 

antiquus, old; anticus, that is in front 

anulus, anellus, uot ann-. 

apud ; also (less freq. ) aput. 

arcesso or accerso. 

atqui, better than atquin. 

auctor, auctoritas, not aut-. 

audacter, not audaciter. 

autumnus, not auctumnus. 

baca, better than bacca. 

baccar, better than bacchar. 

ballista, better than balista. 

balneum or balineum. 

barritus, not baritus, barditus. 

belua, not bellua. 

benedico, benefacio, or separately, bene 
dico, bene facio. 

benevolus, benencus, etc., better than beni- 
volus, beniflcus. 

bipartitus and bipertitus. 

braca, not bracca. 

bracchium, not brachium. 

bucina, not buccina; so bucinator. 

caecus, not coecus. 

caelebs, not coelebs. 

caelum, caelestis, etc., not coel-. 

caementum, not cementum. 

c&enum, not coeuum. 

caerimonia or caeremonia, not cer-. 

caespes, not cespes. 

caestus, not cestus. 

candela, not candella. 

Cauda, vulgar form coda. 

causa, better than caussa. 

cena, not coena. 

ceteri, not cacteri. 

cheragra or cbiragra. 

circumeo or circueo, circumitus or circui- 
tus. 

coclea, better than cochlea. 

coicio, better than conicio, coiicio. 

comissor or comisor. 

comminus, not cominus. 

comprehendo, better than comprendo. 

condicio, not conditio. 

conecto, not connecto ; so conexio, conexus. 

conitor, not connitor. 

coniveo, not conniveo. 

conjunx, better than conjux. 

contio, not concio. 

conubium, not connubium. 

convicium, not convitium. 

cottidie or cotidie, not quotidie. 

culleus, culleum. not culeus. culeum. 

cum, or archaic quom, not quutn. 



cum in composition: com before 6, m, p; 
con before c, d,f g, i (for j) : n. q, s, t, v ; 
but co before gn, before n in conecto, 
coniveo, etc., and before vowels and h 
(except comedo, comes, comitor, comi- 
tium, and their derivv.), hence cogo for 
coago; cor before r ; con or col before I. 

cumba, better than cymba, 

cumque, not cunque. 

cuppes, better than cupes ; so cuppedo, 
cuppediae. 

cupressus, not cypressus. 

Cybebe or Cybele. 

damma, not dam a. 

Dareus, better than Darius. 

deicio, better than dejicio. 

denuntio, not denuncio. 

deprehendo or deprendo. 

derigo and dirigo are to be distinguished; 
v. these words. 

describo and discribo are to be distin- 
guished; v. these words. 

designo aud dissigno are to be distin- 
guished; v. designo. 

deversorium, better than devor-, not diver- 
sorium. 

dicio, not ditio. 

dilectus (a military levy), not delectus. 

discidium, not dissidium. 

discribo, discriptio, v. describo. 

disicio (dissicio), better than disjicio. 

dissignator (an undertaker, etc.), not desig- 
nator. 

dumetum or dummetum, dumosus or dum- 
mosus. 

dumtaxat, not duntaxat. 

dupondius, later form dipondius. 

eculeus, better than equuleus. 

edo. esum, better than essum. 

edylliuni or idy Ilium. 

ei (interjection), not hei. 

eicio, better than ejicio. 

elleborus, better than helleborus. 

emo, emptum, not emtum ; so emptio, 
emptor, etc. 

epistula, not epistola ; but epistolicus (= 

fc7TfO-To\(Ki>f). 

Erinys, not Erinnys. 

erus, era, erilis. not herus, etc. 

Euander, Euandrus, not Evander. 

euhoe (= evoi), not evoe. 

ex before vowels and h ; e or ex before 

consonants, 
ex in composition, before vowels, and h, c, 

p (except epotus. epoto^, q, t, and 5 ; the 

s is better retained, e. g. exsanguis, better 

than exanguis, etc. ; e before b, d, g, i 

(for J), 7, m, n, r, v ; ef before/ 
exim or exin. 

eximo, exemptum, not exemtum. 
faenum (vulgar form fenum), riot foenum. 
faenus, better than fenus, not foenus ; so 

faenero, faenerator, etc. 
fecunditas, fecundo, fecundus, not foecun- 

ditas, etc. 
fetidus, feteo, fetor, better than foetidus, 

etc. 
fetus (subst. and partic), not foetus. 
futtilis, better than futilis. 
gaesum, not gesum. 
Gaetuli and Getuli. 
Genava, not Geneva. 

genetivus, genetrix, not genitivus, genitrix. 
glaeba, better than gleba. 
gratiis and gratis. 
Hadria, Hadriaticus, Hadrianus, not Adria, 

etc. 
Hadrumetum, Hadrumetinus, not Adrume- 

tum, etc. [edus. 

haedus, not hoedus. aedus. Rustic form 



Halaesa, Halaesns, not Halesa, etc. 

Halicarnasus and Alicarnasus. 

Hamilcar, not Amilcar. 

Hannibal, not Annibal. 

harena, harenosus, better than arena, etc. 

hariola, hariolatio, hariolor, hariolus, and 
ariola, ariolatio, arioius. 

harundo, better than arundo. 

haruspex, better than aruspes. 

haud and haut ; also, before consonants, 
hau. 

haveo and avco. 

hebenus, better than ebenus. 

hedera, better than edera. 

helluo,' helluatio, helluor, better than he- 
luo, etc. 

hercisco and ercisco. 

heri and (in Quintilian's time) here. 

Hiberes, Hiberia, Hiberus, not Iberes, etc, 

holus, better than olus ; archaic helus. 

bumo, humus, not umo, umus. 

idcirco and iccirco. 

ilico, not illico. 

immo, not imo. 

in primis, inprimis, and imprimis. 

inclitus and inclutus, not inclytus. 

incoho, better than mchoo; not incoo. 

indutiae, not induciae. 

inicio, better than injicio. 

intellego, intellegentia, not intelligo, etc. 

internecio, better than internicio. 

inunguo, not inungo. 

Kalendae, better than Calendae. 

Karthago and Carthago. 

lacrima, not lacruma~lachrima, or lachry- 
ma. 

lamina, lamna, and lammina, 

lanterna, better than laterna. 

lepor and lepos. 

levis, not laevis. 

libet, libens ; archaic lubet, lubens ; so li- 
bido. 

littera, better than litera; so litterula. 

litus, not littus. 

maereo. maeror, maestus, maostitia, not 
moereo, etc. 

maledicus, maleficus, malevolus, better 
than malivolus, etc. 

mille, plur. milia, better than millia. 

millies and milies. better than milliens, etc. 

muita, not muicta; so muito. 

murra, not myrrha. 

myrtum, myrtus. not murtum. etc. 

navus, better tban gnavus. 

ne (particle of affirmation), not nae. 

neglego, neglegentia, not negligo, etc, 

nenia, not naenia. 

nequiquam, better than nequicquam. 

nummus, not numus. 

numquam and nunquam. 

nuntio, nuntius, not nuncio, etc. 

ob in composition, before i (for,/), h, 6, <2, Z, 
w, r, s, t, v (but before s and t frequently 
written op); also before vowels, except 
in obsolesco; ob, sometimes om, before 
m ; oc before c ; of before /; og before 
g ; op before p ; but 6 is dropped in 
omitto, operio, ostendo (for obstendo). 

obicio, better than objicio. 

oboedio, not obedio. 

obscenus, better than obscaenus ; not ob- 
scoenus. 

obstipesco, better than obstupesco. 

opilio, better than upilio. 

otium, otiosus, not ocium, etc. 

paelex, better than pelex; not pellex. 

paene, not pene nor poene. 

paenitet, not poenitet. 

paenula, not penula. 

Parnasus, Parnasius, not Parnassus, etc. 



vi 

paulus, better than paullus. 

pejero, better than pejuro; not perjuro. 

penna and pinna (for the distinction, v. the 
Lexicon, s. v. penna). 

per in composition is unchanged, but r 
may become I before I (pellicio, cf. pel- 
lego), or may fall out in compounds of 
jus andjwro, v. pejero. 

percontor, better than percunctor; so per- 
contatio. 

perlego, not pellego nor pelligo. 

plebs and plebes, not plebis (nom. sing.). 

pretium, not precium. 

proelium, not praelium. 

proicio, better than projicio. 

promunturium, not protnontorium. 

protinus, better than protenus. 

pulcher, not pulcer. 

quamquam and quanquani, 

quattuor, better than quatuor. 

querela, better than querella. 

quicquam, better than quidquam. 

quidquid and quicquid. 

quotiens, better than quoties. 

raeda, better than reda; not rhoda. 

recipero, better than recupero. 

reicio, better than rejicio. 

religio, religiosus. not relligio. 

robigo, not rub: go. 



ORTHOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 

! saeculum, not seculum. 
saepes, saepio, not sepes, ote. 
1 saeta, not seta. 
, siirisa, better than sarissa. 
I satura, later form satira; not satyra. 
! scaena, not scena; so scaenicus, etc. 
' sepulcrum, better than sepulchrum. 
| sesoeuti, not sexcenti. 
: setius, not secius (v. secus). 
singillatim, not singulatim. 
sollemnis, not sollennis, sollempnis. 
somnulentus, better than sornnolentus. 
stuppa, not stupa, stippa; so stuppeus. 
suadela, not suadella, 

sub in composition, before vowels and h K i 
(for J), 6, d f I, n, 5, t, v; sue before c; suf 
before/; sug before g; sum or sub be- 
fore m ; sup beforo p (rarely sub) ; sur 
or sub before r ; sus (for subs) in susci- 
pio, suscito, suspendo, sustineo, susten- 
to, sustuli; su in suspicio, suspiro. 
subicio, better than subjicio. 
suboles, not subolis, soboles. 
subsicivus, not subsecivus. 
sucus, not succus. 
suspicio, better than suspitio. 
taetcr, not teter. 
tamquam and tauquam. 
tingo, not tinguo. 



totiens, better than toties. 

traicio and transicio, better than trajicio. 

trans in composition before vowels and 6, 

c <fiffiP* r * '» v i iran «s uall y before $, 

always before sc; trans or tra before t 

(for i orj), d, I, m } n. 
tropaeum and trophaeum. 
tus, not thus. 

ubicumque, better than ubicunque. 
Ulixes, not Ulysses. 
unierus, not humerus, 
umesco, umor, umidus, etc., not humeaco, 

etc. 
unguo and ungo. 
urgeo, not urgueo. 
utcumque, better than utcunque. 
utrimque, not utrinque. 
venum do and venundo. 
Vergilius, not Virgilius. 
Verginius, not Virginius. 
vertex, not vortex, 
vicesimus, more usual than vigesimus; 

not vicensimus. 
vilicus, vilico, vilicatus, not villicus, etc. 
virectum, not viretum.' 
Volcanus, not Vulcanus. 
vulgus, not volgus. 
vulnus, not volnus. 
vultus, not voltus. 



ABBREVIATIONS 

USED IN REFERRING TO 

ANCIENT AUTHORS AND THEIR WORKS. 



* The dates are given on the authority of Teuffel, in his History of Roman Literature ; hut those marked (?) are doubtful 

or conjectural. 



Aggen. 



Agrim. or 
Agrimens. 

Albin. 
Alcim. 
Aldh. 



A em. Mac. Aemilius Macer, poet obiit, B.C. 14 

Afran. Lucius Afranius, writer of com- 

edy, flor. " 110 

Aggenus Urbicus, writer on hus- 
bandry, ' "(?)AD.400 
The ancient writers on survey- 
ing ; esp. Frontinus, Balbus, 
Hyginus, Siculus Flaccus, and 
Aggenus Urbicus. 
C. Pcdo Albinovanus, poef, " " 28 
Alcimus Avitus, Chr. writer, Ob. " 523 
Aldhelmus, Bishop of Salisbury, 
England, " "709 
" Ep., Epistula ad Acircium, do metris, etc. 
u Laud. Virg., De Laudibus Virg^nitatis. 
Alfen. P. Alfenus Varus, JCLus, fi.(?)B.C. 38 
Arnbros. Auibrosius, Chr. writer, ob. A.D. 397 
u Do Cain ct Abel. 
u De Fide, De Fide Libri V ad Gratianum 

Augustum. 
" De Isaac ct Anima. 
" De Nog et Area. 
" Ep., Epistulae. 
" Hexae'm., Hoxaemeron. 
" in Luc, Expositio Evangelii secundum 

Lucam, Libri X. 
" in Psa., Enarrationes in XII Psalmos. 
" Off, De Offlciis. 
Amm. Ammianus Marcellinus, hist. , " " 400 

Ampcl. L. Ampelius, historian, fl. (?) " 200 

Anthol. Lat. Anthologia I^atina, a collection 

of Epigrams, Inscriptions, and 
Fragments in verse, by p. Bur- 
mann; edited also by Meyer 
and by Riese. 
Apic. Apicius Caelius, writer on cook- 

ery, " " 25 

But the work Dc Re Coquinaria, ascribed to Api- 
cius, is a compilation of a later age. 
App. Lucius Appuleius (Apu.Uphilos., " " 160 

' i: Apol.. Apologia, or De Magiu. 
" Asclep. , Asclepius, or Trismegistus. 
t( Dogm. Plat, De Dogmate Platouis. 
u Flor., Florida. 

" Herb , Herbarium, a work of the fourth cen- 
tury A.D., falsely ascribed to Appuleius. 
" Mag., De Magia, or Apolog-a. 
44 Met. or M., Metamorphoses. 
'• Mund. , De Mundo. 
" Trism., Trismegistus. 
Arn. Arnobius Afer, Chr. writer, " " 295 

Ascon. Q. Asconius Pedianus, gramm., ob. " 88 

Asin. C. Asini us Pollio, orator and hist., " u 5 

At. Cap. Ateius Capito, grammarian, fl. " 14 

Att. or Ace. L. Attius or Accius, writer of 

tragedy, " B.C. 135 

Atta, T. Quinctius Atta, writer of com- 

edy, " " " 80 

Auct. Aetn. Auctor Aetnae ( perh. Lucilius 

Junior), "(?)A.D. CO 

Auct. B. Afr. Auctor Belli Africani, " B.C. 50 

Auct. B. Alex. Auctor Belli Alexandrini { prob. 

Aulus Hirtius), " " 50 

Auct. B. G. 8. Auctor de Bello Gallico libri viii, 

in continuation of Caesar's 
commentarii (prob. Aulus Hir- 
tius), " " 50 

Auct. B. Hisp. Auctor Belli Hispaniensis, " " 50 



or) (Auctor ad Herennium, v. Corni- 
sr. } \ ficius. 



Auct. Her. or\ 

Auct. ad Her. 

Auct. Pervig. Ven. Auctor Pervigilii Veneris, flor. (?) AD. 150 

Auct. Priap. Auctor Priapeorum, v. Priap. 

Aug. Aurelius Augustinus, Chr. writer, obiit, " 430 

'• Acad. , Contra Academicos. 

" Civ. Dei or C. D., De Civitate Dei. 

" De Doctr. Christ., De Doctrina Christiana. 

" Ep., Epistulae. 

" Mor. Manich., De Moribus Manichaeorum. 

" Music, De Musica. 

" Retract., Retractationes. 

" Serm., Sermones. 

" Tria., De Trinitate. 
August. Caesar Octavianus Augustus, " " 13 

Aur. Vict. Sextus Aurelius Victor, hist, fl. " 3C0 

" Caes., Dc Caesaribus. 
<* Epit. , Epitome de Caesaribus. 
" Orig., Origo Gentis Romanae. 
" Vir. 111., De Viris Illustribus. 
Aus. D. Magnus Ausonius, poet, ob. " 390 

" Caes. , De XII Caesaribus, 

" Eel., Eclogarium. 

" Edyl.,Edyllia, or Idyllia. 

" Ep., Epistulae. 

" Ephem., Ephemeris. 

" Epigr., Epigrammata. 

" Epit., Epitaphia. 

" G rat. Act., Gratiarum Actio. 

" Idyll., Idyllia, or Edyllia, 

" Parent. , Parentalia. 

" Per., Periochae. 

" Prof., Professores. 

" Sap., Sapientcs. 

" Urb., Ordo Nobilium Urbium. 
Avien. R. Festus Avienus, poet, " " 370 

" Descr. Orb., Descriptio Orbis Terrae, or rie- 

p/fj-yrio-/?. 
" Or. Mar., Ora Maritima. 
" Perieg, Descriptio Orbis Terrae, or Uepii]- 

yt)<ri?. 

Boeth. Anicius Manl. Torq. Severinus 

Boetius or Boethius,_pAi7os., u " 52o 
" Anal., Analytica. 
" Consol., De Consolatione. 
" Mus., De Musica. 
" Porphyr., Dialogi in Porphyrium. 
u Top., De Differentiis Topicis. 
Brut. M. Junius Brutus, correspondent 

of Cicero, ' " B.C. 42 

Caccil. Statius Caecilius, writer of com- 

edy, fl. " 180 

Cael. Aur. Caelius Aurelianus, physician, " (?) A. D. 420 

•' Acut., Acutae Passiones. 
" Tard., Tardae Passiones. 
Caes. Caius Julius Caesar, historian, ob. B.C. 44 

" B. C, Bcllum Civile. 
;i B. G, Bellum Gallicum. 
Callistr. Callistratus, JCLus, fl. A.D. 200 

Calp. Calpurnius Siculus, poet, "(?) u 55 

" Eel., Eclogae. 
Capitol. Julius Capitolinus, biographer, " (?) " 320 

" Balb.,VitaBalbini. 
" Gord., Vita Gordiani. 
" Max., Vita Maximi. 
" Maxim., Vita Maximini. 
Cass. Hem. L. Cassius Hcmina, historian, " B.C. 140 

Cassiod. Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus, 

historian, ob. A. D. 575 

lu Chron., Chronicon. 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



Cassiod, (cont.). Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus, 

historian, obi it, AD. 575 

" Complex., Complexiones in Epistulas Apo- 

stolicas. 
' ' De Anim. , De Anima, 
'• Hist., Gothorum Historia. 
L< Hist. Eccl., Historia Ecclesiastica. 
" Inst. Div. Litt., Institutio Divinarum Lit- 

terarum. 
-* Var. , Variarum Libri XII. 



Cato, 



R.K. 



M. Fore i us Cato, orator and hist., 
De Re Rustica. 



Cat. or CatulL C. Valerius Catullus, poet, 
Cels. Aurel. Cornelius Celsus, physic, 

Censor. Censorinus, grammarian, 

Charis. Flav. Sosipater Charisius, gram- 

marian, 
Cie. or C. M. Tullius Cicero, orator and 

philosopher, 

" Acad, or Ac, Academicae Quaestiones. 

'• ad Brut., ad M. Brutum Epistulae. 

" Aera. Scaur., Oratio pro Aemilio Scauro. 

" Agr., Orationes de Lege Agraria. 

" Am., Do Amicitia, or Laelius. 

(k Arat. , Aratus. 

" Arch., Oratio pro A. Licinio ArchiA. 

'• Att., Epistulae ad Atticum. 

11 Balb., Oratio pro L. Corn. Balbo. 

" Brut., Brutus sive de Claris Oratoribus. 

" Caecin., Oratio pro Caecina, 
Gael., Oratio pro M. Caelio. 

*' Cat., Orationes in Catilinam. 

" Cat. M., Cato Major, or De Senectute. 

" Clu., Oratio pro Cluentio, 

" Deiot., Oratio pro Rege Deiotaro. 

" DeOr., De Oratore. 

" Div., De Divinatione ad M. Brutum. 

'■ Div. in Caecil., Divinatio in Caeciliura. 

' : Dom., Oratio de Domo sua. 

u Fatn., Epistulae ad Familiares. 

" Fat.,DeFato. 

" Fin., De Finibus. 

" Flac. or FL, Oratio pro L. Flacco. 

" Font, or FonteL, Oratio pro M. Fonteio. 

" Fragm., Fragmenta. 

11 Har. Resp., Oratio de Haruspicum Respon- 
sis. 

14 Her., Auctor ad Herennium. 

Imp. Pomp., Oratio de Imperio Cn. Pom- 

pel, or Pro Lege Manilla. 
In v., De Inventione Rhctorica. 
Lael., Laelius, or De AuiicitiA. 

'■ Leg., De Legibus. 

Lig., Oratio pro Ligario. 

u Manil., Oratio pro Lege Manilla, or De 
Imperio Cn. Pompei. 

'■ Marcell., Oratio pro Marcello. 

'■ Mil., Oratio pro Milone. 

"■ Mur., Oratio pro L. Murena. 
N. D., De Deorum Xatura. 
Ofl".,DeOfflciis. 

" Opt. Gen., De Optimo Genere Oratorum. 
Or., Orator ad M. Brutum. 

'■ Par. or Parad., Paradoxa Stoicorum. 

■' Part. Or., De Partitione Oratoria. 

'• Phil., Orationes Philippicae in M. Anto- 
nium. 

■'• Pis., Oratio in Pisonem. 

%i Plane, Oratio pro Plancio. 

u Prov. Cons., De Provinciis Consularibus. 

" Quinct. or Quint., Oratio pro P. Quinctio, 
or Quinto. 

u Q. Fr. or ad Q. Fr, Epistulae ad Q. Fratrcm. 

'• Rab. Pcrd., Oratio pro Rabirio Perduello- 
nis Reo. 

" Rab. Post., Oratio pro Rabirio Posthumo. 

" Red. Quir., Oratio post Reditum ad Qui- 
rites. 

u Red. in Sen., Oratio post Reditum in Se- 
natu. 

' ; Rep. , De Re Public*. 

" Rose. Am., Oratio pro Quinto Roscio Ame 
rino. 

" Rose. Com., Oratio pro Sexto Roscio Co- 
rn oedo. 

" Scaur., Oratio pro M. Aemilio Scauro. 

''• Sou., De Senectute, or Cato Major. 

u Sest. or Sext., Oratio pro Sestio. 

" Sull., Oratio pro Sulla. 

" Tim., Timaeus. or De Cni verso. 

" Tog. Cand., Oratio in Senatu in Toga Can- 
dida. 

" Top., Topica. 

" Tull , Oratio pro M. Tullio. 

" Tusc, Tusculanae Disputationes. 

" Univ., De Universe or Timaeus. 

" Vatin., Oratio in Vatinium. 

'* Verr., Actio in Verrem. 



flor. 



B.C. 149 

" 54 

A.D. 50 

" 238 

;< 375 



ob. B.C. 43 



flor. B.C. 210 

u a 40 

" A.D. 400 



( (?) " 100 

(?) " 295 

(?) " 330 

" 530 

" 438 

" 50 

1 " 245 



475 
565 



Cine. L. Cincius Alimentus, annalist, 

etc. , • 

Cinn. C. Helvius Cinna, Epic, poet, 

Claud. Claudius Claudianus, poet, 

" B. Get. or Bell. Get., De Bello Getico. 

'• B. Gild, or Bell. Gild., De Bello Gildonico. 

u Cons. Mall. Theod., De Consulatu Fl. Mallii 

Theodori. 
" Cons. Olyb. et Prob., In Consulatum Olybrii 

et Probini. 
" Cons. Stil., De Consulatu Stilichonis. 
" IV. Cons. Hon., De Quarto Consulatu Honorii. 
" VI. Cons. Hon., De Sexto Consulatu Honorii. 
" Epith., Epithalamium. 
l< in Eutr., in Eutropium Libri II. 
" in Rutin., in Rufinium Libri II. 
" Laud. Ser., De Laudibus Serenae Reginae. 
" Laud. Stil., De Laudibus Stilichonis. 

Nupt. Hon. et Mar., De Nuptiis Honorii et 
Mariae. 
*' . Rapt. Pros., De Raptu Proserpinae. 
Claud. Mam. Claudianus Ecdicius Mamertus, 

Chr. writer, 
u Stat. An., De Statu Animae. 

Cloat. Cloatius Verus, grammarian. 

Cod. Codex, 

" Greg., Gregorianus. compiled 

** Hermog.. Hermogenianus. " 

" Just, or Cod., Justinianeus. " 

" Theod., Tlieodosianus. " 

Col. L. Junius Moderatus Columella, 

writer on husbandry, 
Commod. Commodianus. Chr. poet, 

" Apol., Carmen Apologoticum. 
" Instr.. Instructiones. 
Consent. P. Consentius, grammarian, 

Coripp. Fl. Cresconius Corippus, poet and 

grammarian, 
*' Johan., Johannis, sive de Bellis Libycis. 
" Laud. Just., De Laudibus Justini Augusti. 
Corn. Gall. Cn. Cornelius Ga,l\us,poef, ob. B.C. 25 

Corn. Sev. Cornelius Severus,^ostf, u " 28 

Cornif. Cornificus, rhetorician (ace. to 

Quintilian, the name of the 
writer of the four books of 
Rhetorica ad C. Herennium ; 
usu. cited as Auct. Her.), fl. (?) " 60 

Curt. Q. Curtius Rufus, historian, *' A.D. 50 

Cypr. Thascius Caecilius Cyprianus, 

Chr. writer, ob. " 257 

Diet. Cret. . Interpres Dictyos Cretensis, 

about " 380 

Dig. Digesta, i. e. Libri Pandectarum. 

Diom. Diomedes, grammarian, fl. (?) " 375 

Dion. Cato, The name inscribed on a collec- 

tion of distichs de moribus, 
etc., probably of the third or 
fourth century. 
Donat. or Don. Aelius Donatus, commentator, 
Dracont. Dracontius. poet, 

Hexaem., Hexaemeron Creationis Mundi. 
Eccl. Scriptores Ecclesiastici. 

Enn, Q. Ennms, poet, 

'* Ann., Annales. 
l * Trag., Tragoediae. 

Ennod. Ennodius, Chr. poet and biogra- 

phtr, 
'• Ep., Epistulae, 

Epithal., Epithalamium, 
Pan.. Panegyric us. 
'' Vit. Epiph., Vita Epiphanii. 

Eumenius, orator and panegyr- 
ist, * fl. " 300 
Grat. Act., Gratiarum Actio Constantino. 
Pan. Const, Panegyricus Constantino Augu- 
sto dictus. 

Flavius Eutropius, historian, " '' 375 

Fabius Pictor, historian, " B.C. 214 

See Gratius Faliscus. 

Fnxoriims, philosopher, " A.D. 130 

L. Fenestella, historian, (i " 36 

Sext. Pompeius Festus, gramma- 
rian, about (?) " 150 

I Julius Firmicus Maternus, math- 
\ ematician, u " 340 

Flor. L. Annaeus Florus, historian, " " 140 

Venantius Fortunatus, Christian 
poet, " "600 



350 

490 



ob. B.C. 169 



A.D.521 



Eum. 



Eutr. 
Fab. Pict. 
Falisc. 
Favor in. 
Fen est. 
Fest. 

Firm. Mat. or) 
Firm. j 



Fortun. or ) f 
Yen. Fort, J \ 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



flor. 



ob. 



168 



550 



10 



420 



B.C. 44 



Front, or Frontin. S. Julius Frontinus, engineer, etc., obnt, A.D. 103 
" Aquaed., De Aquaed uctibus Urbis Romae. 
" St rat. , S trategem at i ca. 
Fronto or Front. M. Cornelius Fronto, orator, 
" ad Marc, Epistulae ad M. Aurelium. 
" ad Ver., Epistulae ad Verum Imperatorem. 
1( De Diff., De Differentiis. 
" De Eloq., De Eloquentia. 
Fu l gt Fabius Planciades Fulgentius, 

grammarian, etc., 
» De Aetat., De Aetatibus Mundi. 
" Expos., Expositio Sermonum Antiquorum. 
» Myth., Mythologiae. 
u Verg. Cont., Vergiliana Continentia, 
Gai. Gaius, JCtus, 

" Inst, Institutiones Juris Civilis. 
Gell. Aulus Gellius, gramm., etc., 

German. Caesar Germanicus, poet, 

Gloss. • Glossarium. 

" Cyril., Cyrilli. 
" Isid., Isidori. 
" Philox., Philoxeni. 
Gmt. Gratius Faliscus, poet, 

" Cyn. or Cyneg.. Cynegetica. 
Her. See Auctor ad Herennium. 

Hi er< Hieronymus, Chr. writer, 

lt Cant. Cantic, Homiliae inCanticaCanticorum. 
" Cont. Pelag., Dialogi Contra Pelagianos. 
" Ep., Epistulae. 
" in Isa., in Iesaiam Comraentarii. 
'• in Psa., in Psalmos Tractatus. 
Hirt Aulus Hirtius, historian {= Auct. 

B. G. 8, in continuation of Cae- 
sar's commentaries ; and Auct. 
B.Alex.), 
Hor. Q. Horatiua Flaccus, poet, 

" A. P., ArsPoetica, 
" C, Carmina, or Odae. 
" C. S., Carmen Seculare. 
" Ep. , Epistulae. 
" Epod., Epodi. 
" Od., Odae, or Carmina. 
" S. or Sat., Satirac. 
Hy g< C. Julius Hyginus, poet and fab- 

ulist, 
,( Astr., Astronomia. 
11 F.,Fabellae.^^ 
Hyg (Gromat.), Hyginus, writer on surveying, 

" Lim. or De Lim., De Limitibus Constituendis. 
Inscr. Inscriptiones. 

" Don., Donii. 
" Fabr., Fabretti. 
" Graev.. Gracvii. 
" Grut., Gruteri. 
" Gud., Gudii. 
" Maff., Maffeii. 
« Momms., Mommsenii. 
" Murat, Muratorii. 

" Neap. , Regni Neapolitan! (ed. by Mommsen). 
" Orell., Orelli. 
" Rein., Reinesii. 
Inst. Institutiones. 

Isid. Isidorus Hispalensis, gramm., 

" Orig., Origenes. 
javol. Javolenus Priscus, JCtus, 

Jornand. Jornandes or Jordanis, historian, 

Jul Val Julius Valerius, historian, 

" ' » Ros Gest. Alex., Res Gestae Alexandri Ma- 
cedonia 
Julian. Salvius Julianus, JCtus, 

j U at. Justinus, historian, about 

just. Justinianus, emperor, 

" Inst, Institutiones 



Liv. Titus Livius, historian, 

Liv. Andron. Livius Andronicus, writer of 

tragedy, 
Luc. M. Annaeus Lucanus, poet, 

Lucil. C. Ennius Lucilius, satirist, 

" Aotn., Aetna, v. Auctor Aetnae. 
Lucr. T. Lucretius Carus,jpoe« and phi- 

losopher, 
jr acr> Aurelius Theodosius Macrobius, 

critic, 
" S. or Sat., Saturnalia. 
" Somn. Scip., Somnium Scipionia 
Mamert. Claud. Mamertinus, panegyrist, 

Manil. M. Manilius, poet, 

Astron, Astronomica, 



Marc. Emp. 
Mart. 
Mart. Cap. 

Maxim. 
Mel. or Mela 
Min. Fel 



Modest. 
Monum. Ancyr 



10 



A.D.100 



ob. 
ft. 



ob. 



640 

100 
552 
290 



130 
150 
565 



Marcellus Empiricus, physician, 
M. Valerius Martialis, poet, 
Martianus Minneus Felix Capel 

la, satirist, 
MaximianuSjjpoef, 
Pomponius Mela, geographer, 
Minucius Felix, Chr. writer, 
Oct.,Octavius. 

Herennius Modestinus, JCtus., 
Monumentum Ancyranum, an 
inscription placed on the wall 
of the pronaos at Ancyra, by 
Augustus Caesar, 
Naev. C. Naevius, poet, 

Nazar. Nazarius, panegyrist, 

' i Pan. Const. , Fanegyricus Constantini. 
Nemes. M. Aur. Olympius Nemesianus, 

poet, 
" Cyn., Cynegetica. 
«' Ecl.jEclogae. 
^ep. Cornelius Nepos, biographer, 

" Ages., Agesilaus. 
" Alcib. , Alcibiadea 
" Arist, Aristides. 
" Att,Atticus. 
» Cat.,M. PorciusCato. 
" Chabr.,Chabrias. 
" Cim., Cimon. 
" Con., Conon. 
" Dat, Datames. 
" Dion, Dion. 
" Epam., Epaminondas. 
Eum, Eumenes. 
Ham., Hamilcar. 
Hann., Hannibal. 
Iph., Iphicrates. 
Lys. , Lysander. 
Milt, Miltiades. 
Paus., Pausanias. 
Pelop., Pelopidas. 
Phoc, Phocion. 
Reg., De Regibus. 
Them., Themistocles. 
Thras., Thrasybulus. 
Tim. or Timol., Timoleon. 
Timoth.. Tiraotheus. 



obi it, A.D. 


17 


u 


B.C. 204 


« 


A.D. 


65 


" 


B.C. 103 


(( 


u 


55 


flor 


AD. 400 


u 


i ( 


362 


" 


" 


12 


« 


« 


400 


ob. 


" 


102 


fl. 


(?) » 


425 
520 
45 
200 



240 



u U 
ob. B.C. 198 
fl. A.D.320 



B.C. 44 



Juv. 
Juvenc. 



Laber. 
Lact 



D. Junius Juvenalis, poet, 

C. Vettius Aquilinus Juvencus, 

Chr. poet, 
C.Decius Laberius, mimographer, 
L. Caelius Lactantius Firmianus, 
Chr. writer, 
" De IraD., De Ira Dei. 
" Epit, Epitome Divinarum Institutionum. 
" Inst, (or Lact. alone), Institutiones Divinae. 
" Mort. Pers., De Mortibus Persecutorum. 
Laev. Laevius, lyric poet, 

Lampr. Aelius Lampridius, historian, 

" Alex. Sev., Alexandri Severi Vita, 
*' Com., Commodi Vita. 
" Elag., Elagabali Vita, 
Leg. XII. Tab. Leges duodecim Tabularom, compiled 



fl. " 325 
" B.C. 50 

ob. A.D.325 



li.(?)B.C.100 
ob. " 300 



450 



P. Nigidius Figulus, gramm., 
Nonius Marcellus, gramm,, 
Notae Tironianae, a late collec- 
tion of abbreviations ascribed 
to Cicero's freedman Tiro. 
Novius, writer of comedy, 
Novatianus, Chr. writer, 
Julius Obsequens, writer De Pro- 

digiis, 
Publilius Optatianus Porphyrius, 

panegyrist, 
See Inscriptiones. 
Paulus Orosius, historian, 
P. Ovidius Naso, poet, 

" A. A. , Ars Amatoria. 

" Am., Amores. 

" Cons.. Consolatio. 

" F. or Fast., Fasti. 

" H. or Her., Heroides. 

" Hal., Halieuticon. 

" lb., Ibis. 

" M. or Met, Metamorphoses. 

" Med. Fac, Medicamina Faciei. 

" Nux, Nux Elegia, 

" P. or Pont., Epistulae ex Ponto. 

" R. Am. or Rem. Am., Remedia Amoris. 

" Tr. or Trist, Tristia. 

Pac. or Pacuv. M. Pacuvius, writer of tragedy, 



Nigid. 
Non. 
Not. Tir. 

Nov. 

Novat. or Nov 

Obseq. 

Optat. 

Orell. 
Oros. 
Ov 



» « 60 
<(?)A.D.280 



< B.C. 90 

< A.D. 250 

' (?) " 375 
" « 330 

u u 410 

b. " 17 



B.C. 135 



Pacat. 



Latinus Pacatus Drepanius,j9cm- 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



PalL 



Pap in 
Paul. 
Paul. Nol 



Pan., Panegyricus 

Palladius Rutilius Taurus, writer 
on husbandry, 
Apr., Aprilis Mensis, or Liber Y. 
Aug., Augustus Mensis, or Liber IX. 
Dec, December Mensis, or Liber XIII. 
Febr., Februarius Mensis, or Liber III. 
Jan., Januarius Mensis, or Liber II. 
Jul., Julius Mensis, or Liber VIII. 
Juil, Junius Mensis, or Liber VII. 
Mai,, Maius Mensis, or Liber VI. 
Mart., Marti us Mensis, or Liber IV. 
Nov., November Mensis, or Liber XII. 
Oct., October Mensis, or Liber XL 
Sept., September Mensis, or Liber X. 

Aemilius Papinius, JCtus, 

Julius Paulus, JCtus, 

Pontius Paulinus Nolanus, Chr. 
writer, 
Carm., Carmina. 



flor. A.D.389 
"(?) " 350 



Paul. Petr. 

Pers. 

Petr. 

" S. or Sat., 
Phaedr. 
Pict. 
Placid. 



Ep., Epistulae. 



Plaut. 



Paulinus Petricordiensis,poef, 

A. Persius Flaccns, satirist, 

Petronius Arbiter, satirist, 
, Satirae. 

T. Phaedrus. fabulist, 

See Fab. Pict. 

Luctatius (or Lactantlus) Placi- 

dus, scholiast, 
T. Maccius Plaut us, writer of 

comedy, 
Am. or Amph., Ampbitruo. 
As. or Asin., Asinaria. 
Aul., Aulularia. 
Bacch., Bacchides. 
Capt., Captivi. 
Cas., Caslna. 
Cist., Cistellaria. 
Cure, Curculio. 
Ep. or Epid., Epidicus. 
Men., Menaecbini. 
Merc. , Mercator. 
Mil, Miles Glorioaus. 
Most., Mostellaria. 
Pers., Persa. 
Poen., Poenulus. 
Ps. , Pseudolus. 
Rud. , Rudens. 
Stich., Stichus. 
Trin., Trinummus. 
True. , Truculentus. 

C. Plinius Secundus (major), 
H. N., Hist»ria Naturalis (usu. undesignated). 

C. Plinius Caecilius Secundus 
(minor), 
Ep., Epistulae. 
, Panegyricus. 

Plinius Valerianus, physic, (tbe 
last book is a later addition), 
L. Pompon i us, writer of comedy, 
Sextus Pomponius, JCtus, 
M. Porcius Latro, rhetorician, 
Priapea, a collection of satiric 
and erotic poems and frag- 
ments appended to L. Mullor's 
Catullus. 

Priscianus, grammarian, 
Sex. Aurelius Propertius, poet, 

Aurel. Prudentius Clemens, Chr. 
poet, 
" Cath., Cathemerina. 
'' c. Symm., contra Symmachum. 
" Psych., Psycbomachia. 

aretp., irep't lT€<pdva}v. 
Pub. Syr. Publilius Syrus, mimographer, 

Q- Cic. Quintus Tnllius Cicero, 

" Pet. Cons., De Petitione Consulatus. 
Quint. M. T. Quintilianns, rhetoHcian, 

" DecL, Declamationes. 

Inst, (or Quint, alone), InstitutionesOratoriae 



(4 


' 200 


'* 


' 200 


obi it, 


1 431 


n. » 470 


ob. < 


« 62 


fl. (?) ' 


' GO 



Salv. 



flor. A.D.44G 



B.C. 95 
A.D. 50 

" 470 
" 15 



Sen. 



ob. 



" •* 40 

" (?) " 450 
ob. B.C. 184 



PI in. 



Plin. 



" Pan.. 
Plin. Val. 

Pomp. 
Pompon. 
Pore. Latro, 
Friap. 



A.D. 79 



" 113 



"(?) " 400 
fl. B.C. 90 
ob. A. D. 138 
' l B.C. 3 



S » n 'p^r.n* n Pi- Sallustius Crispus, historian, obiit, B.C. 35 
\j. or Kjfii. , (^atinna. ' 

" Fragm., Fragments 
" H. or Hist., Historia. 
J. or Jug., Jugurtba. 

Salvianus, Chr. writer, 
Avar., Adversum Avarjtiam. 
" Ep., Epistulae. 
" Gub. Dei, De Gubernatione Dei. 
Scaev - Q- Mutius Scaevola, JCtus, 

Scrib. Scribonius Largus. physician 

Comp., Compositions Medicamentorum. 
Sed «l- CaeliusSedulius, Chr. poet, 

S ? 4 n ' „ „ M - Anna eus Seneca, rhetorician, 

Contr., Controversiae. 
Suas., Suasoriae. 

L. Annaeus Seneca, philosopher 
and tragedian, 
1. Prose writings. 

Apocol., Apocolocyntosls. 

Ben., De Beneflciis. 

Brev. Vit., De Brevitate Vitae. 

Clem., De Clementia. 

Cons. I-Ielv., ad Helviam Matrem De Consola- 
tione. 

Cons. Marc, ad Marciam De Consolatione 

Cons. Polyb., ad Polybium De Consolatione 

Const or Const. Sap., De Constants Sapientis. 

Ep., Epistulae. 

Mort. Claud, or Lud. Mort., De Morte Claudii 
Caesaris. 

Ot. Sap., De Otio Sapientis. 

Pro v., De Pro vi dent ia. 

Q. N., Quaestioues Naturalcs. 

Tranq., De Tranquilhtate Animi. 

Vit. Beat, De Vita Beata. 
2. Tragedies. 

Agam., Agamemnon. 

Here. Fur., Hercules Furens. 

Here. Oet., Hercules Oetaeus. 

HippoL, Hippolytus, or Phaedra. 

Med., Medea. 

Octav., Octavia. 

Oedip., Oedipus. 

Phaedr., v. HippoL 

Pboen., Phoenissiic. 

Thyest, Thyestes. 

Troad., Troades. 
Ser. Samm. Q. Serenus Sammonlcus, physic. , 

Serv. Servius Honoratus, gramm., 

Sev. See Corn. Sev. 

Sid - Apollinaris Sidonius, Christian 

writer, 
" Carm., Carmina. 
Ep., Epistulae. 



«{?) 



230 
390 



488 



Sil. 
Sisenn. 



Prise. 
Prop, 
Prud. 



500 
16 



fl. A.D. 400 



" B.C. 44 

ob. " 43 

'• A.D. 95 



Eh em. Fan. 

Ruf. 
Rufin. 
Rutil. Lup. 
RutiL or 
Rutil. Nam. 



Rhemmius Fanninus or Remius 

Fav'mus, poet, fl, n\ .< j.qq 

Pond , De Ponderibus et Mensuris. 

Sextus Rufus, historian, " « 350 

Tyrannius Rufinus, Chr. writer, ob. •' 410 
P. Rutilius Lupus, grammanan, fl. (?) " 50 

) f Claudius Rutilius Namatianus, 



C, Sili us Italic us, poet, 

L. Cornelius Sisenna, historian 
and orator, 

Sol. or Sol in. C. Julius Solinus, grammarian, 

Spart. Aelius Spartianus, biographer, 

Stat - P. Papinius Statins, poet, 

u Ach. or AcbiL, Acbillcis. 
" S. orSilv.,Silvae. 
'• Th. orTheb.,Thebais. 

Suct - C. Suetonius Tranquil lus, biog- 

rapher, 
Aug., Octavius Augustus Caesar. 

■■ Caes., Julius Caes;\r. 

" Calig., Caius Caligula. 

" Claud., Claudius. 

" Dom., Domitianus. 

" Galb.,Galba. 

' : Gram., De Gram mat icis. 

" Ner., Nero. 

!f Oth..Otho. 

'■ Rhet, De Rhetoricis. 

11 Tib., Tiberius. 

" Tit., Titus. 

' ' Vesp. , Vespasianus. 

" Vit., Vitellius. 
SuI P- Sulpicius Severus, Chr. writer, 

Symm. Q. Aurelius Symmachus, orator, 

etc. , 

C. Cornelius Tacitus, historian, 
Agr., Agricola. 
A. or Ann., Annales. 
Dial., Dialogus de Oratoribus. 
G. or Germ., Germania. 
H. or Hist., Historia. 
Or., Dialogus de Oratoribus. 
Ter. or T. p. Terentius Afer, writer of com- 

edy, < 

" Ad.,Adelphi. 



" lt 101 

" B.C. 57 

fl. A.D. 260 

" " 285 

ob. « 96 



Tac. 



" 425 



4'20 
119 



B.C. 159 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



Treb. Pol. 
Turp. 
Ulp. 
Val. Cato, 



Val. FL 
Val. Max. 
Val. Prob. 
Varr. 



fi. (?) * 4 400 
ob. B.C. 18 
fl. « 40 
" " lfiO 
» A.D.306 
" BC.130 
A.D.228 



Ob. 



ler. or T. (contA P. Terentius Afer. writer of com- 
edy, obiit, B.C. 159 
" And., Andria. 
t; Eun., Eunuchus. 
14 Heaut., Heautontimorumenos. 
u Hec.Hecyra. 
u Phorm.,Phormio. 
Ter. Maur. Tcrentianus Maurus, gramm., flor. (?) A.D. 290 
Tert. Q. Septimius Florens Tertullia- 

nus, Chr. writer, ob. " 220 

" ad Uxor., ad Uxorem. 
" Apol. , Apologeticum. 
" Cam. Christ.. De Carno Christi. 
u Cor. Mil., De Corona Militis. 
u Cult. Fern., De Cultu Feminarum. 
u Fug. in Pers., Dq Fuga in Persecutions 
" Idol., Idolotria. 
" Jejun., De Jejuni is. 
" Monog., Monogamia. 
" Paen., De Paeuitentia. 

'• Praes. Her. De Prescription ibus Horeticorum. 
'• Pudic, De Pudicitia. 
" Spoct., De Spectaculis. 
" Virg. Vel., De Virginibus Velandis. 
Theod. Prise. Theodoras Priseianus, physician, 

Tib. Albius Tibullus, jsocf, 

Tiro, Tiro, freedman of Cicero, 

Titin. or Titmn. Titinnius, writer of comedy, 
Trebellius Pollio, historian, 
Sex. Turpilius, writer of comedy, 
Domitius Ulpianus, JCtus, 
Valerius Cato, poet, about B.C. 80 

Dir. , Dirae (by an unknown author ; as- 
cribed by some to Valerius 
Cato, and by others to Vergil). 
C, Valerius Flaccus, poet, fl. A. D 70 

Valerius Maxim us, historian, '* " 26 

M, Valerius Probus, gramm., " (?) " 60 

M. Terentius Varro, writer on 
husbandry, etc., 
u L. L., De Lingua lAtina. 
" R. R., De Re Rustica. 
Veg. F. Vegetius Renatus, writer on 

the art of war, 
« Mil.,DeReMilitari. 

Veg. P. Vegetius, "{?) 

" Vet. or Art. Vet., De Arte Veterinaria sive Do 
Mulomedicina. 
Veil. P. Vellelus Paterculus, historian, " 

Ven. Fort. Venanti us Fortunatus, Chr. poet, ob. " 600 

Ver. Flac. Verrius Flaccus, grammarian, "(?)B.C. 4 

Verg. P. Vergilius Maro, poet, " " 19 

" A. or Aen. , Aenels. 

" Cat., Catalecta. 

" Cir., Ciris. 

" Cop., Copa. 

" Cul.,CuIex. 

" E. or Eel., Eclogae. 

" G. or Geor., Georgica. 

" M. or Mor., Moretum. 
Vib. Seq. Vibius Sequester, geographer, fl.(?)A,D. 500 



ob. B.C. 27 



fl. A.D 386 



420 



30 



Vitr. Vitruvius Pollio, writer on ar- 

chitecture, flor. B.C. 10 

Vop. Flavius Vopiscus, historian, " A.D.303 

Vulc. Gall. Vulcatius Gallicanus, historian, 

about " 295 

Vulg. Biblia Vulgatae Editionis (a Lat- 

in version of the Hebrew and 
Greek Scriptures, first made 
toward the end of the second 
century, and revised by St. Je- 
rome,— Hieronymus, A. D. 383- 
392). 

" Abd.,Abdias. 

* ' Act. , Actus Apostolorura. 

'• Agg., Aggaeus. 

" Am. or Amos, Amos. 

'•'- Apoc. Apocalypsis. 

" Bar.,Baruch. 

u Cant, Canticum Canticorum. 

" Coloss., Epistula ad Colossenses. 

u Cor., Epistula ad Corinthios. 

" Dan., Daniel. 

" Deut, Deuteronomium. 

u Eccl., Ecolesiastes. 

" Eccli., Ecclesiasticus, or Filius Sirach. 

" Eph., Epistula ad Ephesios. 

'• Esdr., Esdras. 

4t Esth , Esther. 

u Exod., Exodus. 

" Ezech , Ezechiel. 

" Gal., Epistula ad Galatas. 

" Gen., Genesis. 

u Hab., Habacuc. 

" Heb.', Epistula ad Hebraeos. 

" Isa.,Isaias. 

" Jac, Epistula Jacobi. 

" Jer., Jeremias. 

" Joan., Evangelium Joannis; but 1, 2, 3 Joan., 
Epistula Joannis prima, etc. 

(t Jon., Jonas. 

" Jos.,Josue. 

" Jud., Epistula Judae. 

" Jud. or Judic, Judices, 

" Lev.. Leviticus. 

" Luc, Evangelium Lucae. 

" Mace, or Mach., Machabael. 

" Mai., Malachias. 

" Marc, Evangelium Marci. 

" Matt., Evangelium Matthaei. 

" Mich., Michaeas. 

" Nah., Nahum. 

" Neh., Nehemias, or II. Esdras. 

" Num., Numeri. 

" Os.,Osee. 

" Par. or Paral., Paralipomena, 

" Petr., Epistula Petri. 

" Phil., Epistula ad Philippenses. 

" Philem., Epistula ad Philemonem. 

" Pro v., Pro verbia Salomon ig. 

«' Psa.,PsaImi. 

" Kog.,Reges. 

" Rom., Epistula ad Romanoa 

" Sap., Sapientia. 

" Soph., Sophonias. 

" Thess., Epistula ad Thessalonicenscs. 

" Tim., Epistula ad Timotheunx 

" Tit., Epistula ad Titum. 

" Tob., Tobias. 

" %ich., Zacharias. 



CATALOGUE 



EDITIONS OE ANCIENT AUTHORS, BOOKS OF EEEEEENCE, ETC., 

Used in editing this work with the abbreviations by which they are cited. (Only the most important titles are mentioned; 
the citations of other works are so full as to be intelligible without special explanation.) "^nuuneu, 



Abdy and Walker, J. T. Abdy and B. Walker, editors of the Com- 
mentaries of Gaius, Cambridge, 1870. 
B. and K., J. G. Baiter and C. L. Kayser, editors of Cicero's 

works. 
Bach, E. C. C, editor of the Metamorphoses of Ovid. 
Baumg.-Crus., D. C. G. Baumgarten-Crusius, editor of Ovid. Livy 
and Suetonius. ' 

Benfey, Theod., Griechischer Wurzellexicon, Berlin, 1839-1842. 
Bentl., Richard Bentley, editor of Horace, Cambridge, 1711 ; of Ter- 
ence and Phtedrus, Cambridge, 1726, and of Mamlius, Lon- 
don, 1739. 
Bonn., Edward Bonnell, editor of Quintilian. 
Bopp, Francis, Glossarium Comparativum Linguae Sanscritae, 

3d ed., Berlin, 1867. 
Bramb., W. Brambach, Aids to Latin Orthography, translated bv 

W. G. McCabe, New York, 1877. 
Brix, Julius, editor of Plays of Plautus. 
Biich., F. Bucbeler, editor of Petronius, etc. 
Biinem., J. L. Bunemann, editor of Lactantius. 
Burm., P. Burmann, editor of Vergil, Ovid, etc. 

" P. Burmann (Jun.), editor of Ciaudian, Propertius, and 
Anthologia Latina. 
Buttm., Philip Buttmann, Lexilogus, etc. 

Coningt. , John Conington, editor of Vergil and Persius (the 10th 
and 12th bks. of the Aeneid edited by H. Nettleship. and the 
Persius published under his care). 
Corss., W. Corssen. 

" Ausspr., Ueber Aussprache, Vocalismus und Betonung der 

Lateinischen Sprache, 2d ed., 1868. 
" Beitr., Kritische Beitriige zur Lateinischen Formenlehre 
1863. _ ' 

" Nachtr., Kritische Nachtrage zur Lateinischen Formen- 
lehre, 1866. 
Cruq., Jacobus Cruquius, editor of Cicero's Pro Milone and of 

Horace. 
Curt., Georg Curtius. 
" Gr. Etym.. Grundzuge der Griechischen Etymologie, 4th 
ed., 1873. ' 

Diet. Antiq., Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, edited 

by Win. Smith, Ph. D., and Chas. Anthon, LL. D. 
Diotsch, Rudolphus, editor of SaUust and Nepos. 
Dillenb., W. Dillenburger, editor of Horace, 6th ed., 1875. 
Dint., B. Dinter, editor of Caesar. 
Dober., A. Doberenz, editor of Cassar. 
Doed., Ludwig Doederlein, editor of Horace and Tacitus. 

" Lat. Syn., Lateinlsche Synonym ik und Etymologie. 
Don., Aelius Donatus, commentator on Terence and Vergil of the 
fourth century. '• 

" Ti. Claudius Donatus, commentator on Vergil, contemporary 
With the foregoing. 
Donald., J. W. Donaldson, Latin Grammar, Varronianus. 
Donat., v. Don. 
Draeg., A. Draeger, editor of Tacitus. 

" Hist. Syn., Historische Syntax dor Lateinischen Sprache 
Drak., Arnold Drakenborch, editor of Livy, Silius Italicus, etc. 
Ellendt, Friedrich, editor of Cicero's De Oratore and Brutus 
Ellis, Robinson, editor of Catullus. 
Ernest., J. A. Ernesti, editor of Cicero, Tacitus, and Suetonius. 

" A. W. Ernesti, editor of Livy, Leipsic, 1827. 
Eyssen., Franciscus Eyssenhardt, editor of Ammianus Marcelli- 

nus, Berlin, 1871. 
Fabretti, A., Corpus Inscriptionem Italicarum et Glossarium Itali- 

cum, Turin, 1867. 
Fick, A., Vergleichendes Worterbuch der Indogermanischen 

Sprachen. 
Fischer, Gustavus, Latin Grammar, New York, 1876. 
Fleck., Alfred Fleckeisen, editor of Plautus and Terence. 
Forbig., Albert Forbiger, editor of Vergil. 
Forcel., Facciolati et Forcellini Lexicon totius Latinitatis, new 

edition by Dr. F. Corradini, Padua, 1859-78: A-Phoenix 
Fritzsche, A. T. H., editor of the Satires of Horace. 
Georg., K. E. Georges, Lateinisch-Deutsches Worterbuch. 
Gerber and Greef, A. Gerber and A. Greef, Lexicon Taciteum 
Leipsic, 1877 1878. ' 

Gerl. or Gerlach, F. D. Gerlach, editor of Sallust, of Tacitus's Ger 

mania, and of Nonius Marceiius. 
Gesenius, W.. Hebrew Lexicon, transl. from the Latin by Edward 
Robinson, D D. 



Gesn., J. M. Gesner, editor of Pliny the Younger. 

Gierig, G. E., editor of the Metamorphoses of Ovid and of Pliny 

the Younger. 
Gildersleeve, B. L, editor of Persius. 

Gronov. or Gronovius, I. F. Gronovius, editor of Plautus, Livy, 
and Tacitus, and author of Obss. Libri iv. 

" Abraham Gronovius, editor of Justin, Tacitus, etc. 
Grotefend, Aug., Lateinische Grammatik. 

" Georg Friedrich, Altitalienische Dialecte. 
Haas., F. Haase, editor of Seneca. 
Habicht, E. C, Lateinische Synonymik, Lemgo, 1829. 
Halm, Karl, editor of Cicero's Select Orations, of Nc-pos, Tacitus, 

Quintilian, and Velleius Paterculus. 
Hand, Turs., F. Hand, Tursollinus sen de Particulis Latinis Com- 

mentarii (an incomplete work: Ab-Puta). 
Heind., L. F. Heindorf, editor of the Satires of Horace. 
Herm., K. F. Hermann, editor of Juvenal and Persius. 
Hertz, Martin, editor of Livy and Aulus Gellius. 
Heyn. or Heyne, C. G. Heyne, editor of Tibullus and Vergil. 
Hildebrand, G. F., editor of Appuleius. 

Hint, Valentin Hmtner, Lateinische Etymologie, Brixen, 1873. 
Hoffm., E. Hoffman, Die Construction der Lateinischen Zeit-Par- 

tikeln,2ded., 1873. 
Hofm., F. Hofmann, editor of Cicero's Select Letters. 
Huschke, Ph. Edw., Jurisprudence Antejustinianae quae super- 

sunt, 3d ed., Leipsic, 1874. 
Jahn, J. C, editor of Vergil and Horace. 

1 ' Otto, editor of Persius, Juvenal, etc, 
Jan, L., editor of Pliny the Elder. 
K. and H., 0. Keller and A. Holder, editors of Horace, Leipsic, 1864: 

editio minor, 1878. 
Keil, Heinrich, editor of Pliny the Younger, and of the Gramma- 
tic i Latini. 
Kennedy, B. H., author of the Public School Latin Grammar, 3d 

ed. , London, 1875. 
Key, T. Hewitt, Latin Grammar, London, 1856. 
Kiepert, H., Lehrbuch der Aiten Geographic, Berlin, 1877, 1878 
Kiessl., A. Kiessling, editor of Seneca Rhetor, Leipsic, 1872. 
Klotz, B., Handworterbuch der Lateinischen Sprache, Braun- 
schweig, 1858. 
Kopp, U. F., editor of Martianus Capelia, Frankfort, 1836. 
Kram., Friedrich Kramer, editor of Czesar. 
Krebs, Antibarb., J. Ph. Krebs, Antibarbarus der Lateinischen 

Sprache, 5th ed. by Allgayer, 1876. 
Kuhner, Raphael, editor of Cicero's Tusculanae and author of 

Ausfuhrliche Grammatik der Lateinischen Sprache, Hanno- 
ver, 1877, 1878. 
Lachm., Karl Lachmann, editor of Lucilius, Lucretius, Catullus 

Tibullus, Propertius, etc. 
Lamb., D. Lambinus, editor of Plautus, Lucretius, Cicero, and 

Horace. 
Lor. or Lorenz, A. 0. F. Lorenz, editor of Plays of Plautus. 
Lubb., E. Lubbert, Beitrage zur Temnus- und Modus-Lehre d*« 

Aelteren Lateins. 
Lubk., F. Ltibker, Real-Lexicon des Classischen Alterthums. 
Madv., J. N. Madvig, editor of Cicero's De Finibus, Cato Major, 
Laelius, and Select Orations, author of Emendationes 
Livianae, Adversaria Critica, etc. 
' ' Gram., Latin Grammar, edited by Thacher. 
Mann., Conrad Mannert, Geographie der Griechen und Romer. 
Mayor, J. E. B., editor of Juvenal, 2d ed., London, 1869-78. 
Merguet, H., Lexicon zu den Reden des Cicero, Vol. I. Jena 

1877. ' 

Merk., Rudolph Merkel, editor of Ovid. LeiDsic. 1852. 1853- Mei-i- 

morphoses in new ed. , 1875. 
Momms., Theod or Mommsen, editor of the Digesta, and of the 
Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum. 

" Rom. Gesch., Romische Geschichte. 
Mull., Karl Ottfried Muller, editor of Festus and of Varro de Lin- 
gua Latina. 
" Lucian Muller, editor of Lucilius, Catullus, Tibullus, Pro- 
pertius, and Horace; and author of Orthographiae et Pros- 
odiae Latinae Summarium, Petropoli, 1878. 
Munro, H. A. J., editor of Lucretius and author of Criticisms and 

Elucidations of Catullus. 
Neue. Formenl., Friedrich Neue, Formenlehre der Lateinischen 

Sprache, 2d ed., 1875 and 1877. 
Nieb. Rom. Gesch., B. Niebuhc, Romische Geschichte. 



CATALOGUE OF EDITIONS OE ANCIENT AUTHORS, ETC. 



Nipp. or Nipperd., Karl Nipperdey, editor of Nepos and Tacitus. 

Orell., J. G. Orelli, editor of Cicero, Horace, Tacitus, etc. 

Osann, Friedrich, editor of Fragmenta Appulei de Orthographia, 
and of Cicero's De Re Publica. 

Oud. , F. Oudendorp, editor of Caesar and of Appuleius. 

Paley, F. A., editor of Propertius, 2d ed., 1872. 

Pauck., C. Paucker, Spicilegium Addendorum Lexicis Latinis, 
Mitau, 1875. 

Peter, Hermann, editor of Ovid's Fasti, Leipsic, 1874. 

Pott, Aug. Friedrich, Etymologische Forschungen, Lemgo, 1833, 
2d and greatly enlarged ed. , 1869-76. 

Queck, Gustavus, editor of Statius. 

Ramshorn, Ludwig, Lateinische Grammatik, Leipzig, 1830. 
Syn, Lateinische Synonymik, Leipzig, 1831. 

Rib., Otto Ribbeck, editor of Vergil and of the Scenicae Romano- 
ruin Poesis Fragmenta, and author of a Brief Treatise on the 
Latin Particles. 

Riese, Alexander, editor of Ovid, Leipsic, 1871-1874. 

Ritschl, Friedrich, editor of Plautus; continued by G. Loewe, G. 
Goetz, and F. Schoell. 
" Opusc, Opuscula Philologica. 

Ritt., F. Ritter, editor of Horace and Tacitus. 

Rob. or Roby, H. J. Roby, A Grammar of the Latin Language 
from Plautus to Suetonius. 

Rose and Strubing, Valentin Rose and H, Muller-Strubing, edi- 
tors of Vitruvius. 

Roth, C. L., editor of Suetonius. 

Rudd., Thomas Ruddiman, author of Grammaticae Latinae Insti- 
tutiones, edited by Stallbaum, Leipsic. 1823. 

Sandars, T. C, editor of the Institutes of Justinian, London. 1874. 

Schmalfeld, Dr. Fr., Lateinische Synonymik, Altenburg, 1869. 

Schmid, F. E. T., editor of the Epistles of Horace. 

Schneid., J. G. Schneider, editor of the Scriptores Rei Rusticae 
Veteres. 



Schneid., J. K, L. Schneider, Ausfiihrliche Grammatik der Latei- 
nischen Sprache, 1819-21. 

" F, G. Schneidewin, editor of Martial. 
Schwartz, C. G., editor of Pliny the Younger. 
Servius, Servius Honoratus, a commentator on Vergil, of the 

fourth century. 
Seyffert, Moritz, editor of Cicero'B Tusculanae and Laclius. 
Sill., J. Sillig, editor of Pliny's Historia Naturalis. 
Struve, K. L., Ueber die Lateinische Declination und Conjugation. 
Teuff., W. Teuffel, Geschichte der Romischen Literatur, 2d ed, 

1872; 3d ed., 1877. 
Tisch., Constantinus Tischendorf, editor of Novum Testamentum 

Vulgatae Editionis. 
Torrini, R. P. F. Gabr., Concordantiae Bibliorum Sacrorum Vulga- 
tae Editionis, Prati, 1861. 
Umpf., Franciscus Umpfenbach, editor of Terence, Berlin, 1870. 
Uss. or Ussing, J. L. Ussing, editor of Plautus, Hauniae, Vol. L, 

1875; Vol. II., 1878. 
Vahl., Joannes Vahlen, editor of the Fragments of Ennius, Lucil- 

ius, etc. 
Van., Alois Vanicek, Griechisch - Latcinisches Etymologisches 

Worterbuch, 1877; Fremdworter im Griechischen und Latei- 

nischen, 1878. 
Wagn. or Wagner, J. A. "Wagner, editor of Valerius Flaccus. 

t; " Philip Wagner, editor of Vergi], ed. maj. 1830- 

1841; ed. m in. 1841. 

u " W. Wagner, editor of several plays of Flautus 

and of Terence. 
Weissenb., W. Weissenborn, editor of Livy. 
Wordsw., John Wordsworth, editor of Fragments and Specimens 

of Early Latin, Oxford,1874. 
Zumpt, Karl G., editor of Cicero's Orations against Verres, and De 
Officiis, and of Curtins. 
" Gram., Latin Grammar, edited by AnthoiL 



OTHER ABBREVIATIONS, SIGNS, ETC. 



opp., opposed to, opposite, -tion. 

Orig., originally. 

p., page. 

P. a., participial adjective. 

part., participle. 

partit., partitive. 

pass., passive, -ly, or passage. 

patr. , patronymic. 

per., period. 

perf., perfect. 

perh., perhaps. 

pers., personal, -ly. 

philos., philosophy, -ical, -ically, -opher. 

pi. or plur., plural. 

pleon., pleonastically. 

plqpf., plusquamperfectum. 

plur. tant, used only in the plural. 

poet. , poetical, -ly. 

polit, political, -ly. 

posit, or pos., positive. 



praef. , praefatio. 

praep., preposition. 

preced., preceding. 

pregn. , pregnant, -ly. 

prep., preposition. 

pres., present. 

prob., probably. 

proi.,prologus. 

pron., pronount 

prooem., prooemium. 

prop., proper, -ly, in a proper sense. 

prov. or proverb., proverbial, -ly. 

qs., quasi. 

q. v., quod videas. 

rad., radical or root. 

rar., rare, -ly. 

ref. , refer, -ence. 

rel., relative or reliquiae. 

respect. , respectus. 

rhet., rhetoric, -al; in rhetoric. 

Rom., Roman. 



a. or act. , active, -ly. 

abbrev. , abbreviated, -ation. 

abl., ablative. 

absol. or abs., absolute, -ly, i. e. without 
case or adjunct. 

abstr. , abstract. 

ace. , accusative or according, 

access., accessory. 

ad loc. or ad h. 1., ad locum or ad hunc lo- 
cum. 

adj., adjective, -ly. 

adv. , adverb, -ial, -ially ; or adversus. 

agric. or agricult, agricultural 

a. h. v., ad hanc vocem. 

al., alii or alia, others or other. 

amplif., amplificative. 

analog., analogous, -ly. 

antiq., antiquities. 

ap., apud (in). 

appeL , appellative. 

append, or app., appendix. 

Arab. , Arabic. 

archit, architecture, -tural. 

art., article. 

aug., augmentative. 

Aug., Augustan. 

c, cum (with). 

c. c, coupled with. 

cf., confer (compare). 

chh., church. 

class., classic, -al. 

Cod., Codex (MS.). 

collat., collateral. 

collect., collective, -ly. 

com., commonly, comicus, comic, or In 
comedy. 

comm. or c, common gender. 

commentt., commentators. 

comp., compare or comparative 

compd.. compound. 

concr. , concrete. 

conj., conjunction, conjunctive, or conjuga- 
tion. 

constr., construed, -ctioa 

contr., contracted, contraction, or contrary. 

corresp., oor responding. 

dat., dative. 

decl., declension. 

demonstr. or dem., demonstrative. 

dep. , deponent. 

deriv , derived, -ative, -ation. 

diff., differs or different. 

dim., diminutive. 

dissyl., dissyllable, -abic. 

distr., distributive. 

dub., doubtful. 

eccl., ecclesiastical. 

ed.,editio or editor. 

e. g., exempli gratia, 
ellipt, elliptical, -ly. 
elsewh., elsewhere 
epic, epicene, 
epit., epitaph, 
equiv., equivalent 
esp., especially, 
etc., et cetera, 
etym., etymology, -IcaL 
euphon., euphonic, -ny. 
ex., exs., example, examples, 
expl., explanation, explained, 
express., expression. 
ext, externa, 
extr., extremo (at the end). 

f. or fern., feminine, 
fig. , figure, -ative, -atively. 

* A star before a word denotes that It Is found but once; before a meaning, that the meaning is found but once; and before an 

author's name, that the word is used but once in his writings, 
t This denotes that the word to which it is prefixed is borrowed from the Greek, 
tt These indicate that a word is borrowed from some other language than the Greek. 
t This shows that a word is found only in inscriptions, or in the old grammarians or lexicographers. 
[ ] Words enclosed in brackets, at the beginning of articles, relate to etymology; elsewhere, are of questionable authenticity. 
Words italicized in the citations have been supplied by the conjecture of editors. 



fin. or ad fin., at the end. 

finit, finite (opp. to infinitive). 

foil., following. 

fr. , from. 

Fr. , French. 

fragm., frgm., or fr., fragmenta. 

freq. or fr., frequentative or frequent, -ly. 

fut, future. 

gen., genitive or general. 

geog., geography, -ical. 

Germ., German. 

Goth., Gothic. 

gr. or gram., grammar, -ian, -atical, gram- 
matici. 

Gr., Greek. 

h., hence. 

h. 1., hie locus (this passage). 

h. v., h. vv., this word, these words. 

Heb., Hebrew. 

hibr., hybrid. 

hist., history, -ian. 

ib., ibidem. 

id., idem. 

i.e., id est. 

i. q., idem quod. 

imper., imperative. 

imperf., imperfect. 

impers., impersonal, -ly. 

inanim., inanimate. 

in bon. part., in bonam partem. 

in mal. part., in malam partem. 

inch., inchoative, inceptive 

indecl., indeclinable. 

indef., indefinite. 

indie., indicative. 

inf., infinitive. 

init., in., or ad init., at the beginning. 

inscrr., inscriptions. 

intens., intensive. 

interrog., interrogative, -tion. 

intr., intransitive. 

Ital., Italian. 

JCtus, juris consultus. 

jurii, juridical. 

kindr., kindred. 

1., lege or lectio. 

JL c. or 1. I., loco citato or laudato, in the 
place already cited. 

lang., language. 

Lat., Latin. 

leg, legit, legunt. 

lex., lexicon. 

lit, literal, in a literal sense. 

Lith., Lithuanian. 

m. or masc, masculine. 

math., mathematics, -ical. 

med., medio (in the middle). 

medic, medical or medicine. 

metaph, metaphorical, -ly. 

meton., by metonymy. 

mid. or med., medial; in a middle or re- 
flexive sense. 

mi lit, military, in military affairs. 

MS., manuscript; MSS., manuscripts. 

n. or neutr., neuter. 

n. pr. or nom. propr., nomen proprium. 

naut, nautical. 

neg., negative, -ly. 

no., numero. 

nom., nominative. 

num. or numer., numeral. 

obj. or object., object, objective, -ly. 

obi., oblique. 

oin., omit 

onomat, onomatopoeia. 



saepis., saepissime. 

sc, scilicet. 

s. h. v., sub hac voce. 

s. v., sub voce. 

signif., signifies, -catioa 

simp., simple. 

Span., Spanish. 

specif., specifically. [lowing) 

sq., sequons; sqq., sequentes (and the fol- 

subj., subjunctive. 

subject, or subj., subject, subjective, -ly. 

subst, substantive, -ly. 

suff., suffix, 

sup., superlative or supine. 

syll., syllable. 

syn., synonym, -ymous. 

sync, syncopated. 

tab., tabula (table, plate). 

temp., tense or temporal. 

term., termiuus. 

trag, tragicus, tragic, or in tragedy. 

trans. , translated, -tion. 

transf. , transferred. 

trisyl., trisyllable, -abic. 

trop., in a tropical or figurative sense. 

1 1, technical term. 

usu., usual, -ly. 

v., verb, vide, or vox. 

v. h. v., vide hanc vocem. 

var. lect, varia lectio (different reading). 

vb. , verb. 

voc, voeative. 



LATIN-ENGLISH DICTIONARY. 



1. A, a, indecl. n. (sometimes joined with 
litter a), the first letter of the Latin alphabet, 
corresponding to the a, a of the other Indo- 
European languages : A primum est : hinc 
incipiam,et quae nominaabhoc sunt, Lucil. 
ap. Terent. Scaur, p. 2255 P.: sua rostro si 
humi A litteram impresserit, Cic. Div. 1,13, 
23 : ne in A quidem atque S litteras exire 
temere masculina Graeca nomina recto casu 
patiebantur, Quint. 1, 5, 61. 

II, The sound of the A is short or long in 
every part of the word ; as, ab, pater, ita ; a, 
mater, frustra. During a short period (be- 
tween about 620 and 670 A. U. C. = from 134 
to 84 B.C.) long a was written an, probably 
first by the poet L. Attius, in the manner of 
the Oscan language ; so we find in Latin in- 
scriptions: aa. cetereis (i. e. a ceteris), ca- 

LAASI, FAATO, HAACE, MAARCIVM, PAAPVs, 

paastores, vaarvs ; and in Greek writing, 
MAAPKOY YlOZ MAAPKEAAOZ, KOINTON 
MAAPKION ( like Osc. aasas = Lat. ara, 
Osc. Paapi = Lat. Piipius, Osc. Paakul = 
Lat. Paculus, Pacullus, Pacuvius, etc.), 
v. Ritsehl, Monum. Epigr. p. 28 sq., and cf. 
Mommsen, Unterital. Dialekte, p. 210 sq. 
(The Umbrian language has gone a step far- 
ther, and written long a by aha, as Ahar- 
na, Naharcom, trahaf, etc. ; cf. Aufrecht and 
Kirchhoff, Umbrische Sprachdenkm. p. 76 
sq.) Vid. also the letters E and U. 

III. In etymological and grammatical 
formation of words, short a, very often 
(sometimes also long a) is changed into 
other vowels. 

A. Short a is changed, 2 ? into long a — 

a. In consequence of the suppression of 
the following consonants at the end or in the 
middle of the word: fib, a; vadis,m$; ag-, 
ag-men, exdrneii; tag-, contdmino ; cud-, 
casus. Hence also in the abl. sing, of the 
first decl., and in the particles derived from 
it, in consequence of the suppression of the 
original ablat. end. -d : praedad (Col. 
Rostr.), praedd : sententiad ( S. C. de 
Bacch.), sententid; extrad (ib.), extrd ; 
svprad (ib.), supra. — Hence, 

|>. In perfect forms: scab-o, scdbi ; cav- 
eo, cdvi ; fiiv-eo,fdvi ; pr.v-eo, pdvi (for 
scabui, cavui, favui, pavui). 

C. In other forms : ago, ambdges ; pac-, 
pac-iscor, pdcis (pax); sag -ax, sdaus. 
saga; mac-er, mdcero ; Bg- (<p a yew),fd- 
gus. (Contrary to analogy, a remains short 
in danunt, from dS-in-unt, v. Ritsehl, 1. 1. p. 
17.) 

2. Short a is changed into e or £ — 

a. Into S. (a) Most frequently in the sec- 
ond part of componnds, particularly before 
two consonants : facio, confectus ; jacio, 
conjectus; ra,Tp\o,dereptus; dam-, damno, 
condemno ; fal-, fullo, fefelli ; man-, man- 
do, commendo ; scando, ascendo ; ap-, 
aptus, ineptus ; ar-, ars, iners, sollers ; 
an-, annus, perennis ; capio, aueeps ; ca- 
put, triceps; ago, rernex; jacio, objex. 
And thus in Plautus, according to the best 
MSS., dispenno, dispessus from pando, 
compectus from compaciseor, anteceptus 
from capio (on the other hand, in Vergil, ac- 
cording to the best MS., aspargo, attrac- 
tare t deiractare y keyt their a unchanged). 

(/3) Sometimes d is changed into e also be- 
fore one consonant (but in this case it is 
usually changed into 5 ; v. infra, 3. a. a.) : 
grtidior, ingridior ; Tp?\t\oT,perj>etior; pa- 
rio, reperio ; paro, vitupiro ; tip-, coepi 
(i. e. co-epi) ; cano, tubicen, tibicen; in the 
reduplicated carcSr (from c&rc&r) farf ems 
/written also farfams) ; and so, according to 



the better MSS., aequipSro from paro, and 
defetigo from fatigo. 

(7) In words taken from the Greek : t«- 
\avTov,talentum ; cp<x\apa,phalerae; ai- 
capov, siser ( but, according to the best 
MSS., camCira from Kap.dpa, not camera). 

b. Short a is changed to & in some perfect 
forms : ago, egi ; facio, feci ; jTicio, jeci ; 
frag-, frango, fregi ; capio, copi, and pag-, 
pango, pegi '(together with pepxgi and 
panxi, v. pango). 

3. Short a is changed to ?, a (most fre- 
quently in the second part of compounds) (a) 
before one consonant : ago, ablgo ; facio, 
conf'icio ; cado, co?icido ; salio, ass) Ho ; 
r&pio, abripio ; pater, JuppWer (in Um- 
brian lang. unchanged, Jupater), Marspi- 
ter ; Diesptter, Op)ter ; ratus, irritus ; 
amicus, iriim icus (but d remains unchanged 
in addmo, impdtiens, and in some com- 
pounds of a later period of Roman literature, 
as praejacio, calefacio, etc.). — (/3) Some- 
times also before tico consonants (where 
it is usually changed into 3 ; v. supra, 2. 
a. p.): tag-, tango, contingo ; pag-, pango, 
compingo (unchanged in some compounds, 
as peragro,, desacro, depango-, obcanto, 
etc.). 

1>. d is changed into \ in the reduplicated 
perfect forms: eddo, cecidi; cano, ceclni; 
tag-, tango, tetuji; pag-, pango, pep) gi. 

C. Likewise in some roots which have d : 
png-,pignus; strag- (strangulo, crrpc^-yco), 
stringo. 

d. In words taken from the Greek : w 
%avij, macfcvna ; wardvr], patina ; pvKiivrj, 
bueina; rpv-rdvt],trut\na ; f3a\aveTov,ba- 
llneum; Kardva, Catena (written also Ca- 
tana); ''Aupdyas, Agrlgentum, 

4. Short a is changed into sliortor long 0. 

a. Into 6; scTiho, scobs; par, pars, portio; 
diim-, domo; Fabii, Fovii (v. Paul, ex Fest. 
p. 87) ; jj.apfj.apov, marmbr ; Mars,redupl. 
Marmar, J f armor (Carm. Fratr. Arv.). 

b. Into 6 : da-, donum, dos ; ac-, acuo, 
ocior (v. this art.)- 

5. Short a is changed into ii — 

a. In the second part of compounds, par- 
ticularly before l,p, and b: calco, ineulco; 
salsus, insulsus ; salto, exsulio; capio, oc- 
cupo ; rapio, surrupio and sitrruptus (also 
written surripio and surreptus) ; taberna, 
contubemium ; — before other consonants : 
quatio, conditio ; as, decussis ; Mars, Ma- 
murius, Mamftralia ; and once also con- 
ditmnari (Tab. Bant. lin. 8, immediately fol- 
lowed by condemnatfis, v. Klenze, Philol. 
Abhandl. tab. I., and Mommsen, Unterital. 
Dial. p. 149). 

_ b. In words of Greek origin : 'End fin, 
tieciiba ; aavTuXri, scuMla ; KpaiirdXn, 
crapula ; 7rao-<raAo9, pessfdus ; a<p\a- 
<ttov, aplttstre ; ^pt'ayu/3or, triumphus. 

C, d is perhaps changed into u in ulciscor, 
compared with ale-, aXefco (arc-, arceo). 

B. Long a is sometimes changed into 
i, or 0. 

1. Into e: halo, anhelo ; fas-, festus, 
profhtus; nam, nempe. 

2. Into 0: gna-,gnarus,ignarus,£fir??07Y>. 
(But in general long a remains unchanged 
in composition : labor, deldbor ; gnavus, 
igndinis ; fama, infdmis.) 

IV a Contrary to the mode of changing 
Greek a into Latin <?, i, 0, u (v. supra), 
Latin a has sometimes taken the place of 
other Greek vowels in words borrowed from 
theGreek,as: X6<y%n,lancea; Ku\t£,cdlix; 
ravvjj.i]br\v, Cat'fonitus. 

V The repugnance of the Latin language 



to the Greek combined vowels ao has caused 
the translocation of them in Alumento for 
Aao/utowi/ (Paul, ex Fest. p. 18 Mull.). — 
Greek a is suppressed in Hercules from 
'HpaKAJic (probably in consequence of the 
inserted u; in late Latin we find Heracla 
and Heracula, cf. Ritsehl, in Rhein. Mus. 
Neue Folge, vol. 12, p. 108). 

VI. Latin d was early combined with the 
vowels i and u, forming the diphthongs 
ai and au ; by changing the i into 0, the 
diphthong ai soon became ae. So we find 
in the oldest inscriptions : aide, aidilis, 

AIQVOM, GNAIVOD, HAICE, DVELONAI, TA- 

belai, datai, etc. , which soon gave place 
to aedem, aedilis, aequom, Gnaeo, haec, 
Bellonae, tabeilae, datae, etc. ( the Col. 
Rostr. has praesente, praedad, and the 
S. C. de Bacch. aedem. The triphthong 
aei, found in conqvaeisivei (?), is very rare^ 
Miliar. Popil. lin. 11, v. Ritsehl, 1. 1. p. 21). 
In some poets the old gen. sing, of the first 
decl. {-ai) is preserved, but is dissyllabic, 
di. So in Ennius: Albdl Longdl^ terrdi 
frugiferdi, frondosdi, lundt, vidi ; in 
Vergil : aulai, aurdi, aqudi, pictdi ; in 
Ausonius : herdi. 

B. <te as well as au are changed into other 
vowels. 

1 The sound of ae, e y and oe being very 
similar, these vowels are often interchanged 
in the best MSS. So we find caerimonia 
and cerimonia,caepa a,vAcepa,saeculum 
and s&cuhcm; sca&na and seen a ; caelum 
and coelum, haedus and hoedus, maestus 
and moestus ; crnta, coena, and caena, etc. 

2. In composition and reduplications at 
becomes i: aequus, iniquus; quaero, in- 
qniro ; laedo, illldo ; taedet, pertisum 
(noticed by Cic); aestumo, exlstumo; cae- 
do, cecidi, concido, homicida. 

3. ae is also changed into 1 in a Latinized 
word of Greek origin : 'Axa/or ('Axat/or), 
Achivus. 

4. The diphthong au is often changed to 
6 and u ( the latter particularly in com- 
pounds) : caudex, codex ; Claudius, Clo- 
dius ; lautus, lotus; plaustrnm, plo- 
strum; plaudo,pU>do,explodo ; paulu- 
lum, pblulum ; faux, svffoco ; si audes 
(ace. to Cic. or ace. to others, si audies), so- 
des, etc.; clnudo.inclf'do; causa, acc'i so. 
Hence in some words a regular gradation 
of au, 0, u is found : claudo, clodicare, 
cl r 'do; raudus, rbdus, ri'idus ; eaupo, 
copa, cupa ; naugae, nbgae, (both forms 
in the MSS. of Plautus), nvgae; fraustra, 
frode, frude ( in MSS. of Vergil ) ; cf, 
Ritsehl, in Wintercatalog 1854-55, and 0. 
Ribbeck, in Jahn's Neue Jahrb. vol. 77, 
p. 181 sq. — The change of au into oe and e 
appears only in audio, (oboedio) obidio. 

S = Au sometimes takes the place of cm?- ; 
faveo, fautum , favitor, fautor ; navis, 
navita t nauta ; avis, aueeps, auspex. So 
Latin aut corresponds to Sanscr. a®a 
(whence -vd, Lat. -ve), Osc. avti, Umbr. 
ute, ote ; and so the Lat. preposition ab t 
through «y, becomes au in the words au~ 
fero and aufugio (prop, av-fero, av-fugio, 
for ab-fero, ab-fugio). Vid. the art. ab init. 

VII. In primitive roots, which have their 
kindred forms in the sister-languages of the 
Latin, the original a, still found in the San- 
scrit, is in Latin either preserved or more 
frequently changed into other vowels. 

A. Original a preserved : Sanscr. m&- 
tri, Lat. mater ; S. bhrdtri, L. frater ; S. 
ndsd, L. nasus and naris; S. ap, L.aqua; 
8. apa, L. ab ; S. ndma, L. nam ; S. catur, 



AB 

L. quattuor (in Greek changed: -re-Trap et); 
S. cupula, L. caput (in Greek changed: kc- 
tpaXrf, etc.). 

B. Original a is changed into other 
Latin vowels — 

1. Into e : S. ad, L, ed (edo) ; S. as, L. es 
(esse) ; S. pat, L. pet (peto) ; S. pad, L. 
ped (pes) ; S. dant, L. dent (dens) ; S. gan, 
L. gen (gigno) ; S. ma, L. me-tior; S. sap- 
tan, L. septem ; S. dakan, L. decern ; S. 
safo,L. centum; S. aham, L. ego; S.pdm, 
L. per ; S. pasu, L. pecus ; S. em>rt, L. 
equus, etc. 

2. Into £ : S. an-, a- (neg. part.), L. in- ; 
S. ana (prep.), L. in; S. antar, L. inter; 
S. sama, L. similis; S. a#?zi, L. ignis; S. 
abhra, L . imber ; S. panda, L. quinque, etc. 

3. Into o : S. flw, L. ovi (ovis) ; S. ?>ac, 
L. voc (voco) ; S. pra, L. pro ; S. pd, L. po 
(potum) ; S. ndma, L. nomen ; S. api, L. 
ob ; S. navan, L. novem; S. tia^rt, L. no- 
vus, etc. 

4. Into u : S. marmara, L. murmur. 

5. Into a*, ae : S. prati, L. (prai) prae ; 
S. ha spa, L. caespes. 

C Into different vowels in the different 
derivatives : S. wid, L. me-tior, modus ; S. 
prab, L. precor, procus ; S. vah, L. veho, 
via. 

C. Sometimes the Latin has preserved 
the original a, while even the Sanscrit has 
changed it : Lat. pa-, pater, Sanscr. pd, 
pitri. 

2. As an abbreviation A. usually denotes 
the praenomen Aulus; A. A.=Auli duo, 
Inscr. Orell. 1530 (but A. A.=Aquae Aponi, 
the modern Abano, ib. 1643 sq. ; 2620 ; 
3011). The three directors of the mint 
were designated by III. YIRI A. A. A. F. F. 
(i. e. auro, argento, aeri flando, feriundo), 
ib. 569 ; 2242 ; 2379 ; 3134 al. ; so also A. 
A. A., ib. 3441 (cf. C!ic. Fam. 7, 13 Jin., and 
v. the art. Triumviri) ; A. T>. A. agris dan- 
dis ad8ignandia, and A. I. A. agris ju- 
dicandis adsignandis ; A. O. arnico op- 
tirno ; A. P. a popitlo or aediliciae pote- 
statis; A. P. R. aerario populi Romani. 
— Upon the voting tablets in judicial trials 
A. denoted absolvo ; hence A. is called lit- 
tera salutaris, Cic. Mil. 6, 15; v. littera. 
In the Roman Comitia A. (=antiquo) de- 
noted the rejection of the point in question ; 
v. autiquo. In Cicero's Tusculan Disputa- 
tious the A. designated one of the dispu- 
ta,nts=adulescens or auditor, opp. to M. 
for magister or Marcus (Cicero) ; but it 
is to be remarked that the letters A and 
M do not occur in the best MSS. of this 
treatise; cf. edd. ad Cic. Tusc. 1, 5, 9. — In 
dates A.D.=ante diem; v. ante; A.U.C. 
=anno urbis conditae ; A. P. R. C. anno 
post Romam conditam. 

3. a, prep. =ab, v. ab. 

4. S. inter j.=ah, v. ah. 

Aaron (Aaron, Prud. Psych. 884), in- 
decl. or onis, m., "Pl!^, Aaron, brother 
of Moses, and first high-priest of the He- 
brews, Vulg. Exod. 4, 14 ; 6, 25 al. 

ab, a, abs, prep, with abl. This Indo- 
European particle (Sanscr. apa or ava, Etr. 
av, Gr. airo, Goth, af, Old Germ, aba, New 
Germ, ab, Engl, of, off) has in Latin the fol- 
lowing forms: ap, of, ab (av), an-, d, a ; 
aps, abs, as-. The existence of the oldest 
form, ap, is proved by the oldest and best 
MSS.analogoustotheprep.apud,the Sanscr. 
api, and Gr. eirl, and by the weakened form 
af, which, by the rule of historical grammar 
and the nature of the Latin letter/, can be 
derived only from ap, not from ab. The 
form af, weakened from ap, also very soon 
became obsolete. There are but five ex- 
amples of it in inscriptions, at the end of the 
sixth and in the course of the seventh cen- 
tury B.C., viz. : af vobeis, Inscr. Orell. 
3114; af mvbo, ib. 6601; af capva, ib. 
3308 ; af solo, ib. 589 ; af lyco, ib. 3036 
(tf/?:oZw«t=avolant, Paul, ex Fest. p. 26 
Mull., is only a conjecture). In the time 
of Cicero this form was regarded as ar- 
chaic, and only here and there used in ac- 
count-books ; v. Cic. Or. 47, 158 (where the 
correct reading is af, not abs or ab), and 
cf. Ritschl, Monum. Epigr. p. 7 sq, — The 
second form of this preposition, changed 
from ap, was ab, which has become the 
principal form and the one most generally 



AB 

used through all periods — and indeed the 
only one used before all vowels and h ; 
here and there also before some consonants, 
particularly I, n, r, and s ; rarely before c, 
j, d, t; and almost never before the labials 
p,b,f, v, or before m, such examples as ab 
Massiliensibus, Caes. B.C. 1, 35, being of the 
most rare occurrence. — By changing the b 
of ab through v into u, the form au orig- 
inated, which was in use only in the two 
compounds aufero and aufugio for ab- 
fero, ab-fugio ; anfuisse for afuisse, in Cod. 
Medic, of Tac. A. 12, 17, is altogether un- 
usual. Finally, by dropping the b of ab, 
and lengthening the a, ab was changed into 
d, which form, together with ab, predom- 
inated through all periods of the Latin lan- 
guage, and took its place before all conso- 
nants in the later years of Cicero, and after 
him almost exclusively.— By dropping the b 
without lengthening the a, ab occurs in the 
form d- in the two compounds d-bito and 
d-perio, q. v. — On the other hand, instead 
of reducing ap to a and a, a strengthened 
collateral form, aps, was made by adding to 
ap the letter s (also used in particles, as in 
ex, mox, vix) . From the first, aps was used 
only before the letters c,g,t, and was very 
soon changed into abs (as ap into ab): abs 
chorago, Plaut. Pers. 1, 3, 79 (159 Ritschl) : 
abs quivis, Ter. Ad. 2, 3, 1 : abs terra, Cato, 
R. R. 51 ; and in compounds : aps-cessero, 
Plaut. Trin. 3, 1, 24 (625 R.) ; id. ib. 3, 2, 84 
(710 R.) : abs-condo, abs-que, abs-tineo, etc. 
The use of abs was confined almost exclu- 
sively to the combination abs te during the 
whole ante-classic period, and with Cicero 
till about the year 700 A.U.C. (=B.C. 54). 
After that time Cicero evidently hesitates 
between abs te and a te, but during the last 
five or six years of his life a te became pre- 
dominant in all his writings, even in his 
letters ; consequently abs te appears but 
rarely in later authors, as in Liv. 10, 19, 8 ; 
20, 15, 12 ; and who, perhaps, also used abs 
conscendentibus, id. 28, 37, 2 ; v. Drakenb. 
ad h. 1. (Weissenb. ab). — Finally abs, in con- 
sequence of the following p, lost its b, and 
became as- in the three compounds as- 
pello, as-porto, and as-pertior (for as- 
spernor) ; v. these words. — The late Lat. 
verb abbretio may stand for adbrevio, the 
d of ad being assimilated to the following b. 

The fundamental signification of ab is de- 
parture from, same fixed point (opp. to 
ad, which denotes motion to a point). I. In 
space, and, II. Fig., in time and other 
relations, in wliich the idea of departure 
from some point, as from source and origin, 
is included ; Engl, from, away from, out 
of; down from; since, after; by, at, in, 
on, etc. 

I. Lit., in space: ab classe ad urbem 
tendunt, Att. ap. Non. 495, 22 (Trag. Rel, 
p. 177 Rib.) : Caesar maturat ab urbe pro- 
flcisci, Caes. B. G. 1, 7 : fuga ab urbe tur- 
pissima, Cic. Att. 7, 21 : ducite ab urbe 
domnm, ducite Daphnim, Verg. E. 8, 68. 
Cicero himself gives the difference between 
ab and ex thus : si qui mihi praesto fuerit 
cum armatis hominibus extra meum fundum 
et me iutroire prohibuerit, non ex eo, sed ab 
{from, away from) eo loco me dejecerit. 
. . . Unde dejecti Galli ? A Capitolio. Unde, 
qui cum Graccho fuerunt? Ex Capitolio, 
etc., Cic. Caecin. 30, 87 ; cf. Diom. p. 408 P., 
and a similar distinction between ad and 
in under ad. — E 1 1 i p t. : Diogenes Alexan- 
dro roganti, ut dicerct, si quid opus essct : 
Nunc quid em pauhdum, inquit, a sole, 
a little out of the sun, Cic. Tusc. 5, 32, 92. 
— Often joined with usque: illam (mulie- 
rem) usque a mari supero Romam proflcisci, 
all the ^Lv(y from, Cic. Chi. 68,192; v. us- 
que, I. — And with ad, to denote the space 
passed over : siderum genus ab ortu ad oc- 
casum commeant, from . . . to, Cic. N. D. 2, 
19 init . ; dab ... in : venti a laevo latere 
in dextrum, ut sol, ambiunt, Plin, 2, 47,48, 
§128. 

"\j m Sometimes with names of cities and 
small islands, or with domns (instead of the 
usual abl.), partic, in military and nautical 
language, to denote the marching of soldiers, 
the setting out of a fleet, or the departure of 
the inhabitants from some place : oppidum 
ab Aenea fugiente a Troja conditum, Cic. 
Verr, 2, 4, 33 : quemadmodum (Caesar) a 
Gergovia discederet, Caes. B. G. 7, 43 fin. ; 
so id. ib. 7, 80 fin. ; Sail. J. 61; 82; 91; 



AB 

Liv. 2, 33, 6 al. ; cf. : ab Arimino M. Anto- 
nium cum cohortibus quinque Arretium 
mittit, Caes. B. C. 1, 11 fin. ; and : protinua 
a Corfinio in Siciliam miserat, id. ib. 1, 25, 2 : 
profecti a domo, Liv. 40, 33, 2 ; of setting 
sail: cum exercitus vestri numquam a Brun- 
disio nisi hieme summa transmiserint, Cic. 
Imp. Pomp. 12,32; so id. Fam. 15,3,2; Caes. 
B. C. 3, 23 ; 3, 24 fin. : classe qua advecti 
ab domo fuerant, Liv. 8, 22, 6 ; of citizens r 
interim ab Roma legatos venisse nuntiatum 
est, Liv. 21, 9, 3 ; cf. : legati ab Orico ad M. 
Valerinm praetorem venerunt, id. 24, 40, 2. 

C. Sometimes with names of persons or 
with pronouns : pestem abige a me, Enn. 
ap. Cic. Ac. 2, 28, 89 (Trag. v. 50 Vahl.) : 
Quasi ad adulescentein a patre ex Seleucia. 
veniat, Plaut. Trin. 3, 3, 41 ; cf. : libertus a 
Funis cum litteris ad Hermippum venit,. 
Cic. Fl. 20, 47 : Nigidium a Domitio Capuam 
venisse, id. Att. 7, 24 : cum a vobis disces- 
sero, id. Sen. 22 : multa merces tibi deflu- 
at ab Jove Neptunoque, Hor. C. 1, 28, 29 al. 
So often of a person instead of his house r 
lodging, etc. : videat forte hie te a patre ali- 
quis exiens, from the father, i.e. from his 
house, Ter. Heaut. 2, 2, 6 : so a fratre, id. 
Phorm. 5, 1, 5 : a Pontio, Cic Att. 5, Bfin. .- 
ab ea, Ter. And. 1, 3, 21; and so often : a me, 
a nobis, a se, etc, from my, our, his house, 
etc., Plaut. Stich. 5, 1, 7 ; Ter. Heaut. 3, 2 r 
50; Cic. Att. 4, 9, 1 al. 

B. T r an s f., without the idea of motion. 
To designate separation or distance, with 
the verbs abesse, distare, etc., and with the 
particles longe,procul,prope,^Xz. 1. Of 
separation : ego te afuisse tain diu a nobis 
dolui, Cic. Fam. 2, 1, 2 : ahesse a domo pau- 
lisper maluit, id. Verr. 2, 4, 18, § 39 : turn 
Brutus ab Roma aberat, Sail. C. 40, 5 : absint 
lacerti ab stahulis,Verg. G. 4, 14. — 2. Of dis- 
tance: quot milia fundus suus abesset ab 
urbe, Cic. Caecin. 10, 28 ; cf. : nos in castra 
properabamus, quae aberant bidui, id. Att. 
5, 16 fin. ; and : hie locus aequo fere spatio 
ab castris Ariovisti et Caesaris aberat, Caes. 
B. G. 1, 43, 1 : terrae ab hujusce terrae* 
quamnos incolimus,continuatione distantes^ 
Cic. N. D. 2, 66, 164 : non amplius pedum 
milibus duobus ab castris castra distabant,. 
Caes. B.C.I, 82, 3; cf. id. ib. 1, 3, 103.— With 
adverbs : annos multos longinque ab domo 
bellum gerentes, Enn. ap.Kon. 402, 3 (Trag. 
v. 103 Vahl.) : cum domus patris a foro 
longe abesset, Cic. Cael. 7, 18 fin. ; cf. : qui 
fontes a quihusdam praesidiis aberant lon- 
gius, Caes. B. C. 3, 49, 5 : quae procul erant 
a conspectu imperii, Cic. Agr. 2, 32, 87 ; cf . : 
procul a castris hostes in collibus constite- 
runt, Caes. B. G. 5, 17, 1 ; and : tu procul a 
patria Alpinas nives vides,Verg. E. 10, 46 
(procul often also with simple abl. ; v. pro- 
cul) : cum esset in Italia bellum tam prope 
a Sicilia, tamen in Sicilia non fuit, Cic. Verr. 
2, 5, 2, § 6 ; cf. : tu apud socrum tuam prope 
a meis aedibus sedebas, id. Pis. 11, 26 ; and : 
tam prope ab domo detineri, id .Verr. 2, 2, 3, 
§ 6. — So in Caesar and Livy, with numerals 
to designate the measure of the distance r 
onerariae naves, quae ex eo loco ab milibus 
passuum octo vento tenebatur, eight miles 
distant, Caes. B. G. 4, 22, 4 ; and without 
mentioning the terminus a quo : ad castra 
contenderunt, et ab milibus passuum minus 
duobus castra posuerunt, less than two 
miles off or distant, id. ib. 2, 7, 3 ; so id. ib. 
2,5,32; 6,7,3; id. B.C. 1,65; Liv. 38, 2C, 2 
(for which : duo milia fere et quingentos pas- 
sus ab hoste posuerunt castra, id. 37, 38, 5). 
— 3. To denote the side or direction from 
which an object is viewed in its local rela- 
tions, = a parte, at, on, in : utrum hac ! n 
feriam an ab laeva latus ? Enn. ap. Plaut. 
Cist. 3, 10 (Trag. v. 38 Vahl.) ; cf. : picus 
et cornix ah laeva, corvos, parra ab dextera 
consuadent, Plaut. As. 2, 1, 12 : clamore ab 
ea parte audito. on this side, Caes. B. G. 8, 
26, 4 : Gallia Celtica attingit ab Sequauis et 
Helvetiis fiumen Rhenum.cm the side of the 
/Sequani, i. e. their country, id. ib, 1, 1, 5 : 
pleraque Alpium ab Italia sicut breviora ita 
arrectiora sunt, on the Italian side, Liv. 
21, 35, 11 : non eadem diligentia ab decu- 
mana porta castra munita, at the main 
entrance, Caes. B. G. 3, 25 fin. : erat a sep- 
tentrionibus collis, on the north, id. ib. 7, 
83, 2 ; so, ab oriente, a meridie, ab occasu ; 
a fronte, a latere, a tergo, etc. (v. these 
words). 

II. Fig. A. In time. 1. From a. 



AB 

point of time, without reference to the pe- 
riod subsequently elapsed. After: Exul ah 
octava Marias bibit, Juv, 1,49 : mulieres jam 
ab re divina adparebunt domi, immediately 
after the sacrifice, Plaut. Poen. 3,3, 4: Cae- 
sar ab decimae legionis cohortatione ad dex- 
tnim cornu profectus, Caes. B , G. 2, 25, 1 : ah 
hac contione legati missi sunt, immediately 
after, Liv. 24, 22, 6 ; cf. id. 28 33, 1 ; 40, 47, 
8 ; 40, 49, 1 ah : ah eo magistratu, after 
this office, Sail. J. 63, 5: a surama spe 
novissima exspeetabat, after the greatest 
hope, Tac. A. 6, 50 fin. — Strengthened by 
the adverbs primum, coufestim, statim, pro- 
tin us, or the adj. recens, immediately af- 
ter, soon after : ut primum a tuo digressu 
Romam veni, Cic. Att. 1, 5, 4 ; so Suet. Tih. 
68 : confestim a proelio expugnatis hostium 
castris, Liv. 30, 36, 1 : statim a funere, Suet. 
Caes. 85; and followed by statim: ab itinere 
statim, id. ih. 60: protinus ab adoptione, 
Veil. 2, 104, 3: Homerus qui recens ab ilio- 
rum aetate fuit, soon after their time. Cic. 
N. D. 3, 5 ; so Varr. K. R. 2, 8, 2 ; Verg. A. 6, 
450 al. (v. also primum, confestirn, etc.). — 
Sometimes with the name of a person or 
place, instead of an action: ibi mihi tuae lit- 
terae binae redditae sunt tertio abs te die, 
i. e. after their departure from you, Cic. 
Att. 5, 3, 1: in Italiam perventum est quin- 
to mense a Carthagine Nova, i. e. after leav- 
m(/(:=:postquam a Carthagine profecti sunt), 
Liv. 21, 38,1: secundo Punico (bello) Scipionis 
ciassis XL. die a securi navigavit, i. e. after 
its having been built, Plin. 16,39, 74, § 192. 
— Hence the poet, expression : ab his, after 
this (cf. e« tovtuv), i. e. after these words, 
hereupon, Ov. M. 3, 273 ; '4, 329 ; 8, 612 ; 9, 
764. 

2. With reference to a subsequent period. 
From, since, after : ab hora tertia bibeba- 
tur, from the third hour, Cic. Phil. 2, 41: 
iniinito ex tempore, non ut antea, ab Sulla 
et Pompeio consulibus, since the consulship 
of, id. Agr. 2, 21, 56 : vixit ab omni aeterni- 
tate,/rt>?» all eternity, id. Div. 1, 51, 115 : 
cum quo a coudiscipulatu vivebat conjunc- 
tissime, Nep. Att. 5,3: in Lycia semper a 
terrae motu XL. dies serenos esse, after an 
earthquake, Plin. 2, 96, 98, § 211 al. : cen- 
tesima lux est haec ah interitu P. Clodii, 
since the death of, Cic. Mil. 35, 98 ; cf. : cu- 
jus a morte quintus hie et tricesimus annus 
est, id. Sen. 6, 19 ; and : ab incenso Capi- 
toiio ilium esse vigesumum annum, since, 
Sail. C. 47, 2 : diehus triginta, a qua die ma- 
teria caesa est, Caes. B. C. 1. 36. — Sometimes 
joined with usque and inde: quodaugures 
omnes usque ab Romulo decreverunt, since 
the time of, Cic. Vat. 8, 20: jam inde ab in- 
felici pugna ceciderant animi,/ro«t the very 
beginning of, Liv. 2, 65 fin. — Hence the 
adverbial expressions ah initio, a principio, 
a primo, at, in, or from the beginning, 
at first ; v. initium, principium, primus. 
Likewise ab integro, anew, afresh; v. inte- 
ger. — Ab . . . Sid, from (a time) . . . to: ab 
hora octava ad vesperum secreto collocuti 
sumus, Cic. Att. 7, 8, 4 ; cf. : cum ab hora 
septima ad vesperum pugnatum sit, Caes. 
B. G. 1, 26, 2 ; and : a quo tempore ad vos 
consules anni sunt septingenti octoginta 
unus, Veil. 1, 8, 4 ; and so in Plautus 
strengthened by usque : pugnata pugnast 
usque a mane ad vesperum, from morning 
to evening, Plaut. Am. 1, 1,97; id. Most. 3, 
1,3; 3, 2, 80.— Rarely ab . . . in: Romani 
ab sole orto in multum diei stetere in acie, 
from . . . till late in the day, Liv. 27, 2,9; 
so Col. 2, 10, 17 ; Plin. 2, 31, 31, § 99 ; 2, 
103, 106, § 229 ; 4, 12, 26, § 89. 

1). Particularly with nouns denoting a 
time of life : qui homo cum animo inde ab 
ineunte aetate depugnat &uo,from an early 
age, from early youth, Plaut, Trin. 2,2, 24; 
so Cic. Off, 2, 13, 44 al. : mihi magna cum eo 
jam inde a pueritia fuit semper familiaritas, 
Ter. Heaut. 1, 2, 9 ; so, a pueritia, Cic. Tusc . 
2, 11, 27 Jin. : id. Fain, 5, 8, 4: jam inde ab 
adulescentia, Ter. Ad, 1, 1, 16 : ab adulescen- 
tia, Cic. Uep. 2, 1: jam a prima adulescentia, 
id. Fam. 1,9, 23: ab ineunte adulescentia, 
id. ib. 13, 21, 1 ; cf. followed by ad : usque 
ad hanc aetatem ah ineunte adulescentia, 
Plaut. Trin. 2, 2, 20: a primis temporibus 
aetatis, Cic. Fam. 4, 3, 3 : a teneris unguicu- 
\is, from childhood, id. ib. 1, 6, 2 : usque a 
toga pura id. *tt. 7, 8, 5 : jam inde ab incu- 
nabula, Liv. 4, 36, 5: a prima lanugine, 
S^&t. Oth. 12: viridi ab aevo, Ov. Tr. 4, 10, 



AB 

17 al. ; rarely of animals : ab infantia, Plin. 
10. 63, 83, § 1»2.— Instead of the nom. abstr. 
very often (like the Greek U nai&mv, etc.) 
with concrete substantives : a puero, ab 
adulescente, a parvis, etc, from childhood, 
etc. : qui olim a puero parvulo mihi pae- 
dagogus fuerat, Plaut. Merc. 1, 1, 90 ; so, a 
pausillo puero, id. Stich. 1, 3, 21 : a puero, 
Cic, Ac. 2, 36, 115 ; id. Fam. 13, 16, 4 (twice) 
al. : a pueris, Cic. Tusc, 1, 24, 57 ; id. de Or. 
1, 1, 2 al. : ah adulescente, id. Quint. 3, 12: 
ab infante, Col. 1, 8, 2:, a parva virgine, 
Cat, 66, 26 ai. — Likewise and in the same 
sense with adject.: a parvo,/n>??u<z little 
child, or childhood, Liv. 1, 39, 6 fin. ; cf. : 
a parvis, Ter. And. 3, 3, 7 ; Cic. Leg. 2, 4, 9 : 
a parvulo, Ter. And. 1, 1, 8 ; id. Ad. 1, 1, 23 ; 
cf. : ab parvulis, Caes. B, G. 6, 21, 3: ab 
tenero, Col. 5, 6, 20 ; and rarely of animals : 
(vacca) a bima aut trima fructum ferre in- 
cipit,Varr. R.R. 2, 1,13. 

B. In other relations in which the 
idea of going forth, proceeding, from some- 
thing is included. 

1, In gen. to denote departure, separa- 
tion, deterring, avoiding, intermitting, etc., 
or distance, difference, etc., of inanimate or 
abstract things. From ; jus atque aecum 
se a malis spernit procul, Enn. ap. Non. 399, 
10 ( Trag. v. 224 Vahl. ) : suspitionem et 
culpam ut ab se segregent, Plaut. Trin. 1, % 
42 ; qui discessum animi a corpore putent 
esse mortem. Cic, Tusc. 1, 9, 18 : hie ab arti- 
flcio suo non reeessit, id. ih. 1, 10, 20 ai. : quod 
si exquiratur usque ab stirpe auctoritas, 
Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 180 : condicionem quam ah 
te peto, id. ib, 2, 4, 87 ; cf. : mercedem glo- 
riae fiagitas ab iis, quorum, etc., Cic. Tusc. 

1, 15, 34: si quid ab illo acceperis, Plaut. 
Trin. 2, 2, 90: quae (i. e. antiquitas) quo 
propius aberat ab ortu et divina progenie, 
Cic. Tusc. 1, 12, 26 -. ab defensione desistere, 
Caes. B. C. 2. 12, 4 : ne quod tempus ab 
opere intermitteretur, id. B. G. 7, 24, 2 : ut 
homines adulescentis a dicendi studio de- 
terream, Cic de Or, 1, 25, 117, etc.— Of dis- 
tance (in order, rank, mind, or feeling) : qui 
quartus ab Ajrcesila fuit, the fourth in suc- 
cession from , Cic. Ac. 1, 12, 46: tu nunc eris 
alter ab illo, next after him, Verg. E . 5, 49 ; 
cf. : Aiax, heros ab Achille secundus, next 
in rank to, Hor. S. 2, 3, 193 : quid hoc ah 
illo differt, from, Cic Caecin. 14, 39 ; cf. : 
hominum vita tantum distat a victu et cultu 
bestiarum, id. Off. 2, 4, 15 ; and : discrepare 
ab aequitate sapientiam, id. Pep. 3, 9 fin. 
(v. the verbs differo, disto, discrepo, dissi- 
deo, dissentio, etc.) : quae non aliena esse 
ducerem a digmtate, Cic. Fam. 4, 7; alieno 
a te animo fuit, id. Deiot. 9, 24 (v. alienus). 
— So the expression ab re (qs. aside from 
the m alter, profit; cf . the opposite, in rem) , 
contrary to one's profit, to a loss, dis- 
advantageous (so in the affirmative very 
rare and only ante-class.) : subdole ab re 
consulit, Plaut. Trin. 2, 1, 12 ; cf. id. Capt. 2, 

2, 88 ; more frequently and class, (but not 
with Cicero) in the negative, non, baud, ab 
ra,not without advantage or profit, not 
useless or unprofitable, advantageous : 
haut est ab re aucupis, Plaut. As. 1, 3, 71 : 
non ab re esse Quinctii visum est, Liv. 35, 
32. : so Plin. 27. 8. 35 : 31. 3. 26 ; Suet. 
Aug. 94; id. Dom. 11 ; Gell. 18, 14 fin. ; 
App. Dogm. Plat. 3, p. 31, 22 al. (but in Ter. 
Ad. 5, 3, 44, ah re means with respect to 
the money matter). 

2, In par tic. a. To denote an agent 
from whom an action proceeds, or by whom 
a thing is done or takes place. By, and in 
archaic and solemn style, of, So most fre- 
quently with pass, or intrans. verbs with 
pass, signif., when the active object is or is 
considered as a living being: Laudari me 
abs te, a laudato viro,Kaev. ap. Cic. Tusc. 4, 
31, 67 : injuria abs te afflcior, Enn. ap. Auct. 
Her. 2, 24, 38 : a patre deductus ad Scaevo- 
lam, Cic. Lael. 1, 1 : ut tamquam a prae- 
sentibus coram haberi sermo videretur, id. 
ih. 1, 3: disputata ab eo, id. ib. 1, 4 al. : 
ilia (i. e. numerorum ac vocum vis) maxi- 
me a Graecia vetere celebrata, id. de Or. 

3, 51, 197 : ita generati a natura sumus, 
id. Off. 1, 29, 103 ; cf. : pars mundi dam- 
nata a rerum natura, Plin. 4, 12, 26, § 88 : 
magna adhibita cura est a providentia deo- 
riira, Cic. N. D. 2, 51 al. — With intrans. 
verbs: quae (i. e. anima.) calescit ab eo spi- 
ritu, is warmed, by this breath,G\c. N. D. 
2, 55, 136 ; cf. Ov. M. 1, 417 : (mare) qua a 



AB 

sole collucet, Cic. Ac. 2, 105 : salvebis a meo 
Cicerone, i.e. young Cicero sends Ms com- 
pliments to you, id. Att. 6, 2 fin. : a qui- 
bus (Atheniensibus) erat profectus, i. e. by 
whose command^e-p. Milt. 2, 3: ne vir ab 
hoste cadat, Ov. H. 9, 36 al.— A substantive 
or adjective often takes the place of the 
verb (so with de, q. v.) : levior est plaga ab 
amico quam a debitore,Cic. Fam. 9, 16, 7 ; 
cf. : a bestiis ictus, morsus, impetus, id. Off. 
2, 6, 19 : hi calor est a sole, id. N. D. 2, 52 : 
ex iis a te verbis (for a te scriptis), id. Att. 
16, 7, 5 : metu poenae a Romanis, Liv. 32, 
23, 9 : bellum ingens a Volscis et Aequis, 
id. 3, 22, 2 : ad exsolvendam fidem a consu- 
le,id. 27, 5, 6. — With an adj. : lassus ab equo 
indomito, Hor. S. 2, 2, 10 : Munis ab ingenio 
notior ille tuo, Prop. 5, 1, 126 : tempus a no- 
stris triste malis, time made sad by our 
misfortimes, Ov. Tr, 4, 3, 36. — Different 
from per : vulgo occidebantur : per quos et 
a quibus? by lohom and upon whose or- 
ders? Cic. Rose. Am. 29, 80 (cf. id, ib. 34,97: 
cujus consilio occisus sit, invenio ; cujus 
manu sit percussus, non laboro) ; so, ab hoc 
destitutus per Thrasybulum (i. e. Thrasy- 
bulo auctore), Nep. Ale. 5, 4. — Ambiguity 
sometimes arises from the fact that the 
verb in the pass, would require ab if used 
in the active : si postulatur a populo, if the 
people demand it, Cic Off. 2, 17, 58, might 
also mean, if it is required of the people; 
on the contrary: quod ab eo (Lucullo) laus 
irnperatoria non admodum exspectabatur, 
not since he did not expect military 
renown, but since they did not expect 
military renown from him, Cic Ac. 2, 3, 
2, and so often; cf.Rudd.II.p.213. (Theotis 
of the active dative, or dative of the agent, 
instead of ab with the pass., is well known, 
Zumpt, § 419. It is very seldom found in 
prose writers of the golden age of Roman 
liter. ; with Cic. sometimes joined with the 
participles auditus, cognitus, constitutus, 
perspectus, provisus, susceptus; cf. Halm 
ad Cic. Imp. Pomp. 24, 71, and ad ejusdem, 
Cat. 1,'7 fin. ; but freq. at a later period ; 
e. g. in Pliny, in Books 2-4 of H. N., more 
than twenty times ; and likewise in 1 acitus 
seventeen times. Vid. the passages in Nip- 
perd. ad Tac A. 2,49.) Far more unusual 
is the simple abl. in the designation of 
persons : deseror conjuge, Ov. H. 12, 161 ; 
so id. ib. 5, 75 ; id. M. 1, 747 ; Verg. A. 1, 
274 ; Hor. C. 2, 4, 9; 1, 6, 2 ; and in prose, 
Quint. 3, 4, 2; Sen. Contr. 2, 1 ; Curt. 6, 7, 
8 ; cf. Rudd. II. p. 212; Zumpt ad Quint. 
V. p. 122 Spalding. — Hence the adver- 
bial phrase a se = u0' lavrov, sua sponte, 
of one's own accord, spontaneously : ip- 
sum a se oritur et sua sponte nascitur, Cic. 
Fin. 2, 24, 78: (urna) ab se cantat quoja sit, 
Plaut. Rud. 2, 5, 21 (al. eapse ; cf. id. Men. 

1, 2, 66) ; so Col. 11, 1, 5 ; Liv. 44, 33, 6. 

b. With names of towns to denote origin, 
extraction, instead of gentile adjectives. 
From, of : pastores a Pergamide,Varr, R. R. 

2, 2, 1 : Turnus ab Aricia, Liv. 1, 50, 3 (for 
which Aricinus, id. 1, 51, 1) : obsides dant 
trecentos principum a Cora atque Pometia 
liberos, Liv. 2, 22, 2 ; and poet. : ionga 
mundi servator ab Alba, Auguste, thou who 
art descended from, the old Alban race 
of kings (=oriundus, or ortus regibus Al- 
bania), Prop. 5, 6, 37. 

C. In giving the etymology of a name: 
earn rem (sc legem, Gr. vopov) illi Graeco 
putant nomine a suum cuique tribuendo ap- 
pellatam, ego nostro a legendo, Cic. Leg. 1,6, 
19: annum intervallum regni fuit: id ab 
re . . . interregnum appellatum, Liv. 1,17, 
6 : (sinus maris) ab nomine propinquae ur- 
bis Ambracius appellatus, id. 38, 4, 3; and 
so Varro in his Ling, Lat., and Pliny, in 
Books 1-5 of H.N. ,on almost every page. 
(Cf. also the arts, ex and de.) 

d. With verbs of beginning and repeat- 
ing : a summo bibere, in Plaut, to drink in 
succession from the one at the head of the 
ta&Z<j;da,puere,absummo,Plaut.As.5,2,41; 
so, da ab Delphio cantharum circum,id Most. 
1, 4, 33 : ab eo nobis causa ordienda est po- 
tissimum, Cic, Leg. 1, 7, 21 : coepere^ a fame 
mala, Liv, 4, 12, 7 : cornicem a cauda de ovo 
exire,tail-foremost,F\m, 10,16,18: a capite 
repetis, quod quaerimus, Cic. Leg. 1, 6, 18 al. 

e. With verbs of freeing from, defending, 
or protecting against any thing : a foliis et 
stercore purgato, Cato, R. R. 65 (G6), 1 : tan- 
tumne ab re tuast oti tibi? Ter. Heaut. 1, 

3 



AB 

1, 23 ; «f. : Saguntini ut a proelhs quietem 
habuerant, Liv. 21, 11, 5 : expiandum forum 
ab illis nefani sceleris vestigiis, Cic. Rab. 
Perd. 4. 11 : haec provincia non modo a ea- 
lamitate, sed etiam a metu calamitatis est 
defendenda, id. Imp. Pomp. 6, 14 (v. defen- 
do) : ab incendio urbein vigiihs munitam in 

fallorrol-iQt Coll A On. ..1 



ABAC 



r,, i '"^"""'u uiucin vigiius muniiam m- 
teliegebat, Sail. C. 32 : ut neque sustinere 
se a lapsu possent, Liv. 21, 35, 12 : ut meam 
domum metueret atque a me ipso caveret 
Cic. Sest. 64, 133. 

£ With verbs of expecting, fearing hop- 
ing, and the like, ab = a parte, as, Cic. Att. 
9, 7, 4 : cum eadem metuain ab hac parte 
since I fear the same from this side; 
hence, timere, metuere ab aliquo, not, to be 
afraid of any one, but, to fear something 
(proceeding from ) from Mm : ei inetui a 
Chryaide, Ter. And. 1, 1, 79; cf. : ab Hanni- 
bale metuens, Liv. 23, 36 : and : metus a prae- 
tore, id. 23, 15, 7 ; v. Weissenb. ad h. 1. : a quo 
quidem generejudices.ego numquamtimui, 
"Jic. bull. 20,59: postquam nee ab Romania 
vobis ulla est spes, you can expect nothing 
from the Romans, Liv. 21, 13, 4. 

g-. With verbs of fastening and holding : 
funiculus a puppi religatus, Cic, Inv. 2, 51, 
iy±: cum sinistra capilhim ejus a vertice 
teneret, Q. Cic. Pet. Cons. 3. 

h. Ulrisei se ab aliquo, to take vengeance 
on one : a ferro sanguis humanus se ulcisci- 
tur, Plin. 34, 14, Hfin. 

i. Cognoscere ab aliqua re, to know or 
learn, by means of something (different 
trom ab aliquo, to learn from some one) : 
id se a Gallicis armis atque insignibus coe- 
noyisse, Caes. B.C. 1, 22. 

j. Dolere, laborare, valere ab, instead of 
the simple abl. ; doleo ab animo, doleo ab 
ocuhs, doleo ab aegritudine, Plaut. Cist. 1. 1 
62 : a niorbo valui, ab aniino aeger fuj id' 
Ep. 1, 2, 26 ; cf. id. Aul. 2, 2, 9 : a frigore 
et aestu ne quid laboreiit, Varr. P.P. 2 2 
17 ; so, a frigore laborantibus, Plin. 32, io' 
46, § 133 ; cf. : laborare ab re frumentaria' 

C T\5;. G - 7 ' 10 ' 1 ' itL B - C - 3 ' 9 i v - iaboro! 
k. Where verbs and adjectives are joined 
with aft, instead of the simple abl ah de- 
fines more exactly the respect in which that 
which is expressed by the verb or adj is to 
be understood, in, relation to, with re 



gard to, %n respect to, on the part of- ab 
mmn,in ! K "" ™— * m 4,3,59: a 



ingenio improbus, Plaut. True. -± a oy ■ ■ 
me pudica'st, id. Cure. 1, 1, 51: orba ab opti- 
matibus contio, Cic. Fl. 23, 54; so Ov. H 
6 156 : securos vos ab hac parte reddemus* 
Plane, ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 21 Jin. ( v . securus) • 
locus copiosus a fruinento, Cic. Att. 5, 18 
2; cf. : sumus imparati cum a militibus 
turn a pecunia, id. ib. 7, 15 fin. : ille Grae- 
cus ab omni laude felicior, id. Brut 16 63 • 
ab una parte baud satis prosperum, Liv 1* 
32 2 al ; so often in poets ab arte = arte' 
artfully, Tib. 1, 5, 4 ; 1, 9, 66 ; Ov. Am. 2 
4, ov. ' 

L In the statement of the motive instead 
of ex, propter, or the simple abl. causae 
from, out of, on account of, in conse- 
quence of: ab singulari am ore scribo Bal* 
ap. Cic. Att. 9, 7, BJin. : linguam ab irrisu 
exserentem, thrusting out the tongue in 
derision, Liv. 7, 10, 5 : ab honore, id 1 8 • 
In' ^ ^ a ' a spe ' ab odi0 ' v - Drak - ad L iv '24 
cV \ 2 h\ S; ? f ~ also Kritz and Fabri ad 
oivii. u. o±, o, ana laon ad Liv. 21, 36, 7. 

m. Especially in the poets instead 'of the 
gen. : ab illo injuria, Ter. And 1 l i<>q. 
tulgor ab auro, Lucr. 2, 5 : dulces a foAtibus 
undae,Verg. G. 2,243. 

n. In indicating a part of the whole for the 
more usual ex, of, out of: scuto ab novis- 
simis uni militi detracto, Caes. B. G 2 25 1- 
i^™}* *}> novisshnis, id. ib. ; Cic. Sest. 65* 
137; cf .id. ib 59 Jin.: a quibus (captivis 
ad Senatum missus (Regulus). 

O. In marking that from which any thine 
proceeds, and to which it belongs • Qui 
sunt au ea discipline, Cic. Tusc 2 3 7- ab 
eo qui sunt, id. Fin. 4, 3, 7 : nostri iili a 
Platone et Anstotele aiunt, id. Mur 30 63 
x m imitation of 01 (Wo twos). 

p. To designate an office or dignify (with 
or without servus ; so not freq. till after the 
Aug. period; in Cic. only once) : Pollex ser- 

$£ A^a 1 -"? meuS ' one °f m V couriers, 
Cic. Att. fi \& 1 ; so, a manu servus, a secre- 
tary, Suet Caes. 74: Narcissum abepistulis 
(secretary) et Pallantem a raiionibus (ac- 
countant), id. Claud. 28; and so,ab actis ab 



admissione, ab aegris, ab apotheca, ab ar- 
gento, a balneis, a bibliotheca, a codicillis, a 
jumentis, a potione, etc. (v. these words and 
±nscr. Oreii. vol. 3, Ind. xi. p. 181 sq.). 

q. The use of ab before adverbs is for 
the most part peculiar to later Latinity : a 
peregre, Vitr. 5, 7 (6), 8 : a foris, Plin. 17, 24 
^7; Vulg.Gen.7,16; ib. Matt. 23,27: ab in- 
tus, ib. ib. 7, 15 : ab invicem, App. Herb 
112 ; Vulg. Matt. 25, 32 ; Cypr. Ep 63 y- 
Hier. Ep. 18 : a longe, Hyg. Fab. 257 : Vule 
Sf l 2 l 4 ; ib - Matt 26 . 58 : a modo, ib. ib! 
23 39; H/er.Vit. Hilar.: a nunc, Vulg. Luc. 
-i, 48 : a sursum, ib. Marc. 15, 38. 

%3t a. Ab is not repeated like most oth- 
er prepositions (v. ad, ex, in, etc.) with pron 
tnzerrog. or relat. after sitbst. and pron 
demonstr. with ab : Arsinoen, Stratum' 
Naupactum . . . fateris ab hosjtibus esse cap- 
tas. Quibus autem hostibus? Nempe iis 
quos, etc., Cic. Pis. 37, 91: a rebus geren- 
ais senectus abstrahit. Quibus > An iis 
quae 111 juventute geruntur et viribus? id' 
ben. 6: a Jove incipiendum Dutat. Qua 
Jove ? id. Hep. 1, 36, 56: res publica, quas- 
curnque vires habebit, ab iis ipsis, quibus 
tenetur de te P ro P ediem impetrabit, id 
*am. 4 13, 5.—],. Ab in Plantus is once put 
alter the^word which it governs: quo ab 
^s. ±, ±, 1O6.— Cm it is in various ways sepa- 
rated from the word which it governs ■ a 
vitae periculo, Cic. Brut. 91, 313 • a nullius 
umquam me tempore aut commodo id 
Arch. 6, 12 : a minus bono, Sail. C. 2 6 • a 
satis miti principio, Liv. 1, 6, 4 : damnis dives 
abipsasuis,Ov.H.9,96; so id. ib. 12, 18; 13 
Ho.— d. The poets join a and que, making 
«y««,- out in good prose que is annexed to 
the following abl. (a ineque, abs teoue 
etc.): aque Chao, Verg. G. 4, 347: aque 
mero, Ov. M. 3, 631 : aque viro, id H 6 
156: aque suis, id. Tr. 5, 2, 74 al But- a 

fZ qU o\? lC : " am - 2 ' 16 ' 1: a '°s teque/id 
Att. d, 15, 4: a teque, id. ib. 8 11 § 7- a 
pnmaque adulescentia, id. Brnt. 9l! 315 al 
tT e "/ ? reek noun J* oined with ab stands Tn 
the dat. : a parte negotiati, hoc est npav- 
uaTturj. removisse, Quint. 3, 7, 1. 

III. In composition ab, 1, Petains 
1 1 s r 1 gi n a i s i g n i f. : abducere. to take. 
or carry atvay from some pla<:e:' abstra- 
here, to draw away; also, dmenward- 
abicere, to throw down ; and denoting a 
departure from the idea of the simple word 
it has an effect apparently privative: ab- 
simihs, departing from the similar, unlike • 
abnormis, departing from the rule, unusual 
(different from dissimilis, enormis) ■ and 
so also in amens=a mente remotus, alieuus 
(out of one's senses, without self-control 
tnsane): absurdus, missounding, then in- 
congruous, irrational : abutor (in one of 
its senses), to misuse : aborior. abortus to 
miscarry; abludo; for the privative force 
the Latin regularly employs in- v 2 in — 
2. It more rarely designates completeness 
as 111 absorbere, abutor (to use up) (The 
designation of the fourth generation hi the 
ascending or descending line by ab belongs 
here only in appearance; as abavus for 
WMtus V &ter great-great-grandfather. 
although the ureeks introduced a*6*aw*or • 
for the immutability of the syllable ab in 
abpatruus and abmatertera, as well as the 
signif of the word abavus, grandfather's 
grandfather, imitated in abnepos, grand- 
child s grandchild, seems to point to a deri- 
vation from avi avus, as Festus, p. 13 Mull 
explains atavus, by atta avi, or, rather attae 
avus. ) 
Aba (or Abas), ae, m. , v. Aga. 
(iibabuS; ti3 lse read, in inscrr., written 
for abavus.) 

abactor, oris, m. [abigo],=abigeus and 
abigeator one who drives of, a driver 
op- (late Latin): peeorum, Firm. Astr 6 
31; cf. Isid. Orig. 10, 14; and bourn, Mir/ 1 
lei. Oct. 5 ; and absol., a cattle-stealer or 
th ief, App. M. 7, p. 199 med. Elrn. ; Paul. ' 
Sent, d, 18, 1. 

1. abactus, -i, urn, Part, of abigo, 

* 2. abactus, na, m. [abigo j, a driv- 
ing away, robbing (of cattle, vessels, etc. ) 
Phn. Pan. 20, 4. h 

* abaculus, i, m. dim. [abacus], a 
small cube or tile of colored glass for 
making ornamental pavements, the Gr 
afiuKiaKo?, Plin. 36, 26, 67, § 199 



ABAL 



t abacus, i (according to Prise. 752 P. 
al so abax, iicis ; cf. id. p. 688), m., = Hj3ai: 
£«or, prop, a square tablet; hence iri 
p ar ti c, I. A sideboard, the top of which 
was made of marble, sometimes of Ril. 
ver gold, or other precious material 
chiefly used for the display of gold and 
silver vessels, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 16 5 35 • 2 4 
25, § 57; id. Tusc. 5, 21, 61; Varr L L 9 Mil 
Mull.; Plin. 37, 2, 6, §14; Juv. 3,204; perh 
aiso canea mensae Delphicae, Cic Verr 2 4" 
59 init Zumpt; Mart. 12, 67. Accord. 'to 
Liv. 39, 6, 7, and Plin. 34, 3, 8 S H C11 
Manlius Vulso first brought them from Asia 
to Rome, B.C. 187, in his triumph over the 
Oalatae ; cf. Becker, Gall. 2, p. 258 ( 2d 
edit.).— U i a gaming-board, divided 
into compartments, for playing with dice 
or counters, Suet. Ner. 22 ; Macr. S 1 5 — 
III. A counting-table, covered with 'sand 
or dust and used for arithmetical compu- 
tation, Pers. 1, 131; App. Mag. p. 284 , c f 
Becker Gall. 2, p. 65. -IVV A wooden 
tray Cato, P, r. 10, 4._V. A painted 
panel or square compear tment in the 
wall or ceiling of a chamber.Vitr 7 3 
W; Plin. 33, 12, 56, § 159; 35 ' 1 1V3' 
and 35, 6, 13, § 32.- VI. In architecture, a 
flat, square stone on the top of a column 
immediately under the architrave, Vitr b' 
5, 5_sq. ; 4,1, 11 jq. " ' 

Abaddir 1 Abadir), indecl. or iris, 
m. [Heb. l^^IN ^N, mighty father], the 
name of an Oriental deity, Prise. P . 

Abaddon, ni. indecl, [ Heb. destruc- 
tion], the name of the angel of Tartarus, 
Vulg. Apoc. 9, 11. ' 

* ab-aestuo, avi, atum, 1, vi. n. (prop, 
to wave down, hence), poet., to hang down 
richly ; laetis ut vitis abaestuet uvis Poet 
(Tert. or Cypr.) de Jud. Dom. 1. 

(abaglO, fmia, the supposed etvmology 
of adagio, by Varr. L. L. 7, § 31 Mull.) 

* abagmentum, i,«. [abigo], </ means 
for procuring abortion, Prise. Med 2 34 
dub. ' ' 

* abalienatio, onis, /. [abalienoj, a 
legal transfer of property by sale or oth- 
er alienation: abalienatio est ejus rei, quae 
mancipi est, aut traditio alteri nexu aut in 
jure cessio, inter quos ea jure civili fieri 
possunt, Cic. Top. 5 fin. 

ab-alieno, avi, aturn, 1, no. a., orig. to 
make alien from one or froon one's self 
i.e. to remove, separate. J Prop A t„' 
gen. : istuc crucior a viro me tali abaliena- 
ner, to be separated from such a man 
Plaut. Mil. 4, 8, 11 ; so id. Trin. 2, 4, 112 and 
156 (but in Ter. Heaut. 5, 2, 26, the correct 
read. is ah enavit).— B. In partic. 1 T t 
to convey the ownership of a thing to 
another, to make a legal transfer, to sell 
alienate (cf. abalienatio) : earn' (pictn ram) 
vendat : ni in quadriduo Abalienarit, quo ex 
argeiitum acceperit, has sold, Plaut. As 
4,L20; so,agros vectigales populi Komani,' 
Cic. Agr. 2, 24, 64 ; cf. id. ib. 2, 27, 72 : prae- 
?i uin » PAS' 10 i 3 . 14: pecus, Cic. Verr. 2. 3 
ou, § ii9: sepnlcrum, Inscr. Orell. 4357- 
aliquid ab se, ib. 3673. — * 2, In med" 
lang.: membra morbis abahenata, i e' 
dead, Quint. 8, 3, 75: opium sensus kbali- 
enat, makes unconscious, Scrib. Comp 
190 ; ef. id. ib. 192. ' 

II. Trop. A. In gen., to separate 
remove, abstract: nisi mors menm am- 
mum aps te abalienavit, Plant. Cure 1 3 
18; so, assueti inalis abalienaverant ab sensu 
rerum suarum aninios, had abstracted 
their thoughts from, Liv. 5, 42 fin. ; de- 
minuti capite, abalienati jure civiuin de- 
prived of, id. 22, 60, 15. ' ' 
B. In partic,, to alienate, estranae 
render disaffected (Ciceron. ; syn. : ali- 
enare, inimicissimum reddere, disjungere • 
opp. conciliare, retinere ) ; consir. all 
quern or aliquid with ab, the abl. or ace 
only, or quite absoL (a) With ab : si in 
homines caros acerbius invehare. nonne a . 
re judices abalicnes? Cic. de Or. 2, 75, 304- 
so id ib 2, 18/in.; 3, 25, 98 ; id. Fam! 1, 8,' 
4; id Verr 2 4, 27: valde benevolentiarn 
concihant abahenantque ab iis, in quibus 
etc. k1 de Or. 2, 43, 182: animum ab se, 
Liv. 45, 6, l : -(,i) With abl.: qno er^nt ip.si 
propter judicia abalienati, Cic. de Or 2 48, 
199 B. and K. : quod Tissaphernes perjnrio 



ABBA 

suo et homines suis rebus abalienaret et 
deos sibi iratos redderet, Nep. Ages. 2, 5 (cf. 
supra, II. A,, the passage of Liv. 22, GO, 15). 
— (?) The ace. only: qui nos, quos favendo 
in communi causa retinere potuerunt, in- 
videndo abalienarunt, Cic. Fam. 1, 7, 7 : to- 
tain Africam, to estrange, Nep. Ham. 2, 2; 
cf. id. ib. 2, 4 : (noster amicus) mirandum 
in modum est animo ahalienato, alienated, 
Cic. Att. 1,3,3; cf. : indigna patientium ab- 
alienabantur animi, Liv. 25,38,4.— (<3) Absol. 
(very rare) : timebant ne arguendo abalien- 
arerit, Liv. 8, 1 Jin. (for which, in the foil, 
ch. : ita Campanos abalienavit). 

X abambnlantes : abscedentes, Paul, 
ex Fest. p. 26, 10 Mull. 

abamita, ae »/- [avus-amita], sister of 
an abavus, or great - great - grandfather ; 
also called amita maxima, Dig. 38, 10, 3 : 10 
§17^ , k , , . , 

+ abante [ab-ante, like incircum, insu- 
per, etc. ; cf. also the Heb. ISB^O and the 
Engl, from before]. I. Prep, with abl., 
from before: abante oculis parentis rapue- 
runt nymphae, away before the eyes of the 
father, Inscr. Grut. 717, 11.— H. Adv., be- 
fore: ne (qnis) abante aliam (arcam) po- 
nat, Inscr. Orell. 4396. 

AbantlUS, a, nm, adj., of Abantia, 
another name of Eubcea : classis, Eu- 
bcean, Stat. S. 4, 8, 46. 

abarcet: prohibet, Paul, ex Fest. p. 15 
Mull.; cf. abercet. 

Abaris, idis, m . I. A Butulian, slain 
by Euryalus ; ace. Abarim, Verg. A. 9, 344. 
— II. A companion of Phineus, slain by 
Perseus ; ace. Abarin, Ov. M. 5, 86. 

Abaritanus, a, um, adj., of Abaris, 
a place in Africa : harundo, Plin. 16, 36, 
66, §172. 

Abas, antis, m .~A/3at. I. The twelfth 
king of Argos, son of Lynceus and ffy- 
permnestra, grandson of Danaus, fa- 
ther of Acrisius, and grandfather of 
Perseus. His shield was gained by ^Eneas, 
Verg^ A. 3, 286.— B. Hence derivv. 1, Ab- 
anteus, a, um, adj. , pertaining to Abas, 
Ov. m. 15, 164.— 2. Abantiades, ae, m. 
patron., a male descendant of Abas. a. 
His son Acrisius, Ov. M. 4, 607.— b. His 
great-grandson Perseus (by Danae, daugh- 
ter of Acrisius), Ov. M. 4, 673 ; 5, 138 al.— II. 
A Centaur, son oflxion, Ov. M. 12, 306. ' 
III. An Ethiopian, Ov. M. 5, 126.— IV. 
A companion of Diomedes, Ov. M. 14* 
505.— V. A companion of ^Eneas,Verg. 
A. 1, 121.— VI. A Tuscan chieftain, Verg 
A. 10, 170, and 427. 

t abaSCantUS, a, um, = iifidcKavro?, 
unenvied : aeon, Tert. adv. Gnost. 10. 

(abathon, false read, in Vitr. for a/Ja-ro v.) 

Abatos, i,/-,— 'A/Ja-ror (inaccessible), a 
rocky island in the Nile, not far from 
Fhilse, to which the priests only had access, 
Luc. 10, 323 (in Sen. Q. N. 4, 2, 7, written 
as Greek, "A/3aTop). 

ab-avia, ae,/. [avus, avia], mother of 
a great-grandfather, or of a great-grand- 
mother, Dig. 38, 10, 1, § 6 ; 10, § 17. 

ab-avuncnlus, i, tn., great-great- 
uncle; aiso called avunculus maximus. 
Dig. 38^ 10, 3 ; 10, § 17. 

ab-aVUS. i, m. 1. ( = avi avus, cf. 
Paul, ex Fest. p. 13 Mull.) Great-great- 
grandfather, Plaut. Mil. 2, 4, 20; Cic. Brut. 
58, 213 ; id. Har. Kesp. 11, 22 ; 11, 38 (B. and 
K.) ; Dig. 38, 10, 1, § 6; 10, § 15 ; called by 
Vergil quartus pater, A. 10,619.-2. In 
g e n., forefather, ancestor, Plin. 18, 6 8 
5 37; Sen. Clem. 1, 10. ' 

abaz 5 acis, v. abacus init. 

(Abba, ae, false read, in Liv. 30, 7, 10, 
instead of Obba, q. v.) 

abba, indecl.,^lxppa [Chald. Abba, 
Heb. &b], father, Vulg, Marc. 14, 36: ib. 
Rom. 8,15; ib.Gal.4, 6. 

abbas, atis, m. [id.], the head of an 
ecclesiastical community, an abbot (eccl. 
Lat.), Sid. 16, 114 ; Inscr. Mommsen, 3485 
(A.D. 468).-Hence, abbatissa, ae,/, an 
u b bess,JmcT. Mommsen, 3H96 (A.D. 570); 
a^'d abbatia, ae,/., an abbey (eccl. Lat.)', 
Hier. 



AEDI 
&bbassus,hf;='AiJipa<rov,Abba8ms, 

a town in Phrygia, Liv. 38, 15 fin. 

abbreviatio, 6ms,/. [abbrevio], an 
abbreviation, a diminution^ r ulg. Isa. 10, 
23. ' 

ab-brevio, are, v.freq. a. [ab or ad- 
brevio], to shorten, abridge, Veg. Mil. 3 
prol.; Vulg. Isa. 10, 22 ; ib. Rom. 9, 28. 

(ab-Cldo, 6re, cldi, an incorrect form for 
abscido, q. v.) 

Abdalonymus (Abdol-), i, m., a Si- 

donian of royal descent, made king of 
Sidon by Alexander the Great, Curt. 4, 1, 
19 sq. ; Just. 11, 10, 8. 

Abdera, 6rum,«., and ae,/.,=*'A/?d„p a . 
I, Abdera, a town on the southern coast 
of Thrace, not far from the mouth of the 
Nestus, noted for the stupidity of its in- 
habitants. It was the birthplace of the 
philosophers Protagoras, Democriius, 
and Anaxarchus ; ™.,Liv. 45, 29, 6; Gell 

5, 3, 3 ; /., Ov. Ib. 469; Plin. 25, 8, 53, § 94 
dub.; 4, 11, 18, § 42: hie Abdera, non 
tacente me, here was Abdera itself, Cic. 
Att. 4, 17, 3 (4, 16, 6).— 2. Folly, stupidity, 
madness,Cic. 1. 1. (cf. : id est 'Aftdnpmicov, 
i. e. stupid, id. Att. 7, 7, 4, and Arn. 5, p. 164; 
Juv. 10, 50; Mart. 10, 25, 4). — ^ Hence, 

derivv. l.Abderita and Abderites, ae 

m.,= A$6t]ptTr\<;, an Abderite : Democritus 
Abderites, Laber. ap. Gell. 10, 17 : Abderites 
Protagoras, Cic. N. D. 1, 23, 63 ; cf. id. Brut. 
8 : de Protagora Abderita, id . de Or. 3, 32, 128 ; 
Abderitae legati, Liv. 43, 4, 8 ; cf. id. 5 12 
sq. ; Vitr. 7, 5, 6; Just. 15, 2 ah— 2. Ab- 
deritanilS, a, um, adj., of Abdera, 
meton. for stupid, foolish : Abderitanae 
pectora plebis ti.iU^a. Mart. 10 7 25, 4.— JJ 
A city M/Hispauia ISaetica, on the southern 
coast, now Adra, Mel. 2. 6, 7 ; Plin 3 13 
§8. ' ' ' ' 

abdicatio. onis./ [abdico], a renounc- 
ing, disowning. \ m Jurid. 1. 1. : heredita- 
tis, Cod. Just. 6, 31, 6 : liberorum, disin- 
heriting, ib. 6, 8, 47 ; Quint. 7, 4, 27 ; 3 

6, 77; 7, 1, 15 ; Plin. 7, 45 5 46, § 150 al. ; cf. 
Dirksen, Versuch., etc., Leipz. 1823, p. 62 
sq.— *2. Polit. 1. 1., a renunciation of an 
office, abdication : die taturae , Liv. 6, 16 fin . 

abdicative, adv., v. abdicativus. 

abdicatlVTIS, a, um, adj. [abdico]. 
In later philos. lang.— negativua, negative 
(opp. to dedicativus, affirmative.), Pseudo- 
Cysp. Dogm. Plat. p. 30 Elm. (266 Ord. ) ; 

Mart. Cap. 4, p. 121.— Adv.: abdicative, 

negatively : concludere, Mart. Cap. 4, p. 128. 
abdicatrix, f cie, /. [ id. ], she that 
renounces or disclaims any thing (eccl. 
Lat. ) : misericordiae ( humanitas ), Salv. 
adv. Avar. 11, p. 76. 

I. ab-dlCO, avi, atum, 1, v. a. (prop, to 
indicate, announce something as not be- 
longing to one; hence), I. In gen., to 
deny, disown, refuse, reject. — With ace. 
and inf. : mortem ostentant, regno expel- 
lunt, consanguineam esse abdicant, deny 
her to be, Pac. ap. Non. 450, 30 (Trag. Rel. 
p. 84 Rib.): abdicat enim voluptati inesse 
bonitatem, Pseudo-Apul. de Dogm. Plat. 3 
init.— With ace. (so very freq. in the elder 
Pliny) : naturam abdico, Pac. ap. Non. 306 
32 (Trag. p. 120 Rib.): ubi plus mali quam 
boni reperio, id totum abdico atque eicio, 
Cic. de Or. 2, 24, 102: legem agrariam, Plin. 

7, 30, 31, § 116: corticem, id. 13, 22, 43, 
§ 124 : ea (signa) in toftim, id. 10, 4, 5, § 16 ; 
cf. : utinam posset e vita in totum abdicari 
(aurum), be got rid of, id. 33, 1, 3, § 6 : ornni 
venere abdicata, id. 5, 17, 15, 5 73 al. 

II. In par tic. A.Jund.t.t., to renounce 
one, partic. a son, to disinherit (post-Aug.) : 
qui ex duobus legitimis alteram in adoptio- 
nem dederat, alteram abdicaverat, Quint. 3. 
6, 97 ; cf. : minus dicto audientem filium, id. 
7, 1, 14: ex meretrice natum,id. 11, 1, 82 al.: 
quae in scholis abdicatorum, haec in foro 
exheredatorum a parentibus ratio est, id. 7, 
4, 11.— Absol. : pater abdicans, Quint. 11, 1, 
59; cf.: filius abdicantis, id. 4, 2,95; and: 
abdicandi jus, id. 3, 6, 77.— Hence, patrem 
to disown, Curt. 4, 10, 3. ' 

B. Polit. 1. 1. : abdicare se magistratu, or 
absol. (prop, to detach one's self from an 
office, hence), to renounce an office, to re- 
sign, abdicate (syn.: deponere magistra- 
tum) : cousules magistratu se abdicaverunt, 
Cic. Div. 2, 35, 74 ; so, se magistratu, id. 



A B D O 

Leg. 2, 12, 31 ; Liv. 4, 15, 4 al. : se dictatu- 
ra, Caes. B. C. 3, 2 ; Liv. 2, 31, 10; 9, 26, 18 
al.: se consulatu, id. 2, 2, 10; Veil. 2, 22, 
2 : se praetura, Cic. Cat. 3, 6, 14 : se aedili- 
tate, Liv. 39, 39, 9 etc. Likewise : se tutela, 
Cic. Att. 6, 1, 4 ; and fig. : se scriptu, Piso 
ap. Gell. 6, 9, 4; cf.: eo die (Antonius) se 
non modo consulatu, sed etiam libertate ab- 
dicavit, Cic. Phil. 3, 5, 12. — Absol. : au- 
gures rem ad senatum ; senatus, ut abdica- 
rent consules : abdicaverunt, Cic. N. D. 2, 4, 
11.— b. With ace. a few times in the histo- 
rians : (patres) abdicare consulatum juben- 
tes et deponere imperium, Liv. 2, 28 fin. : 
abdicando dictaturam,id. 6^18,4. — In pass. : 
abdicato magistratu, Sail. C. 47, 3 ; cf. : inter 
priorem dictaturam abdicatam novamque a 
Manlio initam, Liv. 6, 39 : causa non abdi- 
candae dictaturae,id. 5, 19 fin. 

2. ab-dlCO, xi, ctum, 3, v. a. A word 
peculiar to augural and judicial lang. (opp. 
addico). *J, Of an unfavorable omen, not 
to assent to : cum tres partes (vineae) aves 
abdixissent, Cic. Div. 1, 17, 31.— H. In ju- 
dicial lang. : abdicere vindicias ab aliquo, to 
take away by sentence ( — abjudicare), 
Dig. 1, 2, 24 (cf. Liv. 3, 56,4). 

abdlte, adv., v. abdo, P. a. fin. 

abditlVUS, a, um, adj. [abdo]. I. Re- 
moved or separated from = remotus, se- 
junctus : a patre, Plaut. Poen. prol. 65.— ££. 
abditivi : abortivi, Paul, ex Fest. p. 22 
Mull, (without an example). 

abdltllS, a, um, Part, of abdo. 

ab-do, idi, itum, 3, v. a. [2. do]. I. L i t, 
to put away, remove : and abdere se, to go 
away, betake one's self to some place : ex 
conspectu eri sui se abdiderunt, Plaut. Ps. 4, 
7, 5 : pedestres copias paulum ab eo loco ab- 
ditas in locis superioribus constituunt, re- 
moved l withdrawn, Caes. B. G. 7, 79, 2 ; so 
with ao: ascensu abdito a conspectu, Liv. 
10, 14, 14: procul ardentes hinc precor abde 
faces, remove, Tib. 2, 1, 82.— The terminus 
ad quern is usually expressed by in with 
ace.: abdidit se in intimam Macedonian! quo 
potuit longissime a castris, Cic. Fam. 13, 29, 
4 ; so, se in contrariam partem terrarum, id. 
Mur. 41, 89: se in classem, Dolab. ap. Cic. 
Fam. 9, 9, 2 : se in Menapios, to depart, 
Caes. B. G. 6, 5, 5 : in silvam Arduennam, id. 
ib. 5, 3, 4 : exercitum in interiora, to with- 
draw, Veil. 2, 110,3 : ea in insulam Seriphon 
abdita est (= ex humana societate quasi ex- 
pulsa), banished, exiled, Tac. A. 2, 85: se 
in bibliothecam, i. e. to retire to, Cic. Fam. 
7, 28 ; cf. : se totum in litteras, id. ib. 7, 33, 
2. — Rarely with other prepositions or with 
local adv. : Audisne haec, Amphiarae, sub 
terram abdite ? Poet. (Att. ?) ap. Cic. Tusc. 
2, 25, 60 ; so with sub, Lucr. 4, 419 : se rus, 
Ter. Hec. 1, 2, 99 : se domum, Cic. Pis. 38, 
92 : se Arpinum, id. Att. 9, 6, 1. 

II, Transf., to hide, conceal, keep se- 
cret, etc. (syn. : occulto, recondo) ; constr. 
aliquid, without or with in and abl., with 
other prepositions, with abl. only, or dat., 
with a local adv. (a) Aliquid: quae partes 
corporis . . . aspeetum essent deformem ha- 
biturae, eas contexit atque abdidit (natura), 
Cic. Off. 1, 35, 126: amici tabellas,id. Pis. 17, 
39: lacrimas, operire luctum, Plin. Ep. 3, 16, 
6: abduntur (delphini) occultanturque in- 
cognito more, Plin. H. N. 9, 8, 7, § 22; cf. : 
occultare et abdere pavorem, Tac? H. 1, 88 : 
pugnare cupiebant, sed retro revocanda et 
abdenda cupiditas erat, Liv. 2, 45, 7 ; so, 
sensus suos penitus, Tac. A. 1, 11: aliquid 
dissimulata offensione, id. ib. 3, 64. — (/3) 
With in and abl. : cum se ille fugiens in 
scalarum tenebris abdidisset,Cic.Mil.l5,40; 
cf. : qui dispersos homines in agris et in 
tectis silvestribus abditos . . . compulit unum 
in locum, id. Inv. 1, 2, 2 : abditi in taberna- 
culis, Caes. R. G. 1, 39, 4 ; cf. : in silvis, id. 
ib. 2, 19, 6: penitus qui in ferrost abditus 
aer,Lucr. 6,1037 al.— (7) With other prepp. : 
cultrum, quem sub veste abditum habebat, 
Liv. 1, 58 fin. ; cf. Ov. M. 10, 715 : ferrum 
curvo tenus hamo, id. ib. 4, 719.— (5) With 
abl.: caput cristata casside, Ov. M. 8, 25 : cor- 
pus cornea domo, Phaedr. 2, 6, 5 : gladium 
sinu,Tac. A. 5,7: latet abditus agro,Hor.Ep. 
1,1,5: hunc (equum) abde domo,Verg.G.3, 
96: ita se litteris abdiderunt, ut, etc., Cic/ 
Arch. 6, 12; v. Halm ad h. 1.— ( e ) With dat. 
(poet.): lateri capulo tenus abdidit ensem, 
he buried, Verg. A. 2, 553.— (C) With local 
adv. : corpus humi, F lor. 4, 12, 38. — Hence, 
5 



ABDU 



ABEO 



abdltus, a > u ra , ?■ a -> hidden, conceal- 
ed, secreted, secret (syn. : reconditus, abs- 
conditus, occultus, retrusus) : sub terrain 
abditi, Att. ap. Cic. Tusc. 2, 25, 60 : vis abdita 
quaedam, Lucr. 5, 1233 : res occultae et pe- 
nitus abditae, Cic. N. D. 1, 19: sunt innu- 
merabiles de bis rebus libri neque abditi 
neque obscuri, id. de Or. 2, 20, 84 : haec esse 
penitus iu media philosophia retrusa atque 
abdita, id. ib. 1, 19, 87 al. : oppida, remote, 
Cod. Tb. 15, 1, U. — Comp. abditior, Aug. 
Conf. 5, 5; 10. 10.— Sup. abditissimus, Aug. 
Enchir. c. 16.— H. In the neutr. : abdl- 
tum, i, mibst. : terrai abdita, Lucr. 6, 809 ; 
so, abdita rerum (=abditae res), Hor. A. P. 
49 : in abdito coire, in concealment, se- 
cretly, Plin. 8, 5, 5, § 13.— Adv. : abdlte, 
secretly : latuisse, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 73, § 181 ; 
Ambros. Job et Dav. 1, 9, 29. 

AV>ddldnyrrmg ; v. Abdalonymus. 
abdomen, Tnis, n. [etym. uncertain; 
perh. for adipomen, from adeps, or perh. 
from abdo, to conceal, cover], the fat lower 
part of the belly, the paunch, abdomen, 
Ka-ntipa.. I. Lit., of men and animals : ab- 
domina tbynni, Lucil. ap. Non. 35, 22 ; so 
Plaut. Cure. 2, 3, 44 ; Cels. 4, 1 Jin.; Plin. 
8, 51, 77 fin. ; 11, 37 84 fin. ; Juv. 4, 107 ; 
Aus. Idyll. 10, 104.— H. M e t o n. for glut- 
tony, sensuality : ille beluo natus abdo- 
mini suo, non laudi, Cic. Pis. 17, 41 ; so, 
natus abdomini, Treb. Gall. 17 ; cf. also Cic. 
Pis. 27, 66 ; id. Sest. 51, 110.— With respect 
to carnal lust : jamdudum gestit moecbo 
hoc abdomen adimere, Plaut. Mil. 5, 5 ; but 
opp. to lechery (libido) : alius libidine insa- 
nit, alius abdomini servit, Sen. Ben. 7, 26, 4. 
ab-duco, xi, ctum, 3, v. a. (abdoycit 
=abducit, in the epitaph of Scipio, Inscr. 
Orell. 550 ; per/, abduxti, Plaut. Cure. 5, 2, 
16 ; imper. abduce, id. Bacch. 4, 9, 108; id. 
Cure. 5, 3, 15 ; Ter. Ad. 3, 4, 36 ; id. Phorm. 
2, 3, 63 • but also abduc, id. Eun. 2, 3, 86), to 
lead one away, to take or bring with one. 
to carry off, take or bring away, remove, 
etc. 

I, Lit. A. I n S en -> of personal ob- 
jects; constr. aliquem, ab, ex, de; in, 
ad: svbigit . omne .lovcanam . opsidesqve . 
abdovcit ( = subigit omnem Lucanam ob- 
sidesque abducit), epitaph of Scipio, 1. 1. : 
hominem P. Quinctii deprehendis in pub- 
lico ; conaris abducere, Cic. Quint. 19, 61 : 
cohortes secum, Caes. B. C. 1, 15 med. al. : 
abduce me hinc ab hac, quantum potest, 
Plaut. Bacch. 4, 9, 108: abductus a mari 
atque ab iis copiis, quas, etc. . . . frumento 
ac commeatu abstractus, Caes. B. C. 3, 78: 
tamquam eum, qui sit rhetori tradendus, 
abducendum protinus a grammaticis putem, 
Quint. 2, 1, 12 : ut Hispanos oranes procul 
ab nomine Scipionis ex Hispania abduceret, 
Liv 27 20, 7 : tu dux, tu comes es ; tu nos 
abducis ab Histro, Ov. Tr. 4, 10, 119 ; ut col- 
legam vi de foro abducerent, Liv. 2, 56, 15 : 
sine eertamine inde abductae legiones, id. 
2, 22, 2 : credo (illuin) abductum in ganeum 
aliquo, Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 5 : abduxi exercitum 
ad infestissimam Ciliciae partem, Cic. Fain. 
2, 10, 3 : ipsos in lautumias abduci impera- 
bat, id. Verr. 2, 5, 56 fin. ; so, liberos eo- 
rum in servitutem, Caes. B. G. 1, 11, 3 : 
servum extra convivium, Sen. Contr. 4, 25. 
—Poet, with ace. only: tollite me, Teucri ; 
quascumque abducite terras (=in terras), 
Verg. A. 3, 601. ~b. Of animals: donee 
(avem) in diversum abducat a nidis, Plin. 
10, 33, 51 fin.— c. Sometimes also of in- 
anim . objects : clavem, to take away, Plaut. 
Cas. 5, 2, 8: pluteos ad alia opera, Caes. 
B. C . 2, 9 : capita retro ab ictu, to draw 
hack, Verg. A. 5,428: togam a faucibus ac 
suramo pectore, Quint. 11, 3, 145 : aquam 
alicui (=;deducere, defiectere), to divert* 
draw off, Dig. 39, 2, 26. — P o e t. : somnos, 
to take away, deprive of, Ov. F. 5, 477. 

B. In part ic. 1. To take with one to 
dine: turn me convivam solum abducebat 
sibi, Ter. Eun. 3, 1, 17 : advenientem ilico 
abduxi ad cenam, id. Heaut. 1, 2, 9 al. 

2. To take aside (in mal. part.): ali- 
quant in cubiculum, Plaut. Most. 3, 2, 7 ; so 
Cic.Verr. 2, 5, 13, § 33 ; Suet. Aug. 69 ; Just. 
21,2jj«.al. 

3. To carry away forcibly, to ravish, 
rob : ad quein iste deduxerat Tertiam, Isi- 
dori mimi flliam, vi abductam ab Rhodio 
tibicine, Cic.Verr. 2, 3, 34; cf. id. ib. 2, 5, 31, 
§ Hi; Verg. A. 7,362: aliquam alicui (niarito, 

6 



etc.), Suet. Oth. 3 ; Dig. 47, 10, 1 al. : ali- 
quam gremiis, Verg. A. 10, 79. — So also of 
stolen cattle, to drive away: cujus (Geryo- 
nis) armenta Hercules abduxerit,Plin. 4,22, 
36 fin. ; so, abducta armenta, Ov. H. 16, 359. 

4, In jurid. lang. : auferre et abducere, 
to take and derive away (auferre of inan- 
imate things, abducere of living beings, as 
slaves, cattle), Cic. Quint. 27, 84 ; Dig. 21, 2, 
57, § 1. 

II. T r o p. A.Ingen.,/o lead away, 
separate, distinguish : animum ad se ip- 
sum advocamus, secum esse cogimus, max- 
imeque a corpore abducimus, Cic. Tusc. 1, 
31 ; so, aciem mentis a consuetudine oculo- 
rum, id. N. D. 2, 17 : divinationem caute a 
conjecturis, id. Div. 2, 5, 13. 

B. I n p a r t ic. \ m To seduce, alienate 
from fidelity or allegiance : legiones a Bruto, 
Cic. Phil. 10, 3, 6: exercitum ab illo, id. ib. 
10, 4, 9 : equitatum a consule, id. ib. 11, 12, 
27 al. 

2. From a study, pursuit, duty, etc., to 
withdraw, draw off, hinder (syn. : avoco, 
averto) : vos a vostris abduxi negotiis, Plaut. 
Rud. 1, 2, 1 ; cf. : a quo studio te abduci ne- 
gotiis intellego, Cic. Fam. 4, 4, 5; and : ab- 
ducuutur homines nonnumquam etiam ab 
institutis suis magnitudine pecuniae, id. 
Verr. 2, 4, 6, § 12 (followed by ab humani- 
tate deducere) ; so, aliquem a meretricio 
quaestu, id. Phil. 2, 18: aliquem a populo- 
rum rebus, id. Rep. 5, 2 : ab isto officio in- 
commodo, id. Lael. 2, 8 al. 

3. To bring down, reduce, degrade 
(Ciceron.) : ne ars tanta ... a religionis auc- 
toritate abduceretur ad mercedem atque 
quaestum, Cic. Div. 1, 41, 92 ; so, aliquem 
ad hanc hominum libidinem ac licentiam, 
id. Verr. 2, 3, 90, § 210. 

abdllCtlO, onis, / [abduco, I. B. 3.]. I. 
A forcible carrying off, ravishing, rob- 
bing, Cod. Th. 4, 8, 5, § 5; 11, 10, 1.— 2. 
(Of a woman.) AbducUon : in abductione 
Hesionae, Dares Phryg. 4.— II S A reUre- 
jwe^Vulg.Eccli. 38,20. 

abductus, a, um, Part, of abduco. 

Abeatae, arum, m., the Abeatce, in- 
habitants of Abea in Achaia, Plin. 4, 6, 10, § 22. 

abecedariUS, a . um [»i b > c > d L be- 
longing to the alphabet, alphabetical 
(late Lat.). I. Adj. : psalmi, Aug. Retract, 
l, 20.— n. Subftt. A. abecedarius^ «, 
m., one who learns the a, b, c (eccl. Lat.). 
— B. abecedaria, ae, /., elementary 
instruction, Fulg. Myth. 3, 10.— C. abe- 

cedarium, ft, n -, (f , b. c, the alphabet 

(eccl. Lat.). 

Abel, indecl. or Glis, and AbeluS, i, 

m., Abet, son of Adam, Vulg.— Hence, Abe- 
lica virtus, Mythogr. Vatic. 3, 6, 15. 

Abella, ae,/., a town in Campania, 
near Nola , abounding in fruit-trees and 
nuts, now Avella, Sil. 8, 545 : malifera, 
Verg. A. 7, 740. — Hence, Abellana nux 
or Avellana, also Abellina, the filbert, Plin. 
15, 22, 24, § 88; and Abellani,^ inhabi- 
tants of Abella, Just. 20, 1. 

Abellinum, i, n -> Abellinum, a city 
of the Hirpini, in Italy, Plin. 3, 5, 9, § 63; 
hence, Abellinates, ium, m. , the inhab- 
itants of Abellinum, id. 3, 16, 11, § 105 ; 
another town of this name in Italy is re- 
ferred to by Pliny, 1.1. 

AbelllO, onis, m., the name of a Gallic 
deity, Inscr. Orell. 1952 sq. 

t abemito signiflcat demito vel auferto 
(take away) ; emere enim antiqui dicebant 
pro accipere, Paul, ex Fest. p. 4 Mull. ; cf. 
adimo. 

ab-eo. ivi or ii, itum.Tre, v. n. (abin = 
abisne, Plaut. and Ter. ; abiit, dissyl., v. 
Herm. Doctr. Metr. p. 153), to go from a 
place, to go away, depart. J, Lit. A. 
In gen., constr. with ab, ex, the simple 
abl., the ace. with in, the local adv. hinc, 
and absol. : abeo ab illo, Plaut. Cure. 2, 3, 
70 : abi in malam rem maxumam a me, id. 
Ep. 1, 1, 72 (v. infra) ; so id. Bacch. 4, 9, 
107: abin e conspectu meo? id. Am. 1,3, 
20 (but also abin ab oculis ? id. Trin. 4, 
2, 149 ; id. True. 2, 5. 24) : abituros agro 
Argivos, id. Am. 1, 1, 53 : abire in aliquas 
terras, Cic. Cat. 1, 8, 20 : insanus, qui hinc 
abiit modo, Plaut. Merc. 2, 2, 61 : abi prae, 
jam ego sequar, go on, I will soon fol- 
lowed. Am. 1,3,45. —With supine: abiit ex- 
sulatwm, into #Pi/e,Plaut.Merc.3,4,6; Liv. 



ABEQ 

2,15^7i.,: cf : abi deambulatum, Ter. Heaut. 
3,3, 26.— AbsoL: (Catilina) abiit, ex cessit, 
evasit, erupit, Cic. Cat. 2, 1, 1 : praetor de 
sella surrexit atque abiit, id. Verr. 2, 4, 65 
fin. : quae dederat abeuntibus,Verg. A. 1,, 
196 al. : sub jugum abire, Liv. 3, 2, 8fin.— 
With inf. : abi quaerere, Plaut. Cist. 2, 1, 
26. — Of things : cornus sub altum pectus 
abit, penetrates deeply, Verg. A. 9, 700. 

B. In par tic. 1, To pass away, so 
that no trace remains ; to disappear, van- 
ish, cease, a. Cf man, to die : qui nunc 
abierunt hinc in communem locum (i. e. in 
Orcum), Plaut. Cas. prol. 19 ; cf. : ea mortem 
obiit, e medio abiit, Ter. Phorm. 5, 9, 30 ; so 
also Cic. : abiit e vita, Tusc. 1, 30, 74 al.— 
b. Of time, to pass away, elapse : dum 
haec abiit hora T Ter. Eun. 2, 3, 50: menses, 
id. Ad. 4, 5, 57 r annus, Cic. Sest. 33, 72: abit 
dies, Cat. 61,195: tota abit hora,Hor. S. 1, 
5, 14. — c. Of other things : per inane pro- 
fundum, Lucr. 1, 1108 : nausea jam plane 
abiit ? Cic. Att. 14, 10, 2 ; so id. Fam. 9, 20 ; 
Ov.M. 7,290 al. 

2. To be changed from one's own ways 
or nature into something else, to be trans- 
formed, metamorphosed; always constr. 
with in (chiefly poet., esp. in Ov. M., as 
a constant expression for metamorphosis) : 
terra abit in nimbos imbremque, Lucil. ap. 
Varr. L. L. 5, § 24 Mull. : in corpus cor- 
pore toto, to pass with their ichole body 
into another, Lucr. 4, 1111 : aut abit in 
somnum, is, as it were, wholly dissolved 
in sleep, is all sleep, id. 3, 1066 : E in V 
abiit,Varr.L.L.5, § 91 Mull.: in villos abe- 
unt vestes, in crura lacerti, Ov. M. 1, 236 ; 
id. ib. 2, 674 : jam barba comaeque in silvas 
abeunt, id. ib. 4, 657 ; 4, 396 ; so id. ib. 3, 398; 
8, 555 ; 14, 499 ; 14, 551 al. : in vanum abi- 
bunt monentium verba, will dissolve into 
nothing, Sen. Ep. 94 med. ; hence, in avi 
mores regem abiturum, would adopt the 
ways of Liv. 1,32. 

II, T r o p. A. I n g e n . , to depart from , 
to leave off, to turn aside: ut ab jure non 
abeat, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 44, § 114; so, ab empti- 
one, Dig. 2, 14, 7, § 6 ; 18, 2, 14, § 2 sq. : a 
venditione, ib. 18, 5, 1 : sed abeo a sensibus, 
leave, i. e. speak no more of Cic. Ae. 2, 28, 
9; so often "with longe: non longe abieris, 
you need not go far to seek for examples, 
id. Fam. 7, 19 ; cf. : ne longius abeam, id. 
Rose. Am. 16, 47 ; id. Caec. 33, 95 al. : quid 
ad istas ineptias abis? why do you have 
recourse to — f id. Rose. Am. 16, 47 : abit 
causa in laudes Cn. Pompeii, Quint. 9, 2, 55 : 
illnc, unde abii, redeo, / set out, Hor. S. 1, 1, 
108 : pretium retro abiit, has fallen, Plin. 
Ep. 3, 19, 7. 

B. In parti c. 1. With abl. , to retire 
from an office or occupation : abiens ma- 
gistrate, Cic. Pis. 3, 6 ; id. Fam. 5, 2, 7 ; Liv. 
2, 27 fin. ; 3, 38 Jin. al. ; so, abire consulatu, 
Cic. Att. 1, 16, 5 ; cf. flaminio, Liv. 26, 23 fin. : 
sacerdotio, Gell. 6, 7, 4: honore, Suet. Aug. 
26 : tutela, Dig. 26, 4, 3, § 8 ; cf. : tutela vel 
cura, ib.26, 10,3, § 18 al. 

2. Of the consequence or result of an ac- 
tion, to turn out, end, terminate : mira- 
bar hoc si sic abiret,Ter. And. 1, 2, 4; cf. : 
non posse ista sic abire, Cic. Att. 14, 1 ; so 
id. Fin. 5, 3, 7 ; Cat. 14,16 al. 

3. In auctions, t. t., not to be knocked 
down to one: si res abiret ab eo mancipe, 
should not fall to him, Cic.Verr. 2, 1, 54 ; 
cf. : ne res abiret ab eo, that he may pur- 
chase it, id. 2, 3, 64 ; so Dig. 18, 2, 1 ; 50, 
17, 205. 

4. The imper. abi is often a simple ex- 
clamation or address, either with a friendly 
or reproachful signif. a= Abi, ludis me, 
credo, Begone, you are fooling me I Plaut. 
Most. 5, 1, 32 ; so Ter. Ad. 4, 2, 25 ; cf. 
Hor. Ep. 2,2,205.— "b.Begon e! be off! abi 
modo, Plaut. Poen. 1, 3, 20 : abi, nescis ine- 
scare homines, Ter. Ad. 2, 2, 12 ; hence in 
the malediction, abi in malam rem ! go be 
hanged ! Plaut. Pers. 2, 4, 17 : abin hinc in 
malam crucem ? id. Most. 3, 2, 163 (cf. Cic. : 
quin tu abis in malam pestem malumque 
cruciatum ? Phil. 13, 21) ; v. crux and cm- 
ciatus. 

Abeona, ae,/. [abeo], the gdddess of 
departing children, Aug. Clv.~£>ei, 4, 21. 

* ab-equito, are, v. n., to ride, away . 
ut praetores pavidi abequitaverint Syracj- 
sas, Liv. 24, 31, 10 ; v. Weissenb. ad h. 1. 



ABHO 
1 abercet = prohibet, Paul, ex Fest. 



^p. 25 Mull. 

aberratio, onis,/. [aberro, II. B. 1, a 

relief iroin something, a diversion ; perh. 

• only' in Cicero ( and in him only in two 
passages) : a dolore, Att. 12, 38, 3 (cf. ib. § 1: 
non equidem levor, sed tamen aberro) : a 
molestiis. id. Fam. 15, 18, 1. 

ab-erro a\% atum, 1, v. n.,to wander 
from the way, to go astray. J, Lit.: 
puer inter homines aberravit a patre, Plaut. 
Men. prol. 31 : taurus,quipecore aberrasset, 
Liv. 41, 13, 2.— II. T r o p. A. (Like abeo, 
II. A.) To wander from, stray, or devi- 
ate from a purpose, subject, etc. ( Cicero- 
nian) : a regula et praescriptione naturae, 
Cic. Ace, 2, 46. 140 : ne ab eo, quod proposi- 
tum est, longius aberret oratio, id. Caecin. 
19 ; so id. Off. 1, 28 ; 1, 37 ; id. Fin. 5, 28 
al.— Also without ab : vereor ne nihil con- 
jectura aberrem,Cic. Att. 14, 22 (with a con- 
jectural , id. N. D. 1, 36, 100) : etiam si aber- 
rare ad alia coeperit, ad haec revoeetur 
oratio, id. Off. 1, 37 Jin.: rogo, ut artificem 
(sc. pietorem), quern elegeris, ne in melius 
quidem sinas aberrare, that the painter 
should not depart from the original, 
even to improve it, Plin. Ep. 4, 28 7m —B. 
To divert the mind or attention, to forget 
for a time : at ego hie scribendo dies totos 
nihil equidem levor, sed tamen aberro, Jam 
indeed not free from sorrow, but I divert 
my thoughts, Cic. Att. 12, 38; so id. ib. 12, 
45 (cf. aberratio). 

abf ore and abforem, v. absum. 

X abg"reg"are est a grege ducere,Paul. 
ex Fest. p. 23 Mull. 

(abhiemo, a false read, for hiemo, Plin. 
18, 35, 81, § 354.) 

ab-hinc, temp. adv. I. O f future 
time, henceforth, hence, hereafter (ante- 
clas-.) : seque ad ludos jam hide abhinc 
exerceant, Pac. ap. Charis. 175 P. (Trag. 
iiei.p.80 Rib.); so, aufer abhinc lacrimas. 
— Hut more usu., II, Of past time, ago, 
since ; with ace. or abl,, and the cardin. 
num. (except the comic poets most freq. 
in Cic, both in his Orations and Letters). 
<a) With ace: sed abhinc annos factumst 
sedecim, Plaut. Cas. prol. 39; so Ter. And. 
1, 1, 42 ; id. Hec. 5, 3, 24 ; id. Phorm. 5, 9, 
28 ;'cf. : abhinc triennium, Cic. Rose. Com. 
13 : abhinc annos quattuordecim,id.Verr. 2, 
1, 12, § 34 ; cf. id. Balb. 6, 16 ; id. Phil. 2, 46, 
119; Hoi\ Ep. 2,1,36 ai.— (/3) With abl.: qui 
abhinc sexaginta annis occisus foret, Plaut. 
Most. 2. 2,63; so abhinc annis xv., Cic. Rose. 
Com. 13: comitiis jam abhinc diebus tri- 
ginta factis, thirty days ago, id. Verr. 2, 2, 
5271/1. In Lucr. 3, 967 : aider abhinc lacri- 
mas, it is prob. only a fuller expression for 
nine, as in Plaut. Pers. 5, 2, 19: jurgium hinc 
.auferas, since there is no other example 
where abhinc is used of place. Vid. upon 
this article, Hand, Turs. 1, 63-66. 

ab-horrCO, u i, ^ re j 2, v. n. and a., to 
shrink back from a thing, to shudder 
at, abhor. I. Lit. (syn. aversor; rare 
but class.) ; constr. with ab or absol., some- 
times with the ace. (not so in Cicero ; cf. 
Haase act Reisig Vorles. p. 696) : retro volgus 
abhorret ab hac, shrinks back from, Lucr. 
1, 945 : 4, 20 : omnes aspernabantur, omnes 
■abhorrebant, etc., Cic. Clu. 14, 41 : quid 
tarn abhorret hilaritudo? Plaut. Cist. 1, 1, 
56 : punhlos atque distortos, Suet. Aug. 83 ; 
soid. Galb. 4; Vit. 10. 

II. Trans f. , in gen. A. To be averse 
or disinclined to a thing, not to wish it, 
usu. with ab: a nuptiis, Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 92 : 
ab re uxoria, id. And. 5, 1, 10 ; and so often 
in Cic. : Caesaris a causa, Cic. Sest. 33 : a 
caede, id. ib. 63 : ab horuni turpitudine, au- 
dacia, sordibus, id. ib. 52, 112 : a scribendo 
abhorret animus, id. Ate. 2, 6 : animo ab- 
horruisse ab opthno statu civitatis, id. Phil. 
7, 2 : a ceterorum consilio, Nep. Milt. 3, 5 al. 
B. I 11 a yet more general sense, to be 
remote from an object, i. e. to vary or j 



ABIC 

latione, Liv. 22, 13 ; so id. 29, 6 ; 30, 44 : a 
tide, to be incredible, id. 9, 36 : a tuo scele- 
re, is not connected with, Cic. Cat. 1, 7 al. 
—Hence, like dispar, with dat. : tarn paca- 
tae profectioni abhorrens mos, not accord- 
ant with, Liv. 2, 14.— 2. To be free from : 
Caelius longe ab ista suspicione abhorrere 
debet, Cic. Cael. 4.-3. Absol. (a) To alter: 
tantum abhorret ac mutat, alters and 
changes, Cat. 22, 11.— (/3) To be unfit: sin 
plane abhorrebit et erit absurdus, Cic. de 
Or. 2, 20, 85 ; cf. : absurdae atque abhorren- 
tes lacrimae, Liv. 30, 44, 6; and: carmen 
abhorrens et inconditum, id. 27, 37, 13. 

ab-horresco, 5r e, — horresco ( eccl. 
Lat.), Vulg.2 Mace. 6,12. 

* ab-horride, adv., in an unfit man- 
ner, improperly, Charis. p. 41 P. 

ablCIO or abjlC- (in the best MSS. abi- 
cio; cf. fib ci. i)v. P. 2, 3, 37; ablcit, Juv. 
15, 17), ere, jeci, jectum, 3, v. a. [ab-ja- 
cio], to cast au-ay, to throw away, throw 
down, I. Lit.: in sepulcrum ejus ab- 
jecta gleba non est,\ arr.L.L.5,§ 23 Mull.: 
scutum, Cic. Tusc. 2, 23 : insigne regium de 
cauite. id. Sest. 27: socer ad pedes abjectus, 
id! ib. 34 ; so, se ad pedes, id. Phil. 2, 34, 86 : 
se e inuro in mare, id. Tusc. 1, 34 ; so, corpus 
in mare, id. Phil. 11, 2, 5: impelluntur, feri- 
untur, abiciuntur, cadunt, id. Tusc. 2, 15, 
36 : se abjecit exanimatus, he threw him- 
self down as if lifeless, id. Sest. 'Al.— Ab- 
sol. : si te uret sarcina, abicito, throw it 
down, Hor. Ep. 1, 13, 7.— Also with in and 
abl., when the place from which a thing is 
thrown is designated : anulum in mari, Cic. 
Fin. 5, 30, 92 Madv. N. cr.; so, ut se abi- 
ceret in herba, id. de Or. 1, 7, 28 : statuas in 
propatulo domi, Nep. Hann. 9, 3 : cadaver 
in via, Suet. Ner. 48 ; cf. : ubi cadaver abje- 
ceris,Tac. A. 1, 22. 

II. Fig. A. I n g en -> to Gas t °JF-> throw 
away, give up, etc. : ut primum tenebris 
abjectis inalbabat, as soon as the day, hav- 
ing dispelled the darkness, was begin- 
ning to brighten, Enn. Ann. v. 219 Vahl.: 
nusquam ego vidi abjectas aedis, nisi modo 
hasce. throivn away, i.e. sold too low, Plaut. 
Most. 3, 3, 3: psaltria aliquo abiciendast, 
must be got rid of {il faut se de- 
faire d'elle, Dacier ), Ter. Ad. 4, 7, 26 : 
vitam, Cic Att. 3, 19 : salutem pro aliquo, 
id. Plane. 33: memoriam beneficiorum, id. 
Phil. - 11: versum, to declaim it care- 
lessly id. de Or, 3, 26 (cf. with id. ib. 3, 59 : 
pone, lus est ille ambitus, non abiciendus, 
the p riod must be brought gradually to 
a clou, not broken off abruptly). 

B, In par tic. 1, To throw off, cast 
aside care for, remembrance of, etc., to 
give up, abandon: abicimus ista, we let 
that go, Cic. Att. 13, 3: fama ingenii mihi est 
abicienda, / niuxt renounce, id. ib. 9, 16: 
domum Sullanam desperabam jam . . . sed 
tamen 11011 abjeci, but yet I have not aban- 
doned it, i. e. its purchase, id. Fam. 9, 15: 
abjectis nugis, nonaense apart, Hor. Ep. 2, 
2, 141 (cf. amoto ludo, id. S. 1, 1, 27). 

2. To cant down to a lower grade, to 
degrade, humble, Cic. Leg. 1, 9 : hie annus 
senatus auctontatem abjecit, degraded or 
lowered the authority of the Senate, id. 
Att. 1, 18 ; so also id. Tusc. 5, 18 : id. de Or. 
3, 26, 104. — Hence, abjectae res, reduced 
circumstances (opp. fiorentes), Nep. Att. 
8 ; Cic. Quint. 30 ; Tac A. 4, 68. 

3. Abicere se, to throw one' a self away, 
degrade one's self, v. Cic. Tusc. 2, 23 : ut 
enim fit, etc. — Hence, abject US. a, urn, 
P. a., downcast, disheartened, despond- 
ing; low, mean, abject, worthless, un- 
principled. A. Q u "o me miser confe- 
ram? An domum? matremne ut mise- 
ram lamentantem vide am et abjeetam ? 
Gracch. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 56, 214: plura 
scribere non possum, ita sum animo per- 
culso et abjecto, Cic. Att. 3, 2. — B. Nihil 
abjectum, nihil humile cogitare, Cic. Fin. 5, 
20 : contemptum atque abjectum, id. Agr. 2, 
34: verbis nee inops nee abjectus, id. Brut. 
62, 222 al.— Comp. .^animus abjectior, Cic. 



differ from to be inconsistent or not to Lael.16; IAv.9,G.—Siip.: animus abjectissi- 

" J ----- '--.._. ....1 _,„„ w . :*„„ ! mus , Q U i n t. 11, 1, 13 al.— Adv. : abjecte. 

1. Dispiritedly, despond ingly : in dolore 
est providendum, ne quid abjecte, ne quid 
timide, ne quid ignave faciamus, Cic. Tusc. 
2, 23, 55; id. Phil. 3, 11, 28.-2. Low, mean- 
ly: quo sordidius et abjeetius nati sunt, Tac. 
Or. 8: incuriose et abjecte verbum posituin, 
improperly, Geli. 2, 6, 1. 



agree 'with (freq. and class. ) : temeritas 
tanta, ut non procul abhorreat ab insania, 
Cic. Rose, Am. 24, 68 : a vulgari genere ora- 
tionis atque a consuetudine communis sen- 
sus, id. de Or. 1, 3, 12 : oratio abhorrens ^a 
persona- hominis gravissimi, id. Rep. 1, 15 : 
ab-jopmione tua, id. Verr. 2, 3, 20 : Punicum 
-abhorrens os ab Latinorum nominum pro- 



A B I T 

abl@gHUS, a, um, adj. (poet., also tri- 
syllabic ; collateral form abiegnevs, Inser. 
Napol.) [abies], made of fir-wood or deal: 
trabes, i. e. a ship, Enn. ap. Auct. ad Her. 2, 
22, 34: sors, Plaut. Cas. 2, 6, 32 : equus, i. e. 
the wooden horse before Troy, Prop. 4, 1, 
25 (of Verg, A. 2, 16): stipes, Att. ap. Fest. 
p. 219 Mull. (Trag. Pel. p. 170 Rib.) : hastile, 
Liv. 21, 8, 10 : scobis, Col. 12, 44, 4 al. 
aniens, euntis, Part, of abeo. 
abies 5tis (abietis, abiete, trisyllabic 
in poet./ Enn. ap. Cic Tusc. 3, 19, 44; 
Verg. A. 2, 16 al. ; so, abietibus, quad- 
risyl. sometimes, as Verg. A. 9, 674), f 
[etvm. uncer., perh. akin to a.\daivco; cf. 
^\(i T ^) = pinus], the silver-fir: Pinus picea, 
Linn. : tXctTt), the tree as well as the wood 
of it, Plin. 16, 10, 19, § 48; Pall. 12, 15, 1 : 
abies consternitur alta, Enn. ap. Macr. 6, 
2 (Ann. v. 195 Vahl.): crispa, id. ap. Cic. 
Tusc. 3, 19, 44 (Trag. v. 117 ib.) : enodis, Ov. 
M. 10. 94. In Verg., on account of its dark 
foliage, called nigra: nigra abiete, A. 8, 
599 : abietibus patriis aequi juvenes, tall as 
their native firs, id. ib. 9, 674 (imitation 
of Horn. II. 5, 560: tAdrrjatv €oik6t6? v^!/»- 
\f}aLv). — tl. Poet., meton. (cf. Quint. 8, 
6,' 20), like the Greek IhuTt), any thing 
■made of fir. 1. = epistula, a letter (writ- 
ten on a tablet of fir), Plaut. Pers. 2, 2, 66 
(cf. Engl, book, i. e. beech). — 2. = navis, a 
ship, Verg. G. 2, 68 ; id. A. 8, 91 ; cf . id. ib. 
5, 663.— 3. ~ hasta, a lance,Yerg. A. 11, 
667. 

abietariUS, a, um, adj. [abies], per- 
taining to fir-wood, deal : negotio, Paul, 
ex Fest. p. 27 Mull.— Subst. ; abietariUS, 
ii, m., a joiner, Vulg. Exod. 35, 35. 

* ablffa, ae,/. [abigoj, a plant which 
has the power of producing abortion; 
Greek %a^aiTrirv^, grown d-pin e : Teucrium 
iva, Linn. ; Plin. 24, 6, 20, § 29. 

ablg*eator, oris , m. 1 = abigeus or 
abactor, a cattle-stealer, Paul. Sent. 5, 18. 
ablffeatUS, f»s, m. [abigeus], cattle- 
stealing, Dig. 47, 14, 1 sq. ; 49, 16, 5, § 2. 

abigeus, i- m - [abigo], one that drives 
away cattle, a cattle-stealer, Dig. 47, 14, 
1 ; 48, 19, 16. 

ab-lgO egi, actum, 3, v. a. [ago], to drive 
away. I. Lit. A. In gen.: abigamjamego 
ilium advenientem ab aedibus, / will drive 
him away as soon as he comes, Plaut. Am. 
prol. 150 : jam hie me abegerit suo odio, he 
will soon drive me away, id. As. 2, 4, 40 ; 
so Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 47 ; Varr. R. R. 2, 1 ; Cic. de 
Or. 2, 60 al. : uxorem post divortium, to re- 
move from the house, Suet. Tib. 7. — S. 1 n 
par tic. 1. To drive away cattle: familias 
abripuerunt, pecus abegerunt, Cic. Pis. 34; 
soid. Verr. 2, 1,10; 3,23; Liv. 1,7,4; 4,21; 
Curt. 5, 13 al.— 2. Medic. 1. 1. a. To remove 
a disease : febres, Plin. 25, 9, 59, § 106 ; 30, 
11, 30 fin.: venenatorum morsus, id. 20, 5, 
19, _!), To force birth, procure abortion: 
partuin medicamentis, Cic. Clu. 11 ; so Plin. 
14, 18,22 ; Tac. A. 14, 63 ; Suet. Dom. 22 al. 
—II. Trop., to drive away an evil, get 
rid of a nuisance: pestem a me, Enn. ap. 
Cic. Ac. 2, 28, 89 (Trag. v. 50 Vahl. ) : las- 
situdinem abs te, Plaut. Merc. 1, 2, 3 : curas, 
Hor. Ep. 1, 15, 19 : pauperiem epulis regum, 
id. S. 2, 2, 44 al.— Hence, abactUS, a, 
um, P. a. A. Of magistrates, driven 
aicay, forced to resign their office, Paul, 
ex Fest. p. 23 Mull.— B. Abacta nox, i. q. 
Anita, finished, passed, Verg. A. 8, 407.— 
C Abacti oculi, poet., deep, sunken, Stat. 
Tli. 1, 104. 

Abii orum, m., a Scythian tribe in 
Ama, Curt. 7, 6, 11; Amm. 23, 6, 53. 

abitlO, onis,/. [abeo], a going away, 
departure. I. In gen. (ante-class, for 
abitus), Plaut. Rud. 2, 6, 19 ; Ter. Heaut 1, 
2,16.—H In partic., = mors, death,a,cc. 
to Gloss, ap. Paul, ex Fest. p. 380, 9 Mull. 

* a-bltO, Sre, 3, v. n. [beto, bito], to go 
aicay, depart: ne quo abitat, Plaut. Rud. 
3, 4, 72; cf. Lucil. ap. Vel. Long. p. 2225 P. 
abitus, ns, m. [abeo], a going away, 
departure. I. L it, in abstr. ( class. ) : 
cum videam miserum hunc tarn excruciari- 
er ejus abitu, Ter. Heaut. 3, 1, 5 ; 4, 4, 24 ; 
Lucr. 1, 457 and 677 ; * Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 54, 
§ 125 ; Plin. 18, 31, 74, § 311 al.— H. Transf., 
in concr., the place through which one 
goes, the outlet, place of egress (as aditus, 



ABLE 

of entrance ) : omnemque abitum custode 
coronant. they surround the outht with 
guards, Verg. A. 9, 380 ; so in plur. : cir- 
cumjecta vehicula sepserant abitus, barri- 
caded the passages out, Tac. A. 14, 37. 

abjecte, adv., v. abicio, P. a. Jin. 

abjectio, onis,/. [abicio]. * I, A throw- 
ing away or rejecting : figurarum (opp. 
additio), Quint. 9, 3, 18.— *ff. Abjectio ani- 
mi, dejection, despondency (joined h. 1. with 
debilitatio), Cic. Pis. 36, 88. 

abjectUS, a, um, v. abicio, P. a. 

abgicio,v. abicio. 

* abjudlCatlVUS, a, um, adj., in later 
philos. lang. = negativus, negative, Pseudo- 
App. Dogm. Plat. p. 30 Elm. (267 Oud.). 

ab-judlCO, avi, atum, 1, v. a., to de- 
prive one of a thing by judicial sen- 
tence, to declare that it does not belong 
to one, to abjudicate, lit. and trop. (opp. 
adjudico); constr. with aliquid or aliquem, 
ab aliquo, or alicui : abjudicata a me 
modo est Palaestra. Plaut. Kud. 5. 1. 3 : 4. 3. 
100; id. As. 3, 3, 17: (Rullus) judicabit Al- 
exandream regis esse, a populo Romano ab- 
judicabit, Cic. Agr. 2, 16; cf.; rationem vc- 
ritatis, integritatis. . . ab hoc ordine abjudi- 
cari, id. Verr. 2,1, 2, § 4: sibi libertatem, id. 
Caecin. 34 (in Cic. de Or. 2, 24, 102, many 
since Budaeus, ace. to the MSS., read ab- 
dlco ; so B. and K.). 

* ab-JUgrO, a re ? 1 5 v - a -i l>t. , to loose 
from the yoke ; hence, in gen., to remove, 
to separate from : quae res te ab stabulis 
abjugat? Pac. ap. Non. 73, 22 (Trag. Rel. 
p. 104 Rib.). 

abjunctUS, a, um, Part, of abjungo. 

ab-jung'O, x i, etum, 3, v. a. I. Lit., 
to unyoke : juvencum, Verg. G. 3, 518. — 
Hence, H, Transf., to detach from a 
thing, to remove^ separate : abjuncto La- 
bieno, Caes. B. G. 7, 56 : Demosthenes se ab 
hoc refractariolo judiciali dicendi genere ab- 
junxit, abstained from, *C:e. Att. 2, 1, 3. 

abjuratlO, onis, / [abjuro], a for- 
swearing, Isid. Orig. 5, 6, 20. 

* ab-JUrg'O, avi, atum, 1, v. a., to deny 
or refuse reproachfully : arma alicui, Hyg. 
Fab. 107. 

ab-juro, avi, atum, 1, v. a. (abjurassit 
for abjuraverit, Plaut. Pers. 4, 3, 9), to deny 
any thing on oath: rem alicui : ne quis 
mini in jure abjurassit, Plaut. Pers. 4, 3, 9 : 
pecuniarn, id. Rud. prol. 14: creditum, Sail. 
C. 25, 4.— Absol., Plaut. Cure. 4, 2, 10; cf. : 
mini abjurare certius est quam dependere, 
*Cic. Att. 1, 8, 3. — Poet. : abjuratae ra- 
pinae, abjured, denied on oath, Verg. A. 8, 
263. 

ablactatlO, onis, / [ablacto], the 
weaning of a child, Vulg. Gen. 21, 8 al. 

ab-lactO, are, 1, v. a. , to wean ( eccl. 
Lat.). 

ablaqUeatlO, onis, / [ablaqueo], a 
digging or loosening of the soil round the 
roots of a tree, Col. i] 4, 2 ; 4, 8, 2 ; PI in. 
12, 15, 33, § 66 al. —II. Conor., the 
trench itself made by digging, Col. 5, 10, 
17 Schneid. 

ab-laqueo, avi, atum, 1, v. a. [laque- 
us, a hollow], to turn up the earth round 
a tree, in order to form a trench for water, 
Cato, R. R. 5, 8, 29 ; Col. 2, 14, 3 ; 4, 4, 2 ; 
Plin. 17, 19, 31, § 140. 

ablatio, onis, / [aufero], a taking 
away { eccl. Lat, ), Tert. adv. Marc. 4, 19 ; 
Hier. in Jovin. 2, 11. 

ablatlVUS, h ™>- [id.], with or without 
casus, tlie ablative case (as denoting that 
from which something is taken away), 
Quint. 1, 5. 59; 1, 7, 3; 1, 4, 26; 7, 9, 10 al. 

ablator. or i s j m - [id.], one w h° takes 
away (eccl. Lat.). 

ablatUS, a. um, Part, of aufero. 

ablegatlO, onis, / [ablego], a sending 
off or away : juventutis ad bellum, Li v. 6, 
39, 7. — A euphemism for banishing, exile 
(=relegatio) : Agrippae, Plin. 7, 45, 46, § 149. 

$ ablegxaiaa: partes extorum, quae 
diis immolantur, Paul, ex Fest. p. 21 Mull. 

ab-lego, avi, atum, 1, v. a., to send off 
or away, to remove : aliquem foras, Plaut. 
Mil. 3, 2, 55 ; so id. Cas. prol. 62 : aliquo 
mini est hinc ablegandus, Ter. Hec. 3, 3, 54: 
pecus a prato, Varr. R. R. 1, 47 : honestos 
8 



ABNE 

homines, keep at a distance, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 
32: consilium, id. ib. 2, 2, 30: aud in the 
pun, haec legatio a fratris adventu me ab- 
legat, this embassy sends me away from, 
i. e. prevents me from being present at, 
his arrival, id. Att. 2, 18, 3: magna pars 
ablegati, Liv. 7, 39. — With sup. : pueros ve- 
natum, Liv. 1, 35, 2. — As a euphemism for 
in exsilium mittere, to banish, Just. 1, 5 ; 
Cod. Th. 16, 5, 57. 

t ablepsia, ae, /, = ufiAe^la, blind- 
ness,Serv. ad Verg. A.7, 647 (in Suet. Claud. 
39 written as Greek). 

ab-lig-urrio i-gnrio), "rt, itum, 4, v. 

a. I, To lick away, waste or spend in 
luxurious indulgence : bona. Enn. ap. Don. 
ad Ter. Phorm. 2, 2, 25 (Sat. 29 Vahl. ) ; Ter. 
Eun. 2, 2, 4: patrimonium, App. Mag. p. 313 
(but in Cic. Cat. 2, 5, 10, the correct read, is 
obligaverunt ). — H, In mal. part., Suet. 
Gram. 23. _ 

*ablignrritio (-gnri-)i onis,/: rab- 

ligurrioj, a consuming or spending in feast- 
ing, Capitol. Macr. 15. 

*ablig , urrItor (-gruri-), oris, m - [' d -l> 

one who consumes in feasting, a spendthrift, 
Ambros. Ep. 42. 

* ab-LoCO, avi, atum, 1, v, a., to lease 
out or let out on hire : domum, Suet. Vit. 7. 

* ab-lildo., si, sum, 3, v. n.; meton. (like 
the Greek ixndheiv), not to agree with or 
resemble, to differ from, be unlike : haec 
a te non multum abludit imago, is not 
much unlike thee, Hor. S. 2, 3, 320 (= ab- 
horret, discrepat). 

ab-lUO. "ii utuiu, 3, v. a., to wash off 
or away, to wash, cleanse, purify. % m 
Lit.; pulverem lymph is, Pac ap. Gell. 2. 26, 
13 (Trag. Rel. p. 108 Rib.): Ulixi pedes ab- 
luens, Cic. Tusc. 5, 16, 46: donee me flumine 
vivo abluero, Verg. A. 2. 719: abluendo crn- 
ori balneas petit, Tac. H. 3, 32.— Poet. : ab- 
luere sitim, to quench, Lucr. 4, 876; and: 
abluere sibi umbras, to remove darkness (by 
bringing a light), id. 4, 378. — Of the wash- 
ing away of earth by a shower, Varr. R R. 1, 
35. — In eccl. Lat., of baptism: munere di- 
vinitatis abluti, Cod. Th. 19, 6, 4. — H, 
Trop., of calming the passions: omnis 
ejusmodi perturbatio animi placatione ab- 
luatur, be removed (fig. derived from the 
religious rite of washing in expiation of 
sin), Cic. Tusc. 4, 28, 60: maculam veteris 
industriae laudabili otio. to wash ouL Plin. 
Ep. 3, 7, 3: perjurta, Ov.'F. 5, 681 al. 

ablutio, onis,/ [abluo], a washing, 
cleansing, Macr. S. 3, 7. — Of baptism, cf. 
abluo, I. fin. ( eccl. Lat. ; in Plin. 13, 12, 
23, § 74, the correct reading is adulatione ; 
v. Sillig ad h. 1.). 

* ablutor, Oris, m. [id.], one that washes 
off or purifies (eccl. Lat.). 

ablutUS, a, um, Part, of abluo. 

abluvium, h n - [abluo], = diluvium, 
a flood or deluge, Laber. ap. Gell. 16. 7, 1 
( Com. Rel. p. 300, n. 17 Rib. ) ; Front, 
p. 69 Goes. ; cf. Isid. in Magi Auct. vi. 
p. 503. 

ab-matertera ? ae,/, a great-great- 
great-aunt on the mother's side, also called 
matertera maxima, Dig. 38, 10, 3. 

* ab-natO, ! ~ ire i 1. v - «-, to swim off or 
away, Stat. Ac hill. 1 383. 

abaeg'atlO, 5nis, / [abnego], a deny- 
ing, denial (late Lat. ), Arn. 1, p. 18. 

abnegatlVUS, a, um, adj. [ id.], nega- 
tive : adverbium, a negative adverb, Prise, 
p. 1020 P. al. 

abneg*ator, oris, m. [id.], a denier 
(eccl. Lat.), Tert. Fug. 12. 

ab-neg*0, avi, atum, 1, v. a., to re- 
fuse, be unwilling (poet, and in post- Aug. 
prose): conjugium alicui, Verg. A. 7, 424: 
imbrem, Col. (poet.) 10, 51: comitem (se), 
Hor. C. 1, 35, 22; cf. Sil. 3, 110: depositum, 
to deny, Plin. Ep. 10, 97 ; so, partem pecu- 
niae (pactae), Quint. 11, 2, 11; cf. Dig. 16, 3, 
11 al. — With inf. : medicas adhibere manus 
ad vulnera pastor Abnegat, Verg. G. 3, 456 ; 
so id. A. 2, 637.— Absol: Abnegat, incepto- 
que, etc.^Verg. A. 2, 654. 

ab-nepOS, otls, m. , the son of a great- 
grandchild, Suet. Tib. 3; id. Claud. 24; Dig. 
38, 10, 10, § 15 al. 

ab-neptis, is ) /■•> ^ e daughter of a 



ABNU 

great-grandchild, Suet. Ner. 35; Dig. 38, 
10, 10, § 15 al. 

Abndba, a€ i "*•* a mountain range 
in Germany, the northern part of the 
Black Forest, in which the Danube rises 
Plm. 4, 12, 24, § 79 ; Tac. G. 1 ; cf. Man- 
nert, Germ. p. 512.— II. Hence, Abnoba 
Diana, or simply Abnoba, ae,/, the 
goddess of this mountain, Inscr. Orell. 1986 
and 4974, 

ab-nOCtO. ' ire i 1) v - n - [ nos: ]? to pass the 
night abroad, to stay out all night, Sen. Vit. 
Beat. 26; Gell. 13, 12 fin.; Dig. 1, 18. 15. 

ab-nod.O, are, l,it'. a -i to cut off knots ; 
in the lang. of gardening and the vintage, 
to clear trees of knots, Col. 4, 24, 10 ; 4, 
22, 4. 

* ab-normis. e, adj. [norma, v. ab, 
III. 1.], deviating or departing from a 
fixed rule, irregular, abnormal : abnor- 
mis sapiens, Hor. S. 2, 2, 3 (i. e. qui in nuL 
lius verba juravit, belongs to no distinct 
sect or party, cf. Cic. Lael. 5, 18: ad isto- 
rum normam sapientes). 

ab-nueo, v - abnuo. 

* abnUltio, onis,/ [abnuo], ^negatio, 
negation, Paul, ex Fest. p. 108, 7 Mull. 

abnuiturUS, a, um, = abnuturus, v, 
abnuo. 

* ab-numero, are, 1, v. a., to cast up 
numbers, to reckon up, Nigid, ap. Gell. 15, 
3,4. 

ab-niio, tii, mtum (hence abntiTtu- 
rus, Sail. Fragm. 1, 37 Kritz), or utum, 

3, v. a. and n. (abnueo, Enn. ap. Diom. 
p. 378 P. or Ann. v. 283 Vahl.: abnu- 
ebunt, id. ib. or Trag. v. 371 id.), lit., 
to refuse by a nod ( cf. Nigid. ap. Gell. 
10, 4 fin. ) ; hence, to deny, refuse, to de- 
cline doing a thing, to reject. I. Lit 
A. In g e B (syn. recuso ; opp. conce- 
do), constr. absol., with the ace, the inf., 
quin, or de. (a) Absol. : non recuso, non 
abnuo, Cic. Mil. 36, 100; so Plaut. Capt. 3, 1, 
21; id. True, prol (5; Hor. S. 2, 5, 52; Tac. 
A. 11, 12 ; id. Agr. 4 a]. — (/3) With ace. (in 
Cic. only with general objects, as quid, 
nihil): cum intellegas, quid quisque conce- 
dat, quid abnuat, Cic. Fin. 2, 1, 3 : nihil um- 
quam abnuit meo studio voluntas tua, re- 
fused, id. Fat. 2, 3; so, aliquid alicui: regi 
pacem neque abnuere neque pollicere, Sail. 
J. 47 fin. : alia ( opp. probo ), id. ib. 83 
fin. : abnuere cognomen Bruti, Liv. 1, 56, 
8: impermm, id. 3, 66, 3; cf.: imperium au- 
spiciumque, to reject, id. 28, 27, 4: regulae 
rationem, Quint. 1, 6, 33: omen, Verg. A 5, 
531: aliquem comitem inceptis, Sil. 3, 110. 
— ( T ) With inf.: certare abnueo, Enn. 1. 1. : 
necabnuebant melioribusparere, Liv. 22. 13 
fin.; so id. 22, 37, 4.— With ace. and inf.: 
aeternam sibi naturam abnuit esse, Lucr 3, 
641 ; cf. : abnueret a se commissum esse 
facinus, Cic. Leg. 1, 14, 40; and: baud equi- 
dem abnuo egregium ducem fuisse Alexan 
drum, Liv. 9, 17, 5; so id. 5, 33, 4; 30, 20, 6; 
Quint. 5, 8, 3; 6, 2, 11 (opp. concedo) ; Verg. 
A. 10, 8 al. ; cf. also: inanu abnuit quid- 
quam opis in se esse, Liv. 36, 34, 6. — Im- 
pers. : nee abnuitur ita fuisse, Liv. 3, 72, 6. 
— *(<5) With quin: non abnuere se qum 
cuncta mala pateflerent, Tac. A. 13, 14.— 
* (e) With de : neque illi senatus de ullo 
negotio abnuere audebat, Sail. J. 84, 3. 

B. Esp., abnuens, like the Gr. uxem^v, 
declining service, giving up (very rare): 
milites fessos itineris magnitudine et jam 
abnuentes omnia, Sail. J. 68, 3; cf. : fessos 
abnuentesque taedio et labore, declining 
the combat, Liv. 27, 49, 3. 

II. T r a u s f- » °^ abstract subjects, not to 
admit of to be unfavorable (poet, and in 
post-Aug. prose ) : quod spes abnuit, Tib. 

4, 1, 25: quando impetus et subita belli 
locus abnueret, Tac. H. 5, 13: hoc videre- 
tur, nisi abnueret duritia, Plin. 37, 10, 54, 
§145. 

abnutlVUS, a, um [abnuo], = negati- 
vus; hence subst.: abnutlVTim, i, n., a 
denying, refusal, Dig. 45, 1, 83 ; cf. Abnu- 
tivum : aiimiXGnKov, Gloss. 

ab-nuto, t_lVi ) atum, 1, v. freq. [id.], 
to deny {by a nod) often, to refuse : quid 
te adiri (Vahl. adirier; Rib. adirLtam) ab- 
nutas, Enn. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 41, 164^fwhere ■ 
Cic. censures the word as less forcible thas-. 
vetas, prohibes, absterres, and the like ) : - 



ABOM 



de- 



quid rni abnutas ? Tibi ego abnuto ? Plaut. 
Capt.3,4,79. 

* ab-dlefaClO, ere, = aboleo, to 
stroy : civitatem, Tert. Apol. 35 (al. 
facere). 

ab-dleo, « T -'i (ui), itum, 2, v. a., orig. 
(in contrast with ad-oleo) to retard or to 
check the growth of; hence, in a more ex- 
tended sense, to destroy, efface, abolish; 
trop., to terminate, and, in the pass., to 
die. to decay (not before the Aug. period). 
I, Lit.: cuncta viri mommienta, Verg. A. 
4' 497 : deum aedes vetustate aut igni abo- 
litac,Tac. A.2,49; cf . : corpus alicnj us igni, 
i. e. to burn, id. ib. 16, 6; so, libros, Plin. Ep. 
7, 19, 6 : Homeri cavmina,Suet. Calig. 34 al.— 
In pass.: aboleri, to die (opp. nasci), Plin. 
7, prooeni. § 4. — Poet. : viscera undis, to 
remove the poisonous flesh by washing, 
Verg. G. 3, 560.— H. Fig. : dedecus arrms, 
Verg. A. 11, 789; cf.: labem prioris igno- 
miniae.Tac. H. 3, 24: memoriam, Suet.Calig. 
60 ; Verg. A. 1, 720 : magistratum alicui, 
Liv. 3, 38, 7 : legem ( = abrogare), Quint. 1, 
5 29 ; cf. decretum, Suet, Claud. 6 ; Galb. 23 : 
crimen, Dig. 48, 6, 2, § 10 : frumentationes, 
Suet. Aug. 42: veetigalia, id. Ner. 10: vim 
moremque asylorum, id. Tib. 37 al. : non- 
nulla ex antiquis caerimoniis paulatim abo- 
lita (=omissa, neglecta), Suet. Aug. 31; 
cf.: memoria nondum omnino aboiita, id. 
Gram. 24. 

ab-oleSCO, evi, no sup., 3, v. inch. n. 
(vox Vergiliana) [aboleo], to decay little 
by little, to vanish, cease (like aboleo, not 
before the Aug. period} : tantique abolescet 
gratia facti, * Verg. A. 7, 232 : donee cum re 
nomen quoque vetustate abolevit, Liv. 1, 23, 
3 ; cf. : cujus rei prope jam memoria abole- 
verat, id. 3, 55, 6 ; 9,36,1: poena, Gel]. 20, 1 
al.: abolescit.Crescite,etc.,Tert.Exh.Cast.6. 
abdlltio, onis, /. [id.],<m abrogating, 
annulling, abolishing, abolition (post- 
Aug.). I. In gen.: tributorum, Tac. A. 
13, 50 ; cf. : qiiadrageshuae quinquagesi- 
nineque, id. ib. 13, 51 : legis. Suet. Aug. 34 : | 
sententiae, Tac. A.G,2 fin.— II. In partic. 
A. An amnesty, Suet. Tib. 4; Flor. 4, 7,3 : 
sub pacto abolitionis, Quint. 9, 2, 97. — B. 
In the Dig., the 'withdrawal of an accu- 
sation or suit,suspension: abolitiopublica, 
ex lege, privata, Cod. Th. 9, 37, 3 sq. : Dig. 
48, 16 al. ; cf. Rein, Crhninalrecht. p. 273 sq. 
ab-dlitor, oris, m -> one w ^° i a ^ es 
away a thing, or casts it into oblivion: 
mors, somnus, Tert. Hab. 3 ; Aus. Grat. 2. 

abolla. ae, /. [uM/3o\rj=ava/?o\»j, prop, 
a throwing back and around], a robe of 
thick woollen stuff worn, by soldiers, philos- 
ophers, etc. (called in Verg. A. 5, 421, duplex 
amictus ; v. Serv. ad h. 1. ) : toga detracta est 
et abolla data,Varr. ap. Non. 538, 16 : purpu- 
rea, Suet. Calig. 35.— Of philosophers, Mart. 
4, 53 ; 8, 48 ; Juv. 4, 76 al. : facinus majoris 
abollae, i. e. a crime committed by a deep 
philosopher, Juv. 3, 115. 

X aboloeS, for ab illis ; antiqui enim lit- 
teram non geminabant, Paul, ex Fest. p. 19 
Mull. 

abdminabillS, e , a <*j- [abominor], 
deserving imprecation or abhorrence, 
abomin able, Quint. Decl.; Vulg.Lev.11,10. 
* abdminamentum, U n- [id.], a de- 
testable thing, Tert. adv. Jud. 13. 
abominandus and abominanter, 

v. abommor/w. 

abdminatlO, onis, /. [abominor], an 
abominating, an abomi7iation,hsLct.l,ll ; 
also = abominamentum, Tert. adv. Jud. 5. 

abdmino, are, v. the foil. art. 

ab-ominor, atus, 1, v. dep., to depre- 
cate any thing as an ill omen (not in 
Cic). I 9 Lit: cum dixisset sepukrum di- 
rutiim proram spectare, abominatus, etc., 
when he had spoken the words " a 
ruined sepulchre" etc., wishing that 
ffiis {the sepulchre, or the words spoken) 
might not be of evil omen,ljiv. 30,25 fin.; 
so also id. 6, 18, 9 ; Suet. Claud. 40. — Hence : 
quod abominor, which may God avert, Ov. 
M. 9, 677 ; id. P. 3, 1, 105 ; Plin. Ep. 6, 22, 
7 al. — With inf. : haec imiver^ habere abo- 
minabitur, Sen. Ben. 7, 8. — H. In gen. 
foon. to ooto). io abominate, abhor, detest, 
Liv. 3C, 30, 9 ; Col. 6, prooeni. § 1 ; Quint. 

4. 1,33.— Hence deriw., 1. abominan- 
ter, adv., abominably, detestably, Cod. 



ABKA 
Th, 3,12, 13,— 2, abominandus, a, um, 

P. a., abominable, Liv. 9, 3h Jin.; Sen. 
Ben. 1, 9 ; Quint. 8, 4, 22 ; 9, 2,80. 

r^" 1. Collar. ac£. form abomino,are: 
multam abomina, Plaut. Trin. 3, -i, <«. — 2. 
abominor * n pass, signif. : saevitia eorum 
abominaretur ab omnibus, Varr. ap. Frisc. 
p. 791 P.— So Part. : abominatus, abomi- 
nated, accursed : Hannibal, Hor. Epod. 16, 
8: semimares, Liv. 31, 12, 8: bubo fune- 
bris et maxime abominatus, Plin. 10, 12, 16. 

ab-ominosns, a, um,=ominosus,./WZ 
of ill omens, portentous : Februarius, Sol. 
1, 40 : vox, Diom. p. 472 P. 

Aborigines, um, m. [ab-origo], the 
primeval Romans, the Aborigines, the 
nation which, previous to historical record, 
descended from the Apennines, and, advan- 
cing from Carseoli and Reate into the plain, 
drove out the Sicuii ; the ancestors of the 
Romans, Cato ap. Serv. ad Verg. A. 1, 6 ; 
Varr. L. L. 5, § 53 Mull. ; Cic. Rep. 2, 3; 
Sail. C 6; Liv. 1,1. I. Used as an appel- 
lative, original inhabitants, Plin. 4, 21, 
36, § 120 : Indigenae sunt inde . . . geniti, 
quos vocant aborigines Latini, Graeci av- 
ToxfWr, Serv. ad Verg. A. 8, 328.— H. 
Hence, abuiigmeuS, a, um, adj., abo- 
riginal : sacellum, Ter. Maur. p. 2425 P. 

ab-drior, ortus, 4, v. n. dep. I. (Opp. 
of orior.) To set, disappear, pass away 
(very rare): infimus aer, ubi omnia oriun- 
tur, ubi aboriuntur,Varr.L.L.5,7, § 66 Mull. 
— Gfthe\oice,tofail,$top; infringi linguam 
vocemque aboriri, Lucr. 3, 155.— H. Of un- 
timely birth, to miscarry (v. ab, III. 1.); 
Varr. ap. Non. 71, 27; Plin. 8, 51, 77, § 205. 

* ab-driscor, ci, <2<3j9. = aborior (after 
the analogy of nanciscor, proficiscor), to 
perish, die, Lucr. 5, 732 ; v. Lachm. ad h. 1. 

* 1. aborSUS, a, um [aborior, in the 
sense of misbirth], that has brought forth 
prematurely: aborsus abactus venter, 
Paul. Sent. 4, 9, 6. 

2. aborSUS, us, m. [id.], = abortus, 
miscarriage, Tert. de Fig. 3 Jin. ; Non. 
448, 3. 

1. abortlO, onis, /- [id.], premature 
delivery, miscarriage, Plaut. True. 1, 2, 
98 ; Cic'. Clu. 12 ; Dig. 48, 19, 38, § 5. 

2. abortlO, ire, 4, v. n. [id.] to mis- 
carry, Vulg. Job, 21, 10 ; in Plin. 8, 51, 77, 
aboriendi is the true reading (Jan.). 

* abortium, i. ^.,=abortio (eccl. Lat.). 

abortlVUS, a, um, adj. [abortio], per- 
taining to a premature delivery. I, adj. 
A Born p"ematurely=&hQrtxis: Sisyphus, 
* Hor. S. 1, 3, A& j cf. Juv. 2, 32 : ovum, 
addled,^\.&r\. 6,93.— B. That causes abor- 
tion : malvae, Plin. 20, 21, 84, § 226 ; so id. 
24, 5,11, § 18: sternuisse a coitu aborfcivum, 
id. 7, 6, 5, § 42.— II. Subst. : aboriivum, 
\n. A, An abortion, VWn. 18, 17,44, § 150; 
Vulg- 1 Cor. 15, 8 al.— B= (Sc. medicamen- 
tumT) A means of procuring abortion^ 
abiga, Juv. 6, 368. 

aborto, are, 1, v. n. [aborior], io bring 
forth prematurely, Varr. R. R. 2, 4, 14; 
Firm. 3, 7, 6 : filios, id. 6, 31/^. 

abortum, \,n.,v. the foil. art. 

abortus, »s, m. (abortum, i, n., Dig. 

29, 2, 30 ; cf. Paul, ex Fest. p. 29 Mull.) [abo- 
rior], an abortion, miscarriage. I. L it. : 
dicam abortum esse, Ter. Hec. 3, 3, 38 : Ter- 
tullae noilem abortum, had not miscar- 
ried, Cic. Att. 14, 20, 2 : abortum facere, 
to sufer abortion, miscarry, Plin. Ep. 8, 
10, 17 but also, to produce or cause abor- 
tion, Plin. 14, 18, 22, § 118 ; 21, 18, 69, § 116 
al.— B. Me ton., of plants, Plin. 12. 2, 6, 
§ 13.—*" II, Trop., of writings, an unfin- 
ished piece, Plin. praef. § 28. 

ab-patrUUS, i, ui., a great -great- 
grand-uncle on the father's side ; also 
called patruus maximus,T>ig. 38, 10, 3 al. 
ab-rado, sii sum, 3, v. a., to scratch 
off or away, to scrape away, rub off; of 
the beard, to shave. I. Lit. : manibus 
quidquam abradere membris, Lucr. 4, 1103 ; 
so id. 4, 1110: supercilia penitus abrasa,Cic 
Rose. Com. 7, 20 ; barbam in superiore la- 
bro, Plin. 6, 28, 32, § 162.— Of plants : partes 
radicum, to grub up, Vlin. 17, 11, 16, § 82; 
cf. arida, Col. 10, 3: abrasae fauces, made 
rough, Luc. 6, 115 : abrasa corpora, peeled 
off., aTrotn'ipiiaTa, Scrib. Comp. 215. — II, 



ABRO 

Meton.,^ take or snatch away, to seis6 % . 
extort, rob, Ter. Phorm. 2, 2, 19 : nihil a* 
Caecina litium terrore, Cic. Caecin. 7, 19: 
aliquid bonis, Plin. Pan. 37, 2. 

Abraham or Abram^'^cZ.or ae, 
m., Abraham (eccl. Lat.).— II. Hence der- 
iw. A. AbrahamideS, ae, m., a de- 
scendant of Abraham (eccl.^Lat.). — B- 

Abrahameus or Abrameus, a, um, 

adj., belonging to Abraham (eccl. Lat.). 

abraSUS, a, um, Pari, of abrado. 

* abrelictUS, a, um,=derehctus, de-- 
serted, abandoned, Tert. adv. Jud. 1. 

ab-renuntlO, are,l,^.«., strengthened 
form of renuntio, to renounce, e. g. diabolo, 
in baptism (eccl. Lat.). 

abreptUS, a, um, Part, of abripio. 

ab-ripiO, V u h eptum, 3, v. a. [rapio], to 
take away by violence, to drag away, to 
tear off or atoay (stronger than its synn. 
abduco, abigo, abstraho). I. L i t. A. In 
gen.: abripite nunc intro actutum inter 
manus, hurry him away, Plaut. Most. 2, 1, 
38 : puella ex Attica hinc abrepta, stolen, 
Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 30 ; cf. : abreptam ex eo loco 
virginem secum asportasse,Cic.Verr.2,4,49 r 
§ 107 : de convivio in vincla atque in tene- 
bras, id. ib.2, 4,10, § 24: ab complexu alicu- 
ius, Liv. 3, 57, 3: milites vi fluminis abrep- 
ti, Caes. B. C. 1, 64 ; cf. Mel. 3, 5, 8 ; Plin. % 
67, 67, § 170; Verg. A. 1, 108: aliquem ad 
quaestionem, Cic. Clu. 33, 89; cf. : aliquem 
ad humanuni exitum, id. Rep. 1, 16 fin.; 
with ace. only : Cererem, Cic.Verr. 2, 4, 50, 
§ 111 : cives, Nep. Milt. 4, 2 : aliquid, id. 
Dat. 4, 2: abripere se, to run, scamper 
away: ita abripuit repente sese subito, 
Plaut. Mil. 2. 2. 21 : so id. Cure. 5, 1, 8. — 
B. Trans f", of property, to dissipate, 
squander: quod ille compersit miser, id ilia 
univorsum abripiet, Ter. Phorm. 1, 1, 11.— 
II. Trop., to carry off, remove, detach: 
repente te quasi quidam aestus ingenii tui 
procul a terra abripuit atque in altum . . . 
abstraxit, Cic. de Or. 3, 36, 145: voluntate 
omnes tecum fuerunt ; tempestate abreptus 
est unus, id. Lig. 12, 34 (the figure taken 
from those driven away in a storm at sea) ; 
so. abreptus amore caedum, Sil. 5, 229; cf. 
id.' 6, 332: (filium) etiam si natura a pa- 
rentis similitudine abriperet, i.e. made un- 
like him, Cic.Verr. 2, 5, 12. 

t abrodiaetHS (or better, hab-), i, 

m., = afipobianos (living delicately), an 
epithet of the painter Parrhasius, Plin. 
35, 9, 36, § 71. 

ab-rddo. si, sum, 3, v. a., to gnaw off y 
Varr. R.R. 2, 9,13; Plin. 10, 62, 82, § 169; 37, 
6, 21, § 82. 

abr-dgatiO, onis,/. [abrogo], a formal 
repeal of a law, Cic. Att. 3, 23, 2. 

ab-rdgo. iivl, atum, 1, v. a. I. Lit., 
polit. t. t. : to annul in all its parts a 
law now in force, to repeal, to abrogate 
wholly (whereas derogo means to abro- 
gate partly and abrogo to counteract; v. 
these verbs), = cwroKupo<B: rogando legem 
tollere, Front. Dili. 2195 P.; v. rogo (very 
freq. in Cic.) : huic legi nee obrogari fas 
est, neque derogari ex hac aliquid licet, ne- 
que tota abrogari potest, this law cannot 
be invalidated by an opposing one, nor 
modified, by restrictions, nor wholly re- 
pealed Cic" Rep. 3, 22, from which exam- 
ple (cf. also id. ib. 2, 37 ; id. Att. 3, 23, 2, and 
many others in Liv.) it is evident that abro- 
gare was constr. in the classical period with 
«cc\, and noLas later, with dat. ; cf. Liv. 
9, 34 Drak— M3. Of a civil office : magistra- 
tum alicui, to take it from one, to recall 
it: si tibi magistratum abrogasset, Cic.Verr. 
2,2,57; id. Dom.83; so id. Off. 3, 10: Cato 
legem promulgavit de imperio Lentulo ab- 
rommdo. id. Q. Fr. 2, 3, 1 (so the correct 
read., not Lentuli).— II, Trop., in gen., 
to take away, to deprive of: male fidem 
servando illis quoque abrogant fidem, de- 
prive others of credit, Plaut. Trin. 4, 4, 41 ; 
so Cic. Rose. Com. 15 ; id. Ac. 2, 11 ; Auct. 
ad Her. 1, 10. 
abrosus, a, um, Part, of abrodo. 
t abrotdniteSy. ae. m. [abrotonum], . 
=a/?poToi/iTJic, sc. olvor; wine prepared 
with southernwood, Col. 12, 35. 

t abrotonum (or better, hab=),i>^-i 
abrdtdnuS, i, m., = aft P 6Tovov, a plant 
of a pleasant, aromatic smell, southern- 



wood; peril. Artemisia abrotonum, Linn. : 
abrotoni graves, Lucr. 4, 125 ; so m. ; gra- 
vem serpentibus urunt abrotonum, Luc. 9, 
921 : abrotonum aegro non andet dare (as a 
medicine), Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 114 ; cf. Plin. 21, 
10, 34, §§ 60 and 160 ; Scrib. Comp. 7 sq., 167. 
ab-mmpo, upi, upturn, 3, v. a., to 
break off something violently, to rend, 
tear, sever (poet. ; seldom used before the 
Aug. per., only once in Cic, but afterw. by 
Verg., Ov., and the histt often). I, Lit.: 
vincla abrupit equus (transl. of the Homeric 
decrpdv airopprj^as, II. 6, 507), Enn. ap. Macr. 
S. 6, 3 (Ann. v. 509 Vahl.) ; so, nee Le- 
thaea valet Theseus abrumpere caro vin- 
cula Pirithoo, * Hor. C. 4, 7, 27 ; cf. Verg. 
A. 9, 118: abrupti nubibus ignes, torn from, 
Lucr. 2, 214 ; cf. with the fig. reversed, in 
Verg. : ingeminant abruptis nubibus ignes, 

A. 3, 199 : abrupto sidere, i. e. hidden by 
clouds, id. ib. 12, 451 : plebs velut abrupta 
a cetero populo, broken off, torn from, 
Liv. 3, 19,9.—H, Trop.: (legio Martia) se 
prima latrocinio Antonii a.hmpit,first freed 
itself, Cic. Phil. 14, 12 : abrumpere vitam, 
to break the thread oflife,Verg. A. 8, 579 ; 
9, 497 ; so later, abrumpere fata, Sen. Here. 
Oet. 893, or, medios annos, Luc. 6, 610 : ab- 
rumpere vitam a civitate, to leave it, in or- 
der to live elsewhere, Tac. A. 16, '28 fin. : fas, 
to destroy, violate, Verg. A. 3, 55 : medium 
sermonem, to break off, interrupt, id. ib. 4, 
388 ; cf. abruptus : omnibus inter victoriam 
mortemve abruptis, since all means of 
escape, except victory or death, were 
taken from its, Liv. 21, 44, 8.— Hence, ab- 
TUptus. a, uin, P. a., broken off from, 
separated, esp. of places, inaccessible, or 
difficult of access. A. L it. , of places, pre- 
cipitous, steep (syn. : praeceps, abscissus) : 
locus in pedum mille altitudinem abruptus, 
Liv. 21, 36 : (Roma) muuita abruptis monti- 
bus, Plin. 3, 5, 9, § 67 ; Tac. A. 2, 23 : petra un- 
dique abscissa et abrupta, Curt. 7, 11.— Also 
absol. : abrnptum, i, n., a steep ascent 
or descent: cf. praeceps: vastos sorbet iu 

^abrnptum flnctus, she mcallows down her 
gulf Verg. A. 3, 422.— B. Trop., broken, 
disconnected, abrupt: Sallustiana brevi- 
tas et abrnptum sermonis genus, Quint. 4, 
2, 45: contnmacia, stubborn,Ta,c. A. 4, 20. — 
Comp. , Plin. 11, 37, 51, § 138 ; Tert adv. Marc. 
1, 1.— Sup., Plin. Ep. 9, 39, 5.— Absol. : per 
abrupta, by rough, dangerous ways, Ta,c. 
Agr. 42 fin, (cf. supra: abrupta contu- 
maciam — Adv. : abriipte. 1. Lit., in 
broken manner, here and there: palantes 
flammarum ardores, Amra. 17, 7, 8. — 2. 
Trop., of conduct, hastily, inconsider- 
ately, Just. 2, 15, 4; of discourse, abrupt- 
ly, Quint. 3, 8, 6; 4, 1, 79 ; also, simply, 
Macr. Somn. Scip. 1, 19.— Comp., Amm. 20, 

abrapte. adv., v. abrumpo, P. a.fln. 
abruptlO, onis,/. [abrumpo], a break- 
ing or tearing off, a rending asunder. 

I. Lit.; corrigiae, of a shoe-latchet, * Cic. 
Div. 2, 40, 84.— II. Trop.: augurii, inter- 
ruption, Paul, ex Fest. pp. 270 and 271 Mull. 
—Of divorce, Att. ap. Cic. Att. 11, 3, 1. 

abruptus, a, um, v. abrumpo, P. a. 

&b&,prep., v. ab. 

abs-cedo, cessi, cessum, 3, v. n. (sync, 
abscessem = abscessissem, Sil. 8, 109 ), to 
go off or away, to depart. I. Lit. A. 
In gen.: abscede hinc, sis, sycophanta" 
Plant. Poen. 1, 2, 162 : meo e conspectu, id. 
Capt. 2, 3, 74 : numquam senator a curia ab- 
scessit aut populus e foro, Liv. 27, 50, 4 ; so, 
a corpore (mortui), Tac. A. 1, 7 ; cf. id. ib. 3' 
5: ut abscesserit inde (i. e. e castris) dicta- 
tor, Liv. 22, 25, 9 : illorum navis longe in 
altum abscesserat, Plant. Rud. prol. 66. 

B. I n p a r t i e. 1 . Milit. 1. 1 , to march 
off, to depart, retire : non prins Thebani 
Sparta abscessissent quam,etc, 3sTep. Iphicr. 
2 fin.: longius ab urbe hostium, Liv. 3, 8, 
8 ; cf. : a moenibus Alexandriae, id. 44, 19, 

II. — Absol. : si urgemns obsessos, si 'non 
ante abscedimus quam, etc., Liv. 5, 4, 10 ; 
so Nep. Epam. 9. — Impers. : abscedi ab 
hoste, Liv. 22, 33, 10 ; cf. id. 27, 4, 1 : nee 

.ante abscessum est quam, etc., id. 29, 2, 16 ; 
so, a moenibus abscessum est, id. 45, li, 7 :' 
manibus aequis abscessum, Tac. A. 1, 63. 

2. To disappear, withdraw, be lost 
from vieic : cor (est) in extis : jam absce- 
«det, simul ac, etc., will disappear,Civ . Div 
10 



ABSC 

' 2,16 fi?i.— Poet.: Pallada abscessisse mihi, 
has zoithdrawn from me.from mypozcer, 
Ov. M. 5, 375.— Of stars, to set, Plin. 2. 17, 
14,§72al. ' 

3. Of localities, to retire, recede, re- 
treat: quantum mare abscedebat, retired, 
Liv. 27, 47 fin. ; so in architecture : frontis 
et latermn abscedentium adumbratio, of 
the sides in the background, Vitr. 1, 2, 2 • 
so id. 1, 2, 7, praef. 11. 

4. With respect to the result, to retire, 
to escape : abscedere latere tecto, to escape 
with a whole skin, Ter. Heaut. 4, 2, 5. 

II. Fig., to leave off, retire, desist 
from, constr. with ab, the simple abl., or 
absol. : labor ille a vobis cito recedet, bene- 
factum a vobis non abscedet (followed by 
abibit), Cato ap. Gell. 16, 1 Jin. ; so, cito ab 
eo haec ira abscedet, Ter. Hec. 5. 2, 15.— 
With abl. only: haec te abscedat suspicio, 
Plaut. Ep. 2, 2, 100 : abscedere irrito iucep- 
to, to desist from, Liv. 20, 7, 1.— Absol. : 
aegritudo abscesserit, Plaut. Merc. 1, 2, 29 ; 
so, somnus, Ov. F. 3, 307: imago, Plin. Ep. 
7, 27, 6 : ille abscessit ( sc. petitione sua ), 
desisted from the action, Tac. A. 2, 34: 
ne quid abscederet (sc. de hereditate), Suet. 
Ner. 34; so, semper abscedente usufructu, 
Dig. 7, 1, 3, §2. 

abscessiO, onis, /. [abscedo], a going 
away, a separating: cum ad corpora 
turn accessio fieret,tum abscessio,i.e.^m- 
inution, * Cic. Univ. 12 ; Diet. Cret. B. Tr. 
1, 5. 



ABSI 



abscessus,Hs,m, [id.], a going away, 
departure, absence : solis, * Cic. N. D. 1, 
10, 24 ; Verg. A. 10, 445 ; Tac. A. 4, 57 : 
continuus, continued absence, id. ib. 6, 38. 
—II. Medic. 1. 1., an abscess, Cels. 5, 7 : in 
plur., id. 5, 18. 

abs-Cldo, cldi, cisum, 3, v. a. [caedo], 
to cut off with a sharp instrument (diff 
from ab-scindo, to break or tear off as with 
the hand); the former corresponds to prae- 
cidere, the latter to avellere, v. Liv. 31 34 
4 Drak. I. Lit.: caput, Cic. Phil, li 2 
5 ; Liv. 4, 19 ; Verg. A. 12, 511 al . ; so, mem- 
bra, Lucr. 3, 642 : bracchium, Liv. 4, 28 8 • 
collum, Sil. 15, 473 : dextram, Suet. Caes 
68: linguam, Plaut. Am. 2,1,7; Suet. Calig 
27 al. : comas alicui, Luc. 6, 568 : truncos ar- 
borum et ramos, Caes. B. G. 7, 73, 2.— II 
Trop., to cut off, deprive of; to detract": 
spern (alicui), Liv. 4, 10, 4; 24, 30, 12 ; 35 
45,6: orationemalicni,id.45,37,9: omnium 
rerum respectum sibi, id. 9, 23, 12 : omnia 
praesidia, Tac. H. 3, 78 : vocem, Veil. 2, 66 • 
cf. Quint. 8, 3, 85 — Absol. : quarum ('ora- 
tionum) alteram non libebat mihi scribere, 
quia abscideram, had broken off, Cic. Att. 2, 
7. — Hence, abscisus, a, um, P. a., cut 
off. A. Of places, steep, precipitous (cf. 
abruptus): saxum undique abscisum, Liv 
32, 4, 5 ; so id. 32, 25, 36 : rupes, id. 32, 5 
12.— B. Of speech, abrupt, concise, short' 
in voce aut omnino suppressa, aut etiam 
abscisa, Quint. 8, 3, 85 ; 9, 4, 118 Halm (al. 
abscissa ) : asperum et abscisum castiga- 
tiouis genus, Val. Max. 2, 7, 14: responsum 
id. 3, 8, 3: sententia, id. 6, 3, 10; cf. in 
comp. : praefractior atque abscisior justitia, 
id. 6, 5, ext. i.—Sup. prob. not used.— Adv.: 
abscise, cut off; hence, of speech, con- 
cisely, shortly, distinctly, Val. Max 3, 7 
ext. 6; Dig. 50, 6, 5, §2. 
ab-scindo, cidi, cissum, 3, v. a., to tear 

ror av:ay, to rend away (v. preced. art). 
Lit.: tunicam a pectore abscidit, he tore 
the tunic down from his breast, Cic. Verr. 
2, 5, 1 : cervicibus fractis caput abscidit, cut 
off, id. Phil. 11, 5. — With simple abl. : 
umeris abscindere vestem, Verg. A. 5, 685 ■ 
with de, id. G. 2, 23 > nee quidquam deus 
abscidit terras, torn asunder, separated 
Hor. C. 1, 3, 21 ; cf. Verg. A. 3, 418 ; Ov! 
M. 1, 22 al. : venas, to open the veins, Tac 
A. 15, 69; 16, 11.— II. Trop., to cut off 
separate, divide (rare): reditus dulces,z?o 
cut off, Hor. Epod. 16, 35: inane soldo, to 
separate, id. S. 1, 2, 113 : querelas alicujus, 
Val. Fl. 2, 160 : jus, Dig. 28, 2, 9, § 2. 

abscise, adv., v. abscido, P. a.fln. 
_ * abscissio. <>nis,/. [abscindo], a break- 
ing off in the midst of a discourse; rhet. 
fig., Auct. ad Her. 4, 53 ; 4, 54 : vocis, Scrib 
Comp. 100. 

abscissus, a, um, Part, of abscindo. 

abscisns, a, um, P. a., v. abscido. 



' abscondite, adv., v. abscondo, P. a. 
absconditor, oris, m. [abscondo], one 

that hides or conceals, Jul. Firm. 5 15 ■ 
Tert. adv. Marc. 4, 25. 

abs-COndo, condi and condidi, condi- 
tum and consum, 3, v. a. (abscondi, Tac H 
3, 68; Curt. 6, 6 ; Gell. 17. 9 ; Caecil. and 
Pompon, ap. Xon. 75, 25 : abscondidi Plaut 
Merc. 2, 3, 25 ; Sil. 8, 192 : absconsum' 
Quint. Decl. 17, 15), to put away, conceal 
carefully, hide, secrete (the access, idea of 
a careful concealment distinguishes this 
word from its synn. abdo, celo, abstrudo, 
etc.) . I. L i t. : est quiddam, quod occulta- 
tur, quod quo studiosius ab istis opprimi- 
tur et absconditur, eo magis emmet et ap- 
paret, Cic. Rose. Am. 41 fin. : neqniquarn 
(earn) abdidi, abscondidi, abstrusam habe- 
bam, Plaut. Merc. 2, 3, 25 : aurum secun- 
dum aram, Fragm. ap. Prise, p. 890 P : f u- 
tes absconditi, Auct. ad Her. 4, 6, 9 : ensem 
iu vulnere, to bury, Sen. Thyest. 721 (cf. : 
lateri abdidit ensem, Verg. A. 2, 553 ; v. 
abdo, II e .)j so, abscondit in ae're telum, 
1. e. shot it out of sight, Sil. 1, 316. — Pass., 
of stars, to set, and thus become invisible' 
Verg. G. 1, 221. — Hence, B. In gen., to 
make invisible, to cover : fiuvium et cam- 
pos caede, Sil. 11, 522 ; so id. 17, 49.— C 
Poet., to put a place out of sight, to 
lose sight of, to depart from : aerias Phae- 
acum abscondimus arces, we leave behind 
Verg. A. 3,291 (cf. id.ib. 4, 154: transmittunt 
cursu campos).— II. Trop.: fugam furto, 
to conceal flight, Verg. A. 4, 337 : praena- 
vigavimus vitam, et quemadmodnm in mari, 
sic in hoc cursu rapidissimi temporis, pri- 
mum pueritiam abscondimus, deinde adn- 
lescentiam, leave behind, outlive ( cf the 
prec, C), Sen. Ep. 70, 2; Tac. A. 13, 16.— 
Hence, abscondltllS, a, um, P. a., hid- 
den, concealed, secret, unknown ; gladii 
absconditi, Cic. Phil. 2, 108: in tam abscon- 
ditis msidiis,id. Cat. 3, 1, 3 : jus pontificum, 

id. Dom. 54, 138.-^. i. abscondite, 

of discourse. a . Obscurelu, abstrusely, 
Cic. Inv. 2, 23.— b. Profoundly, Cic. Fin. 3' 
1 > 2 ~ 2. absconse (from absconsus), se- 
cretly, Hyg. Fab. 184; Firm. Math. 2, 2. 

t absegmen, ini9 > n - [ab-seco], accord- 
ing to Festus, s. v. penitam, ap. Kaev. a 
piece (of flesh) out off, Paul, ex Fest. u 242 
6 Mull. ' 

absens, entis ( not apsens ), Part of 
absum. 

absentia, ae, /. [absum], absence: 
confer absentiam tuam cum mea, Cic. Pis 
16, 37 ; Anton, ap. Cic. Att. 14, 13, A ; Quint 
4, 2, 70; Tac. A. 4, 64 al. : testimoniorum" 
want of, Quint. 5, 7, 1. 

* absentiVUS, a, um, adj. [absens], 
long absent, Petr. S. 33. 

absento, iire, l,v. a. and n. [id.]. I. 
Act., to cause one to be absent, i. e. to send 
away: patriis procul absentaverit astris, 
Claud. Pros. 3, 213 (others read amaitdave- 
rit, or patriisque procul mandaverit), Cod 
Th. 12, 1, 48.-H. Neutr., to be absent: 
absentans Ulixes, Sid. 9, Ibjhi. 

absida,ae, v. absis init.. 

absidatns ; a, um, adj. [absis], having 
an arch ; arched, vaulted (late Lat.) : porti- 
cus, Paul. Vict. 4: caveae.Cassiod. Var. 4,51. 

ab-Sliio, ii and ui, no sup., 4, v. n. and 
a. [salio], to leap or spring away, to leap 
off: procul, Lucr. 6, 1217.— With ace. rei (as 
in Gr. (p^eiv n) : nidos tepentes absili- 
unt (aves), fly from their warm nests, 
Stat. Th. 6, 97. ' 

ab-similis, e, adj. [ab, priv.], unlike, 
usually with a neg. and dat. (a) Absol.: 
talces non absimili forma muralium falcium 
Caes. B. G. 3, 14, 5.— (/?) with dat. : (herba) 
neque absimilis bitumini, Col. 6, 17, 2 ; so 
Plin. 8, 33, 51, § 121 ; Suet. Oth. 1 ; id. Dom. 
10 al. 

absinthlatns, a, um, adj. [absinthi- 
um], containing wormwood : poculum, 
i. e. filled with wormwood - wine, Sen, 
Snas. 6, p. 40 Bip.— Absol. : absinthia- 
tum, sc. vinum, wormwood-wine, Pall. 2, 
32 ; Lampr. Hel. 21. 

_t absinth! tes, ae, m., — ^ lv Bi rm , sc. 
oivos, wornnwood-wine, CoL 12. 35 : Plin 
14, 16, 19, § 109. 

t absinthium,', n. (aisoabsinthins, 

i, m., ap. \ arr. ace. to Non. 190, 25), = uV^V- 



A BSO 

nwood, Plin. 27, 7, 28 sq. ; Cato, 



titoi . 

R. R. 159 ; Varr. R. R. 1, 57 ; Col. 12, 35 
Plaut. Trin. 4, 2, 90 : tetrum, Lucr. 1, 936 ; 
2, 400: 4, 11 al.— Trop. for something bit- 
ter, but wholesome, Quint. 3, 1, 5. 

t absis or apsis, wis (coiiat. form ab- 

Sida, ae, Paul. Ep. 12 ; cf. Isid. Orig. 15, 8, 
7j /|La^«, lit. a fitting together in a cir- 
cular form, hence an arch or ■waw/f. I. 
Plin. Ep. 2, 17 (but in Plin. 36, 12, 17, the 
correct read, is aspidem, v. Sillig ad h. 1.). 
—In a church, the choir, Isid. Orig. 15, 18, 
7, and Paul. Ep. 12 (in both of which it is 
doubtful whether absis, idis, or absida, ae, 
should be read ; cf. Areval upon Isid. 1. c. ). 
—II The circle which a star describes in 
its orbit Plin. 2. 18, 16, § 79; cf. id. 2, 15, 
13, § 63. —Ill A round dish or bowl, Dig. 
34, 2, 19, § 6 ; lb. Fragm. 32, § 1. 

ab-sisto, stiti, no sup., 3, v. n. (like all 
the compounds of the simple active verb, 
used only in a neutr. signif.), to withdraw 
or depart from, to go away ; coustr. absol., 
with ab, or the simple abL (not in Cic). 
I, Lit.: quae me hie reliquit atque ab- 
ttitit, who has left me behind here, and gone 
off. Plaut. True. 2, 6, 32: ah signis, Caes. B. 
G. ."5, 17; v. Gron. ad Liv. 27, ±5. — Absol.: 
miles abstitit, wmt away, Tac. 2, 31: ab ore 
scintillae absistunt, burst forth, Verg. A. 12, 
101: limine, id. ib. 7, G10: luco, id. ib. 6, 259. 
—II. Trop. with abL (of subst. or gerund.) 
or the inf., to desist from an act, purpose, 
etc., to cease, to leave off (so, perh., flrst in 
the Aug. period, for the more common de- 
sisto): obsidione, Liv. 9, 15 Drak. : bello, 
Hor. S. 1, 3, 104: continuando magistratu, 
Liv. 9, 34 : sequendo, id. 29. 33 : ingratis 
benefacere, id. 36, 35 : moveri, Yerg. A. 6, 
399: absiste viribus indubitare tuis, cease 
to distrust thy strength, id. ib. 8, 403 ; cf. 
morari. id. ib. 12, 676. 

* ab-Sltus, a , um, ad 3-i l V in 9 o,way, 
distant Paul. Nol. 13, 5. 

* ab-SOCer, Sri , m i a great -great- 
grandfather of the husband or wife, Capi- 
tol. Gord. 2. 

absolute, adv., v. absolvo, P. a. 

absolutlO, Onis, / [ absolvo ]. I. In 
judicial Iang.,ft>2 absolving, acquittal: sen- 
tentiis decern et sex absolutio confici pote- 
rat, Cic. Clu. 27 : annus decimus post virgi- 
num r>bsoIutionem, id. Cat. 3, 4: majestatis 
(for de majestate), an acquittal from cri- 
men majestatis, id. Fain. 3, 11.— In Suet, in 
plur. : reis absolutiones venditare, Vesp. 
16.— II, Completion, perfection, consumma- 
tion. A. I u g e n — virtus quae rationis 
absolutio" deflnitur, Cic. Fin. 5, 14 : hanc 
absolutionem perfectionemque in oratore 
desiderans, this finish and perfection, id. de 
Or. 1, 28, 130; so id. Inv. 2, 30.— B. Esp., 
in rhet., completeness, Cic. Inv. 1, 22, 32. 

abSolutoriUS, a , um, adj. [id.], per- 
taining to acquittal, release. I. Adj. : ta- 
beilae. damnatoria et absol utoria Suet. Aug. 
33: judicia, Gai, Dig. 4, 114.— II. Subst.: 
absolutdrium, ", n. (sc. remedium). a 
means of deliverance from : ejusmali, Plin. 

28, 6, 17, § 63. 

absolutus, a , um, p - «■> frorn 

ab-SOlvo. vi, utum, 3, v. a., to loosen 
from, to make loose, set free, detach, untie 
<usu. trop., the fig. being derived from fet- 
ters, qs. a vinculis solvere, like vinculis 
exsolvere, Plaut. True. 3, 4, 10 ). I. Lit. 
(so very rare) : canem ante tempus, Amm. 

29, 3: asmum, App. M. 6, p. 184: cf.: cum 
nodo cervicis absolutum, id. ib. 9, p. 231: 
valvas stabuli, i. e. to open, id. ib. 1, p. 108 
fin. : absoluta lingua (ranarum) a gutture, 
loosed, Plin. 11, 37, 65, § 172. 

II. T r o p. A. To release from a long 
story, to let one off quickly: Paucis absolvit, 
ne moraret diutius, Paa ap. Diom. p. 395 
P (Trag. Rel. p. 98 Rib.); so, te absolvam 
brevi, Plaut. Ep. 3, 4, 30. 

B. To dismiss by paying, to pay off : ab- 
solve nunc vomitum . . . quattuor quadra- 
ginta illi debentur minae, Plaut. Most. 3, 
1, 120; so Ter. Ad. 2, 4, 13 and 18.— Hence, 
in gen., to dismiss, to release: jam hosce 
absolutos censeas, Plaut, Aul. 3, 5, 43 ; and 
ironic, id. Capt. 3, 5, 73. 

C. To free from (Ciceronian) : ut nee 
Hoscium stipulatione alliget, neque a Fan- 
nio judicio ~se absolvat, extricate or free 



ABSO 

himself from a lawsuit, Cic. Rose. Com. 12 : 
longo bello, Tac. A. 4, 23 : caede hostis se 
absolvere, to absolve or clear one J s self by 
murdering an enemy, id. G. 31. — With gen. : 
tutelae, Dig. 4, 8, 3; hence, 

I), In judicial lang., t. t., to absolve 
from a charge, to acquit, declare innocent ; 
constr. absol., with abL, gen., or de (Zumpt, 
§ 446 ; Rudd. 2, 164 sq.) : bis absolutus, Cic. 
Pis. 39: regni suspicione, Liv. 2, 8: judex 
absolvit injuriarum eum, Auct. ad Her. 2, 13 ; 
so Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 29 al. ; de praevari cat tone 
absolutus, id. Q. Fr. 2, 16. — In Yerr. 2, 2, 
8, § 22: hie (Dionem) Veneri absolvit, sibi 
condemnat, are dativi commodi : from the 
obligation to Venus he absolves him, but 
condemns him to discharge that to himself 
(Verres).— With an abstract noun: fidem 
absolvit, he acquitted them of their fidelity 
(to Otho), pardoned it, Tac. H. 2, 60. 

E. In technical lang., to bring a 
work to a close, to complete, finish (without 
denoting intrinsic excellence, like perfi- 
cere ; the fig. is prob. derived from detach- 
ing a finished web from the loom ; cf. : rem 
dissolutam divulsamque, Cic. de Or. 1, 42, 
188). _So of the sacrificial cake: liba abso- 
luta (as taken from the pan), ready, Varr. 
R. R. 2, 8; but esp. freq. in Cic. : ut pic- 
tor nemo esset inventus, qui Coae Veneris 
earn partem, quam Apelles inchoatam reli- 
quisset, absol veret, Cic. Off. 3, 2 (cf. Suet. 
Claud. 3); id. Leg. 1, 3, 9; id. Att. 12, 45; 
cf. id. Fin. 2, 32, 105 ; id. Fam. 1,9,4; id. 
Att. 13, 19 al. — So in Sallust repeatedly, 
both with ace. and de, of an historical state- 
ment, to bring to a conclusion, to relate : 
cetera quam paucissumis absolvam, J. 17, 
2: multa paucis. Cic. Fragm. Hist. 1, n. 2: 
deCatilinae conjuratione paucis absolvam, 
id. Cat. 4, 3 ; cf. : nunc locorum sitnm, quan- 
tum ratio sinit, absolvam, Amm. 23, 6. — 
Hence, absolutus, a , um , p - a -> brought 
to a conclusion, finished, ended, complete (cf. 
absolvo. E.). A. In £ en '- nee appellatur 
vita beata nisi confecta atque absoluta, 
when not completed and concluded, Cic. Fin. 
2, 27, 87 ; cf. : perfecte absolutus, id. ib. 4, 
7*. 18; and: absolutus et perfectus per se, 
id. Part. Or. 26, 94 a\.—Comp., Quint. 1, 1, 
W.—Sup., Auct. ad Her. 2, 18, 28; Plin. 35, 
10, 36, § 74; Tac. Or. 5 al.— B. Esp. 1. 
In rhet. lang., unrestricted, uncondition- 
al, absolute : hoc mini videor videre. esse 
quasdam cum adjunctione necessitudines, 
quasdam simplices et absolutas, Cic. Inv. 
2, 57, 170.— 2. In gram. a. Nomen ab- 
solutum, which gives a complete sense with- 
out any thing annexed, e. g. : deus, Prise, 
p. 581 P.— b, Verbum absolutum, in rrisc. 
p. 795 P., that has no case with it; in Diom. 
p. 333 P., opp. inchoativum.— c. Adjectivum 
absolutum, which stands in the positive, 
Quint. 9, 3, 19. — Adv.: absolute, /w%, 
perfectly, completely ( syn. perfecte ), dis- 
tinctly, unrestrictedly, absolutely, Cic. Tusc. 
4, 17, 38; 5, 18, 53; id. Fin. 3, 7, 26 ; id. Top. 
8, 34 al.— Co mp., Macr. Somn. Scip. 2, 15. 
absone, adv -^ v - absonus^n. 
ab-SOnUS, a , um , ad J> I. Deviating 
from the right tone, discordant, dissonant, 
inharmonious : sunt quidam ita voce abso- 
ni, ut , . . in oratorum numerum venire 
non possint, Cic. de Or. 1, 25, 115: vox ab- 
sona atque absurda, id. ib. 3, 11, 41. — 
Hence, II, I n gen., not harmonizing with 
a thing, not accordant with, unsuitable, in- 
congruous ; constr. with ab or (= alien us) 
with dat. or absol. : nee absoni a voce mo- 
tus erant, Liv. 7,2: nihil absonum fidei 
divinae originis fuit, id. 1, 15: fortunis ab- 
sona dicta, Hor. A. P. 112. — Absol: nihil 
absonum, nihil agreste, Quint. $, 3, 107; 

cf. id. 12, 10, 32.— Adv.: absone, discord- 

anily, incongruously, Gell. 15, 25 ; App. 
Mag. p. 277. 

ab-SOrbeO; bui, rarely psi, ptum (ab- 
sorbui, Plin. 9, 35, 58 : absorpsi, Luc. 4, 
100 ; cf. Vel. Long. 2233 P.), 2, v. a., to 
swallow down any thing, to devour. I, 
Lit.: unda legiones, Naev. B. Pun. 4, 16 : 
oceanus vix videtur tot res tarn cito ab- 
sorbere potuisse, Cic. Phil. 2, 27, 67: pla- 
centas, Hor. S. 2, 8, 24; so id. ib. 2, 3, 240 K. 
and H. (al. o&sorbere and exsorbere) : uni- 
onem. Plin 1. 1. (Sill, ob-): res ad victum, 
to devour, Cic. Rep 2, 5. — II. Trop., to 
engross, absorb : nunc absorbuit aestus glo- 



ABST 

riae, Cic. Brut. 81; so id. Leg. 2, 4, 9: ipse 
ad sese jamdudum vocat, et quodam modo 
absorbet orationem meam, and, as it were, 
eats up my discourse (i. e. wishts it to treat 
of him only), id. Sest. 6, 13: ea (meretrix) 
acerrume aestuosa absorbet, devours (i. e. 
squanders one's property, the figure taken 
from the sea), Plaut. Bacch. 3, 3, ti7. 

* absorptlO, 6ms, / [absorbeo], per 
met., a drink, beverage, Suet. Ner. 27 dub. 

abs-peUo,-porto,-portatio ? v ^P • 

I. abs-que, v re P- 9 0V - abl - [ from abs 
and the generalizing -que, like susque deque 
from sub and de ; cf. Prise. 999 P.] (ante- and 
post -class.), without. I, Ante -class. A. 
Denoting defect in conception, while the 
class, sine indicates defect in reality. In 
Plaut. and Ter. only in conditional clauses: 
absque me. te, eo, etc. , esset = nisi or si 
ego, tu, is. etc., non fuissem; without me, 
i. e. without my agency, if it had not been 
for me : nam "hercle absque me foret et 
rneo praesidio, hie faceret te prostibilem, 
if I had not stood by you, Plaut. Pers. 5, 
2, 56 ; cf. id. Trin. 5, 2, 3 : nam absque ted 
esset, numquam hodie ad soiem occasum 
viverem. if you had not aided me, etc., 
id. Men. 5, 7, 33; cf. id. Bacch. 3, 3, 8; id. 
Trin. 4, 1, 13 : absque eo esset, recte ego 
mihi vidissem, Ter. Phorm. 1, 4, 11. Some- 
what different is, quam fortunatus cete- 
ris sum rebus, absque una hac foret, if it 
were not for this one thing, id. Hec. 4, 2, 
25. 

B. After Plaut. and Ter., absque appears 
in the classic lang. only a few times in a 
kind of jurid. formula: absque sententia. 
without judgment, contrary to it : nullam 
a me epistulam ad te sino absque argu- 
mento ac sententia pervenire, Cic. Att. 1, 
19, l; cf.: an etiamsi nulla ratione ductus 
est. impetu raptus sit et absque sententia? 
Qirnt. 7, 2, 44. 

21. Post -class. A. Likewise in jurid. 
lang." i. q. sine, without : decerni absque 
libelli documento, Cod. Th. 11, 30, 40; so, 
absque praejudicio, Gell. 2, 2, 7 : absque ulla 
observatione. Cod. Th. 13. 5, 38 : absque 
omni praerogativa principum, Amm. 23, 5. 

B. I- <!• praeter, except : apud Aeschy- 
lum "eundem esse versum absque paucis 
syllabis, Gell. 13, 18 (19), 4; so, absque pau- 
cis, Symm. Ep. 2. 36: absque his, Cod. Th. 6, 
4. 18; 11, 16. 17: purpureus absque cauda, 
except the tail, Sol. 46. — Adv., = praeter- 
quam, nisi: absque labra, except the lips, 
Amm. 23, 5; so, absque illud nomen, Jul. 
Val. Rer. Gest. Alex. M. 1, 18. 

2. absque — et abs : loca > tem P la ■ ■ • 

eorum relmquatis absque his abeatis, Form, 
ap. Macr. S. 3, 9. 

~ abstantia, ae, / [ absto ], distance, 
Vitr. 9, 1, 11. 

abs-temiUS. a, um, adj. [cf. temetum 
and temulentus]', abstaining from intoxi- 
cating drinks, temperate, sober, aoivos. I, 
Lit.: sicca atque abstemia, Lucil. ap. Non. 
68, 30 : mulieres, Varr. ap. Non. ib. : vina 
fugit gaudetque mens abstemius undis, Ov. 
M. 15, 323 al. — Hence. II. in gen. : i. q. 
sobrius, temperate, abstinent, moderate : 
abstemius, herbis vivis et urtica. Hor. Ep. 
1 12 7 — P 1 e o n. : mulieres vini abste- 
miae, Plin. 22, 24, 54, § 115. — B. In later 
Lat. = jejunus. ivho is yet fasting, has not 
breakfasted, Aus. Idyll, praef. 11. 

a bstentio 5 oniB,/ [abstineo], the hold- 
ing back, retaining : stercorum, Cael. Aur. 
Acut. 3, 18. 

abstentuS, a , um , Part of abstineo. 

abS-terg-eo, rsi, rsum. 2, v. a. (the 
form abstergo, gtre rests upon spurious 
readings, except in eccl. Lat., as Vulg. 
Apoc. 21, 4), to wipe off or away, to dry by 
wiping I Lit.: labellum, Plaut. As. 4, 1, 
52- sudorem, id. Men. 1, 2, 16: vulnera,Ter. 
Eun. 4. 7. 9 : lacrimas, Lucil. ap. Porphyr. 
ad Hor. S. 1, 2, 68 : fietum, Cic. Phil. 14, 
34 : everrite aedis, abstergete araneas, 
brush away, Titin. ap. Non. 192, 10. — *B. 
Transf. : remos (qs. to wipe away, i. e.), 
to break, to dash to pieces, Curt. 9, 9, 16.— 

II. Trop., to wipe away (any thing dis- 
agreeable, a passion, etc.), i. e. to drive 
away, expel, remove, banish : ut mihi ab- 
sterserunt omnem' sorditudinem. Plaut 
Poen. 5, 2, 10; esp. freq. in Cic. : dolorem, 
Q Fr 2 9 = senectutis molestias, Sen. 1; 

11 



ABST 

metum, Fam. 9, 16; luctum, Tusc. 3, 18: 
suspicionem, Amm. 14, 11. 

abs-terreo, ui, Iturn, 2, v. a., to drive 
away by terrifying, to frighten away, to 
deter (by fear) : patrem, Plaut. Most. 2, 1, 
74; so Ter. Andr. 3, l 14: neminem a con- 
grcssu meo neque janitor mens neque 
somnus absterruit, Cic. Plane. 27: homi- 
nes a pecuniis capiendis, id.Verr. 2, 2, 58; 
so Hor. S. 2, 5, 83 ; Li v. 5, 41 ; Suet. Caes. 
20 al. — With de : ut de frumento anseres 
absterreret, Plaut. True. 2, 1, 41. — With 
simple abl. : lenonem aedibus, Titin. ap. 
Non. 95, 1 : teneros animos vitiis, Hor. S. 
1, 4, 128 ; so Tac. A. 12, 45 al. — H. T r a n s f. 
with an abstract object, to take away, re- 
move, withdraw : pabula amoris sibi, Lucr. 
4, 1064: satum genitalem cuiquam, id. 4, 
1233: auctum, id. 5, 846. 

abstersus. a, um, Bart, of abstergeo. 

* abstinax, Scis, adj. , = abstinens, 
abstinent, Petr. S. 42 ; Symm. Ep. 1, 47. 

abstinens, entis, P. a., v. abstineo. 

abstinenter, adv., v. abstineo, P. a., 
fin. ' 

abstinentia, ae, / [abstineo], absti- 
nence, self-restraint (the quality by means 
of which one abstains from unlawful de- 
sires, acts, etc. , freedom from covetousness 
(se ab re abstinet) ; it always has reference 
to the outward object from which one re- 
strains himself; while the syn. continentia 
designates merely subjective self-restraint. 
Yet as early as Cic. these ideas passed into 
each other, ab&tinentia being used for con- 
tinentia, and continentia— referring to an 
object— taking the place of ab&tinentia). 

1, In gen., a refraining from any thine: 
conciliare benevolentiam multitudinis abs- 
tinent ia et continentia, i. e. by not violat- 
ing the right of property (alieno abstinent) 
and by self-control (se continent), Cic. Off. 

2, 22 : possum multa dicere de provincial 
in eo magistratu abstinentia, id. Sest. 3- 
id. Verr. 4, 46; id. Q. Rose. 17; so id. Att' 
5, 17; Sail. C. 3— H. In later Lat., absti- 
nence from food, fasting, starvation — ine- 
dia (v. abstineo) : vitam abstinentia finivit, 
he ended his life by starvation, Tac A 4 
35; Sen. Ep. 70, 9; 77, 9; cf. Cels. 2, 16; 
febrem quiete et abstinentia mitigavit 
Quint. 2, 17, 9: so Plin, 27, 55, 80 al.— From 

abs-tineo, tti, tentum, 2, v. a and n. 
[teneo], to keep off or away, to hold back, to 
hold at a distance. In the comic writers 
and Cic. this verb is in most cases purely 
active, hence constr. with aliquem {or se) 
re or ab re ; the neuter signif. first became 
prevalent in the Aug. per. = se abstinere. 
I, Act. : dum ted abstineas nupta vidua 
virgine, etc., Plaut. Cure. 1 l. 37: 'urbanis 
rebus te, id. Cas. 1, 1, 13; id. Men. 5, 6 20- 
Ter. Heaut. 2, 3, 132 : manus a muliere 
Lucil. ap. Xon. 325, 32; cf. : man us absti- 
neant, Plaut. Trin. 2, 2, 11 : amor absti- 
nendust (apstandust, R. ), id. ib. 2, 1 30 • me 
ostreis et muraenis facile abstinebam. Cic. 
Fam. 7, 26 : ab alienis mentes, oculos' ma- 
nus, de Or. 1, 43: manus auimosque ab hoc 
scelere, id.Verr. 1, 12 fin. : se nullo dede- 
core, id. Fin. 3, 11, 38 : se cibo, Caes. B. C. 
8,44: ne ab obsidibus quidem iram belli 
hostis abstinuit, Liv. 2, 16: aliquos ab le- 
gatis violandis, id. 2, 22 : se armis, id. 8 
2 al.— Hence: m&num a, &e, to abstain from 
suicide, Cic. Tusc. 4, 37 al. 

II. Neutr. : abstinere, to abstain from 
a thing; constr. with abl., ab, inf. quin or 
quominus, the gen., or absol. L\ With 
abl. : haud abstinent culpa, Plaut! Men 5 
2, 18 Ritschl: injuria, Cic. Off 3 17 70' 
faba (Pythagorei). id. Div. 2. 58, 119 ■ proe- 
lio, Caes. B. G. 1, 22, 3: pugna, Liv. 2 45 
8 : senatorio ambitu, Tac. A. 4, 2 : manibus' 
id. Hist. 2, 44; auribus principis, to spare 
them, id. Ann. 13, 14 : sermone Graeco 
Suet. Tib. 71: publico abstinuit, did not po 
out, id. Claud. 36 al. — Impers.: ne a me 
quidem abstinuit, Cic. de Or. 3, 43 171 • ut 
seditionibus abstineretur. Liv. 3 10 7- « 
id. 5, 50, 1.-03) With ab :' ut ne a mulieri- 
bus quidem atque infantibus abstinerent 
Caes. B. G. 7, 47, 5.— ( 7 ) With inf.: dum 
mi abstineant invidere, if they only cease 
to envy me, Plaut. Cure. 1, 3, 2; so Suet. 
ilu - 2 ^- — (<5) With quin or quominus : aegre 
abstinent, quin castra oppugnent, Liv 2 
45, 10: ut ne clarissimi quidem viri absti' 
12 



ABST 

nuerint, quominus et ipsi aliquid de ea 
scriberent, Suet. Gram. *3.— (* e) With the 
gen. (in Greek construction like the Greek 
anexeaBai twos) : abstineto irarum calidae- 
que rixae, Hor. C. 3, 27, 69 (cf. infra, ab- 
stinens).— (O Absol. : te scio facile absti- 
nere posse, Plaut. Aul. 2, 5, 19 : non tamen 
abstinuit, Verg. A. 2, 534.— Es p. in med., 
to abstain from food: abstinere debet ae- 
ger, Cels. 2, 12, 2. -Hence, abstinens, 
entis, P. a., abstaining from (that which 
is unlawful), abstinent, temperate; constr. 
absol. with abl. , or poet, with gen. : esse 
abstinentem, contmere omnes cupiditates 
praeclarum est, Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 11 : praeto- 
rem decet non solum manus, sed etiam 
oculos abstinentes habere, id. Off. 1. 40. 
144 : impubi aut certe abstinentissime re- 
bus venereis, Col. 12, 4, 3: animus absti- 
nens pecuniae, Hor. C. 4, 9, 37 ; so, alien! 
abstinentissimus, Plin. Ep. 6, 8, 5 ; and : 
somni et vini sit abstinentissimus, Col. 11 
1, 3.— Comp., Auson. Grat. Act. 28.— Sup.\ 

coi. and Plin. 1. \.— Adv.: abstinenter 

unselfishly, Cic. Sest. 16, 37. — Comp Au- 
gustin. Mor. Manich. 2, 13. ~ ' 

ab-sto, are, 1, v. n., to stand off or at 
a distance from, to stand aloof: si longius 
abstes, Hor. A. P. 361. 

* abstractly, onis, / [abstraho], a 
separation: conjugis, Diet. Cret. 1, 4. 

abstractus, a, um, p. a. of 

abs-traho, xi, ctum, 3, v. a. (abstraxe 
= abstraxisse, Lucr. 3, 050), to draw away 
from a place or person, to drag or pull 
away. I. L i t. A. In gen.: ut me a 
Glycerio miserum abstrahat, Ter. And 1 
5, 8; so, liberos ab aliquo, Caes. B. G. 3 2 
5: aliquem de matris complexu avellere 
atque abstrahere, Cic. Font. 21 (17): ali- 
quem e gremio e sinuque patriae,'id.' Cael. 
24, 59; for which, aliquem gremio, Ov. M. 
13, 658: aliquem raptim ex oculis horni- 
num, Liv. 39, 49, 12: naves e portu, id. 37, 
27, 6 (al. a portu): aliquem a conspectu 
omnium in altum, Cic. de Or. 3, 36 145 
(corresp. with, a terra abripuit).— Absol * 
bona civium Romanorum diripiunt . 
in servitutem abstrahunt, Caes. B. G. 1 42 
3: navem remulco abstraxit, id. B. C. 2! 23.' 
— B. E s p. , to withdraw, alienate from a 
party: copias a Lepido, Cic. Fam. 10 18 3: 
Germanicum suetis legionibus, Tac. A. 2* 5. 

II. T r o p. , to draw away, withdraw di- 
vert : animus se a corpore abstrahet, Cic. 
Rep. 6, 26 : a rebus gerendis senectus ab- 
strahit (for which in the preced. , avocare) 
id. de Sen. 6: me a nullius commodo, id! 
Arch. 6, 12: aliquem a malis, non a bonis, 
id. Tusc. 1, 34 fin. al. : magnitudine pecu- 
niae a bono honestoque in pravum ab- 
stractus est, Sail. J. 29. 2: omnia in duas 
partes abstracta sunt, respublica, quae me- 
dia fuerat, dilacerata, id. ib. 41, 5.— Hence 
abstractus, a > um, P. a. ; in the later 
philosophers and grammarians, abstract 
(opp. concrete) : quantitas, Isid. Or. 2, 24 
14. ' ' 

abs-trudo, «~si, f,sum, 3, v. a., to push 
or thrust away, and hence to conceal (cf 
abdo). I. Lit.: aurum, Plaut. Aul. 4, 6, 
13; so ib. 4, 5, 3: id. Cure. 5, 2, 8: in cere- 
bro colaphos, to thrust into the brain itself 
id. Rud. 4, 3, (W (cf. a similar passage from 
V erg. under abdo) : mane me in silvam 
aDstrusi densam, Cic. Att. 12, 15: tectum 
inter et laquearia, Tac. A. 4 69 — II 
Trop. : in profundo veritatem ' Cic. Ax"" 
10: tristitiam, Tac. A. 3, 6: metum, id ib 15 
5 al. — Hence, abstrusus, a, um, P, a.\ 
hidden, concealed. A. L i t. : corpus ab- 
strusum in flumine, Att. ap. Non 308 8 
(Trag. Rel. p. 195 Rib.) : insidias, Cic. Leg 
Agr. 2, 49 : terra, Ov. H. 7, 147 : incendium 
Veil. 2, 130, 4. -With dat. : serpens ab- 
strusa terrae.Vell. 2, 129, 4.— O. In neutr. 
absol. : in abstruso esse, to be in con- 
cealment, Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 129 ■ to be un- 
known, Amm. 17, 7. — B. Trop.: dolor 
reconditus et penitus abstrusus, a conceal- 
ed and inwardly repressed sorrow, Auct 
-r. pro Bom. 10 : disputatio paulo abstru- 
sior, requiring a somewhat deeper investi- 
gation, Cic. Ac. 2, 10, 30: homo abstrusus 
reserved, Tac. A. 1, 24.— Sup. not used — 
Adv. comp. : abstrusiUS, A mm. 28, 1, 49 : 
semet amandarunt, more closely. 



ABSU 



(ab-StrUG, a false read, in Tert. adv 
Marc. 4, 27.) 
abstruse, adv., v. abstrudo, P. a. fin. 

* abstrusio, onis,/. [abstrudo], a re* 
moving, concealing : seminis,Arn. 5, p. 183. 

abstrUSUs, a, um, v. abstrudo, P. a. 

* abs-tulo, ^re, vt. a., an old form (from 
which is the perf. abstuli),=aufero, to take 
away : aulas abstulas, Plaut. Fragm. ap. 
Diom. P. 376. 

(absuetudo. mis, a false read, in App. 
Mag. p. 318 for assuetudo.) 

ab-SUm, a-fui (better than abfui). afi- 
turus (aforem, afore), v. n., in its most 
general signif., to be away from, be ab- 
sent. I. In gen. A. Absol. without des- 
ignating the distance (opp. adsum) : num 
ab domo absum ? Plaut. Ep. 5, 2, 1G : me 
absente atque insciente, id. Trin. 1, 2 130 : 
domini ubi absunt, are not at home not 
present, Ter. Eun. 3, 5, 53 : facile aerum- 
uam ferre possum, si inde abest injuria 
Caecil. ap. Non. 430, 18.— B. With reference 
to the distance in space or time ; which is 
expressed either by a definite number, or, 
in gen., by the advs. multum, paulum (not 
parum, v. below) longe, etc. : edixit, ut ab 
urbe abesset milia pass, ducenta, Cic. Sest. 
12, 29 : castra, quae aberant bidui, id. Att. 
5, 16: hie locus aequo fere spatio ab cas- 
tris Ariovisti et Caesaris aberat, Caes. B. G. 
1, 43: haud longe abesse oportet, he ought 
not to be far hence, Plaut. Am. 1, 1 166 ■ 
legiones magnum spatium aberant, Caes. 
B. G. 2, 17 : menses tres abest, Ter. Heaut. 

1, 1, 66: haud permultum a me aberit in- 
fortunium, Ter. Heaut. 4, 2, 1 ; Cic. Fam. 

2, 7. —With the simple abl. for ab: pau- 
lumque cum ejus villa abessemus, Cic. Ac. 
1, 1 Gijrenz; but, ab ejus villa, B. and K. - 
cf. : nupta abesse tua, Ov. R. Am. 774.— 
With inter: nee longis inter se passibus 
absunt, Verg. A. 11, 907.— With prope, pro- 
pius, proxime, to denote a short distance : 
nunc nobis prope abest exitium, is not far 
from, Plaut. Aul. 2, 3, 8 ; so with est : prope 
est a te Deus, tecum est, Sen. Ep. 41; i loca 
quae a Brundisio propius absunt, quam tu! 
biduum, Cic. Att, 8, 14 : quoniam abes pro- 
pius, since you are nearer, id. ib. 1, 1 : ex- 
istat aliquid, quod . . . absit longissime a 
vero, id. Ac. 2, 11, 36 ; so id. Deiot. 13 ■ 
Caes. ap. Cic. Att. 9, 16 al.— Hence the 
phrase: tantum abest, ut— ut, so far from 
—that, etc. (Zumpt, g 779), the origin of 
which is evident from the following exam- 
ples from Cic. (the first two of which have 
been unjustly assailed): id tantum abest 
ab officio, ut nihil magis officio possit esse 
contrarium, Off. 1, 14 (with which comp. 
the person, expression: equidem tantum 
absum ab ista sententia, ut non modo non 
arbitrer . . . sed, etc., id. de Or. 1, 60, 255): 
tantum abest ab eo, ut malum mors sit ut 
verear, ne, etc., id. Tusc. 1, 31, 76: ego 
vero istos tantum abest ut ornem, ut efflci 
non possit, quin eos oderim, so far am I 
from — that, id. Phil. 11. 14; sometimes 
etiam or quoque is added to' the second 
clause, Lentul. ap. Cic. Fam. 12, 15, 2; Suet. 
Tib. 50; more rarely contra, Liv. 6, 31, 4. 
Sometimes the second ut is left out: tan- 
tum afuit, ut inflammares nostros animos : 
somnum isto loco vix tenebamus, Cic 
Brut. 80, 278 ; on the contrary, once in 
Cic. with a third ut : tantum abest, ut nos- 
tra miremur, ut usque eo difflciles ac mo- 
rosi simus, ut nobis non satisfaciat ipse 
Demosthenes, Or. 29, 104. 

II. Hence, A. To be away from any 
thing unpleasant, to be freed or free from : 
a multis et magnis molestiis abes, Cic. 
Fam. 4, 3: a culpa, id. Rose. Am. 20: a 
reprehensione temeritatis, Plane, ap Cic. 
Fam. 10, 23. 

B. To oe removed from a thing by will, 
inclination, etc. ; to be disinclined to (syn! 
abhorred): a consilio fugiendi, Cic. Att. 7 
24: ab istis studiis, id. Plane. 25: ceteri a, 
periculis aberant, kept aloof from, avoided 
Sail. C. 6, 3 : toto aberant bello, Caes. B. G. 
7, 63. 

G. To be removed from a thing in regard 
to condition or quality, i. e. to be different 
from, to differ = abhorrere :* abest a tua 
virtute et fide, Brut, et Cass. ap. Cic. Fam. 
11, 2: istae Ko/Welcu non longe absunt a 
scelere, id. Att. 13, 30: haec non absunt a 
eonsuetudine somniorum, id. Divin. 1, 2L 



ABSU 

'42, — Since improvement, as well as deteri- 
< oration, may constitute the ground of dif- 
ference, so absum may, according to its 
connection, designate the one or the other : 
, nulla re longius absumus a natura ferarum, 
in nothing are we more elevated above the 
nature of the brute, Cic. Off. 1, 16, 50; so also 
the much -contested passage, Cic. Plane. 7, 
17 : longissime Plancius a te afuit, i. e. 
valde, plurimis suffragiis, te vicit, was far 
from you in the number of votes, i. e. had 
the majority ; v. Wunder ad Plane, proleg. 
p. 83 sq. ; on the other hand, to be less, in- 
ferior : longe te a pulchris abesse sensisti, 
Cic. Fragm. ap. Non. 339, 23 : multum ab eis 
aberat L. Fuiius, id. Brut. 62, 222 ; so Hor. 
A. P. 370. 

D. Not to be suitable, proper, or fit for a 
thing: quae absunt ab forensi contentione, 
Cic. Or. 11, 37 : ab principis persona, Nep. 
Ep. 1, 2. 

E To be wanting,= desum, Pac. ap. Cic. 
Fin. 5, 11, 31 (Trag. Re!, p. 122 Rib. ) : unum 
a praetura tua abest, one thing is want- 
ing to your praetorship, Plaut. Ep. 1, 1, 
25: quaeris id quod habes; quod abest non 
quaeris, Ter. Heaut. 5, 4, 16 ; cf. Lucr. 3, 
970 and 1095.— After Cicero, constr. in this 
signif. with dat. : quid huic abesse poterit 
de maximarum rerum scientia? Cic. de Or. 
1, 11. 48 : abest enim historia htteris no- 
stris, history is yet wanting to our literature, 
id. Leg. 2, 5.— So esp. in the poets: donee 
virenti canities abest morosa, Hor. C. 1, 
9, 17 ; 3, 24, 64 ; Ov. M. 14, 371. — Hence 
the phrase non multum (neque multum), 
paulum, non (haud) procul, minimum, 
nihil abest, quin. not much, little, nothing 
is wanting that (Zumpt, Gr. § 540); but not 
panim, since parurn in good classical au- 
thors does not correspond in meaning with 
non multum, but with non satis (v. parum): 
neque multum abesse ab eo, quin, etc., 
Gaes. B. G. 5, 2, 2; and absol.: neque mul- 
tum afuit quin, id. B. C. 2, 35, 4: paulum- 
que afuit quin. ib. § 2: legatos nostros haud 
procul afuit quin violarent, Liv. 5, ifin.: 
minimum afuit quin periret, was within a 
little of Suet. Aug. 14: nihil afore credunt 
quin, Verg A. 8, 147 al. 

P. Abesse alicui or ab aliquo, to be want- 
ing to any one, to be of no assistance or 
service to (opp. adsum) : ut mirari Torqua- 
tus desinat, me, qui Antonio afuerim, Sul- 
lam defendere, Cic. Sull. 5 : facile etiam 
absentibus nobis {without our aid) Veritas 
se ipsa defendet, id. Ac. 2, 11, 36: longe iis 
fraternum nomen populi Romani afutu- 
rum, Caes. B. G. 1, 36. So also Cic. Plane. 
5. 13: et quo plus intererat, eo plus aberas 
a me, the more I needed your assistance, the 
more you neglected me, v. Wunder ad h. 1. ; 
cf. also Sail. C. 20 fin. 

Q, Cicero uses abesse to designate his 
banishment from Rome (which he would 
never acknowledge as such) : qui nulla lege 
abe=sem. Cic Sest, 34, 37 ; cf. : discessus. 
—Hence, absens, entis i aen - P lur - regul. 
absentiuni ; absentum, Plaut. Stich. 1, 1, 
6), P. a, absent (opp. praesens). A. I" 
gen.: vos et praesentem me cura leva- 
tis et absenti magna solatia dedistis, Cic. 
Brut. 3, 11; so id. Off. 3, 33, 121; id. Verr. 
2, 2, 17: quocirca (amici) et absentes ad- 
Biint et egentes abundant, id. Lael. 7, 23: 
ut loquerer tecum absens, cum coram id 
non licet, id. Att. 7, 15 : me absente, id. 
Dom. 3; id. Cael. 50: illo absente, id. Tull. 
17; id. Verr. 2, 60: absente accusatore, id. 
ib. 2, 99 al. — Sup. : mente absentissimus, 
Aug. Conf. 4, 4. — Of things ( not thus in 
Cic.): Romae rus optas, absentem rusticus 
urbem tollis ad astra, Hor. S. 2, 7, 28 ; so, 
Rhodus, id. Ep. 1, 11, 21 : rogus, Mart. 9, 
77, 8: venti, Stat. Th. 5, 87: imagines re- 
ruin absentium, Quint. 6. 2, 29 : versus, 
Gell. 20, 10.— B. I n p a r t i c. 1, In con- 
versat. lang. (a) Praesens absens, in one^s 
presence or absence : postulo ut mini tua 
domus te praesente absente pateat, Ter. 
Eun. 5, 8, 29.— {/3) Absente nobis turbatumst, 
in our absence (so also: praesente nobis, v. 
praesens), Ter. Eun. 4, 3, 7; Afran. ap Non. 
76, 19 (Com. Rel. p. 165 Rib.). — 2. In 
polit. lang.. not appearing in public can- 
vassings as a competitor: deligere (Scipio) 
iterum consul absens. Cic. Rep. 6, 11 ; so 
Liv. 4, 42, 1; 10. 22, 9.-3. — mortuus, de- 
ceoxzd, Plaut. Cas. prol. 20 ; Vitr. 7, praef. 
% 8. — 4. E 1 1 i p t. : absens in Lucanis, ab- 



ABSY 

sent in Lucania, i. e. absent and in Lucania, 
Nep. Hann. 5, 3; so id. Att. 8, 6. 

* abstimedo, ™\s, f. [absumo], a con- 
suming or devouring consumption, in a 
pun : quanta sumini absumedo ! Plaut. 
Capt. 4, 3, 3. 

ab-SUmO, m P si , mptum ( not nasi, 
mtum), 'A, v. a. I. Orig., io take away ; 
hence, io diminish by taking away. Of 
things, to consume, to annihilate ; of per- 
sons, orig. to ruin, to corrupt; later, in a 
phys. sense, to kill. Thus Hercules, in the 
transl. of the Trachiniae, complains : sic 
corpus clade horribili absumptum exta- 
buit, consumed, ap. Cic. Tusc. 2, 8, 20; so 
Philoctetes in a piece of Attius: jam jam 
ahsnmnr : cnnficit animam vis vulnens, 
Att. ap. Cic. Tusc. 2, 7, 19 (Trag. Rel. p. 209 
Rib. ) : jam ista quidem absumpta res 
ent: diesque noctesquc estur, bibitur, etc., 
Plaut. Most. 1, 3, 78 : absumpti sum us, 
pater tuus venit, we are lost, undone! id. 
ib. 2, 1, 18 ; id. Am. 5, 1, 6 : nisi quid 
tibi in tete auxili est, absumptus es, you 
are ruined, id. Ep. 1, 1, 76: dum te fidelem 
facere ero volu'^t', absumptu's paene, id. 
Mil. 2, 4, 55 : pyt;san<lo modo mini quid 
vini absumpsit ! has consumed, Ter. Heaut. 
3, 1, 48; so, absumet heres Caecuba digni- 
or, Hor. C. 2, 14, 25: mensas malis, Verg. 
A. 3, 257; cf. id. G 3, 268; and: absump- 
tis frugum alimentis, Liv. 23, 30, 3: urbem 
fiammis, to consume, destroy, Liv. 30, 7, 9; 
cf. Veil. 2, 130 ; Pi;n. Ep. 10, 42 : plures 
fame quam ferro absumpti, Liv. 22, 39, 14; 
cf. : quos non oppresserat ignis, ferro ab- 
sumpti, killed, id. 30, 6, 6; and: multi ibi 
mortales ferro igmque absumpti sunt, id. 
5, 7, 3; so, nisi mors eum absumpsisset, 
id. 23, SO fin.; and: animam leto, Verg. A. 
3, 654. — Absum i, to be killed : ubi nuper 
Epiri rex Alexander absumptus erat, Liv. 
9, Yl fin.— Absumi in aliquid, to be used for 
any thing, to be changed into : dentes in 
cornua absumi, Plin. 11, 37, 45 fin. — H. 
Fig, to ruin : cum ille et cura et sumptu 
absumitur, Ter. Phorm. 2, 2, 26: satietatem 
amoris, to consume, id. ib. 5, 5, 6. — Often of 
time: ne dicendo tempus absumam, spend, 
pass, Cic. Quint, 10; so, quattuor horas di- 
cendo, Liv. 45, 37, 6 : diem, Ov. Tr. 4, 10, 
114: biduum inter cogitationes, Curt. 3. 6, 
8: magnarn partem aetatis in hoc, Quint. 
12, 11, 15. 

* absumptio, onis,/ [absumo], a con- 
suming, Dig. 7, 5, 5. 

absumptus, a, um, Part, of absumo. 
absurd^, adv. , v. absurdus. 

* absurdltas, atis, / [absurdus], dis- 
sonance, inconaruitv. absurdity, (late Lat.), 
Claud. Mam. 3" 11 ; cf. Prise. Op. Min. 102 
Lindemann. 

ab-surdas, a < um - ad J- t ab > ™ is -> an(i 
Sanscr. svan = sonare; cf. susurrus. and av- 
pty£ ,= a pipe ; cf. also absonus], out of tune, 
hence giving a disagreeable sound, harsh, 
rough. I, Lit : vox absona et absurda, Cic. 
de Or. 3, 11, 41 ; so of the croaking of frogs : 
absurdoque so'no fontes et stagna cietis, 
Poet. ap. Cic. Div 1, 9. 15. — H, Fig, of 
persons and things, irrational, incongru- 
ous, absurd, silly, senseless, stupid : ratio 
inepta atque absurda, Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 22: hoc 
pravum, ineptum, absurdum atque alie- 
num a vita mea videtur, id. ib. 5, 8, 21: 
carmen cum ceteris rebus absurdum turn 
vero in illo, Cic. Mur. 26: ilhid quam in- 
credibile, quam absurdum I id. Sull. 20 : 
absurda res est eaveri, id. Balb. 37: bene 
dicero haud absurdum est, is not inglori- 
ous, per litotem for, is praiseworthy, glori- 
ous', Sail. C. 3 Kritz. — Homo absurdus, a 
man xoho is fit or good for nothing: sin 
plane abhorrebit et erit absurdus, Cic. de 
Or. 2, 20, 85: absurdus ingenio, Tac. H. 3, 
62; cf. : sermo comis, nee absurdum inge- 
nium, id. A. 13, 45. — Comp., Cic. Phil. 8, 
41; id. N. D. 1, 16; id. Fin. 2, 13. — Sup., 
Cic. Att. 7, 13.—^*).: absurde. 1. L^-, 
discordantly: canere, Cic. Tusc. 2, 4, 12.— 
2 Fig, irrationally, absurdly, Plaut. Ep. 
3,'l, 6; Cic. Rep. 2, 15; id. Div. 2, 58, 219 
al.— Comp., Cic. Phil. 8, 1, 4. — Sup., Aug. 
Trin. 4 fin. 

Absyrtis, v. 2 Absyrtus. 

1. AbsyrtnS, \ m., — "A\l/vpTO?, a son 
of Metes, king of Colchis, killed by his sister 
Medea in her flight with Jason: he was torn 



ABUN 

in pieces by her, and his limbs were scat- 
tered in the way to prevent her father's 
pursuit, Ov. Tr. 3, 9. 6 sq. ; Cic. N. D. 3, 19, 
48. 

2. Absyrtus, i, w.,="A\f/upTor, a river 
in Illyria waich flows into the Adriatic Sea, 
Luc. a, 190 (al. Absyrtis or Apsyrtis). 

(ab-torqucO, a false read. ap. Att. in- 
stead of obtorqueo, Trag Rel. p. 210 Rib.) 

abundans, antis, P. a., and abun- 

danter, adv. , v. abundo, P. a. 

abundantia, ae, / [ abundo ], abun- 
dance, plenty, fulness, richness (syn. copia). 
f. In the Cic. and Aug. per. usu. with a 
gen. to define it more exactly: omnium re- 
rum abundantia et copia, Cic. Lael. 23; id. 
Agr. 2, 97: otii, id. Farn. 7, 1: amoris, id. 
ib. 1, 9, 1 al.— II. Absol. , pecuniary wealth, 
riches, Cic. Cat. 2, 10 ; Tac. Agr. 6 ; id. H. 
2, 94: laborare abundantia, from overload- 
ing the stomach, Suet. Claud. 44 (cf. id. ib. 
40).— Fig, of speech: multa ex juvenili 
abundantia coercuisse, Quint. 12, 1, 20. 

* abundatlO, onis, / [id], an over- 
flowing : fossae, Plin. 3, 16, 20, § 121. 

abunde, adv. [as if from an obs. abun- 
dis, e], in great profusion or abundance, 
abundantly, exceedingly, very ; constr.. A, 
With verbs : perfu&e atque abunde usi 
magnum pondus auri, Sisenn. ap. Non. 
516, 31 : abunde satis facere quaestioni, 
Cic. Div. 2, 1, 3: quibus mala abunde om- 
nia erant, Sail. C. 21; so with esse (like 
satis, frustra, bene est, etc.), id. ib. 58, 9; 
id. J. 63, 2; cf. : mihi abunde est, si satis 
expressi, etc., / am more than satisfied, 
Plin. Ep. 4, SO fin.; so, abunde est, si, id. ib. 
7, 2 fin.; cf. ; cum sit satis abundeque, si, 
etc., id. Pan. 44, 7; and: abunde est, with 
a subject- clause : hoc dixisse abunde est, 
Col. 4, 19, 1; so id. 5, 3, 9: Cels. 1, 3: Plin. 
Ep. 5, 8, 7 al. : sufficere, Liv. 4, 22, 3: con- 
tingere, Hor. Ep. 1, 4, 10 : cavere, Ov. M. 15, 
759: persequi aliquid, Veil. 2, 103,3: abunde 
agnoscere, id. 2, 1 J6, 3 : mirari, id. 1, 16, 2 ; 2, 
116^ 3 al.— B. Witn ad J- : abunde magna, 
Sail. J. 14, 1H : abunde pollens potensque, id. 
ib. 1. 3: par, Liv. 8, 29, 4: constans Curt. 6, 
17. 13: pulchrum atque magmflcum, Plin. 
H.'N. praef. § 15: abunde similes Quint. 
10, 1, 25: disertus, id. 11, 1, 36: elatus spi- 
ritus, id. 10, 1, 104 al. — C. With adv. : 
abunde satis est, Hor. S. 1, 2, 59 ; so Quint. 
12, 11, 19 : abunde dixit bene, id. 12, 9, 7.— 
I>. With gen. (like satis, affatmi, etc. ; cf. 
Rudd. II. p. 317) : terrorum et fraudis abun- 
de est, Verg. A. 7, 552: potentiae gloriae- 
que, Suet. Caes. 86: honorum, Front, ap. 
Chans, p. 177 P.: quibus abunde et ingenii 
et otii et verborum est, Gell. 6, 8, 4. 

ab-undo, *~ ivi > ruum, 1, v. n. I. Lit, 

of a wave, to flow over and down, to over- 
flotv (while redundo signifies to flow over 
a thing with great abundance of water, to 
inundate): apud abundantem antiquam 
amnem, Att. ap. Non. 192, 4 (Trng Rel. 
p. 175 Rib. ) : flumina abundare ut face- 
rent. Lucr. 6, 267; cf. id. 1, 282; Verg. G. 3, 
484;' and in the beautiful figure in Plaut.: 
ripis superat mi atque abundat pectus lae- 
titvX, for joy, my heart, swells alxme its banks 
and overflows, Stich. 2, 1, 6: ita abundavit 
Tiberis, ut, etc., Liv. 30, 38, 10; cf. : quan- 
do aqua Albana abundasset, id. 5, 15, 11; 
so, fons in omnem partem, Plin. 18, 22, 51, 
§ 188. __ 

II. Transf. A. Poet., of plants, to 
shoot up with great luxuriance : de terriB 
abundant herbarum genera ac fruges. Lucr. 
5, 920 (in Enn. ap. Macr. 6, 3. the better 
read, is obundantes, Enn p. 65 Van I. ). 

3. In gen., to abound, to be redundant : 
sive deest naturae quippiam, sive abundat 
atque affluit, Cic. Div. 1, 29, 61 : abunda- 
bant et praemia et operae vitae, Plin. H. 
N. 14, prooem. § 4.— Once with dat.: tenu- 
ionbus magis sanguis, plenioribus magis 
caro abundat, Cels. 2, 10. 

C. To overflow with any thing, to have 
an abundance or superabundance of, to 
abound in (the most usual s gnif ) ; constr. 
with abL, and once poet, with gen. ( cf. 
Rudd. II. p. 189 n.). (a; With abl. : divitiis, 
Ter. Heaut. 3, 2, 17: villa abundat porco, 
haedo, agno, etc. , Cic. Sen. 16, 56 : prae- 
ceptis philosophiae, id. Off. 1. 1: ingenio, 
otio, id. de Or. 1, 6, 22 : mulier abundat 
audacia. id. Clu. 84: cujus oratio omnibus 
13 



ABUT 

ornamentis abundavit, id. Balh 7 : equi- 
tatu, Caes. B. G. 7, 14: magna copia fru- 
menti. id. ib. 8, 40: aqua, Auct. B. Alex. 1 : et 
aequalium famiharitatibus et consuetudi- 
ne propinquorum, Cic. Tusc, 5, 20, 58: cli 
entibus, Quint. 5, 10, 26. — Poet. : amore 
abundas, you are too fortunate in love (suc- 
cessu prospero affluis, Don. ), Ter. Phorm. 
1, 3, 11; cf. Lucil. : ille abundans cum sep- 
tem incolumis pinnis redit, ap. Don. Ter. 
La— (/?) With gen. : quarum et abundemus 
rerum et quarum indigeamus, Lucil. ap. 
Non. p. 498, 7. — Esp., to abound in wealth, 
to be rich (cf. abundantia, II.): et absentee 
adsunt et egentes abundant, Cic. Lael. 7, 
23: Caiotam, si quando abundare coepero, 
ornabo, id. Att. 1, 4, 3. — Hence, abun- 
dans, antis, P. a. , over/lowing. £. Lit., 
of rivers, fluids, etc. : fluvius abundantior 
aestate, i. e. fuller, Plin. 2, 103, 106, § 227 : 
abundantissimus amnis, Cic. Rep. 2, 19: 
menses (mulierum), Plin. 22, 25, 71, § 147. 
— B. T r a n s f. 1 . Existing in abundance, 
copious, abundant : non adesa jam, sed 
abundanti etiam pecunia sic dissolutus, 
Cic. Quint. 12, 40. — 2. Containing abun- 
dance, abounding, rich, full ; constr. with 
abl. , gen. , or absol. ( a ) With abl. : vir abun- 
dans bellicis laudibus, Cn. Pompeius, Cic. 
Off. 1, 22, 78 : abundantior consilio, ingenio, 
sapientia, id. Pis. 26, 62: rerum copia et 
sententiarum varietate abundantissimus 
id. de Or. 2, 14, 58. — (/?) With gen.: (via) 
copiosa omniumque rerum abundans, Nep. 
Eum. 8, 5 : lactis, Verg. E. 2, 20 : corporis, 
Claud, ap. Eutrop. 2, 380: pietatis, id. IV. 
Cons. Hon. 113.— ( 7 ) Absol: non erat abun- 
dans, non inops tamen oratio, Cic. Brut. 67, 
238: abundantior atque ultra quam oportet 
fusa materia, Quint. 2,4,7: abundantissima 
cena, Suet. Ner. 42; cf. id. Calig. 17. — Also 
in a bad sense, of discourse, pleonastic, su- 
perabundant, Quint. 12, 10, 18; 8, 3, 56.— 
Hence, adv. : ex abundanti, superabundant- 
ly, Quint. 4, 5, 15; 5, 6, 2; Dig. 33, 7, 12, § 46 
al. — b. Esp., abounding in wealth, rich 
(syn. dives, opp. egens) : (supellex) non ilia 
quidem luxuriosi hominis,sed tamen abun- 
dantis, Cic. Phil. 2, 27, 66 : haec utrum 
abundantis an egentis signa sunt ? id. Par. 

6, i, § 43. — Hence, adv. : abundant er, 

abundantly, copiously : loqui, Cic. de Or. 2, 
35: ferre fructum, Plin. 24, 9, 42.— Comp., 
Cic. Trop. 10.— Sup., Suet. Aug. 74. 

abundas, a, urn, adj. [abunde, Hand, 
Turs. I. p. 71], copious (post-class.) : lavacris 
nitidis et abundis, Gell. 1, 2, 2 : aqua, Paul. 
Nol. 734 Murat. 

abusio, <~>nis, / [abutor]. J, In rhet. 
lang., a harsh use of tropes, Gr. Kardxptio-t?, 
Auct. Her. 4, 33, 45; Cic. Or. 27, 94; Quint. 
8, 2, 5: per abusionem, id. 3, 3, 9 al.— H. 
In gen., abuse, misuse (eccl. Lat. ). 

abusive, adv. [abusivus]. \ m By an 
improper use, Quint. 8, 6, 35; 9, 2, 35. — H. 
Slightly, not in good earnest, Amm. 24, 4. 

abuSlVUS, a, urn, adj. [abutor], misap- 
plied : appellatio, Auct. Pan. ad Const. 4. 

abusor. oris, m. [id.], he who misuses 
(eccl. Lat.). 

ab-USque, prep. ( vox Vergil. ), even 
from, as far as from, like ab constr. with 
abl : Siculo prospexit abusque Pachyno, 
Yerg. A. 7, 289 : animalia maris Oceano 
abusque petiverat, Tac. A. 15, 37 ; so App. 
Mag. p. 311 med.; Amm. 19, 4 al. (in Plaut' 
Am. L, 1, 97, the correct read, is usque). 

a'DUSUS, us, m. [abutor], a using up, 
consuming, wasting, Cic. Top. 3; Dig. 7 5 
5 al. ' ' 

ab-utor, usus, 3, v. dep., to use up any 
thing, to use to the end, to consume entirely 
(utendo vel in usum consumere, Non. p. 76, 
29); constr. in ante-class, period with ace, 
in class, per. with abl. \ m L i t. ( a ) With 
ace. : nos aurum abusos, Plaut. Bacch. 2, 3, 
126 ; so, argentum, id. Pers. 2, 3. 10 : qui 
abusus sum tantam rem patriam, id. Trin. 
3, 2, 56 : operam, Ter. And. prol. 5 Ruhnk. : 
meretricem, id. Phorm. 2, 3, 66: suam vim 
Lucr. 5, 1032.— (/3) With abl. : sumus parati 
abuti tecum hoc otio, to spend this leisure 
time with you, Cic. Rep. 1, 9 Creuz ; so, 
otio liberaliter, Veil. 2, 105, 1 : omni tem- 
pore, Cic. Yerr. 2, 1, 9, § 25 : sole, id. Att. 
12, 6, 2: studiis, id. Fam. 9, 6, 5: me auu- 
sum isto prooemio, id. Att. 16, 6,4 al ■ abuti 
14 



ACAD 

ali qua re ad aliquid, to make use of for any 
purpose, to take advantage of: abuti saga- 
citate canum ad utilitatem nostram, id. 
N. D. 2, 60, 151; cf. id. Lig. 1, 1; id. Mil. 2, 
6. — Hence, XI, In a bad sense, to misuse, 
to abuse : sapientiam tuam abusa est haec, 
Plaut. Poen. 5, 4, 29 ; so in the exordium 
of the first oration against Cat.: Quousque 
tandem abutere, Catihna, patientia nostra? 
will you abuse our patience ? libertate, Cic. 
Verr. 2, 5, 43, § 113 : intemperanter otio 
et htteris, id Tusc. 1, 3, 6 : iis festivitatibus 
insolentius, id. Or. 52, 176 al. : legibus ac 
majestate ad quaestum, id. Rose. Am. 19, 54 : 
cf. id. Verr. 2, 2, 25, § 61 ; id. N. D. 1, 23, 
64 al.— B. Esp., in rhet. (of words), to use 
improperly, Cic. Or. 27, 94 ; id. de Or. 3, 43, 
169; Quint. 5, 10, 6 al. 

jg®=Pass.: abusa, consumed, Plaut. As. 
1, 3, 44 ; so also Varr. : utile utamur potius 
quam ab rege abutamur, ap. Prise, p. 792 
P., and Q. Hortensius, ib., abusis locis : 
abutendus, Suet. Galb. 14. 

Abydus and Abydos, i (in. mss. also 

AboedUS),/ (m., Verg. G. 1, 207), ="a/?„- 
<3or, a town in Mysia, on the narrowest 
point of the Hellespont, opposite Sestos, now 
perh. Aidos or Avido, Mel. 1, 9, 1 ; Auct. 
Her. 4, 54, 68: ostrifer, Verg. G. 1, 207: mea, 
Ov. H. 18, 127 ; 19, 30 al. : Abydum oppi- 
dum, Plin. 5, 32, 40, § 141. — XX. Hence 
deriv. : AbydenUS, a , um > aa J- , belonging 
to Abydus : juvenis, i. e. Leander, Stat. S. 
1, 2, 87 ; the same absol. : Abydenus, Ov. 
H. 18, L— In plur. : Abydeni, the inhabi- 
tants of Abydus, Liv. 31, 16. 

Abyla, a e, /, = 'a/3v\^, a spur of a 
mountain in Africa, on the strait of Gib- 
raltar, one of the Pillars of Hercules, 
opposite Calpe, Mel. 15, 3) Avien. Perieg. 

t abySSUS, *,/, = a/3va<rov (SC. Xi/xvtj). 
1. A bottomless pit, an abyss, Isid. Orig. 13, 
20. — 2. The sea, Vulg. Gen. 1, 2.-3. The 
place of the dead, Orcus, Hades,Vulg. Rom. 
10, 7.-4. Tartarus, hell, where the wicked 
are confined, Vulg. Luc. 8, 31; ib. Apoc. 9, 1. 
So in eccl. Lat. 

1 AC, a Latin root, denoting (X) sharp 
and (2) quick, kindred with the Greek & K - 
po? and wk-vv, Sanscr. acu ( = celeriter ). 
Hence the Latin acer, acies, acuo, acus, 
acutus, aquila, accipiter, acupedius (prob. 
also equus), ocior, and oculus. 

2. ac, con J , v. atque. 

t acacia, ae, /, = LuaKia. I, The 
acacia tree, the Egyptian pod-thorn : Mimo- 
sa Nilotica, Linn. ; described by Plin. 24, 
12, 67, § 109 sq.— II. The juice or gum of 
the same, Cels. 6, 6 ; Plin. 20, 21, 85, § 233 ; 
Scrib. Comp. 23 al. 

t academia, ae, /, = Uad^ia, and 
less correctly aKadnnia, the Academy, a 
gymnasium about six stadia from Athens, 
named after the hero Academos or Echede- 
mos (cf. Plut. Thes. 31), celebrated as the 
place where Plato taught ; whence his 
scholars were called Academici, and his 
doctrine Philosophia Academica, in dis- 
tinction from Stoica, Cynica, etc., Cic. de 
Or. 1, 21, 98; id. Or. 3, 12; id. Fin. 5, 1, 1 
al.— II. Meton. £. For The philosophy 
of the Academy: instaret academia, quae 
quidquid dixisses, id te ipsum scire nega- 
ret, Cic. de Or. 1, 10, 43 ; id. Off. 3, 4, 20 al. : 
Academia vetus, id. Ac. 1, 4, 18 ; id. Fin. 5, 8, 
21 : recens, id. Leg. 1, 13, 39 ; cf. recentior, 
id. de Or. 3, 18, 68; and adulescentior, id. 
Fam. 9, 8, 1 : nova, id. Ac. 1, 12, 46 al. — 
B. Cicero, as a partisan of the Academic 
philosophy, named his estate, on the way 
from Lake Avernus to Puteoli, Academia ; 
there also he wrote the Academica. He 
had another Academia at his Tusculan 
villa, Cic. Tusc. 2,3; 3, 3 ; id. Att. 1, 4, 3 al. 
(The i long, Cic. Biv. 1, 13, 22 ; Tull. Laurea 
ap. Plin. 31, 2, 3, § 8 ; short, Claud, de Cons. 
Mall. Theod. 94; Sid. 15, 120.) 

(Academice, es, in Cic. Att. 13, 16 ; 
better written as Greek, 'A/ca^/x^ oi> v - 
Tafif, i. e. Academica, the Academics, v. 
academicus.) 

t academiCUS, a, um, adj., = ^Kadn- 
/if «'■>?, relating to the Academy, Academic: 
phi]osophi,Gell. 11.5.— Hence, subst. : aca- 
demiCUS, U m., an Academic philosopher, 
Cic. N. D. 2, 1, 1; and in plur., id. ib. 1, 1, 



ACAU 

1; Id. Ac. 2, 44; id. Fin. 2, 11, 34 al. ; hence, 
quaestio, inquiry on the Academic philoso- 
phy, id. Att. 13, 19, 3 (v. academia, II. B.). 
—In neutr. plur.: Academica, one of 
Cicero's writings, the Academics Cic. Off. 
2, 2, 8; id Att. 13, 19, 5; also called Aca- 
demici libri, id. Tusc. 2, 2, 4. 

Academns. i, m., = } A/cd6t lf xov, a Gre- 
cian hero, from whom the Academia near 
Athens is said to have derived its name- 
inter silvas Academi, Hor. Ep. 2, 2, 45. 

t acalanthis, Mis, /, = 'teaXavBis, 

i. q. acanthis, a very small bird of a dark- 
green color ; according to Voss, the thistle- 
finch, goldfinch, Verg. G. 3, 338. 

t acalephe, es ; /, =z i Ka \^t], a nettle, 
Macer. de Virt. Herb. 2, 2. 

Acasnas, antis, m., = 'Alcanas, x. A 
son of Theseus and Phazdra, Verg. A. 2, 262. 
—II. ^ servant of Vulcan, Val. Fl. 1, 583. 
— III. ^ promontory of Cyprus, Plin. 5, 
31, 35, §129. 

t acanos, ^ m., = ana-vo?, a plant, a 
kind of thistle : Onopordon Acanthium, 
Linn. ; Plin. 22, 9, 10, § 23. 

f acanthice mastiche = htavBtKh 

fjiavTixii, the juice of the plant helxine, 
Plin. 21, 16, 50, § 96. 

t acanthillis, Wis, /, = anavOiXXis, 

wild asparagus, App. Herb. 84. 

acanthinus, a, um, adj. [acanthus], 
resembling the plant bear's-foot, Col. 9, 4, 4, 
and Plin. 25, 7, 38, § 78. 

t acanthion, i> «•, = uKd^Btov, a spe- 
cies of thistle, Plin 24, 12, 66, § 108. 

t acanthis, wis,/, = uKavei?. x. ^ 

little bird of a dark-green color, that lives 
in the thorn bushes, the thistle-finch or gold- 
finch (pure Latcarduelis): Fringilla cardu- 
elis, Linn. ; Plin. 10, 63, 83, § 175 ; 10, 74, 
95, § 205.— II. A plant, called also sene- 
cio^groundsel, Plin. 25, 13, 106, § 168. 

AcanthlUS, a , um, adj., from Acan- 
thus, a town in Macedonia : sal, Plin. 31, 7, 
41, § 85. 

1. 1 acanthus, h m- ,= Sko^oj. I. The 
plant bear's -breech, beards-foot, or Drank- 
ursine : Acanthus mollis, Linn. ; Verg E 
3, 45; 4, 20 ; id. G. 4, 123 ; id. A. 1, 649; 
Plin. 22, 22, 34, § 76 al.— n. Fern., a thorny 
evergreen tree of Egypt, Verg. G. 2, 119 : 
Veil. 2, 56, 2 ; Plin. 24, 12, 66 sq. 

2. Acanthus, i,f,= 'hKavBo<;, a town 

of Macedonia, now Erisso, Liv. 31, 45 fin.; 
Mel. 2, 2, 9 ; Plin. 4, 10, 17, § 38. 

t acanthyllis, idis,/, = luiavOvKxi^ 

a little bird, Plin. 10, 33, 50, § 96. 

t acapnos, on, adj., = aKanvo?, with- 
out smoke : ligna acapna, wood so dry as to 
emit no smoke in burning, Mart. 13, 15 : mel 
acapnon, honey obtained without driving 
away the bees by smoke, Col. 6, 33, 2 : Plin. 
11, 16, 15, § 45. 

Acaman, anis (ace. Acarnana, Liv. 36, 
11, 6 ; 37, 45, 17 ; ace. plur. Acarnanas, id. 
Epit. 33), adj., pertaining to Acarnania, 
Acamanian : amnis, i. e: Achelous, Sil. 3, 
42 (cf. Ov. M. 8, 569); subst, an Acama- 
nian, an inhabitant of Acarnania,Y erg. A. 
5, 298 ; Liv. 1. c. ; from 

Acarnania, ae,/ , Acarnania, ='Anap- 
vavia, the most westerly province of Greece, 
Cic. Pis. 40, 96 ; Caes. B. C. 3, 55 ; Liv. 26, 
25 al. ; Mel. 2, 3, 4; Plin. 4, 1, 2 sq.— Hence, 
AcarnanicUS, a > um , adj., Acamani- 
an: conjuratio, Liv. 26, 25, 18. 

acarne. v - acharne. 

Acastus, i, m -, ="ak(i<ttos. I. Son of 
Pelias, king of Thessaly, husband of Asty- 
damia or Cretheis, and father of Laoda- 
mia, Ov. M. 8, 306 ; 11, 410 al. — XI. The 
name of one of Cicero's slaves, Cic. Att. 7, 
1 al.^ 

t acatalecticus, ) a, um, = Uara- 

t acatalecius, ) x^-tiho?, -to?, in 

prosody, a verse in which no syllable is 

wanting in the last foot (opp. catalecticus), 

Diom. p. 501 P. ; Prise. 1216 P. 

t acatium, U «., = u/cd-nov, a light 

Greek boat, Plin. 9, 30, 49, § 94. 

t acatUS, i, /, =aKaTor, a light vessel 
or boat ( pure Latin, actuaria ), Trn. adv. 
Marc. 5, 1 med. 

acaunumarg , a 7 ae, / [a Celtic word 



ACCE 

bum agaiuium, stone], a kind of marl, per- 
haps stone-marl, Plin. 17, 7, 4, § 44. 

T acaustus, a. ura, adj. , — aKay(7T09, 
incombustible; hence s-w&S'd. to. (sc. lapis), 
the carbuncle, since it was regarded as in- 
combustible: acaustoe(i. e. aKavtnoi). Plin. 
:17,7, 25, §92; v. Sill. a. h. 1. 

AcbariiS, h m -, a title of the Arabian 
kings, among the Cheeks and Romans, Tac. 
A. 12, 12; also written Abgarus and Abgar, 
Cap it. Anton. 9; Inscr. Orell. no. 921. 

Acca, & e, /■ [cf. Set. accA = mater, and 
the Gr. '\kkm~ mater Cererisj. I, La- 
rentia, #* e wi/e o/#ie shepherd Faustums, 
who nursed and brought up the twins Romu- 
lus and Remus ; mother of the twelve Arvaies 
Fratres,Varr. L. L. 6, 23; Gell. 6, 7. In her 
honor the Romans celebrated in December 
a feast called Ldrentdlta, or Ace ,1 a (v. 
Larentia}.— If, J. companion of Camilla, 
Verg. A. 11, o'zO. 

Accaiia, um, w -> v. the preced. word 
and Larentia. 

t ac-cano ° r ac-cino, to sing to or 

with any thing, ace. to Varr. L. L. 6, § 75 
-Mull., and Dioni. p. 425 P. 

* ac-Canto, *~ ire ; 1, v. n., to sing at: 

.umuliP, Stat. Siiv. 4, 4, 55. 

accailtus, ns, m., ^accentus, Mart 
Cap. 3, )\M: Bed.deMetris, p. 2358 Putsch. 

* accedenter, adv. [accedo], i. q. pro- 

pe, nearly, Cassiod. (?). 

aC=CSdo, cessi, cessum, 3, v. n. {perf 
sync, accestis,Verg. A. 1, 201), to go or come 
to or near, to approach (class. ). I. L i t. 
H, In gen., const r. with ad, in, the local 
adverbs, the' ace. dai., infin., or a&soZ. 
(a) With ad : accedam ad hominem, Plaut. 
Mil. 2, ('), 14; so, ad aedis, id. Am ph. 1, 1, 
108 : ad iiammam, Ter. Andr. 1, 1, 103 : om- 
uls ad aras, to beset every altar, Lucr. 5, 
1199: ad oppidum, Caes. B. G. 2, 13: ad 
ludos, Cic. Pis. 27. 65: ad Caesarem sup- 
plox, id. Fam. 4, 4, 3 : ad manum, to come 
to their hands (of fishes), id. Att. 2, 1,7: ad 
Aquiuuin, id. Phil. 2, 41, lOd; so, ad He- 
vacleam, id.Verr. 2, 5, 49,' § 129. — Impers.: 
ad eas (oleas) cum accederetur, Cic, Caecin. 
^ 22.— ( ; i) With in : ne m aedis accederes, 
Cic. Caecin. 13, 36: in senatum, id. Att. 7, 
4 1: in Macedonian}, id. Phil. 10, 6: in fu- 
nns aliorum, to join a funeral procession, 
id. Leg. 2. 26, 6t5 al.— (7) With local adv. : 
eodem pacto, quo hue accessi, abscessero, 
Plaut. Trin. 3, 2, 84: illo, Cic' Caecin. 16, 
46: quo, Sail. J. 14, 17.— (d) With ace. (so, 
except the names' of localities, only in 
poets and historians, but not in Caesar and 
Livy): jurat integros accedere fontis at- 
quo baurire, Lucr. 1, 927, and 4, 2: Scyl- 
laeam rabieni scopulosque, Verg. A. 1, 201 : 
Sicamos portus, Sil. 14, 3 ; cf. id. 6, 604: 
Africam, Nep. Harm. 8; aliquem, Sail. J. 
18, 9; 62, 1 : Tac. H. 3, 24: ciassis Ostia 
cum magno commeatu accessit, Liv. 22,37, 
1 : Carthaginem, Plin. Ep. 7, 27, 3. — ( e ) 
With dat. (poet.): delubris, Ov. M. 15, 745: 
silvis, id. ib. 5, 674: caelo (i. e. to become a 
god), id. ib. 15, 818, and 870. — (* f ) With 
inf. : dum constanter accedo decerpere 
p-osas), App. M. 4, p. 143 med.—( n ) Absol. : 
accedam atque hanc appellabo, Plaut. Am. 
1. 3, 17 : deici nullo modo potuisse qui 
uoii accesserit, Cic. Caecin. 13, 36: accessit 
propius, ib. 8, 22 : quoties voluit blandis 
accedere dictis, Ov. If, 3, 375 al. — Impers.: 
non potis accedi, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 2, 1G, 
■to (Trag. v. 17 ed.Vahl.): quod ea proxime 
accedi potcrat, Cic. Caecin. 8, 21. 

B. I u P a r t i c. X.To approach a thing 
in a hostile manner (like aggredior, adorior), 
to attack: acie instructa usque ad castra 
h ostium accessit, Caes. B. G. 1, 51 : sese 
propediem cum magno exercitu ad urbem 
accessurum, Sail. C. 32 fin. : ad manum, 
to fight hand to hand, to engage in close 
combat, Nep. Eum. 5, 2; Liv, 2, 30, 12: ad 
corpus alienjus, Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 2, 2: Ataue 
accedit muros Rom ana juveritus, Enn. 
ap. Gell. 10, 29 (Ann. v. 527 ed.Vahl.): hos- 
tis accedere ventis navibus velivolis, id. ap. 
Uacr. S. 6, 5 (Ann. v. 380 ib.); and, 'in ma- 
latn part. , Ter. Heaut. 3, 3, 22.-2. Mercant. 
1. 1 : accedere ad hastam, to attend an auc- 
tion, Nep. Att. 6, 3; Liv. 43, 16, 2.-3, In 
late Lat. : ad manus (different from ad 'ma- 
num, B. 1), to be admitted to kiss hands, 
Capit Maxim. 5, 



ACCE 

II. F J g. Sl^ In gen., to come near to, 
to approach : haud invito ad auris sermo 
mi accessit, Ter. Hec. 3, 5, 32; so, clemens 
quidam sonus auris ejus accedit, App. M. 
5, p. 160: si somnus non accessit, Cels. 3, 
18 ; cf. : febris accedit, id. 3, 3 sq. : ubi ac- 
cedent anni, Hor. S. 2, 2, 85 ; cf. : acce- 
dente senecta, id. Ep. 2, 2, 211. 

B. I n p a r t i c. J, To come to or upon 
one, to happen to, to befall (a meaning in 
which it approaches so near to accldo that 
in many passages it has been proposed to 
change it to the latter; cf. Ruhnk. Rut. 
Lup. 1, p. 3; 2, p. 96; Dictat. in Ter. p. 222 
and 225) ; constr. with ad or (more usually) 
with dat. : voluntas vostra si ad pottam 
accesserit, Ter. Phorm. prol. 29: num tibi 
stultitia accessit? have you become a fool? 
Plaut. Am. 2, 2, 77 : paulum vobis accessit 
pecuniae, Ter. Hec. 3, 5, 56: dolor accessit 
bonis viris, virtus non est imminuta, Cic. 
Att. 1, 16, 9 : quo plus sibi aetatis accede- 
ret, id. de Or. 1, 60, 254 al. 

2. With the accessory idea of increase, 
to be added = addi ; constr. with ad or 
dat. : primum facie (i. e„ faciei) quod ho- 
nestas accedit, Lucil. ap. Gell. 1, 14 ; so ap. 
Non. 35, 20: ad virtutis summam acce- 
dere nihil potest, Cic. Fin. 4, 24 : Caseio 
animus accessit, id. Att. 5, 20; 7, 3; id. Clu. 
60 al. : pretium agris, theprice increases, ad- 
vances. Plin. Ep. 6, 19, 1, — Absol. : piuraac- 
cedere debent, Lucr. 2, 1129 : accedit mors, 
Cic. Fin. 1, 18, 60; id. de Or. 2, 17, 73: quae 
jacerent in tenebris omnia, nisi iitterarum 
lumen accederet, id. Arch. 6, 14 (so, not ac- 
cenderet, is to be read).— If a new thought 
is to be added, it is expressed by accedit 
with quod (add to this, that, etc. ) when it 
implies a logical reason, but with ut (be- 
side this, it happens that, or it occurs 
that) when it implies an historical fact (cf. 
Zumpt, § 621 and 626) : accedit enim, quod 
patrem amo, Cic. Att. 13, 21 : so Gael. ap. 
Cic. Fam. 8, 2; Cic. Rose. Am. 8, 22; id. 
Att. l, 92 al. ; Caes. B. G. 3, 2 • 4. 16 ; Sail. 
C. 11, 5; on the other hand: hue accedit 
uti, etc. , Lucr. 1, 192 , 215, 265 al. : ad App. 
Claudii senectutem accedebat etiam ut 
caecus esset, Cic. de Sen. 6, 16; so id. Tusc. 
1, 19, 43; id. Rose. Am. 31, 86; id. Deiot. 1, 
2; Caes. B. G. 3, 13; 5, 16 al. When sev- 
eral new ideas are added, they are intro- 
duced by res in the plur. : cum ad has sus- 
picions certissimae res accederent: quod 
per fines Sequanorum Helvetios transdux- 
isset; quod obsides inter eos dandos curas- 
set; quod ea omnia, etc., Caes. B, G. 1, 19. 
Sometimes the historical idea follows ac- 
cedit, without ut: ad haec mala hoc mihi 
accedit etiam: haec Andria . . . gravida e 
Pamphilo est, Ter. Andr. 1, 3, 11 : accedit 
illud: si maneo. . . cadendum est in unius 
potestatem, Cic. Att. 8, 3, 1. 

3. To give assent to, accede to, assent to, 
to agree with, to approve of; constr. with 
ad or dat (with persons only, with dat.) : 
accessit animus ad meam sententiam 
Plaut. Aul. 2, 7, 13; so Cic.Verr. 2, 3, 28, § 
69; Nep. Hilt. 3. 5:' Galba speciosiora sua- 
dentibus accessit, Tac. H. 1, 34; so Quint. 
9, 4, 2 al. 

4. To come near to in resemblance, to re- 
semble, be like ; with ad or dat (the' latter 
most freq., esp. after Cic.) : homines ad 
Deos nulla re propius acceduntquam sa- 
lutem hominibus dando, Cic. Lig. 12: An- 
tonio Philippus proximus accedebat, id. 
Brut. 147; cf. id.Verr. 2, 2, 3; id. de Or. 1, 
62, 263; id. Ac. 2, 11,36 al. 

£>„ To enter upon, to undertake ; constr. 
with ad or in : in eandem infamtam, Plaut. 
Trin. 1,2, 84: ad bellorum pericula. Cic. 
Balb. 10 : ad poenam, to undertake the in- 
fliction of punishment id. Off. 1, 25, 89 : ad 
amicitiam Caesaris, Caes. B. C. 1, 48 : ad 
vectigalia, to undertake their collection as 
contractor, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 42 : ad causam, the 
direction of a lawsuit, id. ib. 2, 2, 38 ; id. de 
Or. 1, 38, 175 al. But esp. : ad rem publi- 
cam, to enter upon the service of the state, 
Cic. Off. 1, 9, 28; id. Rose. Am. 1 al. 

* acceleratio, onis, / [accelero], a 
hastening, acceleration: oratioms enunti- 
andae, Auct. Her. 3, 13. 23. 

ac-celero, avi,atum (also adc-),V-«- 
and u. I. Act. .to hasten, accelerate: gressum 
adcelerasse decet, Att. ap. Non. 89, 25 (Rib. 
Trag. Rel. p. 139); so. gradum. Liv. 2. 43, 



ACCE 

8: mortem, Lucr. 6, 772: iter, Caes. B.C. 2 
39 ; Liv. 31, 29 : oppugnationem, Tac. A. 12, 
46: consulatum alicui, id. ib. 3, 75. — Pass.. 
Tac. Agr. 43; id. H. 2, 85; id. A. 1, 50.— If, 
Neutr. , to hasten, to make haste : si adcele- 
rare volent, ad vesperam consequentur. 
* Cic. Cat, 2, 4, 6 : ipse quoque sibi accele 
raret, Nep. Att. 22, 2; Liv. 3, 27, 8; Verg 
A. 5, 675; 9, 221, 505; Plin. 2, 17, 14, § 74 
al. : ad aliquem opprimendum, Liv. 27, 47, 
8.— With local accus. : Cremonam, Tac. H. 
2, 100. — Impers.: quantum accelerari pos- 
set, as speedily as possible, Liv. 3, 46, 5. 
* accendium, n, n. [accendo], a kin- 
'ing, a setting on fire, Sol. 5 fin. 
1. accendo, onis, m. [2. accendo]. o.n 
inciter, instigator; read by Salmasius in 
Tert. de Pall. 6, where the old reading eer- 
do is to be preferred. 

2. ac-cendo, ndi, nsum, 3, v.a. [cf. can- 
deo], prop, to kindle any thing^ above, so that 
it may burn downwards (on the contr. , suc- 
cendere, to kindle underneath, so that it 
may burn upwards; and incendere, to set 
fire to on every side) (class., esp. in the 
trop. signif., very freq.). J. Lit., to set 
on fire, to kindle, light : utPergama accensa 
est, Liv. Andr. ap. Non. 512, 31 (Rib. Trag. 
Rel. p. 1) : faces accensae, Cic. Pis. 5 : 
lumen de suo lumine, to kindle, Enn. ap 
Cic. Off. 1, 16, 51 (Trag. v. 388 ed. Vahl.); 
cf. : ita res accendent lumina rebus, Lucr. 
lfin.; and: Deus solem quasi lumen ao- 
cendit, Cic. Univ. 9, 28; so, ignera,Verg. A 
5, 4 al. 

B. Metou,, to light up, to illuminate • 
luna radiis solis accensa, Cic. Rep. 6. 17 (cf. 
id. N. D. 1, 31, 87) ; so of the lustre of gold: 
et gemmis galeam clypeumque accenderat 
fluro, Sil. 15, 681 (but in Cic Arch. 6, 14. 
the correct read, is accederet, v. Halm a. 
h. ].). 

XL Fig., to inflame a person or thing 
(by any thing), to set on fire, to kindle, to 
incite, rouse up; aliquem or aliquid aliqua 
re: placare hostem ferocem inimiciterque 
accensum, Att. ap. Non. 514, 22: quos me- 
rita accendit Mezentius ira,Verg. A. 8, 50: 
nunc prece nunc dictis virtutem accendit 
amaris, id. ib. 10, 368 (7. 482, bello ammos 
accendit, is more properly dat). That to 
which one is excited is denoted by ad : ad 
dominationem accensi sunt. Sail. Jug. 31, 
16 ; the person against whom one is ex- 
cited, by in or contra: in maritum accen- 
debat, Tac. A. 1, 53: quae res Marium con- 
tra Meteilum vehementer accenderat, Sail. 
J. 64, 4 ; with quare c. subj. : accendis quare 
cupiarnmagis ill i proximus esse. P.or S. 1, 
9, 53. The historians use this word very 
often, esp. with abstract substt. : certamen, 
Liv. 35, 10 : discordiam, id. 2, 29 : spem, 
Tac. Ann. 12, 34 (cf.Verg. A. 6, 183): dolo- 
rem, id. ib. 15, 1 al. In Cic. de Or. 1, 25. 
114, praeclare enim se res habeat, si haec 
accendi aut commoveri arte possint, ac- 
t cendi is obviously the first enkindling. 
| rousing, of talent (syn. with commovo- 
j ri); cf. id. de Or. 2, 47 ; id. Phil. 3, 7. And 
so perhaps Sen. Ben. 7, 9: crystallina . . . 
! quorum accendit fragilitas pretium, signi- 
' lies vessels of crystal, whose fragility gives 
them value (in the eyes of luxurious men). 
aC-Censeo (''*)> nsum, 2, v. a., to reel- 
on to or among, to add to ; as a verb, finit. 
very rare: numine sub dommae lateo at 
que accenseor illi, i. e. 2" am her compan 
ion, Ov. il. 15, 546 ; and : accensi, qui lit* 
accensebantur, id est attribuebantur, Non. 
520, 7. — But hence in frequent use, ac. 
Census? a > um > P- «■-, reckoned among, or 
subst acCenSUS, i-, »w. A. One who at- 
tends another of higher rank, an attendant, 
follower; hence, a state officer who attended 
one of the highest magistrates (consul, pro- 
consul, praetor, etc.) at Rome or in the 
provinces, for the purpose of summoning 
parties to court, maintaining order and 
quiet during its sessions, and proclaiming 
the hours ; an apparitor, attendant, order- 
ly (on account of this office, Varr. 6, § 89 
lliill., would derive the word from accieo), 
Varr. ap. Non. 59, 2 sq. ; Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 4 
and 7 ; id. Att. 4, 16 ; Liv. 45, 29, 2 ; Suet. 
Caes. 20 al,— The person to whom one is 
accensus is annexed in dat or gen. : qui 
turn accensus Neroni fuit, Cic.Verr. 2, 1, 
28: libertus, accensus Gabimi, id, Att. 4, 
16, 12. The Decunons and Centurions also 
15 



ACCE 

had their accensi as aids, Varr. L. L. 7, § 58 
Mull. ; also at funerals, as leader of the 
procession, Cic. Leg. 2, 24, 61. Cf. on the 
accensi, Neckeris Antiq 2, 2, p. 375 sq. — 
B. accensi, « A:mc? o/' reserve troops who 
followed the army as supernumeraries (= 
ascripticii, or, in later times, supernumera- 
ry to take the place of those who fell in 
battle. They had no arms, and were only 
clothed with the military cloak, and hence 
called velati : quia vestiti et inermes se- 
quuntur exercitum, Paul, ex Fest. p. 369 
Mali. ; they used in battle only slings and 
stones. Tney were also employed in con- 
structing public roads. Cf. Mommsen, De- 
gli Acee si Velati, in Annah del, Inst. vol. 
xxi. (1649), p. 209 sq. ; and Necker's Antiq. 
3, 2, p. 24i sq. 

accensiMIis, e > ad J-> Prop, that may 
be burnt, but in the one place where it oc- 
curs, it is a,ct, burning; Non accessistis 
ad accensibilem ignem, Vulg. Hebr. 12, 18. 

1. accensus., a , um. a. Part, of ac- 
cendo, kindled. — |j. P. a. of accenseo, reck- 
oned among ; v. these words. 

2, acceilSUS, uS 5 m - [accendo], a kin- 
dling or setting onjire : lucernarum, Plin. 
37, 7, 29, § 103 dub. (al. assensu) ; luminum, 
Symm. 3, 48 ; Plin. 37, 7, 29, ace. to Hard. 

* accentmncula, ae 5 dim. f. [accen- 
tus], accent, Cell. 13, 6, as a transl. of the 
Gr. 7rpo<TLpdia° 

ac-centor. oris, m. [ad -f- cantor], one 
who sings with another, Isid. Orig. 6, 19, 3. 

accentuS. uS ? m. [accino, the attuning 
a thing ; hence] J, L i t. A. I n g e n. , 
a blast, signal (late Lat. ) : aeneatorum ac- 
centu, Amm. 16, 12, 36: id. 24, 4, 22; acu- 
tissimi tibiarum, Solin. 5 fin. — B« In 
g r a m m. , the accentuation of a word, ac- 
cent, tone (post- Aug. ) : accentus, quos 
Graeci -Kpocrwdlas vocant (so that it is a 
lit. transl. of the Cr. word, ~p6? — ad, and 
^5^ = cant us), Quint. 1, 5, 22; 12, 10, 33; 
Diom. p. 425 Putsch. — ZZ, Fig., intensity, 
violence : hiemis, Sid, Ep. 4, 6 : doloris, 
Marc. Emp. 36. 

accepSO, Per sync, for accepero, v. ac- 
cipio. 

accepta, ae, / [accipio] (sc. pars), a 
portion of land granted to an individual 
by the state, Sicul. Fl. p. 22 Goed. al. 

aCCeptabllis, e , «<%"• [accepto], ac- 
ceptable, worthy of acceptance (eccl. Lat.) 
Tert. de Or. 7 al 

acceptator ? oris, m. [id.], J a One who 
accepts or approves of a thing (Eccl.).— ZZ. 
An avenue, access, passage for admittance 
of the people, Inscr. Orell. no. 6589. 

acceptllatio, onis, also written sep- 
arately, accepti latio, / [acceptum fero], 
a formal discharging from a debt (by the 
verbal declaration of the debtor: acceptum 
fero), Gai. 3, 169; id. 170; Dig. 4, 2, 9, § 2; 
34, 3, 3, § 3; id. Lex. 5, § 3 al. ; cf. Rein's 
Privatrecht, p. 359. 

acceptl0 ? onis,/ [accipio]. I B A tak- 
ing, receiving, or accepting : neque dedi- 
tionem neque donationem sine acceptione 
intellegi posse, *Cic. Ton. 8, 37: frumen- 
ti, Sail. J. 29, 4. — B. In later philos. 
lang. : the acceptance, i. e. the granting of 
a proposition, Pseudo-App. Dogm. Plat. 3, 
p. 34 med. — XH t An esteeming, regarding) 
of a thing, Cod. Th. 1, 9, 2; of a person: 
personarum, Vulg. Paral. 2, 19, 7 (transl. 
of 0*03 fctttf?:); cf. l. acceptor, no. II. B. 

*aCCeptltO ? are, doub.freq. v. a. [fr. 
accepto, and that fr. accipio], to take, re- 
ceive, accept : stipendmm, Plaut. ap. Non 
134, 29. 

aCCeptO, avi, atum, 1, v. freq. a. [acci- 
pio], to take, receive, accept ; argentum, 
Plaut. Ps. 2, 2, 32; so Quint. 12, 7, 9; Curt. 
4, 6, 5; Dig. 34, 1, 9: jugum, to submit to, 
Sil. Ital. 7, 41. (But in Plin. 36, 25, 64, the 
correct read, is coeptavere ; v. Sillig. a. h. 1.). 

1. acceptor? oris, m. [id.]. I, One 
who receives a thing (post-class.): donatio- 
nis, Cod. T. 8, 56, 10.— Hence, absol, a re- 
ceiver, collector, Inscr. Orell. no. 3199 and 
7205. — ZZ» F i g. A, One who receives a thing 
as true, grants or approves it, Plaut. Trin. 
1, 2, 167. — B, O ne who unjustly regards the 
oerson, Eccl. 

1G 



ACCI 

2. acceptor, oris, m. , = accipiter, a 
hawk : exta acceptoris, Lucil. ap. Charis. 
p. 76 P. 

acceptormS, a, um. adj. [acceptor], 
that is fit or suitable for receiving; modu- 
lus, for drawing water, Frontin. de Aq. 34 
fin. 

* acceptrix, icis, f. [id.], she that re- 
ceives ; neque datori neque acceptnei, Plaut. 
True. 2, 7, 18. 

acceptum, *, w., v. accipio, II. E. 
aCCeptliS, a, um, v. accipio, P. a. 
aCCerSO, 5re, v. arcesso init. 

* accessa, ae,/. in later Lat = acces- 
sus, the food-tide, iect. dub.. Serv. ad Verg. 
A. 1, 244 (cf. Salmas. Exerc.'p. 203). 

aCCeSSlbllis, e, adj. [accedo], access- 
ible (late Lat. ), Tert. Adv. Prax. 15. 

accessibilxtas ? atis, / [accessibilis], 
accessibility, Tert. Adv. Prax. 15. 

aCCeSSXO, onis, / [accedo], a going or 
coming to or near, an approach. I B I n 
gen. : quid tibi in concilium hue accessio 
est? why comest thou hither? Plaut. Trin. 
3, 2, 86; cf. : quid tibi ad hasce accessio 
est aedis prope ? id. True. 2, 2, 3 ; Cic. 
Univ. 12: ut magnas accessiones fecerint 
in operibus expugnandis, sallies, Caes. B. 
Alex. 22 : suo labore suisque accessionibus, 
i. e. by his labor of calling on people, by his 
visits, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 53fin.~ H, In part. 
A. In m e d i c i n e, t. t. , the access, attack, 
or paroxysm of a disease, Cels. 2, 12 ; 3, 3 
sq ; Sen. Ep. 85, 12 ; id. N. Q. 6, 18, 6 ; Suet. 
Vesp. 23 al. — B. A coming to in the way of 
augmentation, an increase, addition, \ „ In 
abstracts; paucorum annorum, Cic. Lael. 
3, 7: pecuniae, Nep. Att. 14, 2: fortunae 
et dignitatis, Cic. Fam. 2, 1; 7, 6; 10, 9; 
id. Rep. 2, 21: odii, Caes. B. Alex. 48: dig- 
nitatis, Veil. 2, 130 jm.— 2, The thing add- 
ed, the addition, or accession ; in concreto : 
Scaurusaccessionem adjunxit aedibus,<x<M- 
ed a new part, Cic. Off. 1, 39, 138; so id. 
Att. 16, 16. Thus Syphax is called, acces- 
sio Punici belli, as not being the chief 
enemy in the Punic war, but, as it were, 
an appendage to the war, Liv. 47, 7; so in 
Pliny; turba gemmarum potamu's— et au- 
rum jam accessio est, and gold is only acces- 
sory, a mere appendage, 33 prooem. fin. — 
C. I ii r h e t o r. , an addition that makes a 
definition complete : nisi adhiberet illam 
magnam accessionem, Cic. Ac. 2, 35, 112; 
so id. Fin. 2, 13. — D B The addition to every 
kind of fee or tax (opp. decessio), Cato R. 
R. 144: decumae Cic. Rab, 11; sold. Verr. 
2,3,33, § 76; ib. 49, § 116 al. 

^accessito, are, doub.freq. v. [id.], to 
approach repeatedly : eodem ex agro, Cat. 
ap._Gell. 18, 12. 

1. acceSSUS, a > um ? Part of accedo. 

2. aCceSSUS^ u% m - [accedo], a going 
or coming to or near, an approaching, ap- 
proach (syn. aditus;'opp. recessus, disces- 
sus). J. Lit.: accessus nocturnus ad ur- 
bem, Cic. Mil. 19 : (bestiarum) ad res salu- 
tares (opp. recessus), id. N. D. 2, 12 fin. ; 
accessus prohibet refugitque vi riles, Ov. 
M. 14, 636 : sohs accessus discessusque, Cic. 
N. D. 2, 7 ; of the tide, id. Div. 2, 14 fin. ; 
of a disease, Gell. 4, 2_; of soldiers: difficilis, 
Caes. B. Afr. 5 : maritimus, from the sea : 
pedestris, on the land side, id. B. Alex. 
26: loci, to a place, id. B. Hisp. 38. — JJ„ 
Transf. l.Poet. of permission to ap- 
proach, access, admittance (cf. aditus) : dare 
accessum alicui, Ov. Pont. 2, 2, 41: negare, 
id. Her. 10, 64.-2, The place 'by ivhich one 
approaches, a passage, an entrance (in sing. 
and plur. ), Verg, A. 8, 229; Suet. Caes. 58; 
Flor. 2, 12, 5; for ships, Liv. 29, 27, 9.— 
ZZ, F i S- A. An approaching, approach : 
itapedetemptim cum accessus a se ad cau- 
sam facti, turn recessus, an approach to the 
matter, Cic. Fam. 9, 14, 7.— g. An acces- 
sion, increase : accessu istius splendoris 
Cod. Th. 6, 35, 7. 

AcCiaHUS ? a , um, v. Attius (Attianus). 

aCCldens, entis. I„ P. a. fr. accido.— 
II, As subst n. A. The accidental, non- 
essential quality of any thing, to a-v/jifiefiti- 
k6? (opp. substantia, the Greek ova-la) : 
causa, tempus, locus, occasio . . . rerum 
sunt accidentia, the accidental or extrane- 
ous circumstances. Quint. 5, 10, 23; so 3, 6, 
36; 4,2,130: ex accidentibus (r^epithe- 



ACCI 

tis), id. 8, 3, 70 ; hence, an adjective, Macr. 
S. 1, 4. — B. An accident or chance. \ t 
In gen., Dig. 35, 2, 51 : per accidens, acci- 
dentally, Finn. Math. 5,4. — Q m In part, 
an unfortunate circumstance': accidentia 
(opp. prospera), Pseudo-Quint. DecL 

accidentia, ae, / [accido], that which 
happens, a casual event, a chance : esse 
illam naturae accidentiam, Plin. 32, 2 9 
§ 19; Tert._de Anim. Hal. ' 

1. ac-Cldo, cldi, clsum, 3, v. a. [caedo], 
to begin to cut or to cut into [cf. : adamo. 
addubito, etc.); hence, so to cut a thing 
that it falls, to fell, to cut (as verb, finit. 
very rare). I, Lit.: accidunt arbores. 
tantum ut summa species earum stantmm 
relmquatur, Caes. B. G. 6. 27, 4 : accisa or- 
nus ferro,Verg. A. 2, 626; cf. : velutaccisis 
recrescenti stirpibus, Liv. 26. 41, 22 : accisis 
crinibus, cut close, Tac. G. 19: ab locustis 
genus omne acciditur frugum, eaten up, 
Arnob. 1, 3, — P oet., to use up : fames ac- 
cisis coget dapibus' consumere mensas, 
Verg. A. 7, 125. — n. Fi g-, to impair, 
weaken : ita proelio uno accidit Vestmo- 
rum res, ut, etc., Liv. 8, 29, 12 ; so, post 
accisas a Camillo Volscorum res, id. 6, 5, 2 ; 
cf. 6, 12, 6.— Hence, aCG!SUS ? a , um, P. a., 
cut off or down ; impaired, ruined : accisae 
res (opp. integrae), troubled,, disordered, or 
unfortunate state of things : res, Cic. Prov. 
Cons. 14, 34; Liv. 3. 10, 8; 8, 11, 12 al. : 
copiae, Hirt. B. G. 8, 31; Liv. 8, 11 8: 
robur juventutis, id. 7, 29 fin. : opes, Hon 
S. 2, 2, 114: accisae desolataeque gentes. 
Sil. 8, 590: reliquiae (hostium), Tac. A. L 
61. 

S. ac-Cldo, cldi, no sup., 3, v. n. [ca- 
do], to fall upon or down upon a thing, to 
reach it by falling. I, Lit. A. I n § e n - 
constr. with ad, in, local adverbs, with dot. 
or absol : utinam ne accidisset abiegna ad 
terram trabes, Enn. ap. Auct. Her. 2, 22 
(Trag, p. 281 ed. Vahl., where it is: accS- 
disset, ace. to the MSS., v. Vahl. iV. v.): 
signa de caelo ad terram , Plaut. Rud. prol. 
8 ; so, tarn crebri ad terram accidebant 
quam pira, id. Poen. 2, 38 : trabs in hu- 
mum accidens, Varr. ap. Non. 494^'n.; so, 
imago aetheris ex oris in terrarum accidat 
oras, Lucr. 4, 215: rosa in mensas, Ov. F. 
5, 360: quo Castalia per struices saxeas 
lapsu accidit, Liv. Andr. ap. Fest. p. 310 
Mull. (Rib. Trag. Rel p. 5) : ut missa tela 
gravius acciderent, fall upon, hit, Caes. B. 
G. 3, 14; so Liv. 2, 50, 7.— B. Esp. : a. ad 
genua or genibus, of a suppliant, to fall at 
one J s knees : me orat mulier lacrhnansque 
ad genua accidit, Enn. ap. Non. 517, 15 
(Corn. v. 9 ed.Vahl.); so Ter. Hec. 3, 3, 18; 
Suet. Caes. 20 ; id. Claud. 10 ; for which ; 
genibus praetoris, Liv. 44, 31 ; also : ad pe- 
des, Cic. Att. 1, 14, 5, and absol : quo acci- 
dam ? quo applicem ? Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 3, 
19, 44 (Trag. v. 114 ed. Vahl. , where it is accD- 
dam). — C= T r a n s f. , to strike the senses, to 
reach a thing by means of the senses ; constr. 
with ad, the dat. or ace. : vox, sermo accidit 
adauris(oraunbus; also, aurisalicujus), the 
voice, the speech falls upon or reaches the 
ear: notavox ad auris accidit, Att. ap. Non. 
39, 5 : nova res molitur ad auris accidere, 
Lucr. 2, 1024; and: nihil tarn populare ad 
populi Romam auris accidisse, Cic. Sest. 
50, 107: auribus, Liv. 24 46, 5; Quint. 12, 
10, 75: auris, Plaut. Stich. 1, 2, 31; absol.', 
Liv. 10, 5, 2; 27, 15, 16 sq. ; Curt. 4, 4, 5al. ; cf. 
also : clamor accidit ad auris, Liv. 26,40, 10 ; 
and absol. : clamor accidit, id. 4, 33, 9 ; 40, 
32, 2 ; likewise : nomen famaque alicujus ac- 
cidit ad aliquem, id. 21, 10, 12; v. Fabri ad 
h. 1.— Hence sometimes in Livy: vox or 
fama accidit (ad auris or ad aliquem), with 
an ace. c. inf.: ut vox etiam ad hostesac- 
cideret captum Cominium esse, Liv. 10, 
41, 7: quia repente fama accidit classem 
Punicam adventare, the report came, id. 
27,29, 7; v.Weissenb. a. h. 1. 

ZZ. F i g. A. I n S en -i to fall out, come to 
pass, happen, occur; and with dat. pers., 
to happen to, to befall one. (The distinctioD 
between the syn. evenio, accido, and con- 
tingo is this: evenio, i. e. ex-venio, is used 
of either fortunate or unfortunate events : 
accido, of occurrences which take us by 
surprise ; hence it is used either of an indif- 
ferent, or, which is its general use, of an un 
fortunate occurrence: contingo, i. e, con- 
tango, indicates that an event accords with 



ACCI 

one's wishes; and hence is generally used 
of fortunate events. As Isid. says, Differ. 1 : 
Continguni bona: accidunt mala : eveniunt 
utraque) : res accidit, Caes. B. G. 1, 14 ; Id ac- 
ciderat, ut Galli consilium caperent,.ib. 3, 2 ; 
si quid adversi accident, Cic. Ac. 2, 38, 121 ; 
cf. ib. 1, 26, 57: nollem accidisset tempus, 
in quo, etc., id. Fam. 3, 10: si qua calami- 
ty accidisset, id. Verr. 2, 3, 55: id. Rose. 
Am. 34: contra opinionem accidit, Caes. 
B. G. 3. 9: pejus Sequanis accidit, ib. 1, 31 : 
periculum accidit, ib. 3, 3: detrimentum 
accidit, ib. 7, 52. Also of fortunate occur- 
rences : omnia tibi accidisse gratissima, Cic. 
Finn '3. 1; 11, 15; accidit satis opportune, 
Caes. B. G. 4, 22 ; cf. Brem. Nep. Milt. 1, 1 ; 
Herz. Caes. B. G. 7, 3.— Cons tr. with ut 
(Zumpt, § 621), sometimes with quod : ac- 
cidit perincommode, quod eum nusquam 
vidisti. Cic. Att. 1, 17; or with inf.: nee 
enim acciderat mini opus esse, id. Fam. 
6, 11. P 1 e o n a s t. in narrations : accidit 
ut, it happened, or came to pass, that : ac- 
cidit ut una nocte omnes Hermae dejice- 
rentur, it happened that, etc., Nep. Ale. 3, 
2; so Cic. Fam. 3, 8, 8; id. Att. 1, 5, 4 al.— 
B. In part. 1. Si quid cui accidat, or si 
qu'id humanitus accidat, euphemist. for to 
die ; if any thing should happen to one (for 
which Ennius says: si quid me fuerit hu- 
manitus, Ann. v. 128 ed. Vahl.): si quid 
pupillo accidisset, Cic. Inv. 2, 21; Caes. B. 
G. 1, 18; si quid mihi humanitus accidis- 
set, Cic. Phil. 1, 4; Dig. 34, 4, 30 § 2 al. (cf. 
the Greek el n ndBoi) ; so, per aposiopesin, 
give — quod heu timeo, sive superstes eris, 
Ov. Her. 13, 164. (But Cic. Mil. 22, 58; 
Caes. B. G. 2, 35, and similar passages, are 
to be taken in the usual signif.)— 2. To 
turn out (this very rare) : timeo " incer- 
tum"' hoc quorsum accidat, Ter. And. 1, 
5, 20 : si secus accident, Cic. Fam. 6, 21, 2. 
— 3, In g r a m. , to belong to : plurima huic 
(verbo) accidunt (i. e. genus, tempora), 
Quint. 1, 5, 41 al. 

* ac-Cieo, ere, 2, v. a., old form for ac- 
cio. ire. to fetch, to bring : ego ilium hue 
acciebo, Plaut. Mil. 3, 3, 61; dub. (Ritschl 
and Fleckeisen : oneratum runcinabo). 

accinctus, a, ™, P- «• of 

aocingfO, nx i 5 nctum, 3, v. a. J, L i t., 
to gird to or on, to gird round or about (in 
prose, first after the Aug. per. ; in poetry, 
a favorite word with Verg. ) : lateri enseni, 
Verg. A. 11, 489; and med., to gird one's 
self: accingitur ense, id. ib. 7, 640: cf. : 
quo (ense) fuit accinctus. Ov. M. 6, 55± ; so, 
ferro, Tac. A. 6, 2.— B. Transf., to arm, 
equip, furnish, provide : facibus pubes ac- 
cingitur, Verg. A. 9, 74 : gladiis accincti, 
Liv. 40, 13 ; hence : accinctus miles, an 
armed soldier, Tac. A. 11, 18 : ornat Phra- 
aten accingitque (sc. diademate imposito) 
paternum ad fastigium, id. ib. 6, 32 : ac- 
cinctus gemmis fulgentibus ensis, Yal. Fl. 
3, 514. 

II. Fig- A. In geti.^o endow, pro- 
vide; in medicine: magicas accingier ar- 
tes, to have recourse to, Verg. A. 4, 493. — 
B = In part.: accingere se or accingi, to 
enter upon or undertake a thing, girded, 
i. e. well prepared, to prepare one^s self 
make one's self ready (taken from the gird- 
ing of the flowing robes when in active oc- 
cupation); constr. absol., with ad, in, dat., 
or inf. : tibi omne est execlendum, accin- 
gere. make yourself ready, Ter. Ph. 2, 2, 4; 
so id. Eun. 5, 9, 30; Lucr. 2, 1043: i Hi se 
praedae accingunt, Verg. A. 1, 210: accingi 
ad cotiriulatum, Liv. 4, 2; in Tac. very often 
actively, to make any one ready for some- 
thing: "turmas peditum ad munia accingere, 
A. 12, 31 : accingi ad ultionem, id. H. 4, 79: 
in audaciain, id. ib. 3, 66 al. ; within/.: ac- 
cingar dicere pugnas Caesaris, Verg. G. 3, 
46; po: navare operam, Tac. A. 15, 51.— fo. 
Also in the active form, as v. neutr. = se ac- 
cingere : age, anus, accinge ad molas, Pom- 
pon, up. Xon. 469, 28 (Rib. Com. Rel. p. 235) : 
accingunt omnes operi, all go vigorously to 
the work, Verg. A. 2, 235. — Hence, aC- 
cinctUS. a , urn, P. a., well girded. A. 
Lit.: cujus aut familiaris habitus con- 
decentior aut militaris accinctior, Auson. 
Grat. Act. 27. — B. Fig., ready, strict 
(opp. negligent): tfim in omnia pariter m- 
tenta bonitas etaccincta, Plin. Pan. 30 fin. : 
comitates, id. ib. 20 'i. 



ACCI 

+ ac-Cino, Sre, v. n. [cano], to sing to 
any thing, ace. to Diom. p. 425 P. ; cf. ac- 
cano. 

ac-ClO, ivi, Itum, 4, v. a., to call or 
summon, to fetch (rare but class. ). I, L i t. : 
cujus vos tumulti causa accierim, Att. ap. 
Non. 484, 7 (Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 199) : horrife- 
ris accibant vocibus Orcum, Lucr. 5, 996: 
tu invita mulieres, ego accivero pueros, 
Cic. Att. 5, 1, 3; 13, 48, 1; id. de Or. 3, 35, 
141; Sail. J. 108; Liv. 2, 6; Tac. A. 1, 5 al. 
— II. Fig*- accire mortem, to kill one's 
seZ/,Vell. 2, 38 Jin.; Flor. 4, 2, 71: scienti- 
am artemque haruspicum accibam, Tac. H. 
2, 3 ; cf. : accitis quae usquam egregia, id. 
A. 3. 27 ; and : patrios mores funditus 
evert i peraccitam lasciviam, i. e. borrowed, 
id. ib. 14, 20 (but in Cic. Fin. 5, 31, 93, the 
read, acciret is very doubtful ; v. Madv. a, 
h. 1. ; Klotz reads faceret; B. and K., crea- 
ret.). 

aC-CipiO, cep', ceptum, 3, v. a. {fit. 
perf accepso = accepero, Pac. ap. Non. 
74, 31. or Rib. Trag. Rel. 118) [capio], to 
accept. I. In gen., to take a person or 
thing to one's self: leno ad se accipiet ho- 
minem et aurum, will take the man andhis 
money to himself (into his house), Plaut. 
Poen. 1, 1, 51. a. Of things received by 
the hand, to take, receive : cette manus 
vestras measque accipite, Enn. ap. Non. 85, 
1 (Trag. v. 320 ed. Vahl.): ex tua accepi 
manu pateram, Plaut. Amph. 2, 2, 132; 
hence, t r o p. of the word given, the prom- 
ise, with which a grasping of the hand was 
usually connected : accipe daque fidem, 
Enn. ap Macr. S. 6, 1 (Ann. v. 33 ed. Vahl.; 
so in the Gr. -khj-'x eovvac nai XafteU); cf. 
Plaut. Trin. 2, 4, 87; so Verg. A. 8, 150; in 
Ter. of a person to be protected : hanc (vir- 
ginem) accepi, acceptam servabo, Ter. And. 
1, 5, 62; cf. Cic. Fam. 7, 5, and Sail. C. 6, 5, 
— "b. Of things received or taken by differ- 
ent "parts of the body : accipite hoc onus in 
vestros collos, Cato ap. Non. 200,23: gre- 
mio, Verg. A. 1, 685 : oculis aut pectore 
noctem (i. e. somnum), id. ib. 4, 531. — c. 
In gen., very freq., (a) as implying ac- 
tion, to take, to take possession of, to accept 
(Gr. dexeuOai); (ft) of something that falls 
to one's share, to get, to receive, to be the re- 
cipient of{Gr. \ af xftdvetv).—(a) To take, ac- 
cept : hanc epistulam accipe a me, take this 
letter from me, Plaut. Ps. 2,2, 52; 4, 2, 26; 
cf. id. Ep. 3, 4, 26: persuasit aliis, ut pecu- 
niam accipere mallent, Cic. Off. 2, 23, 82: 
condicionem pacis. Caes. B. G. 2, 15: armis 
obsidibusque * acceptis Crassus' profectus 
est, after he had taken into his possession 
the arms and hostages, id. ib. 3, 23 : divitias, 
Nep. Epam. 4, 3: aliquid a patre, to inherit, 
id. Timoth. 1, 1; id. Att. 1 : accipe et haec, 
manuum tibi quae monumenta mearum 
sint,Verg. A. 3, 486 al. — Hence to receive or 
entertain as guest : haec (tellus) fessos pla- 
cidissima portu accipit,Verg. A. 3, 78: Lau- 
rentes nymphae, accipite Aenean, id. ib. 8, 
71; 155; Ov. M. 8, 655 al.— Of admittance 
to political privileges: Nomentani et Peda- 
ni in civitatem accepti, Liv. 8, 14; cf. Cic. 
Off. 1, 11,35: magnifice volo summos viros 
accipere, Plaut. Ps. 1, 2, 34: in loco festivo 
sumus festive accepti, id. ib. 5, 19 ; so id. 
Cist. 1, 1 ( 12; id. Men. 5, 2, 44; id. Pers. 1, 
1, 32, etc. ; Ter. Eun. 5, 9, 52 ; Lucr. 3, 907 ; 
Cic. Att. 16, 6; Ov. F. 2, 725 al.— Hence also 
ironically, to entertain, to treat, deal 
with : ego te miseris jam accipiam modis, 
Plaut. Aul. 4, 4, 3 : hominem accipiam qui- 
bus dictis maeret, id. Men. 5, 1, 7 : indignis 
acceptus modis, Ter. Ad. 2, 1, 12. Perh. also 
Lucil. ap. Xon. 521, 1 : adeo male me accipi- 
unt decimae, treat or use me ill, deal harsh- 
ly with me; and ib. 240, 8: sic, inquam, 
veteratorem ilium vetulum lupum Hanm- 
balem acceptum (Xon. explains the latter 
in a very unusual manner, by deceptum). — 
(ft) To get, to receive, to be the recipient of, 
Pac. ap. Xon. 74, 31; Lucr. 1, 819, 909; 2, 
762, 885, 1009 : ictus, id. 4, 1048 (cf.Verg. A. 
3, 243: vulnera accipiunt tergo): aridior 
nubes accipit ignem, takes or catches fire, 
Lucr. 6, 150; Caes. B. G. 1, 48: humanita- 
tem iis tribuere debemus, a quibus accepi- 
mus, Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 9: pecuniam ob rem 
judieandam. id. Verr. 1, 38: luua lumen so- 
lis accipit, id. de Or. 3, 45; cf. Hor. Ep. 1, 
10, 17: praeclarum accepimus a majoribus 
morem, Cic. Off. 3, 10, 44: praecepta, Caes. 



ACCI 

B. G. 2, 6: accepi tuas litteras (in another 
sense than above), I have received your let- 
ter. it has reached me (allatae sunt ad me), 
Cic. Fam. 1,9,14; 2,1,1; 10,1 al.: accep- 
ts injuria ignoscere quam persequi male- 
bant, Sail. C. 9, 3; Caes. B. G. 2, 33: cala- 
mitatem, ib. 1, 31 : detrimenta, ib. 5, 22 ; 
cf. Cic. Mur. 21, 44 al. So often of dignities 
and offices: provinciam, id. Fam. 2, 10,2: 
consulatum, Suet. Aug. 10 : Galliam, id. 
Caes. 22 al. 

II, I n p a r t i c. A. To take a thing by 
hearing, i. e., 1. To hear, to perceive, to ob- 
serve, to learn (cf. opp. do = I give in words, 
i. e. / say) : hoc simul accipe dictum, Enn. 
ap. Cic. Off. 1, 12, 38 ( Ann. v. 204 ) : quod 
ego inaudivi, accipite, Pac. ap. Non. 126, 
22 (Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 81): hoc etiam ac- 
cipe quod dico, Lucil. ap. Non. 240, 1: car- 
men auribus, Lucr. 4, 983 (so id. 6, 164) ; 1, 
270; cf.Verg. A. 2, 65: voces, Lucr. 4, 613 
(so 6, 171) : si te aequo animo ferre accipiet, 
Ter. And. 2, 3, 23 : quae gerantur, accipies 
exPollione,Cic.Fam. 1,6; 1,9,4; Liv. 1,7. 
— Hence very freq. in the histt., to get or 
receive intelligence of any thing, to learn : 
urbem Romam, sicuti ego accepi, condi- 
dere atque habuere initio Trojani, as I 
have learned, Sail. C. 6, 1, and so al.— 2. 
To comprehend or understand any thing 
communicated: haud satis meo corde ac- 
cepi querelas tuas, Plaut. Cas. 2, 2, 18 : et si 
quis est., qui haec putet arte accipi posse, 
Cic. de Or. 1, 25, 114: ut non solum celeri- 
ter acciperet, quae tradebantur, etc., Nep. 
Att. 1, 3; so Quint. 1, 3, 3; 2, 9, 3 al.— 3. 
With the accessory idea of judging, to take 
a thing thus or thus } to interpret or explain, 
usually constr. witn ad or in c. ace. : qui- 
bus res sunt minus secundae ... ad con- 
tumeliam omnia accipiunt magis, the more 
unfortunate one is, the more inclined is he 
to regard every thing as an insult, Ter, Ad. 
4 3 15: in earn partem accipio, id. Eun. 5, 
2,37; cf. Cic. Fam. 10, 6; id. Att. 16, 6; 
Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 2: non recte accipis, you put 
a wrong construction upon this, id. And. 
2, 2, 30: quae sibi quisque faciliafactu pu- 
tat,' aequo animo accipit, Sail. C. 3, 2. — 
Hence: accipere aliquid omen, or in omen, 
to regard a thing as a (favorable) omen, to 
accept the omen (cf. btxeoBai tov oiuvoi/), 
Cic. Div. 1, 46, 103 : 2, 40, 83 ; Liv. 1, 7, 11; 
21, 63 Jin.; Tac. H. 1, 62; id. A. 1, 28; 2, 
13 ; Flor. 4, 12, 14 a!.— Hence poet,: acci- 
pio agnoscoque deos,Verg. A. 12, 260; cf. 
Ov. M. 7, 620.— B. To take a thin ff u P on 
one's self, to undertake (syn. suscipio) : 
accipito hanc ad te litem, Plaut. Most. 5, 
2,23: mea causa causam accipite, Ter. Hec. 
alt. prol. 47; cf. Cic. Fam. 7 24; so id. 
Verr. 2, 3, 22 ; Quint. 20 al. — Hence also, 

C. To bear, endure, suffer any thing dis- 
agreeable or troublesome : hanccine ego ut 
contumeliam tarn insignem ad me accipi- 
am ! Ter. Eun. 4, 7, 1 : nil satis firmi video, 
quamobrem accipere hunc me expediat 
metum, id. Heaut. 2, 3, 96 ; 5, 1, 59 ; id. 
Eun. 4, 6, 24 ; id. Ad. 2, 1, 53 ; id. Ph. 5, 
2, 4 ; Cic. Tusc. 5, 19, 56 : calamitatem, 
id. Off. 3, 26: injuriam, id. ib. 1, 11 al — 

D. To accept a thing, to be satisfied with, 
to 'approve : dos, Pamphile, est decern ta- 
lenta ; Pam. : Accipio, Ter. And. 5, 4, 48: 
accepit condicionem, dein quaestum acci- 
pit, id. ib. 1, 1, 52 : visa ista . . . accipio 
iisque interdum etiam assentior, nee per- 
cipio tamen, Cic. Ac. 2, 20, 66: preces suas 
acceptas ab dis immortalibus ominati, Liv. 
42, 30, 8 Drak. Cf. Herz, Caes. B. G. 5, 1: 
"equi te esse feri similem, dico." Ride- 
mus et ipse Messius : " accipio,' ' / allow it, 
Exactly so, Hor. S. 1, 5, 58. — B. In m e r " 
c a n t. lang., 1. 1., to receive or collect a sum : 
pro quo (frumento) cum a Varinio praetore 
pecuniam accepisset, Cic. Fl. 45 ; hence 
subst. : acceptum, i, n. , the receipt, and 
in account-books the credit side : in accep- 
tum referre alicui, to carry over to the credit 
side, to place to one's credit, Cic.Verr. 1, 36, 
57; id. Rose. Com. 2; id. Phil. 2,16; id.Caec. 
6,17; Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 234 (opp. datum or ex- 
pensum).— Hence also trop., to owe or be 
indebted to one, in a good or a bad sense : 
ut esset nemo qui non mihi vitam suam, li- 
beros, remp. referret acceptam, Cic. Phil. 2. 
5 : omnia mala, quae postea vidimus, uni ac- 
cepta referemus Antonio, ascribe, id. ib. 22; 
Caes B. G. 8, 58; id. B. C, 3, 57: Acceptum 

17 



ACCL 

refero versibus, esse nocens, Ov. Trist. 2, 10. 
—P. In the gramni., to take a word or 
phrase thus or thus, to explain a word in 
any manner: adversus interduni promis- 
cue accipitur, Charis. p. 207 P. al .— (Syn. 
nanciscor and adipiscor : he to whom 
something is given, accipit ; he who gets 
by a fortunate occurrence, nanciscitur; he 
who obtains it by exertion, adipiscitur. 
" Sumimus ipsi: accipimus ab alio," Vel. 
Long. p. 2243 P.— "Inter tenere, sumere et 
accipere hoc interest, quod tenemus quae 
sunt in nostra potestate : sumimus posita : 
accipimus data," Isid. Diff. 1). — Hence, 
acceptUS, a , ur &, P. »., welcome, agreea- 
ble, acceptable (syn. gratus. Acceptus is 
related to gratus, as the effect to the cause ; 
he who is gratus, i. e. dear, is on that ac- 
count acceptus, welcome, acceptable; hence 
the usual position : gratus atque accep- 
tus).— First, of persons: essetne apud 
te is servus acceptissimus? Plaut. Cap. 3, 
5, 50: plebi acceptus erat, Caes. B. G. 1, 13; 
acceptus erat inoculis,Vulg. 1 Reg. 18, 5.— 
Of things: dis et hominibus est accep- 
tum quod, etc., Van*. R. R. 3, 16, 5: quod 
vero approbaris. id gratuni acceptumque 
habendum, Cic. Tusc. 5, 15, 45: niunus co- 
rum gratum acceptumque esse,Nep.Hann. 
7, 3: quorum mi hi dona accepta et grata 
habeo, Plaut. True. 2, 7, 56 : rem populo 
Romano gratam acceptamque, Cic. Phil. 
13, 50; tempore accepto exaudivi, Vulg. 
2 Cor. 0, 2. — Comp., Plaut. Pers. 4, 4, 96; 
Cic. Rep. 6, 13 ; Tac. A. 6, 45 al.— Sup., 
see above.— Adv. accepte does not oc- 



ACCO 



accipenser, v. acipenser. 

accipiter, tris (earlier also teris, Prise, 
p. 695 P.), m. (/. Lucr. 4, 1006) [com. de- 
riv. from accipio; see 2. acceptor; but cf. 
wKi/TTTepoc, swift-winged], a general name 
for birds of prey, esp. those of the falcon 
kind, Plin. 10, 8, 9, § 21; Ter. Ph. 2, 2 16- 
Lucr. 5, 107 ; Cic, N. D. 3, 19 ; Hor. Ep. 
1, 16, 50 al.— B. In parti c. 1 The 
common hawk, Falco Palumbarius, Linn • 
Hor. C. 1, 37, 17 sq. ; Ov. M. 5, 605 sq. ; Col! 
8, 4, 6; 3, 8, 4 al. : sacer, because auguries 
were taken from it, Verg. A. 11, 721 (cf. 
Horn. Od. 15, 525 sq.).— 2. The sparrow- 
hawk, Falco Nisus Linn used in fowling- 
Mart. 14, 216.— if. Transf, of a rapa- 
cious man: labes populi, pecuniai accipi- 
ter, Plaut. Pers. 3, 3, 5. 

* accipitrina, a e,/. [accipiter], hawk- 
weed, hieracium, Linn. ; App. Herb. 30. 

* aCCipitro, are, 1, v. a. [id.], used by 
Laevius for lacerare, to tear, to lacerate ap 
Gell. 19, 7, 11. 

acClSUS, a, um, P. a. of accido. 
aCCltio, onis, /. [accio], a calling or 
summoning (late Lat.), Am. 4, p. 134. 

1. aCCltllS. a,um,Part. of accio. 

2. accitus, us, m. (only in all, sing.) 
[accio], a summoning to a place, a summons, 
a call : magistratus accitu istius evocan- 
tur, Cic.Verr. 2, 3, 28, § 68 : accitu can ge- 
nitoris,Verg. A. 1, 677. 

ACCIUS, ii, m -, v. Attius, 

acclamatio (adc), onis,/. [acclamo], 
a calling to, an exclamation, shout. I, I n 
gen.: acuta atque attenuata nimis, Auct. 
Her. 3, 12, 21 ; the calling of the shepherd 
Col. 7,3, 26; so mplur., id. 6, 2, 14.— II. In 
P a r t i c. A. A cry of disapprobation (so 
esp. in the time of the republic) : ei contigit 
non modo ut adclamatione, sed ut convicio 
et maledictis impediretur, Cic. Q. Fr. 2, 3 
2; 2,1, 2; quanto jam levior est adclama- 
tio,C. Rabir. 18; id. de Or. 2, 83, 339 etc.; 
Suet. Dom. 23 al.— B. On the contrary, esp. 
later, a shout of approbation (e. g. on the 
appearance of a person honored by the 
people), a huzza : adclamationes multitu- 
dinis assentatione immodica pudorem ope- 
rants, Liv. 31, 15, 2; so Suet. Caes. 79- id. 
Aug. 58 ; id. Oth. 6 (made by the voice; 
while plausus is made with the hands' 
Quint. 8, 3, 3).— O. Rhetor, a figure of 
speech = exclamatio, hnt<pwvr]ij.a, exclama- 
tion, Quint. 8, 5, 11. 

(acclamito, are, a false read, in Plaut. 
Am. 3, 2, 3, for occlamitat.) 

ac-clamo ( a <ic), avi, atum, 1, v. n., to 
raise a cry at, to shout at, to exclaim (in a 
18 



friendly or hostile manner), with and with- 
out the dat.; also with the ace. of the thing 
called. I. To shout at in a hostile sense, 
to disapprove or blame by shouting (so par- 
tic, in the time of the republic): non me- 
tuo, ne niihi adclametis, cry out against 
Cic. Brut. 73, 256 ; cf. id. Muren. 8; id 
Piso, 65; id.Verr. 2, 48; id. Caecin. 28; so 
Sen. Ep. 47, 11; Suet. Galb. 20 al.: hostis 
omnibus, qui adclamassent, Cic.Verr 2, 2 
20; so Veil. 2, 4, 4; Suet. Caes. 70 al.— |f[ 
After the Aug. period, to cry at with appro' 
bation, to shout applause, to approve with 
loud cries, to applaud, huzza : populus et 
miles Neroni Othoni adclamavit, Tac H 
1, 78; Suet. Claud. 7; 27; id. Dom. 13 al.: 
prosequentibus cunctis servatorem libera 
toremque adclamantibus, they applaud him 
with loud acclamations as their saviour and 
deliverer, Liv. 34, 50 fin. ; so Tac. A. 1, 44 
al.— Impers. : ei adclamatum est, Plin. Ep 
4, 9, 18. 

* ac-claro (adc), avi, atum, l, v. a., to 

make clear or evident, to show or make 
known; in the lang. of the augurs: uti tu 
signa nobis certa adclarassis (i. e. adclara- 
vens), Liv. 1, 18 fin. 

actfinis, e, adj. (also adc) [ad-CLnvo], 
leaning on or against something, inclined to 
or toward (poet, and in post- Aug. prose); 
constr. with dat. I. Lit.: corpusque le- 
vabat arboris adclinis trunco Verg A 10 
834; so Ov. M. 15, 737; Stat. Silv. 5 3, 36 
al.— In prose, Plin. 8, 15, 16, § 39; Just. 28, 
4: crates inter se acclines, Col. 12, 15, 1.— 
B. Esp. of localities, Amm. 14,8; 29*5.— 
II. T r o p., inclined to, disposed to (— incli- 
natus, propensus): acchnis falsis animus 
meliora recusat, Hor. S. 2, 2, 6. 

ac-clino, avi, atum, 1, v. a., to lean on 
or against something (not before the Aug. 
period; mostly poet.). I, Lit.: se accli- 
navit in ilium, Ov. M. 5, 72: latus leoni, 
Stat. Silv. 4, 2, 51. — Most freq. in part, 
pass. : acclinatus: colla acclinata, Ov. M. 
10, 268 ; cf. : terrae acclinatus, id. ib. 14, 
666: castra tumulo sunt acclinata, Liv. 44' 
3, 6: maria terris, Stat. Silv. 5, 4, 5.— H^ 
Trop., with se, to incline to a thing: ad 
causam senatus, Liv. 4, 48, 9. 

ac-clivis, e, also (but much less freq.) 
-VUS, a, um, adj. [ad + clivus], up hill, 
mounting upwards, ascending, steep : sta- 
dium, Lucil. ap. Non. 4, 11 : ea viae pars 
valde acclivis est, Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 1, 2, § 4; so 
leniter acclivis aditus, Caes. B. G. 2, 29 al.: 
acclivus, Ov. M. 2, 19. 

aCCliVltas, atis > /. [acclivis], an as- 
cending direction, an acclivity, ascent : pari 
acclivitate collis, Caes. B. G. 2, 18; so Col. 
2, 4, 10.— C oner, of the rising place itself, 
Amm. 14, 2, 13. 

aCCllVUS, a , ui n, v. acclivis. 
ACCO, onis, m., a chieftain of the Seno- 
nes, Caes. B. G. 6, 4; 44 al. 

aC-COgHOSCO, S re , 3, v. a., to know or 
recognize perfectly, Petr. Fragm. 69 Burm. ; 
Tert. ad Ux. 2, 6; adv. Marc. 4, 20 al. 

acedia, ae, c. [accolo], a dweller by or 
near a place, a neighbor {incola, one who 
dwells in a place) : optati cives, populares, 
incolae, accolae, advenae, Plaut. Aul. 3 l' 
1: pastor accola ejus loci, Liv. 1, 7,5* '37' 
53; Tac. A. 2, 68; Verg. A. 7, 729 al. : acco- 
lae Cereris, i. e. dwellers at her temple, Cic 
Verr. 2, 4, 50, § 111.— In Tacitus, adj., of 
the tributary streams of the Tiber: Tibe- 
rim accolis fluviis orbatum, the neighboring 
rivers, A. 1, 79. (The Vulg. uses this word 
in the sense of incola : accola in terra, Psa. 
104,23; Act. 7, 6: terrae, Lev. 18, 27.) 

ac-cdlo (adc), Cului, cultum, 3, v. a., to 
dwell by or near, constr. with ace. or absol. 
(a) With ace: Histrum fluvium. Naev ap. 
Cic. Or. 45, 152 (Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 14) : arcem, 
Att. ap. Non. 357, 14 (ib. p. 202) : ilium locum, 
*Cic. Rep. 6, lhfin.: viam, Liv. 28, 13,4: 
Macedonian, id. 39, 46, 7: Pontum. Tac 
H. 3, 47 : Nilum, Verg. G. 4, 288 ; cf. : 
Rhenum, Tac. H. 1, 51 : nives Haemi, Ov. 
F. 1, 390 : Capitoli saxum, Verg. A. 9, 448 
al. ; hence, pass. : fluvius crebris oppidis 
accolitur, Plin. 3, 1, 30, § 9.— (/3) Absol.: 
vicine Apollo, qui aedibus Propinquus nos- 
tris adcolis, Plaut. Bacch. 2, 1, 4 (the dat. 
aedibus belongs to propinquus, not to ad- 
colis, as Prise, p. 1203 P. seems to have 
construed). — Poet. : accolere vitem, to be 



AOCR 

a cultivating neighbor of it, Cat. 62, 55 dub. 
(Miiller reads coluere.) 

accommodate, adv., v. accommodo, 
P. a. fin. l 

accommodation onis, / [accommo 
do], the fitting or adjusting of one thing to 
another. I. I n ge n. : a. verborum et sen- 
tentiarum ad inventionem, Cic. Inv. 1, 7 
9 -— II. E sp., the adapting of one^ s feeling 
or will to another's, compliance, complai- 
sance, indulgence : ex liberalitate atque ac- 
commodatione magistratuum, Cic. Verr 2 
3, 82, § 189. ' ' 

accommddatus, a , um, p. a. of 

ac-commddo, avi, atum (better, adc), 

1, v. a., to fit or adapt one thing to another, 
to lay, put, or hang on (in good prose, esp. in 
Cic, very freq.), constr. with ad, dat, or 
absol. I, Lit.: coronam sibi ad caput, 
Cic de Or. 2, 61, 250 : clupeum ad dorsum, 
Plaut. Trin. 3, 2, 93 : gladium dextrae, Lucil. 
ap. Cic. Tusc. 4, 21, 48; so, hastam dextrae, 
Sil. 5, 146: calautioam capiti, Cic. Fragm. 
Or. in Clod. 5 ; so, lateri ensem, Verg. A. 2, 
393; absol. : insignia, Caes. B. G. 2, 21. 5.— 
B. I n g e n. . to prepare for any use : Ara- 
bus lapis dentifriciis adcommodatur crema- 
tus, Plin. 36, 21, 41, § 153. 

II. Trop., to adjust or adapt to, to 
accommodate to : meum consilium adcom- 
modabo ad tuum, Cic. Fam. 9 7- so id 
Att. 10, 7; 12, 32; id. Leg. 3, 2 al.— Hence', 
with se, to adapt one's self to another's 
opinion, wishes, etc. , to conform to, to com- 
ply with : omnes qui probari volunt, ad 
eorum qui audiunt arbitrium et nutum 
totos se fingunt et adcommodant, Cic. Or. 
8, 24: alicui de aliqua re, to be compliant 
to one in any thing: peto a te . . . ut ei 
de habitatione adcommodes, id. Fam. 13, 2. 
— B. In gen., to bring a person or thing 
to something, to apply : testes ad crimen, 
Cic. Verr. 1, 18, 55: vim ad eloquentiam, 
iA Or. 7: curam pratis, etc, to apply, 



Quint. 1, 12, 7 : nonnullam operam his stii 
diis, id. 1, 10, 15; cf. 1, 8, 19: verba alicui 
(equival. to dare), id. 6, 1, 27 ; cf. 11, 1, 39 
al. : intentionem his, Plin. Ep. 2, 5, 2 al.— 
Hence, with se (in a more general sense 
than above), to apply or devote one's self to, 
to undertake : se ad rem publicam et ad 
res magnas gerendas, Cic. Off. 1,21 ; of prop- 
erty, to lend it to one for use : si quid iste suo- 
rum aedilibus adcommodavit, id.Verr. 2, 4, 
57.— Hence, accommddatus, a , u «i, P. 

a. , fitted or adaptedto } suitable,conformable, 
or appropriate to (only in prose ; in poet- 
ry, accommodus is used), with ad or dat. : 
puppes ad niagnitudinem fluctuum adcom- 
modatae, Caes. B. G 3, 13: oratio ad per- 
suadendum adcommodata, Cic. Ac. 1, 8: 
quae mihi intelligis esse adcommodata, 
conformable to my interest, id. Fam. 3, 3. 
—Comp. : oratio contionibus concitatis ad- 
commodatior, id. Clu. 1 ; so Caes. B. G. 3, 13 : 
nobis accommodatior, Quint. 4, 1, 5; Suet. 
Ner. 8. — Sup. : exemplum temporibus suis 
adcommodatissimum, Cic Fragm. Corn. 7; 
so Plin. 13, 3, 6, § 26; Plin. Ep. 5, 19, 7- 

Quint. 12, 10, 63 al.— Adv.: accommo- 
date, fitly, suitably, agreeably: dicere 
quam maxime adc. ad veritatem, Cic. de 
Or. 1, 33 149.— Comp., id. Or. 33, 117.— 
Sup., id. Fin. 5, 9, 24. 

ac-commodus (adc), a, um, adj., fit, 
suitable (vox Verg. and poet, for adcommo- 
datu's) ; with dat. : valles adcommoda frau- 
di,Verg. A. 11, 522; so, membra bellis, Stat. 
S. 4, 4, 65: nox fraudi, id. Theb. 10, 192.— 
Also in late prose, Cod. Th. 15, 1, 41; Pall. 
Jul. 8, 2; Veg. 4, 2, 12 al.— Comp., sup., 
and adv. not found. 

*aC-COng"ero (adc), essi, estum, 3, v. 
a., to bear or bring to: ego huic dona ad- 
congessi, Plaut. True. 1, 2, 17. 

ac-corpdro ( adc -), « re , v. a. [ad -|- cor- 
pus]: ahquid alicui, to incorporate, to fit 
or join to (late Lat.). Amm. 16, 8, 11; Sol. 
37. " ' ' ' 

ac-Credo fade), didi, ditum, 3, v. a. 
(pres. sub. adcrediias, Plaut. Asin. 5, 2, 4), to 
yield one's belief to another, i. e. to believe 
unconditionally (rare), (a) With dat. : quis- 
nam istuc adcredat tibi ? Plaut. Asin. 3, 3, 
37 : neque mi posthac quidquam adcreduas, 
id. ib. 5, 2, 4; so, tibi nos, Hor. Ep. 1, 15, 
25.— (J3) Aliquid : facile hoc, Lucr. 3, 856. 



ACCU 

— (7) Absol.: vix adcredens, *Cic. Att. 6, 2, 
3: primo non accredidit, Nep. Dat, 3. 4. 

(accrement um , i, a false read, in 
Plin. 9, 1, 2, for nutrimentum.) 

ac-creSCO (adc), evi, etum, 3, v. n., to 
grow, to become larger by growth, to in- 
crease. I, Lit.: nobis jam paulatim ad- 
crescere puer incipiat, Quint. 1, 2, 1 ; so, ad- 
crcscens imperator, Amm. 27, 6, 13 : eruca, 
Plin. 11, 32, 37; ib. 35, 41: flumen subito, 
Cic. Inv. 2, 31, 97; so, noudum adcrescente 
unda, Tac. A. 2, 8 : caespes jam pectori us- 
que adcreverat, id. ib. 1, 19. — Part.: adcre- 
tus, in pass, sense, wrapped up, Plin. 11, 32, 
3 . — b. Of abstract subjects: valetudo de- 
crescit, adcrescit labor, Plaut. Cure. 2, 1,4: 
amicitiam, quae incepta a parvis cum ae- 
tate adcrevit simul, Ter. And. 3, 3, 7: do- 
lores, Nep. Att. 21, 4: invidia, Hor. S. 1, 6, 
26: magnum facinus, Sen. Ben. 1, 10, 4. — 
II, T r a n s f., in gen. £. To be added to by 
way of increase or augmentation, to be join- 
ed or annexed to : si decern jugera (agri) 
alluvione adcreverint, Dig. 19, 1, 13, § 14: 
veteribus negotiis nova adcrescunt, Plin. 
Ep. 2. 8, 3 : sibi adcrescere putat, quod 
cuique adstruatur, id. Pan. 02, 8: trimetris 
adcrescere jussit nomen iambeis, Hor. A. P. 
2o'J: cum dictis factisque omnibus vana 
accresceret fides, Liv. 1, 54, 2. — Hence, 
B. Jund. t. t., to fall to one, as an in- 
crease of his property, Gai. 2, 199; Dig. 12, 
4. 12 al. : jus adcrescendi, the right of in- 
crease, Gai. 2, 126; Dig. 7, 2, 1, § 3 al. 

* aCCretlO, <~>nis, /• [accresco], an in- 
creasing, increment : lunam accretione et 
deminutione luminis . . . significantem dies, 
Cic. Tusc. 1, 28, 68. 

AcCUa, ae,/., <*> town of Apulia, Liv. 24, 
20, 8; dub., v. Weissenb. a. h, 1. 

accubatio. onis,/. [accubo], a rare col- 
lat. form of accubitio, a lying, reclining, 
Cic. Off. 1, 35, 128, ace. to the MSS. 

* accubrtaiia, i um , n - D d 0, sc - stra - 
gula, the coverings spread over the table- 
couches, Trebell. Claud. 14. 

aCCUbltatlO, onis,/. [accubito], a re- 
clining, lying at the table, Spart. Ver. 5 ; 
cf. accubitio. 

accubitio, onis,/. [accubo]. I. A ly- 
ing or reclining, esp. at meals (in the Rom. 
manner, on the triclinium or accubitum) : 
accubitio epularis amicorum, Cic. de Sen. 
13, 45; cf. Non. 193, 30; so Cic. N. D. 1, 34, 
94 (but in Off. 1, 35, 128, the MSS. give ac- 
cubatio).— II, Concr., a couch, Lampr. 
Sev. 34; cf. accubitatio. 

aCCUbltO, ire, = accubo, Eccl. 

aCCUbltcrittS, a , um, adj. [accubo], 
pertaining to reclining : vestimenta, Petr. 
30. 

aCCUbltUXn, *, n - [ id -], a couch for a 
targe number of guests to recline on at 
meals (while the triclinium contained only 
three seats), Lampr. Heliog. 19, 25 al. 

aCCUbitUS, fi s , m - 7 = accubitio. I, A 
reclining at table, Stat. Ach. 1, 110 (quoted 
by Prise. 863 P.) ; id. Theb. 1, 714 ; and pern, 
also Varr.ap. Isid. Orig. 20, 11, 19.— II. Per 
in eton,,a coucA, Vulg. Cant. 1, 11; a place 
on a couch, ib. Luc. 14, 7. 

aC-CUbo (adc), are, 1, v. n., t. t. (the 
forms accubui and accubitum belong to ac- 
cumbo),(oZiewearor6yathing. I. In gen., 
constr. with dat. or absol. : quoi bini cus- 
todes semper accubant, Plaut. Mil. 2, 2, 57 : 
Furiarum maxima juxta accubat, Verg. A. 
6, 606 : accubantes effodiunt, Plin. 35, 6, 19, 
§ 37. — Rarely with ace. : lectum, App.M. 5, 
p. 160. — Of things: nigrum nemus, Verg. 
G. 3,334: cadus (vini), Hor. C. 4,12,18.— Also 
of places (foradjacere): theatrumTarpeio 
monti accubans Suet. Caes. 44. — E sp. H. 
To recline at table (in the Rom. manner): 
accubantes in conviviis, Cic. Cat. 2, 5, 10; 
so, in convivio, Nep. Pel. 3, 2; Cic. Tusc. 
3, 23 ; morem apud majores nunc epularum 
fuisse, ut deinceps, qui accubarent, cane- 
rent ad tibiam, etc., Cic. Tusc. 4, 2, 3; cf. : 
regulus accubans epulari coepit, Liv. 41, 2, 
12; so, absol, Plaut. Stich. 2, 3, 53; Ter. 
Eun. 4, 5, 2 ■ Suet. Caes. 49 al. : cum ali- 
quo, Plaut. Trin. 2, 4, 72 : infra, Liv. 39, 
43, 3: contra, Suet. Aug. 98. — B. To lie 
with, Plaut. Bacch. 1, 1, 39 ; 3, 3, 50; Suet. 
Vesp.21. 

*ac-CUDUO (better, accubio, Lachm. 



ACCU 

ad Lucr. 5, 679 fin.), adv. [accubo], lying 
near, a word formed by Plautus to answer 
to assiduo (fr. sedeo), True. 2, 4, 68. 

* aC-CUd.0, Sre, 3, v. a., lit. to strike or 
stamp upon, to coin (of gold; cf. cudo); 
hence, metaph., to coin further, to add to 
a sum of money : tris minas accudere etiam 
possum, et triginta sient, Plaut. Merc. 2, 3, 
96. 

aC-CUmbo ( a dc.), ciibui, ctibitum, 3, 
v. n., to lay one's self down at a place; 
and hence, to lie somewhere. I, In gen. 
(so very rare): in via, Plaut. Most. 1, 4, 
13 ; of one swi aiming : summis in un- 
dis, Manil. 5, 429.— H. In part. /L, To 
recline at table, in the manner in which 
the Romans (and liually even the Roman 
women, Val. Max. 2, 1, 2) reclined, after 
luxury and effeminacy had become preva- 
lent. While they extended the lower part 
of the body upon the couch (triclinium, 
lectus triclinaris), they supported the up- 
per part by the left arm upon a cushion 
(or upon the bosom of the one nearest; 
hence, in sinu accumbere, Liv. 39, 43; cf. 
a.vometa9a.i^€ha.t li> tw koXttw tlvos, Ev. 

Ioh. 13, 23), the right hand only being used 
in taking food: hoc age, adcumbe, Plaut. 
Pers. 5, 1, 15; so id. Most. 1, 3, 150, etc.; 
Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 31; id. Mur. 35; Liv. 28, 18; 
c. ace: mensam, Att. ap. Non. 415, 26; 
Lucil. Sat. 13; ib. 511, 16: cotidianis epu- 
lis in rnbore, Cic. Mur, 74: in convivio, 
id. Verr. 1, 66: in epulo, Cic. Vatin. 12: 
epulis, Verg. A, 1, 79 ; tecum, Plaut. Bacch. 
5 2, 75; absol., Cic. Deiot. 17. — Since 
three persons usually reclined upon such 
a couch (cf. Cic. Pis, 27), these expressions 
arose: in summo (or superiorem, also su- 
pra), medium and imum (or infra) adcum- 
bere; and the series began on the left side, 
since they lay supported by the left arm. 
The whole arrangement is explained by the 
following figure: 

imus medius summus 





medius lectus 








6. 5. 4. 








t> 




F° 


1= 


21 


00" 


MENSA 


t* 


B 

B 

03 


2 
S 








ST 





OS 






to 



Among the three lecti, the lectus medius 
was the most honorable; and on each lec- 
tus, the locus medius was more honorable 
than the summus ; and this had the pref- 
erence to the imus or ultimus. The con- 
sul or other magistrate usually sat as imus 
of the lectus medius (flg.no. 6), in order that, 
by his position at the corner, he might be 
able, without trouble, to attend to any offi- 
cial business that might occur. The place 
no. 7 seems, for a similar reason, to have 
been taken by the host. See on this subject 
Salmas. Sol. p. 886; Smith's Antiq. ; Beck- 
er's Gall. 3, p. 206 sq. (2d ed.); and Orell. 
excurs. ad Hor. S. 2, 8, 20. This statement 
explains the passages in Plaut. Pers. 5 1, 
14; id. Most. 1,1,42; id. Stich. 3, 2, 37, etc ; 
Cic. Att. 1, 9; id. Fam. 9, 26; Sail. Fragm. 
ap. Serv. ad Verg. A. 1, 702 ; Hor. S. 2, 
8, 20. — B. In m &l- part, (rarely) Plaut! 
Bacch. 5, 2, 73; Men. 3, 2, 11; 5, 9, 82. 

accumulate (adc), adv., v. accumulo 
fin. 

* accumulatio (adc), onis, / [ac- 
cumulo], a heaping up only as t. t. in the 
lang. of gardening, of the heaping up of 
earth round the roots of plants, Plin. 17 
26, 39, § 246. 

* accumulator (adc), oris, m. [id.]. 
one who heaps up or accumulates : opum 
Tac. A. 3, 30. 

aC-CUmulo ( a <lc.), fivi, atum, 1, v. a. 
[cumulus], to add to a heap, to heap up, ac- 
cumulate, to augment by heaping up (mostly 
poetical). I. L i t. A. In gen.: vento- 
rum flatu congeriem arenae accumulan- 
tium, Plin. 4 1, 2: confertos acervatim 
mors accumulabat, Lucr. 6, 1263. — Absol., 



ACCU 

of heaping up money: auget, addit, ad- 
cumulat, *Cic. Agr. 2, 22, 59. (The syn. 
augere and addere are used of any object, 
although still small, in extent or number, 
after the increase; but adcumulare only 
when it becomes of considerable magni- 
tude; hence the climax in the passage 
quoted from Cic.)— B. Esp., botan. t. t., 
to heap up earth round the roots of plants, 
to trench up, Plin. 17, 19, 31, § 139; 18 29 
71, § 295; 19, 5, 26, § 83 al.— H. Tro p., to 
heap, add, increase : virtutes generis meis 
moribus, Epitaph of a Scipio in Inscr. 
Orell. no, 554 : caedem caede, to heap mur- 
der upon murder, Lucr. 3, 71: aliquem do- 
nis, to heap offerings upon one, Verg. A. 6, 
886: honorem alicui, Ov. F. 2, 122: curas, 
id. H. 15, 70.— Absol.: quod ait (Vergiliusj 
sidera lambit (A. 3, 574), vacanter hoc etiam 
accumulavit et inaniter, haspiled up words, 
Gell. 17, 10, 16. — Hence, accumulate, 
adv., abundantly, copiously (very rare) : id 
prolixe accumulateque fecit, Cic. FI. 89: 
accumulate largiri, Auct. Her. 1, 17 fin.: 
prolixe accumulateque pollicetur, App. M. 
10, p. 212. 

accurate, adv., v. accuro, P. a. 

acCUratlO, onis, /. [accuro], accuracy, 
exactness, carefulness (very rare) : mira in 
inveniendis componendisque rebus, Cic. 
Brut. 67, 238 : ad omnem accurationem — 
accuratissime, Veg. 1, 56, 35. 

aCCUratUS, a, um, P. a., from 

a C- CUTO (adc), iivi, iltum, 1, v. a. (arch. 
accurassis = accuraveris, Plaut. Ps. 4, 1, 
29 ; id. Pers. 3, 1, 65), to take care of, to do 
a thing with care. I, In gen. (in Plaut. 
and Ter. very often ; more rare in the class, 
per,, partic. in the verb, fin.; while the P. 
a. occurs very often in Cic, see below), 
(a) With ace. : prandium alicui, Plaut. Mer. 
1, 3, 25: quod facto est opus, id. Cas. 3, 3, 
25 : rem sobrie aut frugaliter, id. Pers. 4, 1, 
1 al. : melius adcurantur, quae consilio ge- 
runtur, quam quae sine consilio admini- 
strantur, Cic. Inv. 1, 34, 58: virtus et cul 
tus humanus sub tecto adcurantur, id. Fr. 
in Col. 12 praef. : barbam, Lampr. Heliog. 
31. — (/3) Absol. : ergo adcures: properato 
opus est, Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 210, v. Ritschl 
a. h. 1. — (7) With ut or we; omnes bonos 
bonasque adcurare addecet, suspicionem 
et culpam ut ab se segregent, Plaut. Trin. 
1, 2, 42; so with ut, Ter. And. 3, 2, 14; 
with ne, id. Hec. 5, 1, 12.— H, Esp.: ad- 
curare aliquem, to treat one carefully, 
regale a guest, Plaut. Ep. 5, 1, 55. — Hence, 
aCCUratUS, a , um , P- ^-, prepared with 
care, careful, studied, elaborate, exact (nev- 
er of persons, for which diligens is used; 
syn. : meditatus, exquisitus, elaboratus, po- 
litus): adcurata malitia, a studied artifice, 
Plaut. True, 2, 5, 20: adcuratae et medita- 
tae commentationes, Cic de Or. 1, 60, 257 : 
adcuratius et exquisitius dicendi genus, id. 
Brut, 82, 283: adcuratissima diligentia, id. 
Att. 7, 3 al : adcuratum habere = adcurare, 
to take care, be at pains, Plaut. Bac. 3, 6, 2l! 
— Adv. : accurate, carefully, nicely, ex- 
actly (syn. : diligenter, studiose, exquisite), 
Cic Att. 16, 5; id. Parad. 1, 4; id. Brut. 22 
al.— Comp., id. Att. 8, 12; Caes. B. G. 6, 22; 
id. B. Alex. 12.— Sup., id. Fam. 5, 17; Nep. 
Lys. 4, 2. 

ac-CUITO (adc), ciScum and curri, cur- 
sum, 3, v. n., to run to a place, to come to 
by running, to hasten to. I. L i t. constr. 
absol., with ad and in : expeditus facito ut 
sis, si inclamaro utaccurras, Cic, Att. 2, 20; 
12, 18 (accucurrisse)* 13, 48: cupide ad 
praetorem accurrit, Cic. Verr. 2 5, 3- so 
Caes. B. G. 1, 22; ib. 3, 5; Sail. J. 106, 2: 
in Tusculanum, Cic. Att. 15, 3 : ad gemitum 
collabentis, Tac. A. 2, 31: in castra, Caes. 
B. Alex. 53: in auxilium accucurrerunt, 
Suet. Calig. 58: ad visendum, id. Ner. 34: 
auxilio suis, Sail. J. 101, 10. — Iwpers.: ac- 
curritur ab universis, Tac. A. 1, 21. — H, 
Trop., of ideas: istae imagines ita nobis" 
dicto audientes sunt, ut simul atque veli- 
mus accurrant, come up, present themselves, 
Cic Div. 2, 67, 138. 

aCCUrSUS (adc.), us, m. [accurro], a 
running or coming to : Remi, Ov. F. 2, 3, 
72: comitum, Stat. Th. 6, 511: populi, Tac. 
A. 4, 41 : subitus militum, Val, Max. 6, 8, 6 : 
tot provinciarum, Tac. H. 4, 25 al. : civium, 
Sen. Hipp. 894. 

19 



ACCU 

* aCCUSablHs, e > adj- [accuso], blame- 
worthy, reprehensible : turpitudo, Cic. Tusc. 
4,35,75. 

aCCUSatlO, oniS j /• [ id -]i complaint, ac- 
cusation, indictment. 1. 1 n a b s t r. : ratio 
judiciorum ex accusatione et defensione 
constat, Cic. Off. 2, 14: comparare and con- 
stituere accusationem, to bring in. Cic. 
Verr. 1, 1: intentare, Tac. A. 6, 4: capes- 
sere, id. ib. 4, 52: exercere, id. H. 2, 10: 
factitare, to pursue or urge, Cic. Brut. 34: 
accusatione desistere, to desist from, give 
up, id. Fragm. Corn. ap. Ascon.; later, de- 
mittere, Aur. Vict. 28, 2: accusationi re- 
spondere, to answer, Cic. Clu. 3. — H, I n 
c o n c r,, the bill of indictment, the action 
or suit : in accusationis septem libris, i. e. 
in. the Orations against Verres, Cic. Or. 29, 
103; so Plin. 7, 30, 31, § 110. 

aCCUSatlVUS, a, um [id., prop, be- 
longing to an accusation, hence], in gramm. 
with or without casus, the accusative case, 
as if the defendant in a suit, Varr. L. L. 
8. § 67 Mull, (in the prec. §: casus accu- 
sandi); Quint. 7, 9, 10, and all the later 
writers. — Hence, praepositiones accusati- 
vae, i. e. those joined with the accusative, 
Serv. ad Verg. A. 1, 28 al. 

accusator, oris > m - t id -]> ori s- one who 

calls another to account; hence, transferred 
to public life, an accuser, a plaintiff, esp. 
in a state-offence (while petitor signifies a 
plaintiff in private" causes; yet accusator is 
often used for every kind of accuser, and 
then includes the petitor, v. accuso no. II. 
A.), f. In gen. (very freq.): accusato- 
rem pro oinni actore et petitore appello, 
Cic. Part. Or. 32,110: possumus petitoris 
personam capere, accusatoris deponere? 
id. Quint. 13 fin. ; cf. Quint. 6, 1, 36: accu- 
satores multos esse in civitate utile est, ut 
metu contineatur audacia, Cic. Rose. Am. 
20: acres atque acerbi. id. Brut. 36: vehe- 
mens et molestus, id.ib. M fin. .• graves, 
voluntarii, id. Leg. 3, 20, 47 : firmus verus- 
que, id. Div. in Caecil. 9, 29 al. : eundem 
accusatorem capitis sui ac judicem esse, 
Liv. 8, 32, 9 : ita ille imprudens ipse suus 
fuit accusator, Nep. Lys. 4, 3 ; graviter eos 
accusat quod, etc., Caes. B. G. 1, 16, 5: ac- 
cusatores tui, Vulg. Act. 23, 35; 25, 18 al- 
ii. Esp., in silv. age, an informer, a de- 
nouncer (= delator): accusatorum denun- 
tiatioues, Suet. Aug, 66; so Juv. 1, 161. 
aCCUSatorie, adv., v. accusatorius. 
aCCUSatOliuS, a,um, adj. [accusator], 
pertaining to an accuser, accusatory : lex, 
Cic. Mur. 5: jus et mos, id. Flacc. 6, 14; 
artificium, id. Rose. Am. 17, 49 : animus, 
id. Clu. 4, 11: vox, Liv. 45, 10: spiritus, id. 
2, 61 : vita, Quint. 12, 7, 3 : libelli, Dig. 48, 
5, 17, § 1 al. —Adv. : aCCUSatdrie, in 
the manner of an accuser, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 
72, § 176; 2, 3, 70, § 164; Liv. 40, 12, 6. 

aCCUSatrix, icis, /. [id.], she who 
makes accusation against any one, a female 
accuser (v. accuso no. I. ) : tu mi accusatrix 
ades, Plaut. As. 3, 1, 10 ; so Plin. Ep. 10, 
67; cf. Prise. Op. Min. 102 Lind. 

* accUSltO, are, I? v. freq. [accuso], to 
accuse : nil erit quod deorum ullum accu- 
sites, Plaut. Most. 3, 2, 23. 

aC-CUSO (also with ss; cf. Cassiod. 2283 
P.), iivi, atum, 1, v. a. [fr. causa; cf. cludo 
with claudo], orig. =iad causam provocare, 
to call one to account, to make complaint 
against, to reproach, blame. I. In gen., 
of persons: si id non me accusas, tu 
ipse objurgandus es, if you do not call me 
to account for it, you yourself deserve to be 
reprimanded, Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 59; quid me 
accusas ? id. As. 1, 3, 21 : meretricem hanc 
primum adeundam censeo, oremus, accu- 
semus gravius, denique minitemur, we 
must entreat, severely chide, and finally 
threaten her, Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 94 sq. : ambo 
accusandi, you both deserve reproach, id. 
Heaut. 1, 1, 67: cotidie accusabam, / daily 
took him to task, id. ib. 1, 1, 50: me aceusas 
cum hunc casum tam graviter feram, Cic. 
Att. 3, 13; id. Fam. 1, 1 Manut. ; me tibi 
excuso in eo ipso, in quo te accuso, id. Q. 
Fr. 2, 2: ut me accusare de epistularum 
neglegentia possis, that you may blame me 
for my tardiness in writing, id. Att. 1, 6. 
— Also metaph. of things, to blame, find 
fault with : alicujus desperation em, Cic. 
Fam. 6, 1: inertiam adolescent] um, id. de 
20 



ACER 

Or. 1, 58 (cf. incusare, Tac. H. 4, 42) • hence 
also : culpam alicujus, to lay the fault on 
one. Cic. Plane. 4. 9: cf. id. Sest. 3si. 80; id. 
Lig! 1, 2 ; id. Cael. 12, 29.— Hence, 

II. Esp. A. Transferred to civil life, 
to call one to account publicly (ad causam 
publicam, or publice dicendam provocare), 
to accuse, to inform against, arraign, in- 
dict (while incusare means to involve or 
entangle one in a cause); t. t. in Roman 
judicial lang. ; constr. with aliquem alicu- 
jus rei (like narnyopelv, cf. Prise. 1187 P.): 
accusant ii, qui in fortunas hujus invase- 
runt, causam dicit is, cui nihil reliquerunt, 
Cic. Rose. Am. 5: numquam, si se ambitu 
commaculasset, ambitus alterum accusa- 
ret, id. Cael. 7 : ne quis ante actarum re- 
rum accusaretur, that no one should be call- 
ed to account for previous offences, Nep. 
Thras. 3, 2 ; Milt. 1, 7. Other rarer con- 
structions are : aliquem aliquid (only with 
id, illud, quod), Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 59 ; cf. 
Ter. Ph. 5, 8, 21: aliquo crimine, Cic. Verr. 
1, 16; Nep. Milt. 8; id. Lys. 3, 4; id. Ep. 
1 al. : de necuniis repetundis. Cic. Clu. 41, 
114; cf. : de veneficiis, id. Rose. Am. 32, 90: 
inter sicarios, id. ib. 32; cf. Zumpt, § 446; 
Rudd. 2, 165 sq. ; 169, note 4.— The punish- 
ment that is implied in the accusation is 
put in gen. ; capitis, to accuse one of a cap- 
ital crime, Nep. Pads. 2, 6; cf. Zumpt, § 447. 
— B. Casus accusandi, the fourth case in 
grammar, the accusative case, Var. L. L. 8, 
§ 66 Mull. ; v. accusativus. 

Ace, es, /., J 'AKr), a town in Galilee, af- 
terwards called Ptolemais or Acca, now St. 
Jean d'Acre, Nep. Dat. 5; Plin. 5, 19, 17, 
§ 75. 

t acedior, ari, 1, v. dep. [unndia], to be 
morose, peevish,Y\ilg. Sir. 6, 26; 22, 6. 

t acentetus, a > um > a -J-> = "K^Ttii-os, 

without points or spots : calix, Fronto de 
fer. Als. 3.— Subst. : acenteta, orum, w., 
= ixKevrnra, used of crystals, Plin. 37, 2, 10, 
§28. 

aceo U1 ", 2, v. n. [v. 2. acer], to be sour, 
J, Lit. (of wine) : vinum, quod neque ace- 
at neque muceat, Cato R. R. 148. — II. 
Fig., to be disagreeable (late Lat.) : mentio 
pectori acet, Sid. Ep. 1,6 a med. 

t acephalus. \ «<#■, = cW0a\o?. I. 

Without head, without chief or leader. — 
Subst. : Acephali,^ wet of heretics, Isid. 
Or. 8,5,66; cf. 5, 39, 39 sq.— H. In prosody, 
of a hexameter which begins with a short 
syllable (e. g. £7rei3>7),Vel, Long. p. 2219 P. 

1. acer, 5ris, n. [kindred with Germ. 
Aho'rn] (/. Serv. ap. Prise, p. 698 P.), the 
■maple-tree, Plin. 16, 15, 26, § 66 sq. — H. 
T r a n s f. , the wood of the maple-tree, maple- 
wood, used, on account of its hardness and 
firmness, for writing-tablets, Plin. 33,11,52, 
§ 146; Ov. Am. 1,11, 28. 

2, acer, cris > cre > aa J. (w. acris, Enn. ; 
/. acer, Naev. and Enn. ; acrus, a um, 
Pall. ; Veg. ; cf. Charis. 63 and 93 P.) [cf. 

«KiV, u.K(iiv, dKfu'/, &Kpu\, wKvi, v$vs ; SanSCr. 

acan = dart, apus = swift; Germ. Ecke ; 
Engl, edge, to egg; and with change of 
quantity, acus, tlcuo, ficeo, ficies, acer- 
bus], sharp, pointed, pierc ing, and the like. 
I s Prop., of the senses and things af- 
fecting them, sharp, dazzling, stinging, 
pungent, fine, piercing : praestans valetu- 
dine, viribus, forma, acerrimis integerri- 
misque sensibus, Cic. Tusc. 5, 15, 45. So, 
a. Of the sight: acerrimus sensus viden- 
di" Cic. de Or. 2, 87, 357: acres oculi, id. 
Plane. 27: splendor, Lucr. 4, 304: quidam 
colores rubor is acerrimi, Sen. Q. N. 1, 14 
al .— b. Of the hearing: voce increpet 
acri? Lucr. 3,953: aurium mensura, quod 
est acrius judicium et certius, Cic. de Or. 

3, 47 : acrem flammae sonitum, Verg. G. 

4, 409: acri tibia, Hor. C. 1 12, 1.— c. Of 
smell, Lucr. 4, 122 : exstinctum lumen 
acri nidore offendit nares, id. 6, 792; cf. ib. 
1216 : unguentis minus diu delectemur 
summa et acerrima suavitate conditio, 
quam his moderatis, Cic. de Or. 3, 25, 99: 
odor, Plin. 12, 17, 40. — d. Of taste.: ut 
vitet acria, ut est sinapi, cepa, allium, Var. 
ap. Non. 201, 13 : acres humores, sharp 
juices, Cic. N. D. 2, 23: lactuca mnatat acri 
stomacho, an acid stomach, Hor. S. 2, 4, 
59; cf. ib. 2, 8, 7: clulcibus cibis acres acu- 
toRque miscere, Plin. Ep. 7, 3 al. — q. Of 
sensation in its widest extent: aesta- 



ACER 

tern auctumnus sequitur, post acer hiems 
fit, sharp, severe, Enn. ap. Prise, p. 647 P. 
(Ann. v. 406 ed. Vahl.— cf. Lucr. 3, 20 ; 4, 261) ; 
and so Hor. : solvitur acris hiems, C.l. 4,1. 
— B. Of the internal states of the 
human system, violent, sharp, severe, 
gnawing : fames, Naev. ap. Prise. 1. 1. (B. 
Punic, p. 18 ed. Vahl.); somnus, Enn. ap. 
Prise. 1. 1. (Ann. v. 369) : morbus, Plaut. 
Men. 5, 2, 119 : dolor, Lucr. 6, 650 : sitis T 
Tib. 1, 3, 77 al. 

II. Of the states of mind; violent, 
vehement, passionate, consuming : mor& 
amici subigit, quae mihi est senium multo 
acerrimum, Att. ap. Non. 2, 22 : acri ira 
percitus, Lucr. 5, 400: cf. 3, 312; 6, 754 (on 
the contrary, 5,1194: iras acerbas): acres 
curae, Lucr. 3, 463, and Var. ap. Non. 241 : 
luctus, ib. 87 : dolor, Verg. A. 7, 291 : me- 
tus, Lucr. 6, 1211; Verg. A. 1, 362: amor, 
Tib. 2, 6, 15 : acrior ad Venerem cupido, 
Curt. 6, 5 al. (Among unpleasant sensa- 
tions, acer designates a piercing, wound- 
ing by sharpness ; but acerbus the rough, 
harsh, repugnant, repulsive.)— B. Applied 
to the intellectual qualities, subtle, 
acute, penetrating, sagacious, shrewd : 
acrem irritat virtutem animi, Lucr. 1,70: 
acri judicio perpende, id. 2, 1041 : memo- 
ria, strong, retentive, Cic. de Or. 2, 87 : vir 
acri ingenio, id. Or. 5 ; cf. id. Sest. 20 al. 
— C. Applied to moral qualities. 1 , In a 
good sense, active, ardent, eager, spirited, 
brave, zealous: milites, Cic. Cat. 2, 10: ci- 
vis acerrimus, an ardent patriot, id. Fam. 
10, 28: defensor, id. ib. 1, 1: studio acri- 
ore esse, id. de'Or. 1, 21: jam turn acer 
curas venientem extendit in annum rusti- 
cus,Verg. G. 2, 405 al.— 2. In a bad sense, 
violent, hasty, hot, passionate, fierce, severe 
(very freq.): uxor acerrima, enraged, an- 
gry, Plaut. Merc. 4, 4, 56; Ter. Ph. 2, 1, 32: 
dominos acres, Lucr. 6, 63 ; Nep. Tim. 3 
5; cf. Bremi Nep. Eum. 11, 1. Also, or 
animals, Lucr. 4, 421 ; 5, 860 ; Verg. A. 4, 
156; Hor.Epod.12,6; 2,31; Nep. Eum. 11,1. 
— D- Of abstract things (mostly poet.), 
Ter. Ph. 2, 2, 32 : egestas, Lucr. 3, 65 : poe- 
nas, id. 6, 72: impetus, ib. 128; 392: acer- 
rimum bellum, Cic. Balb. 6: nox acerrima. 
atque acerbissima, id. Sull. 18 : acrius sup- 
plicium, id. Cat. 1, 1; in Quint.: acres syl- 
labae, which proceed from short to long, 9, 
4. — Acer is constr. with abl., and also (esp. 
inthehistt. of the silv. age) with #ew.,Vell.l„ 
13 ; Tac. H. 2, 5 al. ; cf. Ramsh. § 107, 6 note. 
With in, Cic. Fam. 8, 15 ; with infi, Sil. 3, 
338. — Adv. : acilter ? sharply, strongly, 
vehemently, eagerly, zealously, etc., in all the- 
signif. of the adj., Plaut. Cist. 1, 1, 110; id. 
Ps. 1, 3, 39; Lucr. 6, 783; Cic. Tusc. 1, 30 
al.— Comp., Lucr. 3, 54; 5, 1147; Hor. S. 2, 
3,92; Tac. A. 6, 45; 13, 3.— Sup.,Cic. Fl.ll;, 
id. Fam. 10, 28; 15, 4.— Also, acre, Sail. 
Fragm. ap. Non. p. 132, 25; App. M. 10, 32^ 
and perh. Pers. 4, 34. 

1. aceratus, a 5 um i a 4?- t acus , 5ris lr 

mingled with chaff: lutum, Fest. p. 20, and 
187 Mull. -^ cf. Non. 445, 14. 

2. t aCeratUS, a , ur U, a dj- , = "Keparo?, 
without horns : cochleae, Plin. 30, 6, 15, § 46 
dub. (ace. to others, iicer£tae = a.Kr\pa.Toi, 
complete). 

acerbe, adv., v. acerbus fin. 

acerbltas, ^tis, /. [acerbus], sharp- 
ness, sourness, harshness, the harsh taste of 
fruits. I, Prop.: fructus non laetos et 
uberes, sed magna acerbitate permixtos 
tulissem, Cic. Plane. 38, 92.— Hence, ff m 
F i g., sharpness. A. 0f moral qualities, 
harshness, severity, rigor, moroseness (op p. 
comitas, ienitas, and the like) ; severitatem 
probo, acerbitatem nullo modo, Cic. de 
Sen. 18 ; acerbitas morum immanitasque 
naturae, id. Phil. 12, 11; so id. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 
13; Suet. Caes. 12; id. Ner. 44; cf. Brem. 
Nep, Dion. 6, 5. — Also satirical severity: 
acerbitas et abunde salis, Quint. 10, 1, 94; 
cf. ib. 96, 117. — Also violence, anger : dis- 
sensio sine acerbitate, Cic. Off. 1, 25; id. 
Lael. 23, 87. — And hatred : nomen vestrum 
odio atque acerbitati scitote nationibus ex- 
teris futurum, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 30. — B. of 
one's lot or fortune, grief, sorrow, pain, 
anguish, affliction, and the like : acerbitas 
summi luctus, Cic. Fam. 5, 16: lacrimas, 
quas tu in meis acerbitatibus plurimas ef 
fudisti, Cic. Plane. 42, 101: omnes acerbi- 
tates, omnes dolores cruciatusque perferre, 



ACEB 

3d. Cat. 4, 1; so id. Sest. 38; id. Att. 9, 6; 
:Nep. Ale. 6 al. 

* acerbltudo, inis,/ [id.], = acerbi- 
ras, ace. to Gell. 13, 3. 

acerbo, tivi, atum, 1, v. a. [id.] (vox 
Vergil.}. I, To make harsh or bitter, to 
embitter; lit. and trop. (very rare) : gaudia, 
Stat. Th. 12, 75: mortem, Val. Fl. 6, 655.— 
Hence in an extended sense, H, To aug- 
ment or aggravate any thing disagreea- 
ble (cf. acuo): formidine crimen acerbat, 
Verg. A. 11, 407 : nefas Eteoclis, Stat. Th. 3, 
214. 

acerbllS. a ? um , &dj. [fr. 2. acer, like 
superbus fr. super , yet the short a should 
be noticed], harsh to the taste, of every ob- 
ject which has an astringent effect upon 
the tongue (opp. suavis, Lucr. 4, 661 sq.). 
I, Prop.: Neptuni corpus acerbum, bitter, 
briny. Lucr. 2, 472 ; and esp. of unripe 
fruit, sharp, sour, harsh, and the like : uva 
primo estperacerba gustatu, deinde matu- 
rata dulcescit, Cic. de Sen. 15 : sapornm ge- 
nera tredecim reperiuntur: acer, acutus, 
acerbus, acidus, salsus, etc., Plin. 15, 27, 
32 : and since the harshness of fruit is al- 
ways a sign of immaturity, so Varro, Cice- 
ro, Pliny, et al. use acerbus as a syn. for 
crudus. immaturus, unripe, crude, lit. and 
trop. : nondum matura uva est, nolo acer- 
bam sumere, Phaed. 4, 2, 4 ; so Ov. Am. 2, 
14, 24 ; and trop. : impolitae res et acerbae 
si erunt relictae, Cic. Prov. Cons. 14: cf. 
Gell. 13, 2. — Hence: virgo acerba, not yet 
marriageable, Varr. ap. Non. 247, 15; and 
esp. poet. (opp. to virgo matura, v. matu- 
rus) : funus acerbum, as a translation of 
the Gr. tiava-ro? aa>po9 (Eur. Orest. 1030), 
Auct. Or. pro uom. 16: ante diem edere 
partus acerbos, premature, Ov. F. 4, 647. 
— B. Trans f. (a) to sounds, harsh, hoarse, 
rough, shrill : serrae stridentis acerbum 
horrorem, Lucr, 2, 410: vox acerbissima, 
Auct. Her. 4, 47 ; ((B) to feeling, sharp, keen : 
frigus, bitter, Hor. Ep. 1, 17, 53. 

II. Fig. A, Of m e n : Rough, coarse, 
repulsive, morose, violent, hard, rigorous, 
severe : melius de quibusdam acerbos ini- 
micos meren quam eos amicos, qui dulces 
videantur, Cic. Laei. 24: posse enim asotos 
ex Aristippi, acerbos e Zenonis schola exi- 
re, /or there may go forth sensualists from 
the school of Aristippus, crabbed fellows 
from that of Zeno, id. N. D. 3, 31 (cf. acri- 
culus) : acerbissimi feneratores, id. Att. 6, 
1; so of adversaries or enemies, violent, 
furious, bitter, Cic. Fam. 1, 4 : acerbissi- 
mus hostis, id. Cat. 4, Gfin.; so id. Fam. 
3, 8 : acerbus odisti, Hor. S. 1, 3, 85 K. & H. : 
quid messes uris acerba tuas ? Tib. 1, 2, 98 al. 
— B. Of t h i n g s, harsh, heavy, disagreea- 
ble, grievous, troublesome, bitter, sad (very 
often, esp. in Cic): ut acerbum est, pro 
benefactis cum mali messem metas ! Plaut. 
Ep. 5, 2, 52; cf. Ter. Hec. 3, 1, 1; Att, ap. 
Non. 72, 29: in rebus acerbis, Lucr. 3, 54: 
acerbissimum supplicium, Cic. Cat. 4, 6 : 
acerbissima vexatio, id. ib. 4, 1 : acerba 
memoria temporis, id. Plane. 41: acerbis- 
sima morte affectus, Serv. ap. Cic. Fam. 4, 
12, 2 al.— Hence acerbum funus (diff. from 
above), a bitter, painful death, Plaut. Am. 

I, ], 35: acerbum funus filiae, id. As. 3, 3, 
5, and so Nep. Cim. 4 : vita ejus fuit secu- 
re et mors acerba, afflicting, painful, un- 
welcome. — In the neutr. subst. : acer- 
bum, i: calamity, misfortune, Ov. Tr. 5, 2, 
21 ; Verg. A. 12, 500 — acerba, n. plur. adv. 
ace. to the Gr. idiom, Lucr. 5, 34 (cf. acuta 
et al.), several times imitated by Verg. 
A. 12, 398 ■ 9, 794; id. G. 3, 149. — Adv. : 
acerbe, harshly, sharply, severely, etc., in 
the trop. signif. of the adj., Cic. Fam. 1, 5; 
id. N. D. 2, 33 ; id. Plane. 1 : idem acerbe 
severus in filium. id. Off. 3. 31. 112 : Liv. 
3, 50. 12 ; 7, 3, 9 ; Tac. A. 2, 87 al.— Gomp., 
Cic. Lael. 16; Suet. Tib. 25.— Sup.,C\a. Att. 

II, 1 ; Caes. B. C. 1, 2 ; also Cic. Plane. 
35. ^6, where, of an exclamation of severe 
grief, arerbissime for acerrime is defended 
against Lambinus and Ernesti by Wunder, 
Plane. 1. c. p. 217 ; so B. & K. 

acerneilS. a , um. adj. [1. acer], of ma- 
ple (late Lat. ): cancelli, Inscr. ap. Fabr. p. 
745, note 513 ; pocula, Ven. Ep. 1 ad Greg. 
Pap. ; cf. acernus. 

aceraia, ae >./-, <*> n unknown Jish, Cas~ 
siod.Var. 2, 4. 

aCeniUS. &> um > adj. [1- acer], made of 



ACER 

maple : equus trabibus contextus acernis, 
Verg. A. 2, 112 ; 9, 87 : solio, ib. 8, 178 : 
mensa, Hor. S. 2, 8, 10 ; cf. Mart. 14, 90 : 
mensae, Ov. Met. 12, 254 al. 

acerdSUS, a, um, adj* [acus, £ris], 
fill of chaff : far, mixed with chaff, Gr. 
avroTTvpo?, Lucil. ap. Non. 445, 14 : cae- 
num, id. ib. ; v. Fest. s. v. obacerare, p. 
187 Mii 11. 

acerra, ae ,/ [etym. unc, perh. from 
«cer= maple], a casket in which was kept 
the incense used in sacrifices, esp. in burn- 
ing the dead, an incense-box : ne sumptu- 
osa respersio, ne longae coronae, nee acer- 
rae praetereantur. from the XII. Tab. ap. 
Cic. Leg. 2, 24, 60: plena veneratur larem, 
Verg. A. 5, 745 ; cf. : plena turis, Hor. C. 3, 
8, 2 ; tacita libabit acerra, Pers. 2,5; so also 
Ov. M. 13. 703 : id. Pont. 4. 8. 39 ; Fratr. 
Arval. in'Orell. I. L. 2270, p. 391 al. Cf. 
Fest. s. h. v. p. 18 Mull, who gives another 
signif. : " acerra, ara, quae ante mortuum 
poni solebat. " 

Acerrae, Arum, / I. A town in the 
interior of Campania. N.E. of Naples, now 
Acerra, exposed to frequent inundations 
from the Clanius, on which it is situated; 
hence in Verg. : vacuis Clanius non aequus 
Acerris, G. 2, 225 Wagner ; imitated by 
Siiius, 8, 538.— Deri v., B. Acer rani, 
orum, m., the inhabitants of A., Liv. 27, 3, 
6; Veil. 1, 14, 4; Plin. 3, 5, 9, § 63.— H, A 
town in Umbria, called, for the sake of 
distinction, Acerrae Vatriae. now Gerrha, 
Plin^3. 14, 19, § 114. 

t acersecdmes, ae > m i = «Kep<reKo- 
uns, with unshorn hair ; in Juv., a young 
man, a youth, 8, 128. 

t acerus, a ? um > adj., = ampo?, with- 
out wax : mel acerum, which flows sponta- 
neously from the comb, Plin. 11, 15, 15, § 38 
lee. dub. 

* acervalls, c. adj. [acervus], that is 
heaped up, used by Cic. in dialec. lang. for 
the Gr. a-wpeij^s:, a sophism by accumula- 
tion, Div. 2, 4, 11. 

acervatim, adv. [id.], by heaping up 
or accumulation, by or in heaps. J. Prop.: 
confertos ita acervatim mors accumulabat, 
Lucr. 6, 1263: stercus aspergi oportere in 
agro, non acervatim poni, Varr. a. R. 1, 
38, 1 ; so Col. 9, 13, 4 ; acervatim se de vallo 
praecipitaverunt, Caes. B. A. 31 : cadere, 
Vulg. Sap. 18, 23 ; cf. : pulmentis acerva- 
tim, panibus aggeratim, poculis agmina- 
tim ingestis, App. M, 4, p. 146 Elm. — H, 
Fig.: i. q. summatim, crowded together, 
briefly, summarily : acervatim reliqua di- 
cam, Cic. Clu. 10: multa acervatim fre- 
quentans, crowding together many thoughts 
in one period, id. Or. 25, 85; so Plin. 4, 12, 

23, § 69 : hactenus popuius Romanus cum 
singulis gentibus, mox acervatim, Flor. 1, 
17, 1. 

* acervatlO, r > nis , / [acervo], a heap- 
ing up, accumulation : saporum, Plin. 11, 
53, 117. 

acervo. &vi, atum, 1, v. a. [acervus], 
to form a heap, to heap or pile up, to amass 
(rare, not in Cic. ; per. not before the Aug. 
period). I, Prop.: jam pigritia singulos 
sepeliendi promiscue acervatos cumulos 
hominum urebant. Liv. 5, 48, 3: aggerem, 
Sen. Here. Fur. 1216 : panicum praedensis 
acervatur granis, Plin. 18, 7, 10: acervan- 
tur muricum modo, they gather or collect 
together, id. 32, 9, 31.— II. Trop., to ac- 
cumulate, to multiply : leges, Liv. 3, 34 ; 
Quint. 9, 3, 47; Plm. 26, 4, 10, § 21; 36, 15, 

24, § 101 al. 

acervus, h m - [v. 2. acer], a multitude 
of objects of the same kind, rising in a heap. 
2 Prop. A. ^ heap considered as a body: 
frumenti, Plaut. Ps. 1, 2, 55 ; cf id. Cas. 1, 

1, 38; Att. ap. Non. 192, 3: altus, Lucr. 3, 
198 ; 1, 775 : ut acervus ex sui generis gra- 
nis, sic beata vita ex sui similibus partibus 
effici debeat. Cic. Tusc. 5, 15: acervi cor- 
porum, id. Cat. 3, 10: pecuniae, id. Agr. 

2, 22 : tritici, id. Ac. 2, 29 : farris, Verg. G. 

I, 185 ; thus Ovid calls Chaos : caecus acer- 
vus, M. 1, 24. — B. -^ heap considered as a 
multitude (cf. Germ. Haufen and Eng. col- 
ioq. heap) : aeris etauri, Hor. Ep. 1, 2, 47. — 

II. Fig. A. In g en - , a multitude : facino- 
rum, Cic. Sull. 27: oniciorum negotiorum- 
que, Plin. 36, 5,4, § 27: praeceptorum, Ov. 



ACHA 

Rem. Am. 424 al. — B. Esp., in dialectics, 
t. t., a sophism formed by accumulation, 
Gr. awpznns, Cic. Ac. 2, 16,49; Hor. Ep. 2, 

1, 47 ; cf. acervalis. 

acesco, acui, 3, v. inch, [aceo], to become 
sour, to turn sour : quodcumque infundis 
acescit, Hor. Ep. 1, 2, 54: lac, Plin. 20. 14, 
53 : musta, id. 7, 15, 13 ; id. 11, 16, 15, § 45 ; 
11, 35, 41j Dig. 18, 1, 9, § 2 al. 

Acesines, ae ? m -? = 'Aae<rivti?, a river 
in India, which falls into the Indus, now 
the Ghenaub, Curt. 9, 3, 20 ; Mel. 3, 7, 6 ; Plin. 
6, 20, 23 al. 

Ace Sin us, a , um, adj. , pertaining to 
the river Acesinus in the T auric Peninsula 
(Grimea) : agmina, Val. Fl. 6, 69. 

t acesis, is/,' =r unta-is, a sort of bo- 
rax, used in medicine, Plin. 33, 5, 28, § 92. 

Acesta, a e, also Aceste, es,/. ='akc- 
crra and 'Axeo-T^, a town in the N.W. part 
of Sicily, near the coast; earlier Egesta, 
later Segesta, near the modern Alcamo, 
Verg. A. 5, 718; 9, 218; cf. Serv. ad 1, 550, 
and Heyne Excurs. I. ad Aen. V. — H, 
Deriv." A. Acestenses, ium, m., the 
inhabitants of A., Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 36, § 83. 
— B. Acestaei, ^ e same, Plin. 3, 8, 14, 
§91. 

Acestes, ae ? m *, a mythical king of 
Sicily, Verg. A. 5, 757 ; Ov. M. 14, 83. 

acetabulum, i, »■ [return], orig., a 
vessel for vinegar, Isid. 20 Orig. 4, 12 ; but 
in gen., I, Any cup-shaped vessel, Quint. 

8, 6, 35 ; Vulg. Ex. 25, 29 : acetabula argen- 
tea, id. Num. 7, 84; as a liquid or dry meas- 
ure, the fourth part of a hemina, Cato R. 
R. 102; Plin. 18, 7, 14; 21, 34, 109; and with 
jugglers, the cup or goblet with which they 
performed their feats, Sen. Ep. 45, 7.— H. 
In anatomy, the socket of the hip-bone, Plin. 
28, 11, 49, § 179.— HI. In zoology, the suck- 
ers or cavities in the arms of polypi, Plin. 

9, 29, 46; 30, 48.— IV. In botany, the cup 
of flowers, id. 18, 26, 65, § 245. 

acetaria, orum, n. [id.], sc. olera, that 
which is prepared with vinegar and oil, 
salad, Plin. 19, 4, 19, § 58; 20, 20, 81, § 212. 

acetasce, trivi - 3 - = acesco [id.], to 
become sour, App. Herb. 3. 

t ace to, are, 1, v. a. , old form for agito, 
ace. to Paul, ex Fest. p. 23 Mull. ; cf. the 
letter C. 

acetum, h n - [° ri g- p - a - ^ aceo > be - 
come sour, hence sc. vinum], sour wine, 
wine-vinegar, or simply vinegar (ace. to 
Varr. L. L. 9, § 66 Mull., only in the sing.). 
X, Lit.: cum aceto pransurus est et sale, 
Plaut. Rud. 4, 2, 32 ; Verg. M. 113 : acre, 
Hor. S. 2, 3, 117 : vetus, i.e. spoiled, id. ib. 2, 

2, 62; Liv. 21, 37; Cels. 2, 18; 2, 21; Vulg. 
Joan. 19, 29 al. : mulsum aceti, vinegar- 
mead, v. mulsus. — II, Trop., of acute- 
ness of mind, sense, wit, shrewdness, sa- 
gacity (like sal, sales, wit, witty sayings, 
witticisms, fr. sal, salt) : Ps. Ecquid habet 
is homo aceti in pectore ? Char. Atque aci- 
dissumi, Plaut. Ps. 2, 4, 49 ; id. Bacch. 3, 3, 
1 ; Hor. S. 1, 7, 32 ; Pers. 5, 86 al. 

Achaemenes, is,m., ='Axa</uevn?, the 

ancestor of the old Persian kings, grand- 
father of Gyrus : dives Achaemenes, poet. 
for great or Asiatic wealth in gen., Hor. 
C. 2, 12, 21. 

Achaemenides (Ache), is, m. , a com- 
panion of Ulysses, Verg. A. 3, 614 ; Ov. M. 
14, 161. 

t achaemenis, idis, /, = ixx^p-^i^, 

an amber-colored plant in India, used in 
magical arts, Plin. 24, 17, 102; 26, 4, 9; 
App. Herb. 56. 

AchaemeniUS, a , um 5 «<&"■ [Achae- 
menes q. v. ], Persian : urbes, Ov. M. 4, 212: 
costum. Hor. C. 3, 1, 44 al. 

Achaetus, \m.,a river of Sicily, Sil. 
14, 268. 

1. Achaeus, h m - I. Son ofXuthus, 

brother of Ion, and ancestor of the Achaei. 
—II. -a king of Lydia, Ov. Ib. 301. 

2. Achaeus, a , um > <«#• > =' ax^o?. I. 

Belonging to Achaia: subst., an Achaean : 
Achaeis in finibus, Lucr. 6, 1114; Liv. 35, 
13 — B Ingen., Grecian; subst. , a Greek 
(v. Achaia, II.), Juv. 3, 61; Stat. Th. 2, 164; 
Plin. 4, 7, 14. — II, An inhabitant of a 
Greek colony on the Black Sea, Ov. Pont 4, 
10 27.— HI Portus Achaeorum, the har- 
21 



ACHE 

bor before Troy, where the Greeks landed, 
Plin. 4, 12, 26. 

Achaia or (in poets) Achaia (<ma- 
drisyl.), ae, /. [Axcua]. I. The province 
of Achaia, in the northern part of the Pelo- 
ponnesus, on the Gulf of Corinth, earlier 
called Aegialea (maritime country), Mel. 2, 

3, 4; Plin. 4, 5, 6.— Hence, B, In gen. 
(cf. the Homeric 'Axcuot), for Greece, oppo- 
site to Troja: et quot Troja tulit, vetus et 
quot Achaia formas, Prop. 2, 21, 53; cf. 
Ov. M. 8, 268 ; id. Her. 17, 209 al.— H. 
After the destruction of Corinth by Mum- 
mius, B. C. 146, Greece proper became a 
Rom. prov. under the name of Achaia. — 
Hence, AchaiaS, ^dis, °^0-> An Achaean 
or Greek woman, Ov. H. 3, 71. — Achai- 
CUS, a , um , ^3-1 Achaean, Grecian. I, 
Poet., opp. to Trojan : manns, Verg. A. 5, 
623: ignis, Hor. C. 1, 15, 35.— H. Belong- 
ing to the Roman province Achaia : homi- 
nes, Cic. Att. 1, 13, 1: negotium, id. Fam. 

4, 4, 2: concilium, Liv. 43, 17, 4.— Hence 
L. Mummius obtained, for the destruction 
of Corinth and the complete subjugation 
of Greece, the honorary title of Achalcus. 
Veil. 1, 13, 2; Plin. 35, 4, 8, § 24; and so as 
surname of one of his descendants : Mum- 
mia Achaica, Suet. Galb. 3. — AchaiS, 
Idis, adj., f. J, Achaean, Grecian :. ur- 
bes, Ov. M. 5, 306.— JI. Subst, = Achaia, 
Achaia, Greece, Ov. M. 5, 577; 7, 504.— 
AchaiUS, a , um 7 a< %)- ■' Achaean, Grecian 
{poet, for Acha'fcus and Achaeus) : castra, 
Verg. A. 2, 4G2 ; so Sil. 14, 5 ; 15, 306. 

achantum, i> w -, a kina of frankin- 
cense, Veg. 1, 20. 

achanum, h «■ ["x* v ¥, mute, stupid, 

Gesner], a disease of animals, Veg. 3, 2. 

Achamae, arum, / , a demus or bor- 
ough of Attica, Stat. Th. 12, 623.— Hence, 
AcharnanUS, a , um, ofAcharnae, Nep. 
Them. 1. 7 

achariie, es, /, a sea-Jish, Plin. 32, 11, 
53, § 145. (Al. acarne.) 

Acharrae, arum, /, a town o/Thes- 
saly, Liv. 32, 13, 13. 

1. t achates, ae > m - and/, — 6 « X a- 

T^f, the agate, so called from Achates, a 
river in Sicily, where it was first found, 
Plin. 37,10,55; Sil. 14,228. 

2. Achates, ae, m i a river in the 
southern part of Sicily, between Thermae 
and Selinus, now unknown, Plin. 3, 8, 14, 
§90. 

3. Achates, ae, ™. , the armor-bearer 
and faithful friend of Aeneas, Verg. A. 1, 
120; 174 ; Ov. Fast. 3, 603 al. 

AcheldiaS, SMb, patron./. [Achelous], 
daughter o/ Achelous; hence (plur.), the Si- 
rens, Ov. M. 14, 87: Parthenope, Sil. 12, 34; 
cf. the follg. art. 

AcheldlS, idis, patron. / [id.], daugh- 
ter o/ Achelous; hence (plur.), the Sirens, 
Ov. M. 5. 552. 

ACheiOlUS, a, ™, «#• [•<*■]■ I. re- 
taining to the river Achelous, Verg. G. 1, 9 ; 
Ov.H. 16, 265: CaWiTrho'e, daughter o/ Ache- 
lous, id. M. 9, 413. — II. Aetolian : heros, 
i.e. Tydeus, the son o/Oeneus, king o/Aeto- 
lia, Stat. Th. 2, 142. 

AcheloUS, i, ™-, 'AxeXwor. I. A cele- 
brated river of Middle Greece, which, ris- 
ing in Pindus, separates Aeiolia from 
Acamania, and empties into the Ionian 
Sea, now the Aspropotamo, Mel. 2, 3, 10; 
Plin. 4, 1, 2 al. — Hence, H, The river-god 
Achelous, Ov. M. 8, 549 sq. ; 10, 8 sq. ; Prop. 
2, 34, 33 al. 

Achemenides, is, v. Achaem. 

Acherini orum, m., an unknown peo- 
ple in Sicily, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 43. 

Acheron nt i s (collat. form Acheros, 
Liv. 8, 24, 11; the form Acheruns, untis, 
see below), m., ='Axtp<yv (interpr. 6 a%ea 
pea>v, the stream o/ woe). I, A river in 
Epirus, which flows through the Lake Ache- 
rusia into the Ambracian Gulf, now Suit, 
Liv. 8, 24, 3; Plin. 4, 1, 1, § 4.— JI. Afab- 
ulous river in the Lower World : illi qui 
lluere apud inferos dicuntur, Acheron, 
Cocytus, Styx, etc., Cic. N. D. 3, 17: via 
Tartarei quae fert Acherontis ad undas, 
Verg. A., 6, 295 al.— Hence, B. The Lower 
World itself : Acherontem obibo, ubi mor- 
22 



AC HI 

tis thesauri objacent, Enn. ap. Fest. p. 201 
Mull. (Trag. v. 278 ed. Vahl.): ilectere si 
nequeo Superos, Acheronta movebo, Verg. 
A. 7, 312: perrupit Acheronta Herculeus 
labor, Hor. C. », 3, 36. In prose : ut eum 
suo sanguine ab Acheronte, si possent, cu- 
perent redimere, Nep. Dion. 10, 2.— Hence, 
AcheronteUS, a, um, adj., pertaining 
to the Acheron, Claud. Rapt. Pros. 2, 351. 

Acherontia, ae i / , a small town of 

Apulia, near the frontiers of Lucania, sit- 
uated on a hill, now Acerenza : celsa, Hor. 
C. 3, 4, 14. 

Achei OiitlC US, a, um, adj. , belonging 
to the Acheron or the Lower World : stagna, 
Prud. Cath. 5, 127 : libri, sacred books, writ- 
ten, according to tradition, by the Etruscan 
Tages, prob. relating to the Acherontian 
rites of the dead, Arn. adv. Gent. 2, p. 87 ; 
cf. Serv. ad Aen. 8, 398 ; and Mull. Etrusc. 

1, p. 77. 

AcherOS, v - Acheron init. 

Acheruns, untis, m. [v. Acheron] (/, 
Plaut. Capt. 5, 4, 2; cf. Non. 191, 24; 
poet, in Cic. Tusc. 1, 16, 37 ; the u for o, 
as in Enn. and Lucr. frundes for frondes, 
ace. Gr. Acherunta, Lucr. 4, 170; 6, 251); 
a form much used by ante-class, poets, 
esp. by Plaut., I, For Acheron no. II. B. : 
adsum atque advenio Acheruntc, poet. ap. 
Cic. Tusc. 1, 16, 37; Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 245; 
si ab Acherunte veniam, Plaut. Am. 5, 1, 
26; so Lucr. 3, 37; 628 al.— And with the 
ending i (as in Karthagini): si neque hie 
neque Acherunti sum, ubi sum? Plaut. 
Merc. 3, 4, 21 ; so id. Capt. 3, 5, 31 ; 5, 4, 1. 
— Acheruntis pabulum, food for Acheron ; 
said of a corrupt, abandoned man, in Plaut. 
Cas. 2, 1, 12 : Acheruntis ostium, disparag- 
ingly of bad land, id. Trin. 2, 4, 124 : mittere 
aliquem Acheruntem, to kill one, id. Cas. 
2 8, 12; and: abire ad Acheruntem, to die, 
id. Poen. prol. 71 : ulmorum Acheruns, 
jestingly of a slave, upon whose back rods 
had been broken, id. Am. 4, 2, 9 (cf. Capt. 

3, 4, 117).— Hence, AcheruntlCUS, a, 
um, adj., belonging to, or fit for, Acheruns, 
or the Lower World: regiones, Plaut. Bacch. 

2, 2, 21 : senex, i. e. with one foot in the 
grave, id. Merc. 2, 2, 19 ; id. Mil. 3, 1, 33. 

Acherusia. ae, / [Acheruns]. I. 
Acherusia Palus, A. A lake in Epirus, 
through ivhich the Acheron flows, Plin. 4, 
1, 1. — "Q m A lake in Campania, between 
Misenum and Cumae t now Lago di Eusaro, 
Plin. 3, 5, 9.— II P A cave in Bithynia, from 
which Cerberus is said to have been dragged, 
Mel. 1, 19, 7 ; Plin. 6, 1, 1 ; the same called 
Acherusis ? idis,/-,vai. Fl. 5, 73. 

AcherusiUS (°l d writing Acherunsi- 
us), a, um, adj. [id.]. I. Pertaining to the 
Acheron in Calabria: aqua, Liv. 8, 24. — 
H P Pertaining to the Acheruns (Acheron), 
or' the Lower World: templa, the Lower 
World, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 1, 21, 48 (Trag. 
v. 107 ed.Vahl.) ; in Varr. L. L. 7, § 6 Mull. ; 
and in Lucr. 1, 120 ; cf. Lucr. 3, 25 and 86 : 
humor, Sil. 13, 398: vita, a life of gloom, 
Lucr. 3, 1024. — IH. Pertaining to Acheron 
in Epirus : amnis, Just. 12, 2, 3. 

t acheta, ae, m., = ax^n?, hxerw 
(sounding; pr. the chirper), the male sing- 
ing cicada, Plin. 11, 26, 32, g 92. 

Achilla, ae, v. Acholla. 

Achillas, ae, m - > the murderer of Pom- 
pey, Caes. B. C. 3, 104; 108; Luc. 8, 538. 

achillea, ae, /, a plant, perhaps the 
same as achilleos, Plin. 26, 15, 90. 

Achilleides, v. Achiiiides. 

AchilleiS, i dis > /■ [Achilles], a poem 
o/Statius, of which only two books were 
finished, the Achilleid. 

achilleos, i, /, ^'AxiAAe^os, sc. herba, 
a medicinal plant, said to have been dis- 
covered by Achilles, mil/oil or yarrow, Plin. 
25. 5, 19 ; cf. achillea. 

Achilles, is , m -, ^'Ax^xxeiJ? (poet., 

after the manner of the Gr. Nom., Achil- 
leus, trisyl. , Inscr. Grut. 669,6.— Gen. Achil- 
lei, quadrisyl., Hor. C. 1 15, 34; id. Epod. 
17, 14; and Achilli, as Neocli, Lacydi from 
Neocles, Lacydes, Plaut. Bacch. 4, 9, 14 ; 
Verg. A. 3, 87; cf. Val. Prob. 1468 P.— Ace. 
Achillea. Luc. 10, 523. — Foe. Achille, Prop. 

4, 11, iO.—Abl. Achilli, Ov. Pont. 3, 3, 43), 
the celebrated Grecian hero in tfie Trojan 



ACIE 

war, distinguished /or strength and beauty ; 
son o/ Peleus, king o/ Thessaly, and of 
Thetis, Ov. M. 12 fin. and 13 init; Stat. 
Achill. al. In the fine arts, Achilles is 
represented with hair long and erect, like 
a mane, a body straight and slender, nos- 
trils (/ii/KTvpe?) distended with courage and 
pride, and a physical frame throughout 
noble and powerful, Mull. Arch. § 413. — IJ t 
As an appellative, a handsome and power- 
fid man, Plaut. Mil. 4, 2, 63; Verg. A. 6, 89; 
Gell. 2, 11.— Hence, AchilleilS, a, um, 
<*$)•■> 'Ax'XXeios, o/ or pertaining to Achil- 
les : stirpis Achilleae fastus, Verg. A. 3, 
326 : manes, Ov. M. 13, 448 : statuae, statues 
like Achilles, Plin. 34, 5, 10 : cothurnus, the 
lofty and grave tragic style (since Achilles 
was a hero of the early epos and drama) : 
Achilleo conponere verba cothurno, Prop. 
3, 32, 41 (Aeschyleo, Muller) . —Also, Achil- 
liacUS, a, um, Ven. 7, 8, 63. 

Achiiiides, ae i patron, m. (more cor- 
rect than Achilleides), = 'Ax*XXet<W, a de- 
scendant of Achilles, Ov. H. 8, 3. 

AchlVUS, a, um {gen. plur. Achivom^ 
Verg. A. 11, 266), adj. [fr. Achaeus, with 
the Digamma, Achaefos, Achifus, Achivus], 
Achaean, Grecian (v. Achaia) : tellus, Ov. 
Pont. 1, 4, 33: castra, id. H. 1, 21.— Hence, 
Achivi, the Greeks, Cic. Div. 1, 14: quid- 
quid delirant reges plectuntur Achivi, 
whatever wrongs the (Grecian) kings are 
guilty of (before Troy) their subjects must 
suffer for ; but it soon became a general 
proverb : whatever errors the great commit, 
the people must atone for, Hor. Ep. 1, 2, 14. 

achlis, is, / , a wild beast o/ the North, 
which modern naturalists consider to be 
the same as the alces. — Ace. achlin Plin. 
8, 15, 16, § 39. 

Acholla, ae, / (also Achilla), a town 
in Africa, in the vicinity of Thapsus, now 
El-Aliah, Auct. B. Afr. 33. 

t achor, 0I "i s ) m -i — "X^P, the scab or 
scald on the head, Macer. de Ruta, 1, 12; 
Theod. Prise. 1, 5. 

Achradina, °r Acradina, ae,/, apart 
of the city of Syracuse, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 53; 
Liv. 25, 24, 10. 

t achras, ^is and udos, /, = axpds, 
a wild pear-tree, Col. 7, 9, 6; 10, 15, 250. 

acia, ae,/ [1. acus], a thread for sewing, 
pdnfia, Titin. ap. Non. 3, 21 (Rib. Com. Rel. 
p. 115) ; Cels. 5, 26, 23. 

* acicula, ae ) / [id.], a small pin for 
a head-dress, Cod. Theod. 3. 16, 1; Inscr. 
Grut. 1004, 5. 

Acidalia, ae,/, =.'AKtda\ia, an epithet 
o/ Venus, perhaps from the Fountain Aci- 
dalius, in Boeotia, where the Graces, 
daughters of Venus, used to bathe, Verg. 
A. 1, 720 Serv.— Hence, AcidallUS, a, 
um, adj., pertaining to Venus: ludit Aci- 
dalio nodo, with the girdle o/ Venus, Mart. 
6, 13: arundo, id. 9, 14: ales, i. e. a dove, 
Carm. ad Pis. 79. 

acide, adv., v. acidus/w. 

* acidltas, atis, / [acidus], sourness, 
acidity : stomachi, Marcell. Emp. 20. 

acidulus, a , um, adj., dim. [acidus], 
a little sour, sourish, acidulous : sapor, 
Plin. 15, 15, 16, § 54: aqua, mineral water, 
id. 2, 103, 106, § 230 ; 31, 2, 5, § 9 ; so, tons, ib. 

acidus, a, um, adj. [aceo], sour, tart, 
acid. I, Lit.: sapor, Plin. 15, 27, 32, § 
106: sorba, Verg. G. 3, 380: inula, Hor. S. 
2, 2, 43 : lac, Plin. 28, 9, 36, § 135 : caseus, 
ib. 9, 34, § 132 : acidissumum acetum, Plaut. 
Ps. 2, 4, 49.— B. Transf. 1. Like acer, 
from taste to sound, harsh, rough, shrill : 
sonus acidior, Petr. 68; cf. canticum, ib. 
31. — 2. Acida creta, chalk steeped in vine- 
gar, Mart. 6, 93. — H. Fig., sharp, keen, 
pungent : homo acidae linguae, Sen. Contr. 
5, 34 ; cf. Quint. 6, 3, 53 : quod petis. id sane 
est invisum acidumque duobus, unpleas- 
ant, disagreeable, Hor. Ep. 2, 2, 64. — Adv. : 
acide, bitterly, disagreeably : non acide 
feras, Vulg. Ecclus. 4, 9. — Comp.: sibi aci- 
dius fait, Petr. S. 92. 

? acieris, is ,/ [acies], "securis aerea, 
qua in sacrificiis utebantur sacerdotes, 7 ' 
raul. ex Fest. p. 10 Mull. 

aClCS, £*. / L v - 2 - acer] (gen. acii and 



A C I E 

acie, like dii and die, facii and facie, fr. 
dies, facies, Cn. Mat. ap. Gell. 9, 14; Caes. 
B. G. 2, 23 ; Sail. ap. Serv. ad Verg. G. 

1, 208, or Sail. Fragm. ed. Kritz. p. 118; 
cf. Prise, p. 780 P.), a sharp edge or point. 
J, Lit., of a sword, dagger, sickle, etc.: 
gladiorum, Plaut. True. 2, 6, 11 : Vulg. Heb. 

11, 34: securium, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 43, § 113: 
falcis, Verg. G. 2, 365 : hastae, Ov. M. 3, 107 : 
ferri, Plin. 7, 15, 13. — B. Transf. 1. Of 
the sense or faculty of sight, a. Keenness of 
look or glance, sharpness of vision or sight : 
oculorum, Lucil. ap. Non. 34, 32; cf. Plaut. 
Mil. 1,1,4; Lucr. 1,324; also acies alone, id. 

2, 420; and in plur., id. 4, 693: ne vultum 
quidem atque aciem oculorum ferre potu- 
isae, Caes. B. G. 1,39: pupula ad te dirigit 
aciem, Cat. 63. 56: tanta tenuitas, ut fugiat 
aciem, Cic. Tusc. 1, 22 : bonum incolumis 
acies, misera caecitas, id. Fin. 5, 28, 84 ; so 
ib. 4, 24; Verg. A. 12, 558 al.— Hence, b. 
C o n c r. , the pupil of the eye, Lucr. 3, 411 ; 
cf. with 414 : acies ipsa, qua cernimus, 
quae pupula vocatur, Cic. N. D. 2, 57 : in 
Albania gigni quosdam glauca oculorum 
acie, Plin. 7, 2, 2 (cf. ib. : glaucis oculis); 
and poet, (as pars pro toto) for the eye, 
Lucr. 3, 363 ; 4, 249 ; 281 ; 358 ; 720 : hue ge~ 
iniinLS nunc fiecte acies, Verg. A. 6, 789 ; 

12, 658 (hence the word is also used in the 
plur., cf. below, 2.). — c. ^ looking at an 
object with fixed attention, look, aim: ad 
earn rem habeo omnem aciem, Plaut. Mil. 
4, 2, 38. — On the contr., prima acie, at the 
first glance, Lucr. 2, 448 (cf. primo aspectu, 
Cic. de Or. 3, 25, 98).— 2, In milit. lung., the 
front of an army (conceived of as the edge 
of a sword), line of battle battle-array, a. 
In abstr. (cf. Vitr. praef. 1. 7, p. 154 Rod.) : 
quibus ego si aciem exercitus nostri osten- 
dero, Cic. Cat. 2, 3, 5 : aciem instruere, Caes. 
B. G. 1. 22: dirigere, id. ib. 6, 8: extra aciem 
procurrere, id. B. C. 1, 55 : statuit non proe- 
liis. neque in acie, sed alio more bellum 
gerendum, Sail. J. 54 ; cf. Liv. 5. 41, 4 ; also 
of the arrangement of ships for a naval 
engagement, Xep. Hann. 11 : cf. Caes. B. C. 
1, 58. — Hence, metapL h. The battle- 
array ; m c o n c r. , an army drawn up in 
order of battle: acies est instructa a nobis 
decern cohortium, Galba ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 
30 : hostium acies cernebatur, Caes. B. G. 7, 
62: altera pars acii vitassent fluminis un- 
das, Matius ap. Gell. 9, 14 (as tran&l. of II. 
21 init): dnbitavit acie pars, Sail. Fragm. 
1. 1.: stabit ante aciem, Vulg. Dcut. 20, 2; 1 
Par. 12, 33 : prima acies hastati erant, the 
van, the first line, Liv. 8. 8: tertiam aciem 
laborantibus subsidio mittere, Caes. B. G. 
1, 52: ab novissima acie, from the rear: 
ante signa procedere, Liv. 8, 10: dextra 
acies (— dextrum cornu), the right wing, 
Liv. 27, 48, 8 : agmina magis quam acies 
pugnabant, in marching order, rather than 
in order of battle, id. 25, 34 (acies is here, 
and in similar cases, considered as the 
sing, used collectively ; v. Ond. and Herz. 
Caes. B. G. 7, 62 ; yet the plur. is more 
than probable). Rarely of cavalry, Liv. 8, 
39; Veil. 2, li2.— Po e t. : acies Vulcania, 
of a long line of fire, Verg. A. 10, 408.— c. 
The action of the troops drawn up in battle 
array, a battle, engagement, := pugna : in 
acie celebri objectans vitam, Pac. ap. Non. 
234,-25; Plaut. Mil. 1,1,4: mea facta in acie 
obliti, Att. ap. Non. 502, 1 : in acie Pharsali- 
ca, Cic. Lig. 3; so id. Fam. 6, 3: in acievin- 
cere, Caes. B. G. 7, 29: dimicare, ib. 7, 64: 
copias in aciem ducere, Liv. 31, 34: produ- 
cere in aciem, Xep. Milt. 5: exeedere acie, 
Caes. B. C. 2, 41 ; Liv. 31, 17 : direxerunt 
aciem contra eos, Vulg. Gen. 14, 8; 2 Par. 
18, 33.-3. Aciss fe »*i, steel, Plin. 34, 14, 
41. — 4. Poet, sheen, brightness : obtunsa 
stellarum, Verg. G. 1, 395. 

11. Fig. A. (Ace. to I. B.) (like acumen.) 
Acuteness of the mind, sharpness, force, 
power (so very often in Cicero, but always 
with the gen. mentis, animi, ingenii) : (cum 
animus) exacuerit illam, ut oculorum, sic 
ingenii aciem ad bona eligenda, etc., Cic. 
Leg. 1. 23. 60; so, ingenii, id. Ac. 2, 39, 122: 
mentis, id. N. D. 2, 17, 45; id. Tusc. 1. 30, 
73: animi, id. Sen. 23, 83; id. Phil. 12, 2; 
Veil. 2,118,4; cf: rerum diversitas aciem 
intentionis abrumpit, Flor. 1 prol., § 3. — 
B. A verbal contest, disputation, discus- 
sion, debate : orationis aciem contra con- 
feram, Plaut. Ep. 4, 1, 20: ad philosophos 
me revocas, qui in aciem non saepe prod- 



ACON 

eunt, Cic. Tusc. 2, 25, 60: nos jam in aciem 
dimicationemque veniamus, id. Or. 13 fin.; 
cf. id. Opt. Gen. Or. 5, 17; Quint. 2, 10, 8; 6, 
4,17; 10, 1, 29. 

Acilianus, a, um, adj., pertaining to 
Acilius : annales, the annals of C. Acilius 
Glabrio, Liv. 25, 39; libri, id. 35, 14. 

Acilius, ii m -, th e name of several Ro- 
mans, among whom was M" 1 Acilius Glabrio, 
trib. pleb. , by whom the severe law de pe- 
cuniis repetundis was introduced, Cic. Verr. 

1, 9 and 17.— C. Acilius Glabrio, the histo- 
rian, Cic. Off. 3. 32, 115.— Hence, Acilius, 
a, um, adj., Acilian : lex, Cic. Verr. 1, 1. 

acina, v - acinus. 

t acinaces, is, m -> =uKtvdKri?,the short 
sabre of the Persians, Medes, and Scythians, 
a scimitar. Hor. C. 1, 27, 5 ; Curt. 3, 3, 4; 4, 
15, 17 al. 

* acinar 1US, a, um, adj. [acinus], per- 
taining to the grape : dolia. vessels for hold- 
ing grapes, Varr. R. R. 1, 22, 4. 

aCinatlClUS, a, um, adj. [id.], pre- 
pared from grapes: vinum, made from, 
dried grapes, Pall. 1. 6, 9 ; Dig. 33, 6, 9. 

t acinOS, U /-< = i'ncivos, a fragrant 
plant, perh. wild basil, Plin. 21, 27, 101, 
§ 174. 

aCindSUS, a, um, adj. [acinus], like or 
similar to grapes, Plin. 12, 13, 27, § 47 ; id. 
21, 17, 68, § 109. 

acinus, i, m - and acinum, i, »., 

partic. in plur. acina, orum (also acina. ae, 
/. , Cat. 27, 4). I. A berry, esp. the grape, 
Col. 11, 2, 60; also: hederae sambucique, 
Plin. 15, 24, 29. § 100 sq. : cissanthemi, ib. 
25, § 116: ligustri, ib. 24.74: trychni, ib. 21, 
§ 177. — II. Per me ton., the stone of a 
berry, Cic. Sen. 15, 52. 

t Acionna ae./ , a Gallic deity, Inscr. 
Orell. 19r5. 

acipenser, ^ ris , and acipensis, is 
(also aquip. , not accipenser), w., = a«Kr- 
wricrio?, a fish very highly esteemed in the 
age of the greatest luxury of the Romans, 
perh. the sturgeon, Cic. Tusc. 3, 18; id. Fin. 

2, 8; Hor. S. 2, 2, 47; Ov. Hal. 132. 

1. Acis, i(ilS , m * = T A»as-, a river in 
Sicily, which rises in Mount Aetna, and 
falls into the sea ; now Fiume di Tad, Ov. 
F. 4, 468 ; Sil. 14. 221 ; Claud. Rapt. Pros. 3, 
332 al. —Hence. II. A river-god, ace. to the 
myth, son of Faunus, beloved by Galatea 
on account of his beauty, Ov. M. 13, 750 sq. 

2. Acis. Wis, /. , one of the Cyclades, 
i. q. Siphnus, Plin. 4, § 66. 

acisCO, ^ re i i- <!■• acesco, Garg. Mart, 
ap. Maj. Auct. Class. 3, p. 419. 

t acisculus, i, m - [perh. ascia, and so 
more prop, asciculus]. a little adze, Isid. 
Gloss. — II. As a surname, Quint, 6, 3, 53. 

$ u aciscularius, », m- [acisculus], 
XaTo/uos" {stone-cutter), Gloss. 

t aclassis, i g , /> "tunica ab humeris 
non consuta," Paul, ex Fest. p. 20 Mull. 

aclys, 7 di s (better than aclis), =; u^kv- 
Xi'p (fust used bv Verg. ), a small javelin, 
Verg. A. 7, 730; Sil. 33, 362 al. ; cf. Non. 
554, 3. 

Arm on. <^nis, m, I. A companion of 
Aeneas : Acmon Lymessius, Verg. A. 10, 
128. — II, A companion of Diomed, Ov. M. 
14, 484 ; ace. Acmona. ib. 497. 

Acmdnensis, e - <«#•] pertaining to 
Acmonia, a town of Phrygia, Cic. Fl. 15, 
34; Plin. 5, 29. 29. § 106. 

Acmdnides, is, w - , one °f Vulcan s 
workmen, Ov. F. \ 288. 

acnixa or acna, ae i / [aneva or anai- 

va], a measure or piece of land, 120 feet 
square, Varr. R. R. 1, 10;*Coi. 5, 1, 5; cf. 
Isid. Orig. 15, 15, 5. 

acoenonetus, h m - , v - tae fo11 - 

I acoenonoetus, i, *»., = b.Koivov6r\- 
rof, one who has not common-sense. Juv. 7, 
218 : communi carens sensu, Schol. ad h. 1. 
(Herm. and Rib. ; but Jahn and Mayor here 
read Zlkoivwvt)to? (in Greek letters); perh. 
not sharing, i. e. selfish). 

t acoetis, is,/, Snot-rip, a bed-fellow, a 
wife : Amphitryonis, Lucil. ap. Non. 26, 5. 

t acdnae, arum, /, = uk£i/cu, pointed 
stones : nudae cautes, Plin. 27, 3, 3, § 10. 

t acdniti a ^ v - > — ukovitI, without la- 



ACQU 

bor (1 i t. without dust, the figure taken from 
theathletae, Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 51), Plin. 35, 11 
40, § 139. 

t acdnitum, i, w. , = ukovitov, a poi- 
sonous plant, wolf's-bane, monk's-hood, 
aconite, Plin. 27, 2, 2 ; 6, 1, \fin. : aconiton, 
Ov. M. 7, 407.— In plur., Verg. G. 2, 152 ; Ov. 
M. 7,419; Aus. Idyll. 12,9,11 ; Luc. 4, 322. 
—For a strong poison in gen., Ov. M. 1, 
147 ; Juv. 10, 25. 

t acontias. ae, m., ■=. ^0^10?, I. A 

quick-darting serpent, Amm. 22, 15, 27. — 
II. In plur., acontiae, arum, = ukov- 
riat, meteors or shooting-stars with dart- 
like trains, Plin. 2, 25, 22, § 89. 

AcontlUS, i, »». I. ^ lover of Cy- 
(Uppe, Ov. Her. 20, 239, and 21, 229.— H. 
A mountain in Boeotia, Plin. 4, 7, 12. 

t aCOntlZG, are, v. n., = ukovt^«), lit, 
to shoot a dart; hence, intrans. of blood, 
to spout or gush forth, Veg. 1, 26 and 27. 

t Acontizomenos, i,»i., ='akovti£6- 
jaei'oc (struck with a dart), the title of a 
comedy of Naerius, see the fragment in 
Rib. Com. Rel. p. 5. 

tacopos, -us, i, '"•■ ° r acopon, -um, 

i, n., ^ aKoTro? (removing weariness, pain, 
etc.). I. A kind of stone, perh. crystalline 
quartz or spar, Plin. 37, 10, 54, § 143.— H. 
/., a plant useful in childbirth, also 
called anagyros, id. 27, 4, 13. — HI. Aco- 
p»jjl (sc. medicamentum or unguentum), 
i, n., a soothing salve, Cels. 4, 31 ; 5, 24 ; 
Plin. 23, 8, 80 ; 29, 3, 13 al. 

acor, oris, m. [aceo], a sour taste, sour- 
ness. I. Lit, Col. 3, 21, 5; 7, 8, 1 ; Plin. 
11, 41, 96; 18, 11, 26 ; of meat, Quint, 9, 3, 
27. — II. Fig. hortor ut jucundissimum 
genus vitae nonnullis interdum quasi acori- 
bus condias, i. e. emcitements, Plm. Ep. 7, 3 

tacorna, ae,/, ■=. anopva, a kind of 
thistle, Plin. 21, 16, 56, § 95. 

f acorns, i,/, and acorum, i, «., = 

aKupuv and aKopov, an aror.iatic plant, 
conjectured by some to be our sweet-flag 
or calamus, Plin. 25, 13, 100, § 157 sq. ; 26, 
5, 15, § 28 ; Cels. 3, 21; 2, 23 al. In the form 
acoros, i, /, App. Herb. 6. 

ac-quiesco (adqu.), evi, etum, 3, v. n., 
lit., to become physically q uiet, to come to 
physical repose; hence. in gen., to repose 
or rest (freq. in Cic.). I. Lit.: sine respi- 
rem,quaeso. P e. Immo adquiesee, Plaut. Ep. 
2,2,20 ; id.As.2,2,60 : vitandi caloris causa 
Lanuvii trls horas acquieveram, Cic. Att. 
13,34: alassitudine, Nep. Bat.ll, 3: somno, 
Curt. 9,5, 16 ; cf. : gravi sopore, id. 0, 10, 6, 
and absol. of sleep, id. 8, 6, 3 : cum aures 
extremum semper exspectent in eoque 
acquiescant, Cic. Or. 59. — By euphemism (as 
in all languages), to die (esp. after a weari- 
some life) : sic vir fortissimus multis vari- 
isque perfunctus laboribus, anno acquievit 
septuagesimo, Nep. Hann. 13, 1 ; cf. morte, 
Tac. A. 14, 64 ; and in many epitaphs : hic 
adqviescit, etc., Inscr. Orel!. 2313; 4084; 
4491 al. ; so, quiesco, q. v. 

H s Fig. A, To come to a state of re- 
pose in relation to one's wishes, desires, 
etc.; to repose in; to find rest, pleasure, 
etc., in ; to rejoice in ; in Cic. mostly with 
in, and of things : in the historians and later 
writers, with dat. or all., and also of per- 
sons : quae delectet, in qua acquiescam, Cic. 
Att. 4, 16 : senes in adulescentium caritate 
acquiescimus, id. Lael. 27 ; id. Fin. 3, 2, 6: 
qui jam aetate provecti in nostris iibris 
acquiescunt, id. Div. 2, 2, 5. Examples in 
Cic. of a person : tecum ut quasi loquerer, 
in quo uno acquiesco, Att. 9, 10, and with 
abl. : qui maxime P. Clodii morte acqui- 
erunt, id. Mil. 37, 102 : cui velut oracnlo 
acquiescebat, Suet. Vit. 14 : uno solatio ac- 
quiescens, id. Cal. 51 ; id. Tib. 56 : amicos 
elegit, quibus etiam post eum principes ac- 
quieverunt, id. Tit. 7.— B. To be satisfied 
with, to acquiesce in or give assent to : 
tu,cum es commotus, acquiescis, assentiris, 
approbas (where the climax of the ideas 
should be noticed, you accede to them, i.e. 
you cease to oppose them ; you assent io 
them, i.e. you make kuown your approba- 
tion by words), Cic. Ac. 2, 46, 141 ; so Suet, 
Vit. 14 ; Die. 24, 3, 22, 5 6 ; 38, 1, 7 al. 

ac-quiro (adqu.), slvi, situm, 3, #. a. 
[quaero], to add to, to get or acquire (in 
23 



ACRI 

addition), with ad or dat. (freq. in Cic). 

1, Lit. : mihi quidem ipsi,quid est quod ad 
vitae fructum possit acqniri ? Cic. Cat. 3, 12 ; 

2, 8 : vides quam omnis gratias non modo 
retinentlas, sed etiam acqnirendas putemus, 
but even new favor is to be acquired, 
id. Att. 1, 1 ; Sail. J. 13, 6 ; and poet.: vi- 
resque adquirit eundo, and gains (ever 
new and greater) strenath in her course, 
Verg. A. 4, 175.— II. In gen. A. To get, 
obtain, procure, secure : quod ad usum 
vitae pertineat, Cic. Off. 3, 5, 22; id. Fam. 

10, 3 : famara, Phaedr. 1, 14 : moram, Cic. 
Caecin. 2 : vires, Ov. M. 7, 459 : adquirere 
pauca (sc. nova verba), Hor. A. P. 55.— B, 
In later Lat., absol., to acquire or amass 
riches or money (cf. : quaero, quaestus ; 
abundo, abundantia) [mox adquirendi do- 
cet insatiabile votum, Juv. 14, 125] : acqui- 
rencli ratio, Quint. 12. 7, 10. 

acqUlSltlO ? nis,/. [acquiro], acquisi- 
tion. I. In abstr Dig. 44, 4, 4, § 31 ; Tert. 
Exh. Cast. 12. — II. Concr., an increase, 
accession, Frontin. Aquaed. 10 ; 69 sq. 

tacra, orum, n., also ae,/., = aKpa, a 
promontory or headland, App. de Mundo 
prooem. : Acra lapygia, a promontory in 
Magna Graecia, Plin. 3, 11, 16, §100. 

Acrae, wura, /., = J 'A K pu<. I. A city 
of Sicily, on a lofty hill near Syracuse, 
now Palazzolo > Liv. 24, 36 ; Sil. 14, 206.— 

11, A town in the Ohersonesus Taurica 
(Crimea), Plin. 4, 12, 26, § 86. 

Acraephia, ae,/., 'AKpa«pia, a town 

of Boeotia, now Kardhiza, Liv. 33, 29; 
Plin. 4, 8, 12, § 26. 

t AcraetlS, a, um, adj., = LtipaXos, 
facetting on the heights ; an epithet of 
Jupiter and of Juno, ichose temples 
Stood on heights, Liv. 38, 2 ; 32, 23. 

1. Acragas, antis, m., 'Aupdya? (ace. 
Gr. Acraganta, Ov. F. 4, 475), a mountain 
on the S. W. coast of Sicily, and a city 
upon it; the city was also called Agrigen- 
tum, now Girgenti, Verg. A. 3, 703 ; Mel. 
2, 7. 16 ; cf. Plin. 3, 8, 14, § 89 (v. Agrigen- 
tuni) ; the birthplace of the philosopher 
Empedocles, who was hence called Acra- 
gantinuft, Lucr. 1, 716. 

2. Aerogels, antis, m., a celebrated 
grater (caelator), Plin. 33, 12, 55, § 154. 

t acratopiidruni, U n., =r unpaTo<p6- 

pov, a vessel (a pitcher or flask) for hold- 
ing unmixed wine,Yarr. R. R. 1, 8, 5: Cic. 
Fin. 3, 4, 15. 

acre, adv., v. 2. etcerfin. 

acredo, inis,/. [ft*. 2. acer, as dulcedo fr. 
dulcis], a sharp or pungent taste, Pall. 2, 
15, 19: tollere, Plin.Val. 1, 25: humorum, 
Theod. Prise. 1, 16. 

acredula, ae,/., the name of an un- 
known bird, by which Cic. translates the 
b\o\vywv of Aratus, Div. 1, 8, 14 ; ace. to 
some, the thrush or the owl, Auct. Carm. 
Phil. 15. 

Acriae, arum, /., "AKptai, a town of 
Laconia, Liv. 35, 27, 3. 

aciiculus, a, um, adj. dim. [2. acer], 
somewhat sha?*p, testy .- ille acriculus se- 
nex Zeno, Cic. Tusc. 3, 17, 38 (cf. acerbus, 
and the passage there quoted fr. Cic. N. D. 
3,31). _ 

acridium, ii, n., another name for 
the scammonia, ace. to Isid. Orig. 17, 9, 64. 

acrifdllUm, ii, n. [2. acer -f folium], 
an unknown tree of ill omen, Auct. ap 
Macr. Sat. 2, 16. 

Acrillae, arnm,/., a tmen in Sicily, 
on the road from Syracuse to Agrigen- 
ium, Liv. 24, 35, 8. 

acrimonia, ae,/. [2. acer], sharpness 
or pungency (so far as it has a quickening, 
animating power, diff. fr. acerbitas, which 
desig.a disagreeable sharpness). I. Lit, 
of taste : si ulcus acrimoniam brassicae ferre 
non poterit, the pungency, irritation 
smart, Cato R. R. 157, 5 : dulcis cum qua- 
darn acrimonia, Plin. 24, 14, 78, § 128 ; cf 
sinapis, id. 18, 13, 34, § 128 al.— Of smell! 
Plin. 27, 13, 109, § 133.-H. Fig., sharp- 
ness, acrimony, austerity of character, 
energy of acting: "animi vivacitas," Non. 
73, 17: mei feri ingeri iram atque animi 
acrem acrimoniam, Naev. ap. Non. 73, 18 
(Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 11) • cf. : vim, ferociam, 
animi, atrocitatem, iram, acrimoniam, Att. 
24 



ACEO 

ib. (Ribbeck, p. 196) : convenit in vnltu pu- 
dorem et acrimoniam esse, Auct. Her. 3, 15 
26; cf. ib. 4, 13, 19 ; 24, 34 : si Glabrionis 
patris vim et acrimoniam ceperis ad resi- 
stendum hominibus audacissimis, Cic. Verr. 
1, 17, 52.— Of abstract objects: vis et acri- 
monia causae, Cic. Inv. 2, 48, 143 : licentiae, 
Auct. Her. 4, 37, 49.— Of discourse, sharp- 
ness of speech (opp, sermo) : turn in ser- 
mone, turn in acrimonia, wow; in common 
conversation, now in sharp talk, Auct. 
Her. 4, 42, 54. 

Acrisione, es, /., ' akpkjiwvv, the 
daughter of Acrisius, i. e. Danae, Verer. 
Cat. 11, 33. 

Acrisidneus, a, um, adj., pertain- 
ing to Acrisius: arces, i. e. Argos, Ov. M. 

5, 239: muri, i. e. Ardea, built by Da- 
nae, the daughter of Acrisius, Sil. 1, 661 ; 
so, coloni, Verg. A. 7, 410 (where some 
improperlyrefer it to Danae). 

Acrisioniades, ae, m. patron., 'akoi- 
actoviddns, a descendant of Acrisius, i. e. 
Perseus, son of Danae, Ov. M. 5, 70. 

AcrisiUS, ii, w., 'AKpt'o-tor, King of 
Argos,son of Abas, and father of Danae; 
unintentionally killed by his grandson, Per- 
seus, Ov. M. 4 608 sq. ; Verg. A. 7,' 372: 
Hor. C.3,16,5al. 

1, acrltas, atis,/. [2. acer], i. q. acri- 
tudo, Gell. 13, 3, 2 : vis veritatis atque acri- 
tas, Att. ap. Non. 493, 14 (Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 
196). _ V 

2. Acrltas, ae, m., 'AxpiVar, the most 
southerly promontory in Messenia, now 
Capo di Gallo, Mel. 2, 3, 8 ; 2, 7, 10 ; Plin 
4, 5, 7, § 15. 

acriter, adv., v. 2. ^zarfin. 

acritudo, inis,/. [2. acer], the quality 
of acer, sharpness, f. Lit., of a fluid, 
Vitr. 2, 9, 12 ; 8, 3, 18 sq.— II. T r o p. A^ 
Liveliness, vivacity, force : vigor et acri- 
tudo populi Romani, Gell. 10, 27: haut quis- 
quam potis est tolerare acritudinem, Att. 
ap. Fest. p. 356 Mull. (Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 196). 
— B. Harshness of character: morum.Anp. 
M. 9, 224. 

tacro or acron ? 6nis, m., = aKpwv, 
the extremity of a thing ; so of a mem- 
ber of the body, Veg. 2, 28, 17 ; 5, 65, 2 ; of 
the stem of a plant, Apic. 4, 4. 

t acroama, atis, «., = unpou.^.— 

Prop., that which is heard with pleasure, 
a gratification to the ear; as music or 
reading; esp. used for entertainment at 
meals, with music or reading, Plin. Ep. 

6, 31, 13; Suet. Vesp. 19; Petron. Fragm. 
Tragun. p. 297. — Hence, meton. (like the 
plur. in Greek), the entertainer at table, 
by music (a performer) or by reading (a 
reader) ; also a buffoon : cum ex Themis- 
tocle quaereretur, quod acroama aut cujus 
vocem lubentissime audiret, Cic. Arch. 9: 
nemo in convivio ejus (Attici) aliud acro- 
ama audivit, quam anagnosten, id. Att. 14, 
1 : non solum spectator, sed actor et acroa- 
ma, Cic. Sest. 54 : festivum, id. Verr. 2, 4, 
22. Cf. Smith's Antiq.,and Becker's Gall! 
3, p._203 (2d ed.). 

t acrdamaiaiiXiS, a, nm, adj. [acro- 
ama], belonging to a musical or reading 
entertainment: ser. acroamat. graec, 
i. e. serva acroamataria Graeca, Inscr. Orell. 
2885. 

acrdamatlCUS, a, um, adj., read in 
the old edd. of Gell. 20, 5, where the MSS. 
give, in the same sense, acroaUcus, q. v. 

tacrcasiS, is,/, = «Kp6u<7t? {a hear- 
ing, a listening to), the discourse de- 
livered before an assembly, public lect- 
ure (cf. the use of contio among Eng. and 
collegium among Germ, scholars, for dis- 
course, etc.) : ut eas vel in acroasi audeam 
legere, in a public lecture, Cic. Att. 15,17, 
2 : Callias acroasin fecit, Vitr. 10, 22 : pluri- 
mas acroases fecit, Suet. Gram. 2 (al. aapod- 
cretv). 

t aCrdatiCUS, a, nm, adj., rr aKpoart- 
ko?, designed for hearing only, esoteric 
(opp. ef wTeptKor), in the Aristotelian philos- 
ophy, ace. to the interpreters, Gell. 20, 5. 

Acroceraunia, orum, n, [fr. a«por 

and Kepaui/6f ; pr. Thunder- Heights], a very 
rocky promontory in Epirus, running 
out into the Ionian Sea, now Glossa, 
called by the Italians Linguetta (the moun- 
tain to which it belongs was called Ceraunu 



ACTE 

montes or Ceraunia ; see this art.) : infamis 
scopulos Acroceraunia, Hor. C. 1, 3, 20 ; the 
same in sing. : promontorinm Acrocerauni- 
um, Plin. 3, 11, 15, § 97; for any danger- 
ous place : haec tibi sint Syrtes ; haec 
Acroceraunia vita, Ov. R. Am. 739. 

t acrdchordon, onis, /., = uk P oxo p - 
6w V , a kind of wart, Cels. 5, 28, 14. 

t acrocoief ium, ii, n., = aKpoKwA^- 
<piov, the upper part of the foot of a 
swine, Veg. 6. 1, 2 = 

acrdcolion, ii, n., = aKpondyXiov, i. q. 

aero, Cael. Aur. Acut. 1, 11 ; cf. Veg. 2, 47, 1. 

Acrdcorintims (-us), i,/, 'ak p ok6- 
pivtto?, the citadel of Corinth, situated 
on a height, from 'which the two seas 
could be seen, the Aegean and Ionian, 
Mel. 2, 3, 7; Plin. 4, 4, 5, § 11 ; Liv. 33, 31 
fin. ; 34, 50, 8 ; Stat. Th. 7, 106. 

acrdedrium, ti,n., a kind of onion, 
Plin. 19, 5, 30, § 95. 

t acrolithus, a, um, adj., = *K P 6At6os 
(of stone at the extremity) : statuae, statues 
whose extremities only consisted of mar- 
ble, the remainder of wood, Treb. Poll. 
XXX. Tyr. c. 32 (in Vitr. 2, 8, ll written as 
Greek) ; cf. Mull. Arch. $ 48, 1 ; Winckelm. 
Hist. Art. 1, 2, 17. 

Acron, onis, m. I. A king of the 
Caeninenses, who, in the war with the 
Romans on accoimt of the rape of the 
Sabines, icas slain by Romulus, Prop. 

4, 10, 7. — II, A Greek slain by Mezen- 
tius, Verg. A. 10, 719. — ffl, Helenius 
Acron, a commentator on Terence, Horace, 
and perh. Persius ; cf. TeuffeLRom. Lit. II. 
§370. 

Acronius lacus, <t pari of Lake 
Constance, now the Ueberlingen Lake, 
Mel. 3, 2, 8.^ 

Acrondma saxa, an unknown 
place in Loicer Italy, Cic. Att. 13, 40, 2. 

aCFOpodium, i, n. [aKpor, extreme, 
and -row, foot], the pedestal of a statue^ 
Hyg. F. 88. 

acror, oris, m. [2. acer], =: acritudo, 
Fulg. Cont. Verg. init. 

Acrdta, ae, m., king of the Albani, 
brother of Romulus Silvius, Ov. M. 14, 
617. 

t acroteria, orum, n., = uKpwr^pia, 
the projecting or extreme part of a 
thing. J. Of a harbor, Vitr. 5. 12. — H. 
In architecture, the projecting parts of a 
pediment, serving as a support for figures 
or statues, Vitr. 3, 5, 12 sq. ; cf. Miill. Arch. 
§284. 

t acrdzymUS, a, um, adj., =aK P 6&- 
juor, slightly leavened, Isid. Or. 20, 2, 15. 

1. acta, ae, /, =u.KTri, the sea-shore, 
as place of resort : in acta jacebat, Cic. 
Verr. 2, 5, 25; so id. Cael. 15; id. Att. 14, 
8 ; id. Fam. 9, 6 ; Nep. Ages. 8, 2 ; Verg. A. 

5, 613 al. (perh. also in Verg. Cul. 13: v. 
Sillig. JST. cr.)_. 

2. acta, orum, v. ago, P. a. 
actaea, ae, /., a strong - smelling 

plant, herb Christopher, Actaea spicata 
Linn., Plin. 27, 7, 26, § 43. 

Actaedn, onis, m., 'AktcuW, a grand- 
son of Cadmus, who, having semi Diana 
bathing naked with her nymphs, was 
torn to pieces by his own dogs, Ov. M. 3, 
230 sq. ; ib. 720 ; id. Tr. 2, 105; Varr. R. R. 
2, 9, 9 ; Hyg. F. 181 al. 

Actaeus, a, um, adj., 'Auraio?, per- 
taining to Attica, Attic, Athenian : in 
Actaeo Aracyntho, Verg. E. 2, 24 (as beiug 
on the border of Attica) : arces, of Athens, 
Ov. M. 2, 720 ; fratres, i. e. Clytos and 
Bittes, ib. 7, 681: mel Hymetti, Col. 10, 386: 
imbres, a rain of honey, Stat. Th. 4, 453. 
— Hence, subst.: Actaei, orum, m., the 
inhabitants of Attica, Nep. Thras. 2, 1.— 
Actaea, ae, /., a female Athenian ; of 
Orithyia, Ov.' M. 6, 711. 

actarius, ii, «»., v. actuarius. 

2. acte, es, /., = uktT), a plant, perh. 
= ebulum, Plin. 26, 11, 73, § 120 ; Ap. Herb. 
91. 

2. Acte, es,f.,= AKTtj. I. Lit., coast- 
land or maritime country; hence, the 
earlier name for Attica, the province of 
Middle Greece, in which Athens was situ- 
ated, Plin. 4, 7, 11 ; Gell. 14, 6. — H. One 
of the Horae, Hyg. F. 183. — HI. A con- 



ACTI 

cubine of Xero, Suet. Ner. 28 ; Tac. A. 13, 
12 ; Inscr. Orell. 735 ; 2885. 

ActiaCUS, a urn, adj. [Actium] , relat- 
ing to Actiium : victoria, at Actium, Suet. 
Aug. 18 : ludi, the games which Augustus 
revived at Actium. in honor of his vic- 
tory, id. Tib. 6: Phoebus, who had a temple 
here. Ov. M. 13, 715: aequor, id. H. 15, 166: 
iegiones, which had fought at Actium, 
Tac. A. 1, 42. 

Actias, ndig,/. I a [Acte.l Attic, Athe- 
nian, Verg. G. 4, 463. — H. [Actium.] Of 
Actium: Cleopatra, conquered at Actium 
by A ugustus, Stat. S. 3, 2, 120. 

t actindphdroe, adj- (Gr. nom.plur. ) , 
= a^Ttvocpapot (bearing rays), epithet of the 
cochloe, Plin. 32, 11, 53, 5 147, v. Jan ad" h. 1. 

actlllOSIlS, a, um [uKTt'r ; pr. full of 
ravs, hence], glorious : ecclesia, Amhros. in 
Psa. 41. 

actio, onis,/. [ago], a doing, perform- 
ing, acting, action, act, X. In ?ea: 
non modo deos spoliat motu et actione 
divina, sed etiam homines inertes efficit, 
Cic. X. D. 1, 37 ; 2, 16 ; virtutis laus omnis 
in actione consistit, id. Off. 1, 6 ; id. Fin. 5, 
19, 54. — With subject, gen.: ad eas res 
parandas, quibus actio vitae continetur, 
active, practical life, id. Off. 1, 5 : cor- 
poris, id. Div. 1, 32 : mentis, id. N. D. 1, 17 ; 
and with object, gen. : itaque nee actio re- 
rum illarum (the public performance of 
those things) apertti petulantia vacat, id. 
ib. 1, 35, 127 ; ib. 1, 43 : actio ullius rei, id. 
Ac. 2, 33, 108 ; and so plur. : periculosae re- 
rum actiones sunt, Off. 1,2, 4 ; hence : actio 
gratiarum, the giving of thanks, id. Fam. 
10,19 (cf. : gratias agere).— H. Esp. A. 
Public functions, civil acts, proceed- 
ings, or duties. 1, In gen., Cic. Fam. 9, 
8 : tribunorum.taeir official duties, Liv. 5, 
11 ; so, consularis, id. 4, 55 al. : actiones no- 
stras scriptis mandamus, Cic. Off . 2, 1 ; Caes. 
B. C. 1,5.— Hence negotiation, delibera- 
tion: discessu consulum actio de pace 
sublata est, Cic. Att. 9. 9.— Esp. 2. Of judi- 
cial proceedings, a. An action, suit, pro- 
cess (in abstr.), with a gen. more precisely 
defining it, e. g. actio furti, injuriarum ; also 
with de: actio de repetundis, de aFboribus 
succisis, etc. : actionem alicui intendere, 
Cic. Mil. 14: instituere, to bring an action 
against one, id. Mur. 9 : multis actiones 
(processes, suits) et res (the property in 
suit) peribant, Liv. 39, 18 al. — b. The 
accusation (in concr.), the statement of 
the crime, the indictment, charge, ac- 
cusation: Inde ilia actio, ope consilioqve 

TYO FVE.TVM AIO FACTVM ESSE, Cic. N. D. 

3, 30, 74 ; cf. id. Caecin. 3 ; id. de Or. 1, 36, 
167.— Hence, in gen., judicial forms (the 
omission of which rendered a suit null and 
void): actiones MaiiilianaB, forms relative 
to purchase and sale; cf. Cic. de Or. 1, 58, 
246: Hostilianae, ib. 1, 57, 245. — Hence, c. 
A pleading of a case (spoken or written) ; 
so Cic. calls his Orats. against Verres, ac- 
tiones, pleas, simply dividing them into 
actio prima and actio secunda : actio 
causae, Cic. Caecin. 2, 4; actiones litium,id. 
Phil. 9, 5, 11 ; so, Suet, continuae actiones, 
Ner. 15 : in prima parte actionis, Quint. 10, 
1, 20 al.— d. Permission for a suit: dare 
alicui actionem (which was the right or 
duty of the praetor or judge), Cic. Verr. 2, 
2. 27. — ©, The judicial management of a 
suit, the trial, the day of trial: prima, 
altera, tertia, Cic. Verr. 1, 30 ; 2, 2, 6. — B. 
Gesticulation connected zvith oral deliv- 
ery. 1. Of an orator ; the exterior air or 
bearing, the action, delivery: Demosthe- 
nera ferunt ei qui quaesivisset quid primum 
esset in dicendo, actionem ; quid secundum, 
idem et idem tertium respondisse,Cic. Brut. 
38; cf.id.de Or. 1,18; so that it often in- 
cludes even the voice : actio ejus (Pompeii) 
habebat et in voce magnum splendorein et 
in motu summam dignitatem, id. Brut. 68 ; 
cf. id. Or. 17 : est actio quasi sermo corporis, 
id. de Or. 3, 59 ; cf. ib. 2, 17 al.— Hence, also 
— 2. Of an actor, action : in quo tanta eoni- 
moveri actio non posset, id. de Or. 3, 26. — 
U. In dramatic lang., the action, the con- 
nection or series of events, the plot,\n a 
play : habet enim (fabula) varios actus mul- 
tasque actiones et consiliorum et temporum, 
Cic. Fam. 5, 12, 6. 

actlto, are, v.. freq. [ago], to act or be 
employed in, often or much (only of judi- 



ACTU 

cial or dramatic action): muitas privatas 
causas, Cic. Brut. 70 : tragoedias, id. Rep. 
4, 35 ; so Tac. H. 3, 62 ; Suet. Galb. 3 ; cf. 
Gell. 9, 6. 

Actium, i, n- I. A promontory and 
town in JSpirus, on the Ambracian Gulf 
(now La Punta), where Augustus con- 
quered Antony and Cleopatra, 31 B.C., and, 
in commemoration of it, repaired the temple 
of Apollo, which existed there, and revived 
the Actian games, Mel. 2, 3, 10 ; Plin. 4, 1, 
2, § 5 ; Cic. Fam. 16, 6. —II. A harbor in 
Corcyra, Cic. Att. 7, 2, 3. 

* aCtluncula, ae, /. dim. [actio], a 
short judicial harangue, Plin. Ep. 9, 15. 

1. Ac tlUS, a, um, adj. poet, for Actia- 
cus, pertaining to Actium : ludi, Verg. A. 3, 
280 ; 8, 675 ; 704 ; Hor. Ep. 1, 18, 61 ; Phoe- 
bus, as having a temple at Actium ( v. 
Actium), Prop. 4, 6, 67. 

2. ActlUS, h m -> <z proper name, 
Suet. Tib. 47. ^ 

active, adv., v. the foil. art. fin. 

aCtlVUS; a, um, adj. [ago ]. I. Active: 
philosophia, practical (opp. to contempla- 
tiva) : philosophia et contemplativa est et 
activa ; spectat simul agitque, Sen, Ep. 95,10: 
(opp. to spectativus) thesin a causa sic di- 
stinguunt, ut ilia sit spectativae partis, haec 
activae, Quint. 3, 5, 11: (rhetorice) quia 
maximus ejus usus actu continetur, dicatur 
activa, id. 2, 18, 5. — H. In g r a m m. : verba 
activa, which designate transitive action 
(opp. neutra or intransitiva), Charis. p. 
138; Diom. p. 326 P. al.— Adv.: active. 
in gramm., actively, like a verb active', 
Prise, pp. 794, 799 P. 

1. actor, oris, m. [id.]. I. One who 
drives or moves something : pecoris ac- 
tor, Ov. H. 1, 95 : habenae, a slinger, Stat. 
Ach. 2,419. — H. In gen.,Ae who does 
any thing, a doer or performer (cf. 
ago, II.). A. I n g e n - of every kind of 
action : ut ilium efflceret oratorem verbo- 
rum actoremque rerum, Cic. de Or. 3, 15, 
57 (a translation of the Homer. irpnK-r,pa 
epjuv, 11. 9, 443) : Cato dux, auctor, actor 
rerum illarum fuit, id. Sest. 28 fin. ; so 
Caes. B. C. 1, 26 ; Nep. Att. 3, 2 al. — B. In 
judicial lang., one who brings an ac- 
tion, a plaintiff : accusatorem pro omni 
actore et petitore appello, Cic. Part. 32 ; 
esp. of lawyers: Moloni Rhodio et actori 
summo causarum et magistro, id. Brut. 89 
fin.; so Hor. A. P. 369 al. — Also, one who 
conducts a suit, an advocate, Cic. Caec. 
1. — Hence, C. At a later period, an agent 
or attorney; in gen., an administrator 
or manager or steward, overseer of prop- 
erty or an estate. — So in Tac. : actor pubii- 
cus, 7te who admiinisters the public prop- 
erty, Ann. 2, 30 ; 3, 67 : actor summarum, 
a keeper of accounts or cashier, Suet. 
Dom. 11, and so often in the Dig. : sub acto- 
ribus, overseers (of a household), Vulg. Gal. 
4, 2.— D, In rhetor. Ian g.,6ne who de- 
livers any oral discourse; and esp. owe 
who delivers an oration, an orator: in- 
ventor, compositor, actor, Cic. Or. 19. — 2. A 
player, an actor : actores secundarum et 
tertiarum partium, Cic. Div. in Caecil. 15 ; 
so id. de Or. 1, 26 ; id. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 16 (cf. ago, 
II., and actio, II. C). 

2. Actor, *>ris, m. I, A companion 
of Aeneas, Verg. A. 9, 500. — H. An Au- 
runcan, ib. 12, 94; 96. — Hence, Actd- 
rides. ae, patron, rn., son or grandson 
of Actor : his son, Menoetius, Ov. F. 2, 39; 
his grandson, Patroclus, Ov. Tr. 1, 9, 29; 
id. M. 13, 273; Erithos, id. ib. 5, 79.— In 
plur. : Actdridae, *■ e. Eurytus and 
Cleatus, sons of Actor, King of Phthia, 
id. ib. 8, 308. 

1. actorius. a, um, adj., i. q. activus, 
Tert.An. 14. 

2. Actorius. n, m., a Roman name, 
Suet. Caes. 9 al. ' 

actrix, icis, / [ actor ]. I. A female 
plaintiff, Cod. Th. 7, 16, 41— H, A stew- 
ardess, Inscr. Murat. 913, 6. 

* actualis, e, adj. [id.], active, prac- 
tical, Macr. Somn. Scip. 2, 17.— Adv. : ac- 
tuallter, actively, Myth. Vatic, vol. 3, p. 
181 ed. Bod. 

actuaria, ae, v. 1. actuarius. 

actuaridlum, h n - dim. [actuarius], 
a small, swift vessel impelled by oars, 



ACTU 

row-boat, barge, Cic. Att. 10, 11, 4; 16, 3, 
6; 16,6,1. 
actuarium, n, v. the foil. 

1. actuariUS, a, um., adj. [ago], that 
which is easily moved, swift, agile: 
navis, a swift sailer, Caes. B. G~. 5, 1 ; "Sail. 
Fragm. ap. Non. 535, 1, and Sisenn. ib. 534, 
33 ; Liv. 25, 30 : navigium, Caes. B. C. 1, 27 ; 
cf. : " actuariae naves sunt, quae velis simul 
et remis aguntur," Isid. Or. 19,1,24: also, 

abs. actuaria, ae,/., or actuarium, 

ii, «,., the same, Cic. Att. 5, 9 ; cf. Gell. 10, 25 : 
limes, a road 12 feet wide between fields, 
Hyg. de Lim. p. 151: canes, hunting-dogs, 
hounds, ace. to Vel. Long. 2234 P. 

2. actuarius, ii (written by some ac- 
tarius, to distinguish it from the preceding, 
Vel. Long. 2234 P., and so found in Inss. 
ap. Grut. 260 ; ap. Henzen, 6284), sc. scriba, 
m. [2. actus, II. B. 1.]. I. A short-hand 
writer. Suet. Caes. 55; Sen. Ep. 33, 9; cf. 
Lips. Tac. Ann. 5, 4.— XX, One who writes 
out accounts, Petr. 53. 

actum, i, v. ago. 

actudse, adv., see the foil. s.rt. fin. 

aCtUOSUS. a, um, adj. [actus], full of 
activity, very active (with the access, idea 
of zeal, subjective impulse; diff. from in- 
dustrials, which refers more to the means 
by which an object is attained, Doed. Syn. 
1,123): virtus actuosa (est), et deus vester 
nihil agens expers virtutis (est), Cic.N. D. 
1,40; so id. Or. 36, 125; Sen. Ep. 39.— Hence, 
ace. to Fest. s. v. actus, p. 15, subsi., an 
actor or dancer. — Adv. : actiiose, '» a 
lively manner, with activity, Cic, de Or. 
3, 26, 102. 

1. actus, a, um, P. a., from ago. 

2. actus, lis, "'■ [ago], I. A. The mov- 
ing or driving of an object, impulse.mo- 
tion: linguae actu, Pacuv. ap. JSTon. 506, 17 : 
mellis constantior est natura . . . et cunc- 
tantior actus, Lucr. 3, 192 : levi admonitu, 
non actu, inflectit illam feram, by driving, 
Cic. Rep. 2, 40 : fertur in abruptum magno 
mons inprobus actu, Verg. A. 12, 687 : pila 
contorsit violento spiritus actu, Sen. Agarn. 
432 ; hominum aut animalium actu vehicu- 
lum adhibemus, Cael. Aurel. Tard. 1, 1. — 
Hence, B. Transf. 1, The right of driv- 
ing cattle through a place, a passage for 
cattle: aquae ductus, haustus, iter, actus, 
Cic. Caec 26; Ulp.Dig.8,3,1.— 2. A road 
beticeen fields; a cart- or carriage-way, 
Dig. 8, 1, 5 ; 8, 5, 4 ; 43 19, 1 al,— And, 3. A 
meastcre or piece of land (in quo boves 
aguntur, cum aratur, cum impetu justo, 
Plin. 18, 59) : actus minimus, 120 feet long 
and 4 feet wide: quadratus, 120 feet 
square; and duplicatus, 240 feet long and 
VlQfeet wide, Varr. L. L. 5, § 34 Mull. ; id. 
R. R. 1, 10 ; Paul, ex Fest. p. 17 Mull. Also 
a division made bv bees in a hive, Plin. 
11, 10, 10, § 22. 

II. Th e doin g or performin gofa thin 57, 
an act, performance. A. In gen. (so not 
in Cic. ; for Leg. 1, 11, inst. of pravis actibus, 
is to be read, pravitatibus ; but often in the 
post-Aug. per.) : post actum operis, Quint. 
2, 18, 1 : in vero actu rei, id. 7, 2, 41 : rheto- 
rice in actu consistit, id. 2, 18, 2 : donee resi- 
dua diurni actus contlceret, Suet. Aug. 7« ; so 
id. Claud. 30 : non consenserat actibus eo- 
rum.Vulg. Luc. 23,51.— B, Esp. 1, Pub- 
lic employment, business of state, esp. 
judicial .-actus rerum jurisdiction, Suet 
Aug. 32 ; id. Claud. 15,23 ; also absol. actus, 
Dig. 39,4,16; 40,5,41 al.— 2. The action 
accompanying oral delivery, a. Of an 
orator : motus est in his orationis et actus, . 
Quint. 9, 2, 4; 11, 3, 140.— b. Of an actor: 
the representation of a 2>lay, a part, a 
character, etc. : neque enim histrioni, ut 
placeat, peragenda est fabula, modo in quo- 
cunque fuerit actu, probetur, Cic. de Sen. 19, 
70 : carminum actus, recital, Liv. 7, 2 : his- 
trionum actus, Quint. 10, 2, 11 : in tragico 
quodam actu, cum elapsum baculuni cito re- 
sumpsisset, Suet. Ner. 24. — Hence, also, a 
larger division of a play, an act: pri- 
me actu placeo, Ter. Hec. prol. 31 : neque 
minor quinto, nee sit prodnctior actu Fabu- 
la, Hor. A. P. 189, and tro p. (in Cic. very 
often) : extremus actus aetatis, Cic. de Sen, 
2 ; id. Marcell. 9: quartus actus improbita* 
tis, id. Verr. 2, 2, 6; so id. Phil. 2, 14 ; id. 
Fain. 5, 12 al. 

25 



ACUM 

actUtlim, adv. L" ab actu " (as astutus 
from astu ; or with turn as enclitic, in der 
Randlung da, Corss. Ausspr. II. 849). "id 
est, celeritate," Prise. 1013 P. ; so Hand, s. v. 
who explains : uno actu, nulla re interce- 
dente; Lindem. de Adv. Lat. Spec. 4, p. 17, 
regards it as formed from an obs. vb. actuo, 
with the meaning cum multo actu, non 
segniter ; cf. : ait et dicto citius placat, qs. 
while in the act of speaking, Verg. A. 1, 
142; cf. Hor. S. 2, 2, 80]; immediately, 
quickly ', instantly (in Plaut. very often, 
more rarely in Ter., and, except in Cic. 
Phil. 12. 11. 26 : Venr. A. 9. 255 ; Ov. M. 3, 
557 ; id. H. i2, 207 ; Liv. 29,14, 5 ; and Quint. 
4, 3, 13, perh. not occurring in the class, 
per.) : ite actutum, Naev. ap. Non. 323, 1 : aut 
hie est aut hie adfore actutum autumo, Pac. 
ap. Non. 237, 11 ; Plaut. Am.l, 1, 198 : redibo 
actutum ... id actutum diu est, id. ib. 1,3, 
32 ; and so id. Cure. 5, 3, 49; id. Cap. 3,5, 75 
al. : vos ite actutum, Att. ap. Non. 357, 13 ; 
Ter. Ad. 4, 4, 26 ; id. Ph. 5, 6, 12 ; often in 
late Lat. : si bene aestimo, actutum mere- 
bitur, Symm. Et. 1, 41 ; 2,64; 3,43; 5,35, 

t acuariUS, i, m- [1. acus], one who 
makes needles or pins, Inscr. Orell. 4139. 

acilla, ae,/. dim. [id.j, a little needle, 
ace. to Cledon, p. 1896 : frigit fricantem cor- 
pus acula (lect dub.), Att. Rib. Trag. Rel.p. 
195. 

aculeatUS, a, um, adj. [aculeus], jiW- 
nished with stings or prickles, thorny, 
prickly. I. L i t., of animals and plants : 
aniinalia, Plin. 20, 22, 91: bruchus, Vulg. 
Jer. 51, 27 : herbae, Plin. 24, 19, 119 ; ictus, 
a puncture made by a sting, Plin. 20, 21, 
84, § 223.— H.Fig. A. Stinging, pointed, 
sharp : istaec . . . aculeata sunt, animum 
fodicant, Plaut. Bacch. 1, 1, 30: litterae,Cic. 
Att. 14, 18. 1. — B. Subtle, cunning: con- 
torta et aculeata sophismata, Cic. Ac. 2, 24. 

Aculc-O, onis, m., a Roman cognomen 
in the gens F uria, Liv. 38, 55, 4. — C. Aculeo, 
a famous lawyer, friend of L. Licinius 
Crassus,Cic. de Or. 1, 43, 191 ; 2, 1, 2 al. 

acuiedlUS, i, «&. dim. [aculeus], a lit- 
tle needle or pin : aculeolos in cochleare 
tulit, an old reading in Mart. 8, 71, where 
now aeu levins nix cochleare, is read, 

aculeus, i, w. [ ace. to Prise. 618 P. 
dim . trotn 1. acus, with the gender changed, 
like diecula fr. dies, cf. Val. Prob. 1463 P.], 
a sfring. I. Lit. A,. Of animals: apis 
acuieum sine clamore ferre non possumus, 
Cic. Tusc. 2, 22; so Plin. 11, 17, 17 : nepa- 
rum,Cic. Fin. 5, 15 al. — Also, the spur of 
fowls, Col. 8, 2, 8 : locustarum, Vulg. Apoc. 
9, 10.— B. Of plants, a spine or prickle : 
spinarum, Plin. 13. 9, 19 : carduorum, id. 20, 
23, 99. — C. Of an arrow or dart, the point, 
Liv. 38, 21, 11.— II, Fig., a sting. A. 
Of a sharp, cutting remark: pungunt quasi 
aculeis interrogatiunculis, Cic. Fin. 4, 3; so 
id. Ac. 2, 31 ; id. Plane. 24 al. ; Liv. 23, 42, 
5.— 1§ , Of harsh treatment : aculeos severi- 
tatis judicum evellere, Cic. Clu. 55 fin. ; so 
id. Cael. 12, 29.— C. Of painful thought or 
care : meum ille pectus pungit aculeus, quid 
illi negoti fuerit ante aedis meas, Plaut. 
Trin. 4. 2. 158 : domesticarum sollicitudi- 
num, Cic. Att. 1,18. 

acumen, inis, n. [acuo], a point to 
prick or sting with ; diff. fr. caenmen, which 
designates merely the summit or extremity 
of a thing, Doed. Syn. 2, 108. I. L i t. : turn 
clupei resonunt et ferri stridit acumen, Enn. 
ap. Prise, p. 838 P. (Ann. v. 369 ed. Vahl.) : 
coni, Lucr. 4, 431 : nasi, id. 6, 1193 (i. e. the 
pointed contraction of the nose before 
death; of. Bentl. ad Hor.S. 1,3,29) : stili,Cic. 
, de Or. 1, 33 : ferrum Diana volanti abstule- 
rat jaculo: lignum sine acumine venit, Ov. 
M. 8, 353 ; 3, 84.— Hence, also, the sting of 
av v animal : scorpii, Cic. Arat. 685 : — au- 
spicium ex acuminibus, a military omen 
of victory, when the spears stuck in the 
ground suddenly begin to burn or shine 
at the points, Cic. Div. 2, 36, 77, and id. N. 
D. 2, 3 ; cf. Liv. 22, 1 ; 43, 13.— In Plin., of 
the taste: sharpness or pungency, 14,20, 
25-— II. Fi g. , of the mind, like acies. A. 
Acuteness, shrewdness, keenness, acu- 
men : sermonis leporem, ingeniorum acu- 
men, dicendi copiam.Cic. F1.4 ; so Nep. Ale. 
11 ; Plin. 2, 27, 27, § 97.— Also without a 
gen. : ubi est acumen tuum ? Cic. Tusc. 1, 
6 ; so Lucr. ap. Cic. Fam. 5, 14, 2 : Empe- 
docies an Stertinium deliret acumen, Hor. 
26 



ACUO 

Ep. 1, 12, 20, — P o e t. also in plur. : serus 
Graecis admovit acumina chartis,Hor. Ep. 
2,1, 161.— B= Cunning, subtlety: argutiae 
et acumen Hyperidis, Cic. Or. 31 ; so id. de 
Or. 2, 63. — Also in plur. : dialectici ipsi se 
compungunt suis acuminibus, id. de Or. 2, 
38 : meretricis acumina, Hor. Ep. 1, 17,55. 
— Hence, 

acummariUS, a, um, adj. [acumen], 
good for sharpening : mola,/or sharpen- 
ing weapons, Schol. ad Stat. Th. 3. 

acumino, avi, atum, 1, v. a. [id.], to 
make pointed, to sharpen, in verb finit. : 
contextum spinae acuminavit in caudam, 
Lact. Opif . 7, 7. — Part. perf. : telum culicis, 
Plin. 11, 2, 1 : cornu lunae, id. 18, 35, 79 : 
corpus, id. 11, 24,28. 

actio, ui, utum, 3, v. a. (part.fut. acu- 
turus, not used) [cf. 2. acer], to make sharp 
or pointed, to sharpen, whet. I, Lit. : ne 
stridorem quidem serrae audiunt, cum acui- 
tur, Cic. Tusc. 1, 40 ; so, ferrum, Verg. A. 8, 
386 ; Hor. C. 1, 2, 21 : enses, Ov. M. 15, 776 : 
gladium, Vulg. Deut. 32, 41: sagittas, id. 
Jer. 51, 11.— Poet. : fulmen, Lucr. 6, 278: 
dentes, Hor. C. 3, 20, 10; cf. Tib. 4," 3, 3.— 
II, T r o p. A. First, of the tongue, qs. to 
whet, i. e. to sharpen, exercise, improve: 
acuere linguam exercitatione dicendi, Cic. 
Brut. 97 : linguam causis, Hor. Ep. 1, 3, 23 ; 
so Vulg. Psa. 139, 4; so in gen.: se, to 
exercise one's self, to make one's self 
ready : acueram me ad exagitandam hanc 
ejus legationem, Cic. Att. 2, 7 : mentem, 
ingenium, prudentiam, etc. ; to sharpen : 
multa, quae acuant mentem, niulta quae 
obtundant, Cic. Tusc. 1, 33 ; so id. Brut. 33 ; 
id. Phil. 2, 17 ; id. de Or. 1, 20.— B. Acuere 
aliquem (with or without ad aliquid), to 
spur on, incite, stir up, arouse : ad cru- 
delitatem, Cic. Lig. 4 ; id, Fam. 15, 21 : illos 
sat aetas acuet, Ter. Ad. 5, 3, 49 ; Cic. Rose. 
Am. 33, 110: ita duae res, quae languorem 
afferunt ceteris, ilium acuebant, otium et 
solitudo, id. Off. 3, 1 ; Liv. 28, 19 : curis acu- 
ens mortalia corda, Verg. G. 1, 123 : audi- 
tisque lupos acuunt balatibus agni, id. ib. 
4, 435 : quam Juno his acuit verbis, id. A. 7, 
330.— C Aliquid, to rouse up, kindle, ex- 
cite (mostly poet.) : saevus in armis Aeneas 
acuit Martem et se suscitat ira, Verg. A. 12, 
108: iram, Vulg. Sap. 5, 21: stadia, Val. 
Max. 2, 2,no. 3. — J} m In gramm,: acuere 
syllabam, to give an acute accent to (opp. 
gravem pouere), Quint. 1, 5, 22 ; cf. Prise. 
Op. Min. 159 Lind. : accentus acutus ideo 
inventus est, quod acuat sive elevet sylla- 
bam. — Hence, acutus,a,um,P.a,,sA«rp- 
ened, made pointed; hence, A. Lit., 
sharp, pointed (acer denotes natural sharp- 
ness, etc. : acutus, that produced by exer- 
tion, skill, etc. : sermo acer, impassioned, 
passionate; sermo acutus, pointed, acute 
discourse) : vide ut sit acutus culter probe, 
Plaut. Mil. 5, 4: ferrum, Hor. A. P. 304: 
cuspis, Verg. A. 5, 208 : gladius, Vulg. Psa. 
56, 5 : carex, Verg. G. 3, 231 ; elementa, i. e. 
pointed, jagged atoms (opp. to perplexa, 
connected), Lucr. 2,463: nasus, Plaut, Cap. 
3, 4, 114 : oculi, of a pointed shape, id, Ps. 
4, 7, 121 : aures, pointed, Hor. C. 2, 19, 4 : 
saxa, id. ib. 3, 27, 61 ; so Verg. A. 1, 45.-2, 
Trans f. a. Of the senses themselves, 
sharp, keen : oculos acris atque cicutos, 
Cic. Plane. 66: nares, Hor. S. 1, 3, 29 ; Cels. 
2, 6. — b. Of objects affecting the senses, 
sharp, acute; of the voice, soprano or 
treble : inde loci lituus sonitus effudit acu- 
tos,Enn. ap. Paul, ex Fest. p. 116 Mull. (Ann, 
v. 522 ed. Vahl.) : hinnitu, Verg. G. 3, 94 : 
voces, id. Cir. 107; Ov. M. 3, 224: stridore, 
Hor. C, 1, 34, 15 : vocem ab acutissimo sono 
usque ad gravissimum sonum recipiunt, 
from the highest treble to the lowest base, 
Cic. de Or. 1, 59, 251 ; cf. ib. 3, 57, 216 ; 
Somn. Scip.5 ; Rep. 6, 18.— c. In gen., of 
things affecting the body, of either heat or 
cold from their similar effects, keen, sharp, 
violent, severe: sol, Hor. Ep. 1,10,17 : radii 
solis, Ov. H. 4, 159 : gelu, Hor, C. 1, 9, 4 ; cf, 
Lucr. 1,495 ; Verg. G. 1,93 ; so,febris,Cels. 
2, 4 : morbus, id. 3 (opp. longus), rapid. — 
Subst, with gen. : acuta belli, violent, se- 
vere misfortunes of war, Hor. C. 4, 4, 76 
(= graves belli molestias). — B. Fig, 1. 
Of intellectual qualities, acute, clear-sight- 
ed, intelligent, sagacious (veryfreq.): An- 
tisthenes homo acutus magis quam eruditus, 
Cic. Att. 12, 37 ; so id. de Or. 1, 51 ; id. N. D. 



AD 

1, 16; Nep. Dion. 8, 1 : homo ingenio pru~ 
dentiaque acutissimus, Cic. de Or. 1, 39: 
acutae sententiae, id. Opt. Gen. Or. 2, 5 : 
motus animorum ad excogitandum acuti, 
id. Or. 1, 113: studia, id. Gen. 50: conclu- 
siones, Quint. 2, 20, 5.-2. In gramm. : 
accentus acutus, the acute accent (opp. 
gravis), Prise, p. 159, ed. Lindem.— Com p. 
Plin. 13, 1, 2, — Adv. : acute, sharply, 
keenly, acutely : cernere, Lucr. 4, 804 • ib. 
811 : conlecta, Cic. Deiot. 33 : excogitat, id. 
Verr. 4, 147 : respoudeo, id. Cael. 17 : scri- 
bo, id. Verr. 3, 20 ; so, acutum : cernis, 
Hor. S. 1, 3, 26 : resonarent, ib. 8, 41 : and, 
acuta : canis ululat, Enn. ap. Fest. p. 9 
Mull. (Ann. 346 Vahl.).— Comp., Cic. Inv. 
2, 16.— Suq, Cic. Off. 1, 44 ; id. Verr. 3, 20. 
t acupedlUS, " dicebatur, cui praeci- 
puum erat in currendo acumen pedum," 
swift of foot, Paul, ex Fest, p. 9 Miill. [qs. 
acer -f- pes ; cf. Gr. o£wou<r, <hn6nov?]. 

1. acus, us,/, [cf. 2. acer], I, A needle 
or pin, as being pointed, both for common 
use andornament ^'quasarrinatrixveletiam 
ornatrix utitur, 35 mil. ex Fest. p. 9 Miill. 

A. Lit. : mirabarvulnus,quodacupunctum 
videtur, Cic. Mil. 24, — Hence, acu pin^ere. to 
embroider, Verg. A. 9, 582 ; Ov. M. 6, 23 ; cf. 
Plin . 8, 48, § 191 ; Isid. Orig. 19, 22, 22.— Esp. a 
hair-pin: figat acus tortas sustineatque co- 
mas, Mart. 14, 24: foramen acus, the eye of 
a needle, Vulg. Matt. 19, 24.— Also, a sur- 
geon's needle, a 2>robe,Cels. 7, 17. — Hence, 

B. Trop,: acu rem tangere,£o touch the 
thing with a needle; in Engl, phrase, to 
hit the nail on the head, Plaut. Rud. 5, 2, 
19 ; so, to denote careful and successful ef- 
fort : si acum quaereres, acum invenisses, 
id. Men. 2, 1, 13. — H, The tongue of a 
buckle, Treb. Poll. Claud. 14. — HI. I. q. 
aeus, eris, Col. 2, 10, 40. — IV. -4« imple- 
ment of husbandry, Pall. 1, 43, 2. 

2. acUS, Sris, n. (also, us, /., v. 1. acus, 
III.) [kindred with acus, us, Goth, ahana, 
old Norse agn, old Germ. Agana],—iixvpov, 
the husk of grain and of mdse ; chaff, 
Cato, R. R/54, 2 ; Varr. R."R? 1, 52 ; 57; 3, 
9,8. 

3. acUS, h ni. [1. acus], a kind of 
sea-fish, with a pointed snout, the horn- 
pike or gar-pike (Gr. /3e\ovfi) : acus sive 
beione unus piscium, etc., Plin, 9, 51, 76, 
§ 166 : et satius tenues ducere credis acos, 
Mart. 10, 37, 6 ; cf. Plin. 32, 11, 53, § 145, 
where belonae again occurs. (Some read 
una for unus in the passage from Plin., 
and acf'.s for acos in Mart., as if these 
forms belonged to 1. acus.) 

Acusilas, ae, m. [from 'AKovcn'Aaor], an 
Argive historian, Cic. de Or. 2, 12, 53. 

acutalis, e, adj. [acutus], pointed: ter- 
minus, Front. Col. p. 132 Goes. 

acutarUS (for acutarius), a, um, adj. 
[id.], that sharpens instruments : acutarus 
taber, Ins. ap. Henzen. 7216. 

acutatUS, a, um, adj. [id.], sharp- 
ened : sagittae, Veg. 1, 22, 4. 

acute; adv., v. acuo, P. a. fin. 

acutor, oris, m . [acuo], owe that sharp- 
ens, a sharpener, Not. Tir. p. 120. 

acutule, adv., see the foil. art. fin. 

acutulus, a, um, adj. dim. [acutus], 
somewhat pointed, acute, or subtile : con- 
clusiones, * Cic^N^D. 3, 7, 18: doctores,Gell. 
17, 5 . —A dv. : acutule. somewhat sharp- 
ly, Aug. Conf. 3, 7. 

acutum, adv. . v. acuo, P. a. 

acutUS, a , um, v. acuo, P. a. 

acva and acvarivs, in Inscrr. for 
aqua and aquarius. 

t acylos, !,/■) = ctKuXof, the acorn of 
the holm-oak (ilex), Plin. 16, 6, 8, § 19 (cf. 
Horn. Od. 10, 242). 

t acyrdlogia, ae, / , = uKv P o\o^ia, in 

rhetoric, an impropriety of speech ; e. g. : 
sperare for timere, Serv. ad Verg, A. 4, 419 
(in pure Lat. improprium or impropria 
dictio is used instead of it: (quod'proprie- 
tati est contrarium) id apud nos impro- 
priwm, aicvpov apud Graecos vocatur ; 
quale est tantum sperare dolorem ; Quint. 
8, 2, 3 ; cf. Don. ap. Lind. Corp. Gr. 1, 28 ; 
Charis. p. 242 ; Diom. 2, p. 444). 

<l<imP re P- w i tft acc. (from the fourth cen- 
tury after Christ written also at; Etrusc. 
suf. -a; Osc. az: Umbr. and Old Lat. ar, as 



AD 

in Eug. Tat)., in S. C. de Bacch., as arveho 
for adveho ; arfuerunt, arfuisse, for adfue- 
runt, etc. ; arbiter for adbiter ; so, ar me 
advenias, Plaut. True. 2, 2, 17 ; cf. Prise. 
559 P. ; Vel. Long. 2232 P. ; Fabretti, Glos. 
Ital. col. 5) [cf. Sanscr. adhi; Goth, and 
Eng. at; Celt. pref. ar, as armor, i. e. ad 
mare ; Rom. a], 

I. As antith. to ab (as in to ea 1 ), in a 
progressive order of relation, ad denotes, 
first, the direction toward an object ; then 
the reaching of or attaining to it ; and final- 
ly, the being at or near it. 

j\ m In space. 1, Direction toward, to, 
toward ^ and first, a. Horizontally: 1'ugere 
ad puppim eolles campique videntur, the 
hills and fields appear to fly toward 
the ship, Lucr. 4, 390 : meridie umbrae ca- 
dunt ad septentrionem, ortu vero ad occa- 
sum, to or toward the north and west, 
Plin. 2, 13, and so often of the geog. position 
of a place in reference to the points of com- 
pass, with the verbs jacere, verger e, spec- 
tare, etc. : Asia jacet ad meridiem et aus- 
trum, Europa ad septentriones et aquiio- 
nem, Varr. L. L. 5, § 31 Mull. ; and in Plin. 
very freq. : Creta ad austrum ... ad septen- 
trionem versa, 4, '20 : ad Atticam vergente, 
4,21 al. — Also trop.: animus alius ad alia 
vitia propensior, Cic. Tusc. 4, 37, 81. — j). In 
a direction upwards (esp. in the poets, very 
freq.): mauusqne sursum ad caelum sustu- 
lit, Naev. ap.Non. 116,30 (B. Pun. p. 13, ed. 
Vahl.) : manus ad caeli templa tendebam 
lacrimans, Erm. ap. Cic. Div. 1, 20, 40 (Ann. 
v. 50 ed. Vahl.) ; cf. : dupiices tendens ad 
sidera palmas, Verg. A. 1, 93 : molem ex 
profundo saxeam ad caelum vomit, Att. ap. 
Prise. 1325 p. : clamor ad caelum volvendus, 
Enn. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 104 Mull. (Ann. v. 
520 eel. Vahl.) (cf. with this: tollitnr in cae- 
lum clamor, Enn. ap. Macr. S. 6, 1, or Ann. 
v. 422) : ad caelumque ferat fiammai ful- 
gura rursum, of Aetna, Lucr. 1, 725 ; cf. id. 
2, 191 ; 2, 325 : sidera sola micant ; ad quae 
sua bracchia tendens, etc., Ov. M. 7, 188: 
altitudo pertingit ad caelum, Vulg. Dan. 4, 
17. — c. Also in the direction downwards 
(for the usu. in) : tardiore semper ad terras 
omnium quae geruntur in caelo effectu ca- 
dente quam visu, Plin. 2, 97, 99, § 216. 

% m The point or goal at which any thing 
arrives, a. Without reference to the space 
traversed in passing, to, toward (the most 
common use of this prep.) : cum stupro re- 
dire ad suos popularis,Naev. ap. Fest. p. 317 
Mull. (B. Pun. p. 14 ed. Vahl.) : ut ex tarn 
alto dignitatis gradu ad superos videatur 
potius quam ad inferos pervenisse, Cic. Lael. 
3, 12 : ad terras decidat aether, Lucan. 2, 58. 
— Hence, (a) With verbs which designate go- 
ing, coming, moving, bearing, bringing near, 
adapting, taking, receiving, calling, exciting, 
admonishing, etc., when the verb is com- 
pounded with ad the prep, is not always re- 
peated, but the constr. with the dot. or ace. 
employed ; cf. Rudd. II. pp. 154, 175 n. (In 
the ante-class, per., and even in Cic, ad is 
generally repeated with most verbs, as, ad 
eos accedit, Cic. Sex. Rose. 8: ad Sullam 
adire, id. ib. 25: ad se adferre, id. Verr. 4, 
50: reticulum ad naris sibi adinovebat, id. 
ib. 5, 27 : ad laborem adhortantur, id. de 
Sen. 14: T. Vectium ad se arcessit. id. Verr. 
5, 114 ; but the poets of the Aug. per. , and 
the historians, esp. Tac., prefer the dative ; 
also, when the compound verb contains 
merely the idea of approach, the constr. 
with ad and the ace. is employed ; but 
when it designates increase, that with the 
dat. is more usual : accedit ad nrbem, he 
approaches the city ; but, accedit pro- 
vinciae, it is added to the province.) — 
(/3) Ad me, te, se, for donium meam, 
tuam, snam (m Plaut. and Ter. very freq.) : 
oratus sum venire ad te hue, Plaut. Mil. 
5, 1, 12: spectatores plaudite atque ite ad 
vos comissatum, id. Stich. fin. : eamus ad 
me, Ter. Eun. 3, 5, 64 : ancillas traduce hue 
ad vos, id. Heaut. 4, 4, 22 : transeundumst 
tibi ad Menedemum, id. 4, 4, 17 : intro nos 
vofcat ad sese, tenet intus apud se, Lucil. 
ap. Charis. p. 86 P. : te oro, ut ad me 
Vibonem statim venias, Cic. Att. 3, 3 ; 16, 
10 al.— (y) Ad, with the name of a deity in 
the gen., is elliptical for ad templum or 
aedem (cf. : Thespiadas, quae ad aedem 
Felicitatis sunt, Cic. Verr. 4, 4; id. Phil. 2, 
35: in aedem Veneris, Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 
120: in aedem Concordiae, Cic. Cat. 3, 9, 



AD 

21 ; 2, 6, 12) : ad Dianae, to the temple of, 
Ter. Ad. 4, 2, 43 : ad Opis, Cic. Att. 8, 1, 14 : 
ad Castoris, id. Quint. 17: ad Juturnae, id. 
Clu. 101 : ad Vestae, Hor. S. 1, 9, 35 al. ; cf. 
Rudd. II. p. 41, n. 4, and p. 334.— (5) With 
verbs which denote a giving, sending, in- 
forming, submitting, etc., it is used for the 
simple dat. (Rudd. II. p. 175) : litteras dare 
ad aliquem, to send or write one a letter; 
and: litteras dare alicui, to give a letter 
to one; hence Cic. never says, like Cae- 
sar and Sail., alicui scribere, which strictly 
means, to write for one (as a receipt, etc.), 
but always mittere, scribere, perscribere ad 
aliquem : postea ad pistores dabo, Plaut. As. 
3,3, 119: praecipe quae ad patrem vis nun- 
tiari, id. Capt. 2, 2, 109 : in servitutem pau- 
perem ad divitem dare, Ter. Ph. 4, 3, 48: 
nam ad me Publ. Valerius scripsit, Cic. Fam. 
14, 2 med. : de meis rebus ad Lollium per- 
scripsi, id. ib. 5, 3 : velim domum ad te scri- 
bas, ut mihi tui libri pateant,id. Att. 4, 14; 
cf. id. ib. 4, 16 : ad primam (sc. epistulam) 
tibi hoc scribo, in answer to your first, id. 
ib. 3, 15, 2: ad Q. Fuivium Cons. Hirpini et 
Lucani dediderunt sese, Liv. 27, 15, 1 ; cf. 
id. 28,22, 5. — Hence the phrase : mittere or 
scribere librum ad aliquem, to dedicate a 
book to one (Greek, ■Kpoa^wveii) : has res 
ad te scriptas, Luci, mishnus, Aeli, Lucil. 
Sat. 1, ap. Auct. Her, 4, 12 : quae institue- 
ram, ad te mittam, Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 5 : ego in- 
terea admonitu tuo perfeci sane argutulos 
libros ad Varronem ; and soon after : mihi 
explices velim, maneasne in sententia, ut 
mittam ad eum quae scripsi, Cic. Att. 13, 
18; cf. ib. 16; Plin. 1, 19. -So in titles of 
books : M. Tullii Ciceronis ad Marcum Bru- 
tum Orator; M. T. Cic. ad Q. Fratrem Dia- 
logi tres de Oratore, etc. — In the titles of 
odes and epigrams ad aliquem signifies to, 
addressed to. — (e) With names of towns 
after verbs of motion, ad is used in answer 
to the question Whither ? instead of the 
simple ace; but commonly with this differ- 
ence, that ad denotes to the vicinity of, the 
neighborhood of: miles ad Capuam pro- 
fectus sum, quintoque anno post ad Taren- 
tum, Cic. de Sen. 4, 10 ; id. Fam. 3, 81 : ad 
Veios, Liv. 5, 19 ; 14, 18 ; cf. Caes. B. G. 1, 
7; id. B. C. 3, 40 al. — Ad is regularly 
used when the proper name has an appella- 
tive in apposition to it : ad Cirtam oppidmn 
iter constituunt, Sail. J. 81, 2 ; so Curt. 3, 1, 
22; 4,9,9; or when it is joined with usque, 
Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 34, § 87 ; id. Deiot, 7, 19. - 
( When an adjective is added, the simple 
ace. is used poet., as well as with ad: mag- 
num iter ad doctas proficisci cogor Athenas, 
Prop. 3, ,21, 1; the simple ace, Ov. H. 2, 83 : 
doctas jam nunc eat, inquit, Athenas).— (£) 
With verbs which imply a hostile movement 
toward, or protection in respect to any 
thing, against = adversus : nonne ad se- 
nem aliquam fabricam fingit ? Ter. Heaut. 
3, 2, 34 : Lernaeas pugnet ad hydras, Prop. 
3, 19, 9: neque quo paeto fallam, nee quem 
dolum ad eum aut machrnam commoliar, 
old poet in Cic. N. D. 3. 29, 73: Beigarum 
copias ad se venire vidit, Caes. B. G. 2, 5 ; 7, 
70 : ipse ad hostem vehitur, Nep. Dat. 4, 5 ; 
id. Dion. 5, 4: Romulus ad regem impetus 
facit (a phrase in which in is commonly 
found), Liv. 1, 5. 7, and 44, 3, 10: aliquem 
ad hostem ducere, Tac. A. 2, 52: clipeos ad 
tela protecti obiciunt, Verg. A. 2, 443: mu- 
nio me ad haec tempora, Cic. Fam. 9, 18: 
ad hos omnes casus provisa erant praesi- 
dia, Caes. B. G. 7, 65 ; 7, 41 ; so with nouns : 
medicamentum ad aquam intercutem, Cic. 
Off. 3, 24: remedium ad tertianam, Petr. 
Sat. 18 : munimen ad imbris, Verg. G. 2, 
352: farina cum melle ad tussim siccam 
efficasissima est, Plin. 20, 22, 89, § 243: ad 
muliebre ingenium efficaces preces, Liv. 1, 
9 ; 1, 19 (in these two passages ad may 
have the force of apud, Hand).— (n) The 
repetition of ad to denote the direction to 
a place and to a person present in it is 
rare : nunc tu abi ad forum ad herum, 
Plaut. As. 2, 2, 100; cf. : vocatis classico 
ad concilium militibus ad tribunos, Liv. 5 
47. — (The distinction between ad and in 
is given by Diom. 409 P., thus : in forum 
ire est in ipsum forum intrare ; ad forum 
autem ire, in locum foro proximum ; ut in 
tribunal et ad tribunal venire non unum 
est ; quia ad tribunal venit litigator, in tri- 
bunal vero praetor aut judex; cf. also Sen. 
Ep. 73, 14, deus ad homines venit, immo, 



AD 

quod propius est, in homines venit.) — "fc. 
The terminus, with ref. to the space trav- 
ersed, to, even to, with or without usque, 
Quint. 10, 7, 16 : ingurgitavit usque ad 
imum gutturem, Naev. ap. Non. 207, 20 
(Rib. Com. Rel. p. 30) : dictator pervehitur 
usque ad oppidum, Naev. ap. Varr. L. L. 5, 
§ 153 Mull. (B. Pun. p. 16 ed. Vahl.): via 
pejor ad usque Bah moenia, Hor. S. 1, 5, 96 ; 

1, 1, 97 : rigidum permanat frigus ad ossa, 
Lucr. 1, 355 ; 1, 969 : cum sudor ad imos 
Manaret talos, Hor. S. 1, 9, 10 : ut quan- 
tum posset, agmen ad mare extenderet, 
Curt. 3, 9, 10 : laeva pars ad pectus est 
nuda, id. 6, 5, 27 al. —Hence the Plinian 
expression, petere aliquid (usque) ad ali- 
quem, to seek something everywhere, even 
with one : ut ad Aethiopas usque peteretur, 
Plin. 36, 6, 9, § 51 (where Jan now reads ab 
Aethiopia) ; so, vestis ad Seras peri, id. 
12, 1, 1. — T r o p. : si quid poscam, usque ad 
ravim poscam, Plaut. Aul. 2, 5, 10: dever- 
berasse usque ad necem,Ter. Phorm. 2, 2, 
13 ; without usque : hie ad incitas redactus, 
Plant. Trin. 2, 4, 136 ; 4, 2, 52 ; id. Poen. 4, 

2, 85 ; illud ad incitas cum redit atque in- 
ternecionem, Lucil. ap. Non. 123, 20 : virgis 
ad necem caedi, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 29, § 70 ; so 
Hor. S. 1, 2, 42 ; Liv. 24, 38, 9 ; Tac. A. 11, 
37 ; Suet. Ner. 26 : id. Dom. 8 al. 

3. Nearness or proximity in gen. = 
apud, near to, by, at, close by (in ante- 
class, per. very freq. ; not rare later, esp. 
in the historians) : pendent peniculamen- 
ta unum ad quemque pedum, trains are 
suspended at each foot, Enn. ap. Non. 
149, 33 (Ann. v. 363 ed. Vahl.): ut in 
servitute hie ad suum maneat patrem, 
Plaut. Capt. prol. 49; cf. id. ib. 2, 3, 98; 

3, 5, 41 : sol quasi fiagitator astat usque ad. 
ostium, stands like a creditor continu- 
ally at the door, id. Most. 3, 2, 81 (cf. with 
same force, Att. ap. Non. 522, 25; apud ip- 
sum ^3tas) : ad foris adsistere, Cic. Verr. 1, 
66; id. Arch. 24: astiterunt ad januam, 
Vulg. Act. 10, 17 : non adest ad exercitum, 
Plaut. Am. 1, 3, 6; cf. ib. prol. 133: ade- 
rant ad spectaculum istud, Vulg. Luc. 23, 
48 : has (testas) e fenestris in caput Deici- 
unt, qui prope ad ostium adspiraverunt, 
Lucil. ap. Non. 288, 31 : et nee opinanti 
Mors ad caput adstitit. Lucr. 3, 959 : quod 
Romanis ad manum domi supplementum 
esset, at hand, Liv. 9, 19, 6: haec arma 
habere ad manum, Quint. 12, 5, 1 : domi- 
num esse ad villam, Cic. Sull. 20; so id. 
Verr. 2, 21 : errantem ad flumina, Verg. 
E. 6, 64; Tib. 1, 10, 38; Plin. 7, 2, § 12; 
Vitr. 7,14; 7,12; and ellipt. (cf. supra, 2. 
y): pecunia utinam ad Opis maneret ! Cic. 
Phil. 1, 17.— Even of p e r s o n s : qui pri- 
mum pilum ad Caesareni duxerat (for 
apud), Caes. B. G. 6, 38; so id. ib. 1, 31; 3, 
9; 5, 53; 7, 5; id. B. C. 3, 60: ad inferos 
poenas parricidii luent, among, Cic. Phil. 
14, 13 : neque segnius ad hostes helium 
apparatur, Liv. 7, 7, 4: pugna ad Trebiam, 
ad Trasimenum, ad Cannas, etc., for which 
Liv. also uses the gen. : si Trasimeni quam 
Trebiae, si Cannarum quam Trasimeni 
pugna nobilior esset, 23, 43, 4. — Sometimes 
used to form the name of a place, although 
written separately, e. g. ad Murcim, Varr. 
L. L. 5, 5 154 : villa ad Gallinas, a villa on 
the Flaminian Way, Plin. 15, 30, 40, § 37: 
ad urbem esse (of generals), to remain 
outside the city (Rome) until permission 
was given for a triumph : " Esse ad ur- 
bem dicebantur, qui cum potestate provin- 
cial! aut nuper e provincia revertisseut, aut 
nondum in provinciam profecti essent . . . 
solebant autem, qui ob res in provincia ges- 
tas triumphum peterent, extra urbem ex-- 
spectare, donee, lege lata, triumphantes ur- 
bem introire possent," Manut. ad Cic. Fam. 

3, 8. — So sometimes with names of towns 
and verbs of rest : pons, qui erat ad Gena- 
varn, Caes. B. G. 1, 7: ad Tibur mortem 
patri minatus est, Cic. Phil. 6, 4, 10 : con- 
chas ad Caietam legunt, id. Or. 2, 6: _ad 
forum esse, to be at the market, Plaut. Ps. 

4, 7, 136 ; id. Most. 3, 2, 158 ; cf. Ter. Ph. 4, 
2, 8 ; id. And. 1, 5, 19.— Hence, adverb., ad 
dextram (sc. manum, partem), ad Iaevam,ad 
sinistram, to the right, to the left, or on 
the right, on the left: ad dextram, Att. 
Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 225; Plaut. Poen. 3, 4, 1; 
Ter. Ad. 4, 2, 44; Cic. Univ. 13; Caes. B. 
C. 1, 69 : ad laevam, Enn. Rib. Trag. Rel. 
p. 51 ; Att. ib. p. 217 : ad sinistram, Ter 

27 



AD 

Ad. 4, 2, 43 al. : ad dextram ... ad laevam, 
Liv. 40, 6 ; and with an ordinal number : 
eum plebes ad tertium milliarinm conse- 
disset, at the third milestone, Cic. Brut. 
14, 54, esp. freq. with lapis: sepultus ad 
quinttim lapidem, Nep. Att. 22, 4 ; so Liv. 
3, 69 al. ; Tac. H. 3, IB ; 4, 60 (with apud, 
Ann. 1, 45 ; 3, 45 ; 15, 60) al. ; cf. Rudd. II. 
p. 287. 

B, In time, analogous to the rela- 
tions given in A. 1. Direction toward, 
i. e. approach to a definite point of time, 
about, toward: domum reduetus ad ve- 
sper am, toward, evening, Cic. Lael. 3, 12: 
cum ad liiemem me ex Cilicia recepissem, 
toward winter, id. Fam. 3, 7. — 2. Tne 
limit or boundary to which a space of time 
extends, with and without usque, till, un- 
til, to, even to, up to: ego ad illud frugi 
usque et probus fni, Plaut. Most. 1, 2, 53 : 
philosopbia jacuit usque ad hanc aetatem, 
Cic. Tusc. 1, 3, 5 ; id. de Sen. 14 : quid si 
hie manebo potius ad meridiem, Plaut. 
Most. 3, 1, 55 ; so id. Men. 5, 7, 33 ; id. Ps. 1, 
5, 116; id. As. 2, 1, 5: ad multam noctem, 
Cic. de Sen. 14 : Sophocles ad summam 
senectutem tragoedias fecit, id. ib. 2 ; cf. id. 
Rep. 1, 1: Alexandream se proficisci velle 
dixit (Aratus) remque integram ad reditum 
simm jussit esse, id. Off. 2, 23, 82 : bestiae 
ex se natos amant ad quoddam tempus, id. 
Lael. 8 ; so id. de Sen. 6 ; id. Somn. Sc. 1 al. 
— And with ab or ab-usque, to desig. the 
whole period of time passed away: ab hora 
octava ad vesperum secreto collocuti su- 
mus, Cic. Att. 7, 8 : usque ab aurora ad hoc 
diei, Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 8. — 3. Coincidence 
with a point of time, at, on, in, by : prae- 
sto fu.it ad horam destinatam, at the ap- 
pointed hour, Cic. Tusc. 5, 22: admonuit 
ut pecuniam ad diem solverent, on the day 
of payment, id. Att. 16, 16 A : nostra ad 
diem dictam fient, id. Fam. 16, 10, 4 ; cf. id. 
Verr. % 2, 5 : ad lucem denique arte et gra- 
viter dormitare coepisse, at (not toward) 
daybreak, id. Div. 1, 28, 59 ; so id. Att. 1, 3, 
2; 1, 4, 3; id. Fin. 2, 31, 103; id. Brut. 97, 
313: ad id tempus, Caes. B. C. 1, 24 ; Sail. J. 
70, 5 ; Tac. A. 15, 60 ; Suet. Aug. 87 ; Domit. 
17, 21 al. 

C, The relations of number. 1. 
An approximation to a sum designated, 
near, near to, almost, about, totoard 
(cf. Gr. ewi, 7rp6f with ace. and the Fr. 
pres de, d peu pre's, presque) = circi- 
ter (Hand, Tura. I. p. 102) : ad quadraginta 
earn posse emi minas, Plaut. Ep. 2, 2, 111 : 
nummorum Philippflm ad tria milia, id. 
Trin. 1, 2, 115 ; sometimes with quasi 
added : quasi ad quadraginta minas, as it 
were about, id. Most. 3, 1, 95 ; so Ter. 
Heaut. 1, 1, 93 : sane frequentes fuimus 
omnino ad ducentoa, Cic. Q. Fr. 2, 1 : cum 
annos ad quadraginta natus esset, id. Clu. 
40, 110: ad hominum milia decern, Caea. 
B. G. 1, 4 : oppida numero ad duodecim, 
vicos ad quadringentos, id. ib. 1, 5. — In the 
histt. and post -Aug. authors ad is added 
adverbially in this sense (contrary to Gr. 
usage, by which afifi, Trepi, and €t? with 
numerals retain their power as preposi- 
tions) : ad binuui milium numero utrinque 
sauciis factis, Sisenn. ap. Non. 80, 4: occisia 
ad hominum milibus quattuor, Caes. B. G. 2, 
33: ad duorum milium numero ceciderunt, 
id. B. C. 3, 53 : ad duo milia et trecenti oc- 
cisi, Liv. 10, 17, 8 ; so id. 27, 12, 16 ; Suet. 
Caes. 20 ; cf. Rudd. II, p. 334.-2. The ter- 
minus, the limit, to, unto, even to, a desig- 
nated number (rare): ranam luridam con- 
icere in aquam usque quo ad tertiam par- 
tem decoxeris, Varr. R. R. 1, 2, 26 ; cf. App. 
Herb. 11 : aedem Junonis ad partem dimi- 
diam detegit, even to the half, Liv. 42, 3, 2 : 
miles (viaticum) ad assem p'erdiderat, to a 
farthing, to the last farthing, Hor. Ep. 2, 
2, 27: Plin. Ep. 1, 15: quid ad denarium 
solveretur, Cic. Quint. 4.— The phrase om- 
nes ad unum or ad unum omnes, or simply 
ad unum, means lit. all to one, i. e. all 
together, all without exception; Gr. oI 
na9' eva irtivTe? (therefore the gender of 
nnum ia changed according to that of om- 
nes) : praetor omnes extra castra,ut stercus, 
foras ejecit ad unum, Lucil. ap. Nou. 394, 
22 : de amicitia omnes ad unum idem senti- 
unt, Cic. Lael. 23 : ad unum omnes cum 
ipso duce occisi sunt, Curt. 4, 1,22 al. : naves 
Rhodias afflixit ita, ut ad unam omnes con- 
stratae eliderentur, Caes. B. C. 3, 27 ; onera- 

28 



AD 

riae omnes ad unam a nobis sunt exceptae, 
Cic. Fam. 12, 14 ( cf. in Gr. oi na8' Zva ; in 
Hebr. ^n&<-^5? Dfi3 ^NIBS"^, Exod. 

14,28). — Ad unum without omnes: ego 
earn sententiam dixi, cui sunt assensi ad 
uuuui, Cic. Fam. 10, 16: Juppiter omnipo- 
tens si nondum exosua ad unum Trojanos, 
Verg. A. 5, 687. 

D, In the manifold relations of one ob- 
ject to another. 1. That in respect of or 
in regard to which a thing avails, happens, 
or is true or important, icith regard to, 
in respect of, in relation to, as to, to, in. 
a. With verbs : ad omnia alia aetate sapi- 
mus rectius, in respect to all other things 
we grow wiser by age, Ter. Ad. 5, 3, 45: 
numquam ita quisquam bene ad vitam 
fuat, id. ib. 5, 4, 1 : nil ibi libatum de toto 
corpore (mortui) cernas ad speciem, nil ad 
pondua, that nothing is lost in form or 
weight, Lucr. 3, 214; cf. id. 5, 570; Cic. 
Verr. 2, 1, 21, § 58 ; id. Mur. 13, 29 : illi 
regi Cyro subest, ad immutandi animi 
licentiaui, crudelissimus ille Phalaris, in 
that Cyrus, in regard to the liberty of 
changing his disposition ( i. e. not in 
reality, but inasmuch as he is at liberty to 
lay aside his good character, and assume 
that of a tyrant), there is concealed an- 
other cruel Phalaris, Cic. Rep. 1, 28 : nil 
est ad nos, is nothing to us, concerns us 
not, Lucr. 3, 830 ; 3, 845 : nil ad me attinet, 
Ter. Ad. 1, 2, 54 : nihil ad rem pertiuet, Cic. 
Caecin. 58; and in the same sense elliptic- 
ally: nihil ad Epicurum, id. Fin. 1, 2, 5 ; id. 
Pis. 68: Quid ad praetorem? id. Verr. 1, 
116 (this usage is not to be confounded 
with that under 4.). — b. With adjectives : 
ad has res perspicax, Ter. Heaut. 2, 3, 
129: virum ad cetera egregium, Liv. 37, 
7, 15 : auxiliaribus ad pugnam non multum 
Crassus confidebat, Caes. B. G. 3, 25: ejus 
frater aliquantum ad rem est avidior, Ter. 
Eun. 1, 2, 51; cf. id. And. 1, 2, 21; id. 
Heaut. 2, 3, 129 : ut sit potior, qui prior ad 
dandum est, id. Phorm. 3, 2, 48: difficilis 
(res) ad credendum, Lucr. 2, 1027 : ad ra- 
tionem sollertiamque praestantior, Cic. N. 
D. 2, 62; so id. Leg. 2, 13, 33 ; id. Fin. 2, 
20, 63 ; id. Rose. Am. 30, 85 ; id. Font. 15 ; 
id. Cat. 1, 5, 12 ; id. de Or. 1, 25, 113 ; 1, 32, 
146 ; 2, 49, 200 ; id. Fam. 3, 1, 1 ; Liv. 9, 16, 
13 ; Tac. A. 12, 54 al.— c. With nouns : pri- 
us quam tuum, ut sese habeat, animum ad 
nuptias perspexerit, before he knew your 
feeling in regard to the marriage, Ter. 
And. 2, 3, 4 (cf. Gr. ottw? e% ei Tl ? w P o c 
tO : mentis ad omnia caecitas, Cic. Tusc. 3, 
5, 11 : magua vis est fortunae in utramque 
partem vel ad secundas res vel ad adver- 
sas, id. Off. 2, 6 ; so id. Par. 1 : ad cetera 
paene gemelli, Hor. Ep. 1, 10, 3. — So with 
ace. of gerund instead of the gen. from the 
same vb. : facultas ad scribendum, instead 
of scribendi, Cic. Font. 6 ; facultas ad agen- 
dum, id. de Imp. Pomp. 1, 2 : cf. Rudd. II. 
p. 245. — d. I n gramm. : nomina ad ali- 
quid dicta, nouns used in relation to 
something, i. e. which derive their sig- 
nificance from their relation to another 
object: quae non possunt intellegi sola, ut 
pater, mater; jungunt enim sibi et ilia 
propter quae intelleguntur, Charis. 129 P. ; 
cf. ^risc 580 ib.— 2. With words denoting 
measure, weight, manner, model, rule, etc., 
both prop, and fig., according to, agreea- 
bly to, after (Gr. «ar«, irpos) : columnas ad 
perpendiculum exigere, Cic. Mur. 77 : taleis 
ferreis ad certum pnndus examinatis, Caes. 
B. G 5, 12 : facta sunt ad certain formam, 
Lucr. 2, 379 : ad amussim non est numerus, 
Varr. 2, 1, 26: ad imaginem facere, Vulg. 
Gen. 1, 26 : ad cursus lunae describit an- 
num, Liv. 1, 19: omnia ad diem facta sunt, 
Caes. B. G. 2, 5 : Id ad similitudinem panis 
efficiebant, id. B. C. 3, 48 ; Vulg. Gen. 1, 
26; id. Jac. 3, 9: ad aequos nexus, at 
equal angles, Lucr. 4, 323 : quasi ad tor- 
num levantur, to or by the lathe, id. 4, 
361 : turres ad altitudinem valli, Caes. 
B. G. 5, 42 ; Liv. 39, 6 : ad eandem cras- 
situdinem structi, id. 44, 11 : ad speci- 
em cancellorum scemcorum, with the ap- 
pearance of, like, Varr. R. R. 3, 5, 8 : 
stagnum maris instar, circumseptum aedi- 
ficiis ad urbium speciem, Suet. Ner. 31 : 
lascivum pecus ludens ad cantum, Liv. 
Andron. Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 1: canere ad 
tibiam, Cic. Tusc. 4, 2 : canere ad tibici- 



AD 

nem, id. ib. 1, 2 (cf. : in numerum ludere, 
Verg. E. 6, 28 ; id. G. 4, 175) : quod ad Ari- 
stophanis lucernam lucubravi, Varr. L. L. 
5> § 9 Mull. : carmen castigare ad unguem, 
to perfection (v. unguis), Hor. A. P. 294: 
ad unguem factus homo, a perfect gentle- 
man, id. S. 1, 5, 32 (cf. id. ib. 2, 7, 86) : ad 
istorum normam sapientes, Cic. Lael. 5, 18; 
id. Mur. 3: Cyrus non ad historiae fidem 
scriptus, sed ad efflgiem justi imperii, id. Q. 
Fr. 1, 1, 8 : exercemur in venando ad simili- 
tudinem bellicae disciplinae, id. N. D. 2, 64, 
161 ; so, ad simulacrum, Liv. 40, 6 : ad Pu- 
nica ingenia, id. 21, 22: ad L. Crassi elo- 
quentiam, Cic. Var. Fragm. 8 : omnia fient 
ad verum, Juv. 6, 324: quid aut ad naturam 
aut contra sit, Cic. Fin. 1, 9, 30: ad hunc 
modum institutus est, id. Tusc. 2, 3; Caes. 

B. G. 2, 31; 3, 13: ad eundem istunc mo- 
dum, Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 70 : quem ad modum, 
q. v. : ad istam faciem est morbus, qui me 
macerat, of that kind, Plaut. Cist. 1, 1, 73 ; 
id. Merc. 2, 3, 90 ; cf. 91 : cujus ad arbitri- 
um copia material cogitur, Lucr. 2, 281 : ad 
eorum arbitrium et nutum totos se nngunt, 
to their will and pleasure, Cic. Or. 8, 24 ; 
id. Quint. 71 : ad P. Lentuli auctoritatem 
Rom& contendit, id. Rab. Post. 21 : aliae 
sunt legati partes, aliae imperatoris : alter 
omnia agere ad praescriptum, alter libere ad 
summam rerum consulere debet, Caes. B.C. 
3, 51 : rebus ad voluntatem nostram fluenti- 
bus, Cic. Off. 1, 26 : rem ad illorum libidinem 
judiearunt, id. Font. 36: ad vulgi opinio- 
nem, id. Off. 3, 21. — So in later Lat. with 
instar: ad instar castrorum, Just. 36, 3, 
2 : scoparum, App. M. 9, p. 232 : speculi, 
id. ib. 2, p. 118: ad hoc instar munch, id. 
de Mundo, p. 72. — Sometimes, but very 
rarely, ad is used absol. in this sense (so 
also very rarely /card with ace., Xen. Hell. 

2, 3; Luc. Dial. Deor. 8): convertier ad 
nos, as we (are turned), Lucr. 4, 317 : ad 
navis feratur, like ships, id. 4, 897 Monro. 
— With noun: ad specus angustiae valli- 
um, like caves, Caes. B. C. 3, 49.— Hence, 

3. With an object which is the cause or 
reason, in conformity to which, from ^\hich, 
or for which, any thing is or is done. a. 
The moving cause, according to, at, on, in 
consequence of: cetera pars animae paret 
et ad numen mentis momenque movetur, 
Lucr. 3, 144: ad horum preces in Boeotiam 
duxit, on their entreaty, Liv. 42, 67, 12 : ad 
ea Caesar veniam ipsique et conjugi et fra- 
tribus tribuit, in consequence of or upon 
this, he, etc., Tac. Ann. 12, 37.— jj. The final 
cause, or the object, end, or aim, for the at- 
tainment of which anything, (a) is done, (/3) 
is designed, or, (7) is fitted or adapted (very 
freq.), to, for, in order to. (a) Seque ad 
lndos jam inde abhinc exerceant, Pac. ap. 
Charis. p. 175 P. (Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 80) : veui- 
mus coctum ad nuptias, in order to cook for 
the wedding, Plaut. Aul. 3, 2, 15 : omnis ad 
perniciem instructa domus, id. Bacch. 3, 1, 
6; cf. Ter. Heaut. 3, 1, 41 ; Liv. 1, 54: cum 
fingis falsas causae ad discordiam, in order 
to produce dissension, Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 71 : 
quantam fenestram ad nequitiam patefece- 
ris, id. Heaut. 3, 1,72: utrum ille, qui postu- 
lat legatum ad tanttim bellum, quem velit, 
idoneus nou est, qui impetret, cum ceteri ad 
expilandos socios diripiendasque provincias, 
quos voluerunt, legatos eduxerint, Cic. de 
Imp. Pomp. 19,57: ego vitam quoad putabo 
tua interesse,aut ad spem servandam esse, 
retinebo, for hape, id. Q. Fr. 1, 4 ; id. 
Fam. 5, 17 : haec juventutem,ubifamiliares 
opes defecerant, ad facinora incendebant, 
Sail. C. 13, 4: ad apeciem atque ad usurpa- 
tionem vetustatis, Cic. Agr. 2, 12, 31 ; Suet. 
Caes. 67: paucis ad apeciem tabernaculis 
relictis, for appearance, Caes. B. C. 2, 35 ; 
so id. ib. 2, 41; id. B. G. 1, 51.— (/3) Aut 
equos alere aut canes ad venanduui, Ter. 
And. 1, 1, 30: ingenio egregie ad mise- 
riam natus sum, id. Heaut. 3, 1, 11 ; (in 
the same sense: in rem, Hor. C. 1, 27, 1, 
and the dat., Ter. Ad. 4, 2, 6) : ad cursum 
equum, ad arandum bovem, ad indagan- 
dum canem, Cic. Fin. 2, 13, 40 : ad frena 
leones, Verg. A. 10, 253 : delecto ad naves 
milite, marines, Liv. 22, 19 Weissenb. : 
servos ad remum, rowers, id. 34, 6 ; and : 
servos ad militiam emendos, id. 22, 61, 
2: comparasti ad lecticam homines, Cat. 
10, 16 : Lygdamus ad cyathos, Prop. 4, 8, 
37 ; cf. : puer ad cyathum statuetur, Hor. 

C. 1, 29, 8. — (7) Quae oportet Signa esse 



AD 

ad salutem, omnia huic esse video, every- 
thing indicative of prosperity I see in 
him, Ter. And. 3, 2, 2: haec sunt ad virtu- 
tem omnfci, id. Heaut. 1, 2, 33 : causa ad ob- 
jurgandum, id. And. 1, 1, 123 : argumen- 
tum ad scribendum, Cic. Att. 9, 7 (in both 
examples instead of the gen, of gerund., cf. 
Rudd. II. p. 245) : vinum murteum est ad al- 
vum crudam, Cato E. E. 125 : nulla res tan- 
tum ad dicendum proficit, quantum scriptio, 
Cic. Brut. 24: reliquis rebus, quae sunt ad 
incendia, Caes. B. C. 3, 101 al.— So with the 
adjectives idoneus, utilis, aptus, instead of 
the dat. : homines ad hanc rem idoneos, 
Plaut. Poen.3, 2, 6: calcei habiles et apti 
ad pedem,Cic. de Or. 1,54, 231: orator aptus 
tamen ad dicendum, id. Tusc. 1,3, 5 : sus 
est ad vescendum hominibus apta, id. N. D. 
2, 64, 160 : homo ad nullam rem utilis, id. 
Off. 3, 6: ad segetes ingeniosus ager, Ov. 
F. 4, 684. — (Upon the connection of ad 
with the gerund, v. Zumpt, § 666; Rudd. II. 
p. 261.) — 4. Comparison (since that with 
which a thing is compared is considered as 
an object to which the thing compared is 
brought near for the sake of comparison), 
to, compared to or with, in comparison 
with: ad sapientiam hujus ille (Thales) 
nimius nugator fuit, Plaut. Capt. 2,2, 25 ; id. 
Trin. 3. 2, 100 : ue comparandus hie quidem 
ad illuin'st, Ter. Eun. 4, 4, 14 ; 2, 3, 69: terra 
ad universi caeli complexum, compared 
with the ichole extent of the heavens, Cic. 
Tusc. 1, 17, 40: homini non ad cetera Pu- 
nica ingenia callido, Liv. 22, 22, 15 : at nihil 
ad nostram hanc, nothing in comparison 
with, Ter, Eun. 2, 3, 70 ; so Cic. Deiot. 8, 
24; and id. de Or. 2, 6, 25. 

£S. Adverbial phrases with ad. 1. Ad 
omnia, withal, to crown all: ingentem 
vim peditum equitumque venire : ex India 
elephantos : ad omnia tantum advehi auri, 
etc., Liv. 35, 32, 4.-2. Ad hoc and ad haec 
(in the historians, esp. from the time of Livy, 
and in authors after the Aug. per.), = prae- 
terea, insuper, moreover, besides, in ad- 
dition, hni toutoj? : nam quicumque impu- 
diens, adulter, ganeo, etc. : praeterea omnes 
undique parricidae, etc. : ad hoc, quos ma- 
nus at<iue lingua perjurio aut sanguine civili 
alebat : postremo omnes, quos, etc., Sail. C. 
14, 2 and 3 : his opinionibus inflate animo, 
ad hoc vitio quoque ingenii vehemens, Liv. 
6,11,6; 42,1,1; Tac.H.1,6; Suet. Aug. 
22 al. — 3. Ad id quod, beside that (very 
rare) : ad id quod sua sponte satis conlectum 
animorum erat, inclignitate etiam Romani 
aoceiulcl)antur,Liv.3, 62,1 : so 44,37,12.-4. 
Ad tempus. a. At a definite, fixed, time, 
Cic. Att. 13, 45 ; Liv. 38, 25, 3.— 'b. At a Jit, 
appropriate time, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 54, § 141 ; 
Liv. 1,7,13.— c. For some time, for a short 
ftrne, Cic. Off. 1, 8, 27 ; id. Lael. 15, 53 ; Liv. 
21,25,14.— d. According to circumstan- 
ces, Cic. Plane. 30,7 '4; id. Cael. 6, 13 ; Plane, 
ap. Cic. Fam. 10,9.-5. Ad praeseus (for the 
most part only in post- Aug. writers), a. 
For the moment, for a short time, Cic. 
Fam. 12, 8 ; Plin. %', 22, 34 ; Tac A. 4, 21.— 
b. At present, now,T&c. A. 16, 5 ; id.H. 1, 
44. — So, ad praesentiam,Tac. A. 11, 8. — 6. 
Ad locum, on the spot: ut ad locum miles 
esset paratus,Liv.27,27,2.— 7. Ad verbum, 
word for word, literally, Cic. Fin. 1, 2, 4 ; 
id. de Or. 1, 34, 157 ; id. Ac. 2, 44, 135 al.— 
8. Ad summam. a. On the ichole, gener- 
ally,^ ^ewem^, Cic. Fam. 14, 14,3 ; id. Att. 
14, 1 ; Suet. Aug. 71. — b. In a word, in 
short, Cic. Off. 1, 41, 149 ; Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 106. 
— 9. Ad extremum,ad ultimum, ad postre- 
mum. a. At the end, finally, at last, (a) 
Of place, at the extremity, extreme point, 
top, etc. : missile tehnn hastili abiegno et ce- 
tera tereti, praeterquam ad extremum,unde 
ferrum exstabat, Liv. 21, 8,10.— (/3) Of time 
=Tf'Aor (5e, at last, finally : ibi n& postre- 
muin eedit miles, Plaut. Aul. 3, 5, 52 ; so id. 
Poen. 4, 2, 22 ; Cic. Off. 3, 23, 89 ; id. Phil. 13, 
20,45; Caes.B.G.7,53; Liv. 30, 15, 4 al.— 
Hence, (7) of order, finally, lastly, = &em- 
que : inventa componere ; turn ornare ora- 
tione ; post memoria sepire ; ad extremum 
agere cum dignitate, Cic. de Or. 1, 31, 142. — 
b. In Liv., to the last degree, quite : im- 
probus homo, sed non ad extremum perdi- 
tus, 23, 2, 3 ; cf . : consilii scelerati, sed non 
ad ultimum dementis, id. 28, 28, 8. — 10. 
Quern ad finem? To what limit? Hoio 
far f Cic. Cat. 1, 1 ; id. Verr. 5, 75.— H, 
Quem ad modum, v. sub h. v. 



ADAE 

l£2T 8U Ad (v. ab, ex, in, ete.) is not re- 
peated like some other prepositions with 
interrog. and relative pronouns, after nouns 
or demonstrative pronouns : traducis cogi- 
tationes meas ad voluptates. Quas ? corpo- 
ris credo, Cic. Tusc. 3, 17, 37 (ubi v. Run- 
ner).— "b. Ad is sometimes placed after its 
substantive : quam ad, Ter. Phorm. 3, 2, 39 : 
senatus, quos ad soleret, referendum cen- 
suit, Cic. N. D. 2, 4: ripam ad Araxis,Tac. 
Ann. 12, 51; or between subs t. and adj.: 
augendam ad invidiam, id. ib. 12, 8. — c. 
The compound adque for et ad (like exque, 
eque, and, poet., aque) is denied by Moser, 
Cic. Rep. 2, 15, p. 248, and he reads instead 
of ad humanitatem adque mansuetudinem 
of the MSS., hum. atque mans. But 
adque, in ace. with later usage, is restored 
by Hand in App. M. 10, p. 247, adque haec 
omnia oboediebam for atque ; and in Plaut. 
Capt. 2, 3, 9, utroque vorsum rectum'st in- 
genium meum, ad se adque ilium, is now 
read, ad te atque ad ilium (Fleck., Brix). 

II. In composition. A. Form. 
According to the usual orthography, the d 
of the ad remains unchanged before vow- 
els, and before b, d, h, m, v: adbibo, ad- 
duco, adhibeo, admoveo, advenio ; it is 
assimilated to c, f, g, I, n,p, r, s, t: acci- 
pio, afflgo, aggero, allabor, annumero, ap- 
pello, arripio, assumo, attineo ; before g 
and s it sometimes disappears : agnosco, 
aspicio, asto ; and before qu it passes into 
c: acquiro, acquiesco. — But later philolo- 
gists, supported by old inscriptions and 
good MSS., have mostly adopted the fol- 
lowing forms : ad before j, h, b, d, f,m,n, 
q, v ; ac before c, sometimes, but less well, 
before q ; ag and also ad before g ; a be- 
fore gn, sp, sc, st; ad and also at before 
I; ad rather than an before n; ap and 
sometimes ad before p; ad and also ar 
before r; ad and also as before s; at and 
sometimes ad before t. In this work the 
old orthography has commonly been re- 
tained for the sake of convenient reference, 
but the better form in any case is indi- 
cated.— B. Sign if. In English up often 
denotes approach, and in many instances 
will give the force of ad as a prefix both in 
its local and in its figurative sense. 1. 
Local, a. To, toward : affero, accurro, 
accipio {to one's self). — b. At, by: astare, 
adesse. — c. On, upon, against: accumbo, 
attero.— i Up (cf. de- = down, as in dei- 
cio, decido) : attollo, ascendo, adsurgo. — 2. 
Fig. a. To : adjudico, adsentior. — b. At 
or on : admiror, adludo. — c. Denoting con- 
formity to, or comparison with : affigu- 
ro, adaequo. — d. Denoting addition, in- 
crease (cf. ab, de, and ex- as prefixes to de- 
note privation): addoceo, adposco. — e. 
Hence, denoting intensity: adamo, adim- 
pleo, aduro, and perhaps agnosco. — £ De- 
noting the coming to an act or state, and 
hence commencement: addubito, addor- 
mio, adquiesco, adlubesco, advesperascit. 
See more upon this word in Hand, Turs. I. 
pp. 74-134. 

adactlO, onis,/ [adigo], a forcing or 
bringing to : ad legitimam juris jurandi ad- 
actionem, to th e taking of an oath, Liv. 22, 
38, where just before we find : milites jure- 
jurando adacti. 

1. adactUS, a, um, Part, of adigo. 

* 2. adactUS, us, m. [adigo], a forc- 
ing or bringing to or together. — Hence, 
poet., of the teeth, a biting, a bite: den- 
tis adactus, Lucr. 5, 1330. 

Adad or AdadUS, i, ™-, name of the 
supreme god of the Assyrians, Macr. Sat. 
1,32. 

t adaduneph r os = 'amsov ve<pp6$ 

(Adad's kidnev), i, m. [Adad], a certain 
precious stone, Plin. 37, 11, 71, § 186. 

adaequatlO.onis,/. [adaequo], a mak- 
ing equal, an adjusting, adapting, Tert. 
ad Nat. 1,1 ; Sol. 1, where more correctly 
peraequatio. 

ad-aeque, adv., in like manner as, 
equally, so (most, ante- and post-class. ; not 
in Cic. ; and in Plautus always with the neg- 
atives nemo,numquam,neque,millus,etc., by 
means of which the clause acquires a corn- 
par, signif. ; hence, sometimes a compar. 
abl., and even a pleonastic compar., is al- 
lowed) : numquam, ecastor, ullo die risi ad- 
aeque, Plaut. Cas. 5, 1, 3 : neque munda ad- 



A'DAL 

aeque es, ut soles, id. Cist. 1, 1, 57 ; so id. Cas.. 
3, 5, 45 ; id. Capt. 5, 4, 2 ; id. Mil. Gl. 3, 1,180 r 
quo nemo adaeque antehac est habitus par- 
ous, id. Most. 1, 1, 29 : qui nomine hominum 
adaeque nemo vivit fortunatior, id. Capt. 4, 
2, 48 : ut quem ad modum in tribunis consu- 
lari potestate creandis usi sunt, adaeque in: 
quaestoribus liberum esset arbitrium popu- 
li, Liv. 4, 43, 5 Weissenb., Hertz, (but Madv. 
here reads adaequari) : alii, quos adaeque 
latrones arbitrable, App. 4, p. 145 fin. ; so 
id. ib. 8, p. 216; 10, p. 238; Cod. Th. 8, 18, 4. 
ad-acqUO, av i> atum, 1, v. a. and n. \, 
Act. A. To make equal to, to equalise* 
to level with ; hence, a. In Cic. usually with 
cum ( cf. aequare cum.Verg. A. 1, 193 ) : qui 
cum virtute fortunam adaequavit,Cic. Arch, 
10, 24 : quae . . . admonet, commemoratio- 
nem nominis nostri, cum omni posteritate 
adaequandam, id. ib. 11, 29 : in summa ami- 
corum copia cum familiarissimis ejus est ad- 
aequatus (i.e. par habitus), id. Balb. 28,63. — 
b. In the histt. alicui rei ( cf. : aequo and 
aequiparo) : molibus ferme ( oppidi ) moeni- 
bus adaequatis, on a level with, Caes. B. G. 
3, 12 : omnia tecta solo adaequare, to level 
with the ground ,\Av .1, 29 : quibus duobus 
operibus vix nova haec magnificentia quid- 
quam adaequare potuit, id. ib. 50 ; and with 
solo understood : Alesiam flammis adaequa- 
re, Flor. 3, 10, 23 : cum Claudius liberto& 
sibique et legibus adaequaverit, Tac. A. 12, 
60 : colonias jure et dignatione urbi . . . 
adaequavit, Suet. Aug. 46 ; so Dom. 2.-2. 
Trop., to compare to or with: qui for- 
mam, aetatem, genus mortis magni Alex- 
andri fatis adaequarent, Tac. Ann. 2,73.— 
B. To attain to, or reach, by equalling. 
—With ace. (cf. : aequo and aequiparo) : ne 
quid absit quod deorum vitam possit adae- 
quare, Cic. Univ. 11: longarum navium cur- 
sum adaequaverunt, Caes. B. G. 5, 8 : ut 
muri altitudinem acervi armorum adaequa- 
rent, id. ib. 2, 32 ; cf. id. B. C. 2,16, and Sail. 
J. 4. 

II, Neut., to be equal, a. Absol. : se- 
natorum urna copiose absolvit, equitum 
adaequavit, the votes of the equites were 
equally divided, there was an equal num- 
ber for acquitting and for condemning, Cic. 
Q. Fr. 2, 6, 6.— b. With dat. : turris quae 
moenibus adaequaret, Auct. B. G. 8,41: se 
virtute nostris adaequare non posse intelle- 
gunt, Caes. B. C. 2, 16 Dinter, where some 
read nostros : adaequare apud Caesarem 
gratia, sc. Aeduis, id. B. G. 6, 12. 

adaeratlOj6nis,/.[adaero], a valuing^ 
appraising, Cod. Th. 11, 20, 6 ; 11, 38, 13 ; 
7, 4, 32. 

ad-aero, avi, atum, 1, v. a. [aes], to esti- 
mate by money, to rate, appraise, value : 
in adaerandis reliquorum debitis non mo- 
lestus, Amm. 31, 14 : ita ut nihil adaeretur, 
i. e. ita ut nihil in pecunia praestetur, Ep. 
Imp. Valeriani ap. Trebell. Claud. 14. 

* ad-aestUO. ^re, v. n., to rush, to roar 
(with the idea of boiling up) : adaestuat 
amnis, Stat. Th. 5, 517. 

ad-agnrero, &vi, atum, l,v. a. (a double 
ad, as in adalligo), to heap up : cum ver ad- 
petet, terrain adaggerato bene, Cato, R. R. 94; 
so, terram circa arborem,Col. 5, 11, 8 : terra 
Nilo adaggerata, brought down or depos- 
ited by the Nile, Plin. 13, 11, 21, § 69 : ni- 
tro et sale adaggeratis, id. 36, 12, 17, § 81. 

adagio, onis, /. , a rare form for adagi- 
um : Li adagione: proverbio," Gloss. Pla- 
cid., Mai ; Auct. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, 5 31 
Mull. ; Aus. Monos. praef. 

adagium, i, n - [prob. ad and aio, but 
ace. to Paul, ex Fest p. 12 Miill., •' ad agen- 
dum apta," applicable to life, suitable for 
use], a proverb, an adage: vetus adagium 
est, Nihil cum fidibus graculo, Gell. 1, praef. 
ad-aglritio, onis, /. [double ad, as in 
adaggero and adalligo], knowledge: Dei 
ignoti adagnitionem intentare, Tert. adv. 
Marc. 4, 28. 

ad-algidus, a > um > aa ^j- [ad,*wfe«s.]» 
very cold, chilly ; of climate : adalgidum 
maxime, Fronto, Ep. ad M. Caes. 2, 9, p. 54 
Mai ; in Naev. ap. Cic. Or. 45, 152, Clussman 
would read adalgidmn for atque algidum 
(B.and K.). 

ad-alllgO, are, 1, v. a. (double ad, as in 
adaggero), to bind to, to fasten to, to at- 
tach: uncum (ad arborem), Plin. 17, 23, 35„ 
29 



A DAP 

3 211: radices, id. 20, 21, 84, § 225 : vermicu- 
los bracehio, id. 27, 10, 62, § 89. 

Kdsaa,^d6ol.m„ Charis. 94 P., or gen. 
Adae, also AdamilS, i, c 7¥' Adam ( A 
common in quantity, cf. Prud. Apoth. 759 
and 1078, with Aus. Idyll. 1, 14). 

adamanteilS, a, urn, adj. [adamas], 
of hard steel, iron, etc., or hard as these : 
catenae, adamantine, Manil. 1, 921 : nares 
(taurorum), Ov. M. 7, 104. 

t adamantinus, a, um, adj., = ud a - 
navTivo?, hard as steel, etc., adamantine : 
saxa, Lucr. 2, 447 : duritia, Plin. 37, 11, 73. 
— Hence poet., extremely hard, inflexi- 
ble, invincible : clavi, Hor. C. 3, 24, 5 : tu- 
nica, id. ih. 1, 6, 13 : juga, Prop. 3, 9, 9 ; cf. 
aenus. 

adamantis,*dis,/.,a certain magic 
herb, which cannot be bruised or crushed 
[u-5aM«a>], Plin. 24, 17, 102, § 162 : App. 
Herb. 4. 

t adamas, antis, m. (ace. Gr. adaman- 
ta, adamantas), = udd/jias (invincible), 
adamant, the hardest iron or steel; hence 
p o e t., for a)iy thing inflexible, firm, last- 
ing, etc. (first used by Verg.) : porta ad versa 
ingens solidoque adamante columnae,Verg. 
A. 6, 552 ; cf. Mart. 5, 11 • adamante texto 
vincire, with adamantine chains, Sen. 
Here. F. 807.— Prop, of character, 
hard, unyielding, inexorable: nee rigi- 
•dos silices solid umve in pectore ferrum aiit 
adamanta gerit, a heart of stone, Ov. M. 9, 
615 : lacrimis adamanta niovebis, will move 
<x heart of stone, id. A. A. 1, 659 ; so id. Tr. 

", 45 : voce tna posses adamanta movere, 



ADDA 

nem adapertae, open to, ready to hear, 
Curt. 9, 7, 24. 



Mart. 7, 99 : duro nee enim ex adamante 
creati, Sed tua turba sumus, Stat. S. 1, 2, 69. 
— II. The diamond: adamanta infragilem 
onini cetera vi sanguine hircino rumpente 
Plin. 20, prooem. 1 ; 37, 4, 15, § 55 sq. 

ad-amatory oris, m., a lover, Tert. 
Hab. Mul. 2.— In the Gloss. Graec. a transl. 

Of epO)T£K09. 

ad-ambulo, Sre, 1, v. n., to walk 
about, at, or near a thing (rare; used 
only before and after the class, per.) : ad 
ostium, Plaut. Bacch. 4, 5, 8. — Also with 
dat. : seni, App. M. 11, p. 261 ; so lateri, 3, 

Adamiani, orum, m. , certain heretics 
who imitated the nakedness of Adam be- 
fore the fall, Isid. Or. 8, 5, 14. ' 

ad-amo, avi, atum, 1, v. a. [ad, intens.1, 
to love truly, earnestly, deeply (in the 
whole class, per. mostly— in Cic. always- 
used only in the perf and pluperf ; first in 
Col. 10, 199, and Quint. 2, 5, 22, in the pres.) : 
nihil erat cujusquam, quod quidem ille ada- 
masset, quod non hoc anno suum fore pu- 
taret, Cic. Mil. 32, 87 ; cf. id. Verr. 2, 2, 34 ; 
2, 4, 45 : sententiam, id. Ac. 2, 3, 9 : 'Antis- 
thenes patientiam et duritiam in Socratico 
•sermone maxime adamarat, id. de Or. 3, 17, 
62 ; cf. ib. 19, 71 : laudum gloriam, id. Fam! 
2, 4 fin. ; cf. id. Place. 11 : quern (Platonem) 
Dion admiratus est atque adamavit, Kep. 
Dion, 2, 3 : agros et cultus et copias Gallo- 
rum, Caes. B. G. 1, 31 : Achilleos equos, Ov. 
Tr. 3, 4, 28: villas, Plin. Ep. 3, 7: si virtu- 
tem adamaveris, amare enim parum est 
{am are, as the merely instinctive love of 
goodness, in contrast with the acquired love 
of the philosophers, Doederl.), Sen. Ep. 71, 
6-— II. Of unlawful love, Ov. A. A. 2, 109 ; 
Suet. Vesp. 22 : Plin. 8, 42, 64, 8 155 ; id 36 
5, 4, § 23 ; Petr. S. 110 al. ' 

adampliatUS, a, um, P. a., from ad- 
amplio. 

ad-ampllO, are, 1, v. a. [ad, den. in- 
crease], to widen, to enlarge, to increase : 
adampliemus pondus, Vulg. Ital. Amos, 8, 5, 
where St. Jerome has augeamns: aedicu- 
lam vetustate corruptam adanipliavit, Inscr 
Grnt. 128, 5 ; 884, 8. 

ad-amussim, adv., v. amussis. 

ad-apcrio, ui, ertum, 4, v. a. [ad, in- 
tens.-], to open fully, to open, throw open 
<notin Cic.) : adorti adapertas fores portae 
Liv. 25, 30, 10 Drak. (cf. aperire forts Ter' 
Ad. 2, 1, VS) ; so Suet. Ner. 12 ; Curt 9 7 
24;Ov.Am. 1,5,3; 3, 12,12.— H.Transf.^ 
to uncover, to bare: caput, Se'n. Ep. 64; 
Val. Max. 5, 2, 9 : caelum, to make visible 
Plin. 2,47,48, § 130: adaperta fides, mani- 
fest, Stat. Th. 1, 396 : aures ad criminatio- 

30 



adapertllis, e, adj. [adaperio], that 
may be opened : latus hoc adapertile tauri, 
Ov/fr. 3, 11,46. 

adapertio. onis, /. [id.], an uncover- 
ing; hence, fig., a revealing, disclosure 
(late Lat.) : legis, August. Quaest. 83, 61. 

adapertus, a, um, Part, of adaperio. 

adaptatUS, a, um, P. a. of adapto. 

ad-apto, avi, atum, 1, v. a., to fit, ad- 
just, or adapt to a thing ; with dat. only 
in part. pass. : galericulo capiti adaptato et 
aimexo, Suet. Oth. 12; id. Claud. 33. 

ad-aqUO, avi, atum, 1, v. a. [aqua], to 
bring water to, to give to drink (post- 
Aug.), Vulg. Gen. 24, 46 ; 29, 10.— Of plants: 
amygdalas, Plin. 17, 10, 11, § 64 : vites, Pall. 
3, 33. — * In pass. : adaquari (different from 
the foil.), to be brought to drink : jumen- 
tum,Suet. Galb. 7. 

ad-aquor, atus, 1, v. dep., to bring or 
procure water for one's self, to fetch 
water : nee sine periculo possent adaquari 
oppidani, Auct. B. G. 8, 41, where Dinter 
gives [ad~\aquari ; v. aquor. 

t adarca, ae, and adarce, es, /., = 
abapun, ddcipKn?, a froth or efflorescence 
deposited on sedge,etc, forming a spongy 
growth, also called calamochnus ; form ad- 
arca, Plin. 32, 10, 52, § 140 ; id. 16, 36, 66, 
§ 167 ; 20, 22, 88, § 241 : form adarce, Veg. 
3, 48/2 ; 4, 28, 15 ; Cael. Aur. Tard. 1, 1. 

* ad -are SCO, rui, 3, v. inch, [ad, in- 
tense, to dry up : ubi amurca adaruerit, 
vestimenta condito, Cato, R. R. 98. 

adariariUS, a, um, adj. [ad-ara], serv- 
ing at the altar: magister adariarivs, 
Burton, Inscr. p. 587. 

ad-aro, iire, 1, v. a. [ad, intens.], to 
plough carefully : in an interpolation in 
Plin. 23, 1, § 2. 

t adasia ovis vetula recentis partus, 
Paul, ex Pest. p. 12 Mull. ; Gloss. Mai Clas. 
Auct. viii. p. 52. 

ad-aiicto, iire, 1, v. freq. [adaugeo], to 
augment much : rem sunmiam et patriam 
nostram, Att ap. Non. 75, 3 (Rib. Trag. Rel. 
p. 283). 

ad-auctor, oris, m., an augmenter, 
Tert. de Anim. 2, where better auctor, 

1. adauctus, a.um.Pflw*. of adaugeo. 

2. adauCtUS, us, m. [adaugeo], an 
increasin g, increase, growth : quaecunque 
vides hilaro grandescere adauctu, Lucr. 2, 
1122 : lunae (opp. defectio), Sol. 23/«.. 

ad-augeo, xi. ctum, 2, v. a., to make 
greater by adding to, to increase, aug- 
ment. I. In gen. : timet, ne tua duritia 
adaucta sit, Ter. Heaut. 3, 1, 26 : haec male- 
flcia aliis nefariis cumulaut atque adaugent, 
Cic. Rose. Am. 11 ; so id. Inv. 1, 3, 4 ; 2, 18 ; 
cf. id. Ac. 1, 5, 21; Auct. Her. 2, 25; Plin. 
Pan. 22; Cels. 4, 6 med. — H. Esp., in 
sacrifices, 1. 1., to devote ( cf. augeo) : decu- 
mam esse adauctam tibi quam vovi, Plaut 
Stich.2,2,62. 

ad-ailffesco, ere, v. inch. n. [ad, in- 
tense, to begin to increase or augment, 
to grow, to thrive : neque adaugescit quid- 
quam neque deperit inde, Lucr. 2, 296; so 
also Cic. poet, in Div. 1, 7 fin. 

adaxint, v. adigo init. 

ad-bello, are, to make war upon (late 
Lat.),Amm. 16,9. 

ad-bibu, bibi, bibitum, 3, v. a. [ad, in- 
iens.\ to drink (not in Cic). I. Lit.: 
quando adbibero, Plant. Stich. 2 2 58; so 
Ter. Heaut. 2, 1,8 ; Gell. 2, 22.— H. Tr op., 
of discourse, to drink in, Plaut. Mil. Gl. 3, 
3, 10 (cf. devorare dicta, id. As. 3, 3, 59, and 
Ov. Tr. 3, 5, 14 ; Sid. Carm. 16, 126).— Hence 
of instruction, to drink in eagerly, to lis- 
ten to attentively : nunc adbibe puro Pec- 
tore verba, puer, Hor. Ep. 1, 2, 67. 

* ad-blto, ere, 3, v.n. [beto], to come or 
draw near, to approach: si adbites pro- 
pius, Plaut. Capt. 3, 4, 72. 

* ad-blatero, are, l,v.a. [ad, i?itens.], 
to prattle, to chatter : affauias, App. M. 9, 
p. 221, 25 Elm. ' 

adc, words beginning thus, v. in ace 
t t add ax, acis, m. (an African word, 
ace. to Plin., 1. c), the name of a wild 



ADDI 

animal in Africa, xoith crooked horns 
Capra cervicapra, Linn. ; Plin. 11, 37, 4s' 
§124. _ • » . 

ad-decet, ere, 2, v. impers. [ad, in- 
tens.], it behooves, it becomes, it is fit or 
proper that (used only in Enn. and ITaut. 
in the latter very often), c on s t r. with ace. 
or with ace. and inf. : sed virum virtute 
vera vivere animatiim addecet, Enn ap 
Gell. 7, 17, 10 (Trag. v. 338, ed. Vahl. ; Ribi 
p. 52) : ut matrem addecet familias, Plaut. 
Merc. 2, 3, 80 : meo me aequum est niorige- 
rum patri, ejus studio servire addecet, id. 
Am. 3, 4, 21; nam peculi probain nibil ha- 
bere addecet Clam virum, id. Cas. 2, 2 26; 
so id. Bacch. 1, 2, 20 ; id. Most. 4, 2, 21 ; id 
Ps. 1,5,156; id. Trin. 1,2,41. 

ad-decimo, are, to take by the tenth 
part, to tithe (v. decimo) : vinearum redi- 
tus,Vulg. IReg. 8, 15: greges vestros,ib. 8, 

ad-denseo, ere, and ad-denso, are 

(cf. Wagner ad Verg. G. 1, 248), 2 and 1, 
v. a., to make close, compact (very rare) : 
extremi addensent acies, Verg. A. 10, 432 
Rib.— In pass., of water, to become thick, 
to thicken : aquam radice ea addita adden- 
sari, Plin. 20, 21, 84, § 230. 

ad-dlCO, xi, ctum, 3, v. a. (imp. addice, 
for addic, Plaut. Poen. 2, 50 ; addixti, Mart. 
12, 16), orig., to give one's assent to a 
thing (" addicere est proprie idem dicere et 
approbare dicendo," Pest. p. 13 Mull.), in its 
lit. signif. belonging only to augural and ju- 
dicial language (opp. abdico). I, Of a fa- 
vorable omen,to be propitious to, to favor, 
usually with aves as subj., and without obj. : 
cum sacellorum exaugurationes admitterent 
aves, in Termini fano non addixere, Liv. 1, 
55,3; so, Fabio auspicanti aves semel atque 
iterum non addixerunt, id. 27, 16, 15 ; also 
with auspicium as subj.: addicentibus auspi- 
ciis vocat contionem,Tac. A. 2, 14 ; cf. Drak 
Liv. 1, 36, 3 ; 27, 16, 15. —And with ace. of 
obj.: ilium quem aves addixerant, Pest. p. 
241 Mull.— In judicial lang. : alicui aliquid 
or aliquem, to award or adjudge any 
thing to one, to sentence; hence Festus-, 
with reference to the adjudged or con- 
demned person, says : *' alias addicere dam- 
nare est," p. 13 Miill. • ubi in jus venerit, 
addicet praetor familiam totam tibi, Plaut.' 
Poen. 1, 1, 57 : bona alicui, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 
52 : addictus erat tibi ? had he been de- 
clared bound to you for payment* id. 
Rose. Com. 14, 41 ; hence ironic: Fufl- 
diuni . . . creditorem debitoribus suis ad- 
dixisti, you have adjudged, the creditor 
to his debtors (instead of the reverse), id. 
Pis. 35 : liberum corpus in servitutem, Liv. 
3, 56. —Hence subst., addictus, h m., 
one who has been given up or made over 
as servant to his creditor : ducite nos quo 
jubet, tamquam quidem addictos, Plaut. 
Bacch. 5, 2, 87 : addictus Hermippo et ab 
hoc ductus est, Cic. Fl. 20 extr. ; cf. Liv. 6, 
15, 20. (The addictus, bondman, was not 
properly a slave=s<sryws, for he retained his 
nomen, cognomen, his tribus, which the 
servus did not have ; he could become free 
again by cancelling the demand, even against 
the will of his dominus; the servus could 
not ; the addictus, when set free, was also 
again ingenuus, the servus only UberU- 
nus ; v. Quint. 7, 3, 27. The inhuman law 
of the Twelve Tables, which, however, was 
never put in execution, that one indebted to 
several creditors should be cut in pieces and 
divided among them, is mentioned by Gell. 
20, 1 : Niebuhr, Rom.Gesch. 1 638 ; Smith's 
Antiq.) : addicere alicui judicium, to grant 
one leave to bring an action, Varr. L. L. 
6,§ 61 Mull. : addicere litem, sc. judici, to de- 
liver a cause to the judge. This was the 
office of the praetor. Such is the purport of 
the law of XII. Tab. Tab. I. : post meri- 
diem PRAESENTI STLITEM ADDICITO, ap. Gell. 

17, 2 ; judicem or arbitrum (instead of dare 
judicium), to appoint for one a judge in 
Ms suit, Dig. 5, 1, 39, 46 and 80 : addicere ali- 
quid in diem, to adjudge a thing to one ad 
interim, so that, upon a change of circum- 
stances, the matter in question shall be re- 
stored in integrum, Dig. 18, 2 ; 6, 1, 41 ; 39, 
3, 9. — B. In auctions, to adjudge to the 
highest bidder, knock down, strike off, 
deliver to (with the price in abl.) : ecquis 
est ex tanto populo, qui bona C. Rabirii Po- 



ADDO 

stuml nuramo sestertio sibi addici velit, Cic. 
Rab. Post. 17 ; so id. Verr. 2, 1, 55 ; Suet. 
Caes. 50. — Addicere bona alicujus in publi- 
cum, i. e. to confiscate, Caes. B. C. 2, 18; 
hence in Plant., of a parasite, who strikes 
himself off, as it were, i. e. promises himself 
to one as guest, on condition that he does not 
in the mean time have a higher bid, i. e. is 
not attracted to another by a better table, 
Plaut. Capt. 1, 2, 76 sq. — C. In g en i io &&h 
to make over to : addice tuam mihi mere- 
tricem, Plaut. Poen. 2, 50: hominem inve- 
nire nemiuem potuit, cui meas aedes addi- 
ceret, traderet, donaret, Auct. Or. pro Dom. 
41 : Antonius regna addixit pecunia, Cic. 
Phil. 7, 5, 15 ; so Hor. S. 2, 5, 109. — In a 
in e t a p h. signif., J} m To deliver, yield, or 
resign a thing to one, either in a good or a 
bad sense, a. In a good sense, to devote, to 
consecrate to; senatus, cui me semper ad- 
clixi. Cic. Plane. 39, 93: agros omnes ad- 
dixit deae, Veil. 2, 25 ; hence, morti addicere, 
to devote to death, Cic. Off. 3, 10, 45 : nolite 
. . . oranem Galliam prosternere et perpe- 
tuae servituti addicere, to devote to per- 
petual slavery, Caes. B. G. 7, 77. — \} m In a 
bad sense, to give up, to sacrifice, to aban- 
don (very freq.) : ejus ipsius domum ever- 
tisti, cujus sanguiuem addixeras, Cic. Pis. 
34, 83 : iibidini cujusquenosaddbdt,id.Phil. 
5, 12, 33; so id. Mil. 32; id. Sest. 17; id. 
Quint . 30 ; hence poet,: quid faciat ? cru- 
dele, suos addicere amores, to sacrifice, to 
surrender Ms love, Ov. M. 1, 617 (where 
some read wrongly abdicere). — E. In later 
Latin, to attribute or ascribe a work to 
one : quae (comoediae) nomini eius (Plauti) 
addicuntur, Gell. 3, 3, 13. — Hence, addic- 
tus ? P- «■ (after II. D.), dedicated or 
devoted to a thing; hence, a. Destined 
to : gladiatorio generi mortis addictus, Cic. 
Phil. 11, 7, 16; cf. Hor. Epod. 17, 11. — b. 
Given up to, bound to: qui certis qui- 
busdam destinatisque sententiis quasi addic- 
ti et consecrati sunt, Cic. Tusc. 2, 2, 5 : nul- 
lius addictus jurare in verba magistri, Hor. 
Ep. 1, 1, 14: Prasinae factioni addictus et 
deditus, Suet. Cal. 55. — Comp., sup,, and 
adv. not used. 

addictio, onis,/. [addico], the award- 
ing or adjudging (of the praetor or judge, 
v. addico, B.): bonorum possessionumque 
addictio et condonatio, * Cic. Verr. 1, 4, 12 ; 
so Gai. Inst. 3. 5 189 : Die-. 40. 5, 4. 55 2- 5 ; 
ib. 49, 14, 50. 

addictus, a, um, P. a. of addico. 

ad-disCO, didlci, no sup., 3, v. a. I. To 
learn in addition to, to learn further ; 
Quid ? qui etiam addiscunt aliquid ? ut Solo- 
nem versibus gloriantem videmus, qui se 
cotidie aliquid addiscentem senem fieri di- 
*cit, Cic. de Sen. 8, 26; so id. Fin. 5, 29 ; id. 
de Or. 3, 36 ; Ov. M. 3 593 al. ( cf. addocere, 
Hor. Ep. 1, 5, 18).— II. In gen.,to learn, 
to be informed, to hear : quos earn venire 
rex addidicisset, in lugam vertitur, Just. 2, 
3, 13. 

additamentum, i, n. [addo], an ad- 
dition, accession, increase : inimicorum, 
* Cic. Sest. 31, 68 • vitae, Sen. Ep. 17, 6 : 
praeter nomen nihil est additamenti, Pseud. - 
Sail, ad Caes. de Rep. Ord. 2 : pretii, App. M. 
9, 6. 

addltlClUS (not -tius), a, nm, adj. [id.], 
added, annexed, additional, Tert. de Re- 
bus Carn. 52 ; Dig. 50, 16, 98. 

additio, onis,/. [id.], an adding to, 
addition: fignrarum additio et abjectio, 
Quint. 9, 3, 18 : Sic corpori fit additio. Cael. 
Aur. Acut. 2, 37 ; Prise, p. 978 P. 

additltlUS, v- additicius. 

* addltiVUS, a, um, adj. [id.], added, 
annexed; of the pronoun ipse. Prise n 
1095 P. " l ' 

addltUS, a, um, P. a. of addo. 

* ad-dlVlno, are, 1, v. a. [ad intens.], 
io divine, to prognosticate : quemdam ex 
facie hominum addivinantem, ex his dixisse 
futurae mortis annos, Plin. 35, 10, 36, § 88 
dub. (Cod. Bamb. and Sillig : divinantem). 

ad-d© 3 d di, ditum, 3, v. a. [2. do] (ad= 
duis for addideris, Paul. ex Fest. p. 27 Mull.), 
to put, place, lay, etc., a person or thing 
to another. I. In gen. A. Lit., neve 
avrom addito. let no gold be put into the 
grave with the dead, Fragm. of the XII. 
Tab. in Cic. de Leg. 2, 24 : Argus, quern 
-quondam Ioni Juno custodem addidit, Plaut. 



ADDO 

Aul. 3, 6, 20 ; so id. Mil. 2, 6, 69 : adimunt di- 
viti, addunt pauperi, Ter. Ph. 2, 1, 47 : spu- 
mantia addit Frena feris, Verg. A. 5, 818 : 
Pergamaque Iliacamque jugis hanc addidit 
arcem, i.e. imposuit, id. ib. 3,336; Hor. Epod. 
8, 10 : flainmae aquani, to throw upon, Tib. 
2, 4, 42 : incendia ramis, Sil. 7, 161 : propio- 
rem Martem, to bring nearer, id. 5, 442. — 
With in : uram in ollulas addere, Varr. R. R. 
2, 54, 2 : glandem in dolium, id. ib. 3, 15, 2 : 
eas epistulas in eundem fasciculum velim 
addas, Cic. Att. 12, 53 : adde manus in vin- 
cla meas, Ov. Am. 1, 7, 1 ; id. A. A. 2, 672, 
30. — Poet. : cum carceribus sese effudere 
quadrigae, addunt in spatia, i. e. dant se, 
Verg. G. 1, 513, v. Heyne and Forb.— Hence, 
B. Trop., to bring to, to add to; with 
dat. : pudicitiae hnjus vitium me hinc ab- 
sente'st additum, Plaut. Am. 2, 2, 179 : fle- 
tum ingenio muliebri, Pac. ap. Cic. Tusc. 2, 
21, 50; also absol. : operam addam sedulo, 
Plaut. Cist. 1, 1, 54 ; so id. Pers. 4, 4, 57 : ad- 
dere animum, or animos, to give courage, 
make courageous : mihi quidem addit ani- 
inura, Ter. Heaut. 3, 2, 31 : sed haec sunt in 
iis libris, quos tu laudando animos mihi ad- 
didisti, Cic. Att. 7, 2, 4 ; so, animos cum cla- 
more,Ov. M. 8, 388.— So also : addis mihi ala- 
critatem scribendi,Cic. Att. 16, 3 : verba vir- 
tutem nou addere, impart, bestow, Sail. C. 
58: severitas dignitatem addiderat,id. ib. 57 : 
audaciam, id. J. 94 : formidinem, id. ib. 37 : 
metum, Tac. H. 1, 62 ; cf. ib. 76 : ex ingenio 
suo quisque demat vel addat fidem, id. G. 3 : 
ardorem mentibus, Verg. A. 9, 184 : ductori- 
bus honores, id. ib. 5, 249 ; hence, addere ali- 
cni calcar, to give one the spur, to spur 
him on: anticipate atque addite calcar, 
Varr. ap. Non. 70, 13: vatibus addere cal- 
car, Hor. Ep . 2, 1, 217 (cf. : admovere calcar 
Cic. Att. 6, 1, and adhibere calcar, id. Brut. 
56). 

II, Esp. A. To add to by way of in- 
crease, io join or annex to, to augment, 
with dat. or ad ( the most common signif. 
of this word) : etiam fides, ei quae accessere, 
cibi addam dono gratiis, Plaut. Ep. 3, 4, 37 : 
verbum adde etiam unum, id. Rud. 4, 3, 68 ; 
cf Ter. And. 5,2, 19: non satis habes quod 
tibi dieculam addo ? id. ib*. 4, 2, 27 ; so id. 
Eun. 1, 1, 33 ; id. Ph. 1,1,8: illud in his re- 
bus non addunt, Lucr. S, 900 : quaeso ne ad 
malum hoc addas malum, Caec. ap. Non. 
154, 15 : addendo deducendoque videre quae 
reliqui summa fiat, Cic. Off. 1, 18, 59 ; 30 id. 
de Or. 2, 12 fin. ; id. Fam. 15, 20 ; id Att. 1, 
13: acervum efflciunt uno addito grano, id. 
Ac. 2, 16, 49 : nunc laborem ad cotidiana 
opera addebant, Caes. B. C. 3, 49 : multas res 
novas in edictum addidit, he made essen- 
tial additions to, Nep. Cat. 2, 3 : eaque res 
multum animis eorum addidit, Sail. J. 75, 9 : 
addita est alia insuper injuria, Liv. 2, 2 : no- 
vas litterarum formas addidit vulgavitque, 
Tac. A. 11, 13 ; cf. ib. 14 al. — P oe t. : noc- 
tem addens operi, also the night to the 
work, Verg. A. 8,411 ; ut quantum generi 
demas, virtutibus addas, Hor. Ep. 1, 20, 22.— 
With ad : additum ad caput legis, Suet. Ca- 
lig. 40 ; so Flor. 1, 13, 17.— P e t. with inf. : 
ille viris pila et ferro circumdare pectus ad- 
diderat, he instructed them in addition, 
Sil. 8, 550 : addere gvadum ( sc. gradui), to 
add step to step, i. e. to quicken one's 
pace : adde gradum, appropera, Plaut. Tr. 4, 
3, 3 ; so Liv. 3, 27 ; 26, 9 ; Plin. Ep. 6, 20 ; cf. 
Doed. Syn. 4, 58 : addito tempore, in course 
of time: conjugia sobrinarum diu ignora- 
ta addito tempore percrebuisse, Tac. A. 12, 
6 ; so also : addita aetate, with increased 
age : in infantia scabunt aures ; quod ad- 
dita aetate non qneunt, as they grow old- 
er, Plin. 11,48, 108, § 260.— 2. Mercant. 1. 1., 
to add to one's bidding, to give more : ni- 
hil addo, Poet. ap. Cic. de Or. 2, 63, 255.— B. 
When a new thought is added to what pre- 
cedes, as an enlargement of it, it is intro- 
duced by adde, adde hue, adde quod, and 
the like ( cf. accedo ), add to this, add to 
this the circumstance that, or besides, 
moreover . , . : adde furorem animi pro- 
prium atque oblivia rerum, adde quod in ni- 
gras lethargi mergitur undas, Lucr. 3, 828 
sq. (cf. the third verse before : advenit id 
quod earn de rebus saepe futuris Macerat) : 
adde hue, si placet, unguentarios, saltatores 
totumque ludum talarium, Cic. Off. 1,42, 150: 
adde hos praeterea casus, etc, Hor, S. 2, 8, 
71 : adde hue populationem agrorum, Liv. 7, 
30 : adde quodpubes tibi crescit omnis, Hor. 



ADDU 

C. 2, 8, 17 ; id. Ep. 1, 18, 52 : adde quod in- 
genuas didicisse fideliter artes Emollit mores 
nee sinit esse feros, Ov. Pont. 2, 9, 49 : adde 
hue quod mercem sine fucis gestat, Hor. 
Sat. 1, 2, 83 : adde super dictis quod non le- 
vius valeat, id. ib. 2, 7, 78. — So also when sev- 
eral are addressed, as in the speech of Scipio 
to his soldiers : adde defectionem Italiae, Si- 
ciliae, etc., Liv. 26, 41, 12. — Also with the 
ace. and inf. : addebat etiam, se in legem 
Vocomam juratum contra earn facere non 
audere, Cic. Fin. 2, 17, 55 ; and with an an- 
ticipatory dem. pron. : Addit etiam illud 
equites non optimos fuisse, id. Deiot. 8, 24 : 
Addit haec, fortes viros sequi, etc., id. Mil. 
35, 96 al.: addito as abl. absol. with a subj. 
clause ; with the addition, with this ad- 
dition (post-Aug.): vocantur patres, addi- 
to consul tandum super re magna et atroci, 
with this intimation, that they were to 
consult, etc., Tac. A. 2, 28: addito ut lima 
infra terram sit, Plin. 15, 17, 18, § 62 (cf. : ad- 
juncto ut . . ^haberentur, Cic. Off. 2, 12).— 
Hence, addltUS, a, um, P. a. (addo I.), 
joined to one as a constant observer; 
so, A, Watching or observing in a hos- 
tile or troublesome manner: si mihi non 
praetor siet additus atque agitet me, Lucil. 
ap. Macr. Sat. 6, 4.— Hence, in gen., B. Pur- 
suing one incessantly, persecuting : nee 
Teucris addita Juno Usquam aberit, Verg. 

A. 6, 90 Serv. (= adfixa, incumbens, infesta). 

* ad-ddceo, eui, ctum, 2, v.a., to teach 
something in addition to, to teach : ebri- 
etas addocet artes, Hor. Ep. 1, 5, 18 (but in 
Cic. Clu. 37, 104, the correct read, is adducti, 

B. and K.). 

* ad-dormio, ire, 4, v. n., to begin to 
sleep, to go to sleep : rursus addormiunt, 
Cael. Aurel. 1, 11, 38. 

* ad-dormisco, ere, v. inch, n., to go 
to sleep : quoties post cibum addormisceret, 
Suet. Claud. 8. 

Addua 7 ae, m., 'Adouar (cf. Weichert 
Poet. Lat. 180), a river in Upper Italy, 
which flows into the Po near Cremona, 
now Adde, Plin. 2, 103, 106 ; 3, 16, 20 al. 

t addiibanum = dubium, ace. to Paul, 
ex Fest. p. 21 Mull. 

addubltatio, 6nis, /. [addubito], a 
doubting, a rhetor, fig , Mart. Cap. 5, p. 17 i ; 
Cic. Off. 3. 4, 18, where dubitatio is the bet- 
ter reading (B. and K.). 

ad-dublto, avi, atum, 1, v. n. and a., 
pr., to incline to doubt, to begin to doubt 
( in Cic. several times, but never in his 
orations). I, To be in doubt, to doubt; 
c n s t r. (a) With de or in aliqua re : de 
quo Panaetium addubitare dice bant, Cic. N. 
I). 2,46, 118: de legatis paululum addubita- 
tum est, Liv. 2,4: in his addubitare turpissi- 
mum est, Cic. Off. 3, 4, 18.— (j3) With pron., 
or num , an, etc. : ut addubitet, quid potius 
dicat, Cic. Or. 40 : addubitavi, num a Voium- 
nio senatore esset, id. Fam. 7, 32 : an hoc 
inhonestum necne sit, addubites, Hor. S. 1, 4 
124; so Liv. 8, 10 ; cf. Drak. ad Liv. 2, 4, 7 : 
illud addubitat, utrum, etc,, Nep. Con. 5,4 
(ace. to Br, ad h. 1. : to leave it undecided; 
cf. with dubitare, Cic. N. D. 1,1).— ( 7 ) With 
ace., to be doubtful of a thing, to call in 
question : si plus adipiscare, re explicata, 
boni, quam addubitata mali, Cic. Off. 1, 24, 
83 ; so id. Div. 1, 47, 105. — (3) With inf., to 
hesitate : aptare lacertos addubitat, Sil. 14, 
358. — (e) Absol. : eos ipsos addubitare coget 
doctissimorum hominum tanta dissentio, 
Cic. N. D. 1, 6,14 ; Liv. 10, 19, 13 : Plin. Ep. 
2,19,1. 

ad-duCO, xi, ctum, 3, v. a. (adduce for 
adduc, Plant. Poen. 1, 3, 15 ; Ter. Ph. 2, 1, 29; 
Afr. ap. Non. 174, 32 : adduxti for adduxisti, 
Ter. Heaut. 4, 6, 15 ; id. Eun. 4, 7, 24: ad- 
duxe = adduxisse, Plant. Rud. 4, 4, 3), to 
lead to, io bring or convey to, draw to 
any place or to one's self (opp. abduco, 
q. v. ; syn. : adfero, apporto, adveho, indu- 
co) . I. L i t. : quaeso, qui possim animum 
bonum habere, qui te ad me adducam do- 
mum, Plaut. Ps. 3, 2, 78 : ille alter venit, 
quern secum adduxit rarmenio, Ter. Eun. 
4, 4, 27 ; Afr. ap. Non. 174, 32 : quos secum 
Mitylenis Cratippus adduxit, Cic. Fil. ap. 
Cic. Fam. 16, 21, 5 : Demetrius Epimachum 
secum adduxit, Vitr. 10, 22, 262. — With 
ad : ad lenam, Plaut. As. 5, 2, 65 ; cf. id. 
Mil. 3, 1, 193 : ad cenam, Lucil. ap. Non. 159, 
25 (cf. : abduxi ad cenam, Ter. Heaut 1, % 
31 



ADDU 

9) : adduxit ea ad Adam. Vulg. Gen. 2, 19 : 
ib. Marc. 14, 53.— Or with' a local adv.': tu 
istos adduce intro, Plant. Poen. 5, 3, 54 : quia 
te adducturam hue dixeras eumpse nor. 
eampse, id. True. 1, 2,31 ; so Ter. And. 5, 3, 
29: adduc hue nlium tuum,Vulg. Luc. 9, 41. 
— 2. I* 1 gen., without regard to the access, 
idea of accompanying, to lead or bring a 
person or thing to a place, to take or con- 
duct from one place to another (of living 
beings which have the power of motion, while 
affero is properly used of things: attuli 
hunc. Pseud. Quid? attulisti? Ca. Ad- 
duxi volui dicere, Plaut. Ps. 2, 4, 21).— So of 
conducting an army: exercitum, Cic. Att. 
7, 9 : aquam, to lead to, id. Cael. 14. — With 
in : gentes feras in Italiam, Cic. Att. 8, 11, 2 ; 
cf. Oud. ad Caes. B. G. 4, 22, and Auct. B. G. 
8, 35 : in judicium adductus, Cic. Rose. Am. 
10, 28 : adducta res in judicium est, id. Off. 
3, 16, 67 ; so id. Clu. 17.— With dat : puero 
nutricem adducit, Ter. Hec. 5, 2, 4 : qui ex 
Gallia pueros venales isti adducebat, Cic. 
Quint. 6.— P o e t. with ace. : Diae telluris ad 
oras applicor et dextris adducor litora remis, 
Ov. M. 3, 598 (cf. advertor oras Scythicas, id. 
ib. 5, 649, and Rudd. II. p. 327) : adducere ad 
populum, i.e. in judicium populi vocare, Cic. 
Agr. 2, 6. — Of a courtesan, to procure : pue- 
ro scorta, Nep. Dion. 5 : paelicem,Ov. Fast. 3, 
483.— Poet, also of a place, which is, as it 
were, brought near. Thus Hor. in describ- 
ing the attractions of his Sabine farm : dicas 
adductum propius frondere Tarentum, Ep. 1, 
16, 11.— B. E s p. 1. To bring a thing to 
a destined place by drawing or pulling, 
to draw or pull to one's self: tormenta eo 
graviores emissiones habent, quo sunt con- 
tenta atque adducta vehementius, Cic. Tusc. 
2, 24 : adducto arcu, Verg. A. 5, 507 ; so, ad- 
ducta sagitta,id.ib.9,632: utquevolat moles, 
adducto concita nervo, Ov. M. 8,357 : adducta 
funibus arbor corruit, id. ib. 775 : funem, 
Caes. B. G. 3, 14 ; so Luc. 3, 700 : colla par- 
vis lacertis, Ov. M. 6, 625 : equos, id. Fast. 
6,586. — Hence trop. : habenas amicitiae, 
to tighten, Cic. Lael. 13, 45 ; cf. Verg. A. 9, 
632, and 1, 63.-2. Of the skin or a part of 
the body, to draxo up, wrinkle, contract : 
adducit cutem macies, wrinkles the skin, 
Ov.M. 3,397 : sitis miseros adduxerat artus, 
Verg. G. 3, 483; so,frontem (opp.remittere), 
to contract: interrogavit,quae causa frontis 
tam adductae ? a brow so clouded t Quint. 
10 3, 13 ; so Sen. Benef. 1, 1. 

IL Fig. £i m To bring a person or thing 
into a certain condition ; with ad or in : 
numquam animum quaesti gratis ad malas 
adducam partis, Ter. Hec. 5, 3, 38 : rem ad- 
duci ad interregnum, Cic. Att. 7, 9 : ad ar- 
bitrium alterius, id. Fam. 5, 20 : ad suam 
auctoritatem, id. Deiot. 10, 29 : numquam 
prius discessit, quam ad finem sermo esset 
adductus, Nep. Ep. 3 : iambos ad umbilicum 
adducere, Hor. Epod. 14, 8 : in discrimen 
extremum, Cic. Phil. 6, 7 ; cf. Liv. 45, 8 : in 
suminas angustias, Cic. Quint. 5 : in invi- 
diam falso crimine, id. Off. 3, 20 : in neces- 
sitatern,Liv. 8,7 : vitam in extremum, Tac. 

A. 14, 61.— S. To bring or lead one to a 
certain act, feeling, or opinion ; to prompt, 
induce, pr&vail upon, persuade, move, 
incite to it ; with ad, in, or ut (very freq. 
and class., and for the most part in a good 
sense ; while seducere and inducere denote 
instigating or seducing to something bad, 
Herz. Caes. B. G. 1, 3 ; although there are 
exceptions, as the foil, examples show) : ad 
misericordiam, Ter. Heaut. 5, 2, 42: ad ne- 
quitiem, id. Ad. 3, 3, 4 : ad iracundiam, ad 
fletum, Cic. Brut, 93, 322 : quae causa ad 
faciuus adduxit, id. Rose. Am. 31 : in me- 
tum, id. Mur. 24 : in summam exspectatio- 
nem, id. Tusc. 1, 17 : in spem, id. Att. 2, 22 : 
in opinionern, id. Fam. 1, 1 : in suspicionem 
alicui, Nep. Hann. 7: ad paenitentiam,Vulg. 
Rom. 2, 4 ; ib. 10, 19. — With gerund : ad 
suspicandum, Cic. Pr. Cons. 16: ad creden- 
dum,Nep. Con. 3. — With ut: adductus sum 
officio, fide, misericordia, etc., ut onus hoc 
U^oris mihi suscipiendum putarem, Cic. 
Verr. 1, 2 : nullo imbre, nullo frigore addu- 
ci, ut capite operto sit, id. de Sen. 10 : id. 
Cat. 1, 2; id. Fam. 3, 9; 6, 10, etc. ; Caes. 

B. G. 6, 12 ; Liv . 4, 49 al.— And absol. in 
pass. : quibus rebus adductus ad causam 
accesserim demonstravi, Cic. Verr. 1, 3 : his 
rebus adducti, being induced, Caes. B. G. 
1, 3 ; 6, 10. — With quin : adduci nequeo 
quin existimem, Suet. Tib. 21.— With inf. : 



ADEO 

facilius adducor ferre humana humanitus, 
Afr. ap. Non. 514, 20. — C. Adducor with 
inf., or with ut and subj. = adducor ad 
credendum, ireLBo^at, to be induced' to be- 
lieve : ego non adducor, quemquam bonum 
ullam salutem putare mihi tanti fuisse, Cic. 
Att. 11, 16 : ut jam videar adduci, hanc quo- 
que, quae te procrearit, esse patriam, id. 
Leg. 2, 3 : illud adduci vix possum, ut . . . 
videantur, id. Fin. 1, 5, 14 ; id. ib. 4, 20, 55 ; 
Lucr. 5, 1341. — Hence, adductus, a, um, 
P. a. A. Drawn tight, stretched, strain- 
ed, contracted. — T r o p. : vultus, Suet. Tib. 
68: frons in supercilia adductior, Capitol. 
Ver. 10; cf. Plin. Ep. 1, 16. — Hence, B, Of 
place, narrow, contracted, strait : (Africa) 
ex spatio paulatim adductior, Mel. 1, 4.— C. 
Of character, strict, serious, severe : modo 
familiaritate juvenili Nero et rursus adduc- 
tus, quasi seria consociaret, Tac. A. 14, 4: 
adductum et quasi virile servitium, id. ib. 
12, 7 : vis pressior et adductior, Plin. Ep. 1, 
16. — Sup. not used. — Adv. only in eomp. 
adductlUS, 1. More tightly: adductius 
contorquere jacula, Aus. Grat. Act. 27.-2. 
Trop., more strictly : imperitare, Tac. H. 
3, 7 : regnari, id. Germ. 43. 

adductius, adv., v. adductus Jin. 

adductor? oris, m. y a procurer (cf. 
adduco, I. 2. Jin.), Petr. Afran. ap. Meyer. 
Anthol. II. p. 27. 

adductus, a, um, P. a. of adduco. 

ad-edo, &U> esum (less correctly, ades- 
sum), 3, v. a. (adest = adedit, Luc. 6, 265 ; 
cf. edo), to begin to eat, to bite, to nibble 
at, io gnaw, etc.— As verb finite very rare, 
and mostly poet. ; not found in prose of Cic. 
I. Prop.: angues duo ex occulto allapsi 
adedere jecur, Liv. 25, 16, 2 ; so, adeso jeci- 
nore, Val. Max. 1, 6, 8 : favos, Verg. G. 4, 
242. — Hence metaph, of fire : cum me su- 
premus adederit ignis, Ov. Am. 1, 15, 41 : 
fiamma plurima postibus haesit adesis,Verg. 
A. 9, 537. — II. In an enlarged sense (as a 
consequence of a continued biting, gnawing, 
etc. ; and hence only in the perf. or part, 
pass.; cf.: accIdo,absumo,abrumpo),foe#j 
up, to consume entirely : frumento adeso, 
quod ex areis in oppidum portatum est, Si- 
senn. ap. Non. 70, 32; so, extis adesis, Liv. 1, 
7, 13 ; pisces ex parte adesi, Quint. 6, 3, 90 : 
and metaph., io use uj), to consume, waste 
(as money, strength, etc.) : non adesa jam, 
sed abundante etiam pecunia, Cic. Quint. 
12 : adesis fortunis omnibus, Tac. A. 13, 21 : 
bona adesa, id. H. 1, 4 : adesus cladibus As- 
drubal, Sil. 13, 680.— Hence, adesus,a,um, 
P. a., eaten, gnawed; hence poet., worn 
away ,esip. by water: adesi lapides, smooth, 
polished, Hor. C. 3, 29, 36 (after Theocr. 22, 

49 ; ov? TTOTand? irepte^eae) : SCOpulUS, Ov. 

H. 10, 26 : sale durus adeso caseus, poet, for 
sale adesus caseus, Verg. Mor. 98. 

Adelphi (oe)> Ol'um, m., = ade\<poi, 

The Brothers, a comedy of Terence. 

adelphlS, idis, /. ludeXtprj, sister; so 
called as resembling the caryotis, or be- 
cause they hung two together from a 
branch], a kind of date, Plin. 13, 4, 9, 
§45. 

adeZuptlG, onis, /. [adimo], a taking 
away, a seizw*e : civitatis, Auct. Or. pro 
Dom. 30 : bonorum, Tac. A. 4, 6 : provin- 
cial ib. 2, 76. 

ademptor, oris, 772. [id.], onewho takes 
away : vitae, Aug. in Joann. Tract. 116. 

ademptus, a, um, Part, of adimo. 

1, ad-eo. "< and rarely Ivi, itum (arch, 
adirier for adiri, Enn. Rib. Trag. p. 59), 4, v. 
n. and a. (ace. to Paul, ex Fest. should be 
accented adeo ; v. Fest. s. v. adeo, p. 19 
Mull. ; cf. the foil, word), to go to or ap- 
proach a person or thing (syn. : accedo, 
aggredior, advenio, appeto). I. Lit. A. 
In gen., con st r. (a) With ad (very 
freq. ) : sed tibi cautim est adeundum ad 
virum, Att. ap. Non. 512, 10: neque eum 
ad me adire neque me magni pendere vi- 
su'st, Plaut. Cur. 2, 2, 12 : adeamne ad earn ? 
Ter. And. 4, 1, 15; id. Euu. 3, 5, 30: aut 
ad consules aut ad te aut ad Brutum adis- 
sent, Cic. Fragm. ap. Non. 208, 5 : ad M. Bi- 
bulum adierunt, id. Fragm. ap. Arus. p. 213 
Lind.: ad aedis nostras nusquam adiit,Plaut. 
Aul.1,1,24 : adibam ad istum fundum, Cic. 
Caec. 29— (/3) With in : priusquam Romam 
atque in horum conventum adiretis, Cic. 



ADEO 

Verr. 2,4. 11. § 26 ed. Halm.— E s p. : adire in 
jus, to go to law : cum ad praetorem in jus 
adissemus, Cic. Verr. 4, § 147 ; id. Att. 11, 24 ; 
Caes. B. C. 1, 87, and in the Plebiscit. deTher- 
mens. lin. 42 : qvo de ea re in iovs aditvm 
erit, cf. Dirks., Vers uche S. p. 193. — < 7 ) 
Absol. : adeunt, consistunt, copulantur dex~ 
teras, Plaut. Aul. 1, 2, 38 : eccum video : adi- 
bo, Ter. Eun. 5, 7, 5. — (5) With ace. : ne- 
Stygeos adeam non libera manes, Ov. M. 13, 
465 : voces aetherias adiere domos, Sil. 6, 
253 : castrorum vias, Tac. A. 2, 13 : munici- 
pia, id. ib. 39 : provinciam, Suet. Aug. 47 : 
non poterant adire eum, Vulg. Luc. 8, 19 : 
Graios sales carmine patrio, to attain to, 
Verg. Cat. 11, 62 ; so with latter supine r 
planioribus aditu locis, places easier to ap- 
proach, Liv. 1, 33. — With local adv. r 
quoquam, Sail. J. 14 : hue, Plaut. True. 2, 
7, 60. — B. Esp., 1, To approach one 
for the purpose of addressing, asking aid, 
consulting, and the like, to address, ap- 
pl» to, consult (diff. from aggredior, q. v.). 
— C o n 8 1 r. with ad or oftener with ace. ; 
hence also pass. : quanto satius est, adire 
blandis verbis atque exquaerere, sintne ilia, 
etc., Plaut. Ps. 1, 5, 35 : aliquot me adie- 
runt, Ter. And. 3, 3, 2 : adii te heri de filia, 
id. Hec. 2, 2, 9 : cum pacem peto, cum placo, 
cum adeo, et cum appello meam, Lucil. ap. 
Non. 237,28 : ad me adire quosdam memini, 
qui dicerent, Cic. Fam. 3, 10 : coram adire 
et alloqui, Tac. H. 4, G5.—Pass. : aditus con- 
sul idem illud responsum retulit, when ap- 
plied to, Liv. 37, 6 Jin. : neque praetores 
adiri possent, Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 2, 5.— Hence r 
adire aliquem per epistulam, to address 
one in writing, by a letter : per epistulam, 
aut per nuntium, quasi regem, adiri eum 
aiunt, Plaut. Mil. 4, 6, 9 and 10 ; cf. Tac. A. 
4, 39; id. H. 1, 9. — So also: adire deos, 
aras, deorum sedes, etc., to approach the 
gods, their altars, etc., as a mippliant (cf. : 
acced. ad aras, Lucr. 5, 1199) : quoi me os- 
tendam ? quod templum adeam ? Att. ap, 
Non. 281, 6 : ut essent simulacra, quae vene- 
rantes deos ipsos se adire crederent, Cic. N. 
D. 1, 27 : adii Dominum et depreeatus sum r 
Vulg. Sap. 8, 21 : aras, Cic. Phil. 14, 1 : sedes 
deorum, Tib. 1, 5, 39 : libros Sibyllinos, to 
consult the Sibylline Books, Liv. 34, 55 ; 
cf. Tac. A. 1, 76: oracula, Verg. A. 7, 82 — 
2. To go to a thing in order to examine it, 
to visit: oppida castellaque munita, Sail. 
J. 94 : hibema, Tac. H. 1, 52.-3. To come 
up to one in a hostile manner, to assail, 
attack : aliquem : nunc prior adito tu, ego 
in insidiis hie ero, Ter. Ph. 1, 4, 52 : nee 
quisquam ex agmine tanto audet adire vi- 
rum, Verg. A. 5, 379 : Servilius obvia adire 
arma jubetur, Sil. 9, 272. 

II, Fig. A. To go io the performance- 
of any act, to enter upon, to undertake^ 
set about, under go, submit to (cf. : accedo, 
aggredior,andadorior). — With ad or the ace. 
(class.) : nunc earn rem vult, scio, mecum 
adire ad pactionem, Plaut. Aul. 2, 2, 25 : turn 
primum nos ad causas et privatas et publicas 
adire coepimus, Cic. Brut. 90 : adii causas 
oratorum, id. Fragm. Scaur, ap. Arus. p. 213 
Lind. : adire ad rem publicam, id. de Imp. 
Pomp. 24, 70: ad extremum periculum, Caes. 
B. C. 2, 7. — With ace. : periculum capitis, 
Cic. Rose. Am. 38 : laboribus susceptis peri- 
culisque aditis, id. Off. 1, 19: in adeundis 
periculis, id. ib. 24 ; cf. : adeundae inimici- 
tiae, subeundae saepe pro re publica tem- 
pestates, id. Sest. 66, 139 : ut vitae pericu- 
lum aditurus videretur, Auct. B. G. 8, 48 : 
maximos labores et summa pericula, Nep. 
Timol. 5 : omnem fortunam, Liv. 25. 10 : de- 
decus, Tac. A. 1, 39: servitutem voluntari- 
am, id. G. 24 : invidiam, id. A. 4, 70 : gaudia, 
Tib. 1, 5, 39.— Hence of an inheritance, 1. 1., 
to enter on: cum ipse hereditatem patris 
non adisses, Cic. Phil. 2, 16 ; so id. Arch. 5 ; 
Suet. Aug. 8 and Dig. ; hence also : adire no- 
men, to assume the name bequeathed by 
will.Vell. 2, 60. — B. Adire manum alicui, 
prov., to deceive one, to make sport o/(the 
origin of this phrase is unc. ; Acidalius con- 
jectures that it arose from some artifice 
practised in wrestling, Wagner ad Plaut. 
Aul. 2, 8, 8) : eo pacto avarae Veneri pulcre 
adii manum, Plaut. Poen. 2, 11 ; so id. Aul. 
2, 8, 8 ; id. Cas. 5, 2, 54 ; id. Pers. 5, 2, 18. 

2. ad-e6, adv. [cf. quoad and adhuc] 
(ace. to FestUs, it should be accented adeo, 
v. the preced. word ; but this distinction is 
merely a later invention of the grammarians ; 



ADEO 

■of. Gell. 7, 7). I. In the ante-class, per., A. 
To designate the limit of space or time, with 
reference to the distance passed through ; 
hence often accompanied by usque (cf. ad), 
to this, thus far, so far, as far. 1. Of 
space: surculum artito usque adeo, quo 
praeacueris,^* in the scion as far as you 
have sharpened it, Cato, R. R. 40, 3. — 
Hence : res adeo rediit, the affair has gone 
■so far (viz., in deterioration, " cum aliquid 
pejus exspectatione contigit," Don. ad Ter. 
Ph. 1, 2, 5): postremo adeo res rediit : adule- 
seentulus saepe eadem et graviter audiendo 
v ictus est, Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 61 ; cf. id. Ph. 1, 
2, 5.-2. Of time, so long (as), so long 
(t ill) , strengthened by usque,a.n& with dum, 
donee, following, and in Cic. with quoad : 
merces vectatuin undique adeo dum, quae 
turn haberet, peperisset bona, Plaut. Merc. 1, 
1, 76 ; 3, 4, 72 ; id. Am. 1, 2, 10 al. : nusquam 
destitit instare, suadere, orare, usque adeo 
donee perpnlit,Ter. And. 4, 1,36 ; Cato.R. R. 
67 ; id. ib. 76 : atque hoc scitis omnes usque 
adeo hominem in periculo fuisse, quoad sci- 
tiun sit Sestium vivere, Cic. Sest. 38, 82.— 
B. For the purpose of equalizing two things 
in "comparison, followed by ut : in the same 
degree or measure or proportion . . . in 
which; or so very, so much, so, to such 
a degree . . . as (only in comic poets), 
Plaut. Ep. 4, 1, 38 : adeon hominem esse in- 
venustum aut infelicem quemquam, ut ego 
sum ? Ter. And. 1, 5, 10.— Also followed by 
.quasi, when tlie comparison relates to simi- 
larity: gaudere adeo coepit, quasi qui cupi- 
unt nnptias, in the same manner as those 
rejoice who desire marriage, Ter. Heaut. 
5,1, 12.— C. (Only in the comic poets) — ad 
haec, praeterea, moreover, besides, too : ibi 
tibi adeo lectus dabitur, ubi tu haud som- 
nmn capias {beside the other annoyances), 
xl bed, too, shall be given you there, etc., 
Plaut. Ps. 1,2,80. — Hence also with etiam : 
adeo etiam argenti faenus creditum audio, 
besides too, id. Most. 3, 1, 101.— D. (Only in 
.the comic poets.) Adeo ut, for this pur- 
pose that, to the end that : id ego continuo 
huic dabo, adeo me ut hie emittat manu, 
Plaut. Rud. 5, 3, 32 : id adeo te oratum ad- 
venio, ut, etc., id. Aul. 4, 10, 9 : adeo ut tu 
meam sententiam jam jam poscere possis, 
faciam, etc., id. ib. 3, 2, 26 (where Wagner 
now reads at ut) : atque adeo ut scire pos- 
sis, factum ego tecum hoc divido, id. Stich. 
5,4,15. (These passages are so interpreted 
by Hand, I. p. 138 ; others regard adeo here 
= quin iinmo.)—E. In narration, in order 
to put one person in strong contrast with 
another. It may be denoted by a stronger 
emphasis upon the word to be made con- 
spicuous, or by yet, on the contrary, etc. : 
jam ille illuc ad erum cum advenerit, nar- 
rabit, etc. : ille adeo ilium mentiri sibi cre- 
det Plaut. Am. 1, 2, 4 sq. ; so id. Merc. 2, 1, 
8 al. 

II. To the Latin of every period 
belongs the use of this word, jx. To give 
emphasis to an idea in comparison, so, so 
much, so very, with verbs, adjectives, and 
substantives: adeo ut spectare postea om- 
nis oderit, Plaut. Capt. prol. 65: nemi- 
nem quidem adeo inf'atuare potuit, ut ei 
nummum ullum crederet, Cic. Fl. 20, 47 : 
adeoque inopia est coactus Hannibal, ut,etc, 
Liv. 22,32, 3 Weiss. : et voltu adeo modesto, 
adeo venusto, ut nil supra, Ter. And. 1, 1, 92 : 
nemo adeo ferus est, ut, etc., Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 
39. — With usque : adeo ego ilium cogam 
usque, ut mendicet meus pater, Plaut. Bacch. 
3, 4, 10 : usque adeo turbatur, even so much, 
so continually, Verg. E. 1, 12 ; Curt. 10, 1, 
42 ; Luc. 1, 366. — In questions : adeone me 
fuisse fungum, ut qui ill! crederem? Plaut. 
Bacch. 2, 3, 49 : adeone hospes hujus urbis, 
adeone ignarus es disciplinae consuetudinis- 
que nostrae, ut haec nescias ? Cic. Rab. 10, 
28 ; so id. Phil. 2, 7, 15 ; id. Fam. 9, 10 ; Liv. 
2, 7, 10 ; 5, G, 4. — With a negative in both 
Causes, also with quin in the last : non ta- 
men adeo virtutum sterile saeculum, ut non 
-et bona exeinpla prodiderit, Tac. H. 1, 3; so 
Suet. Oth. 9 : verum ego numquam adeo 
astutus fui, quin, etc., Ter. Ad, 2, 2, 13.— 
Sometimes the concluding clause is to he 
supplied from the first : quis genus Aenea- 
dum,quis Trojaenesciat urhem?. . . nonob- 
tusa adeo irestanius pectora Poeni, viz., that 
ice knot/: not the Trojans and their his- 
toru, Verg. A. 1, 565 : adeo senuerunt Juppi- 
ter et Mars ? Juv. 6 59. — Hence (post-Cic,)-- 
3 



ADEO 

adeo non ut . . . adeo nihil ut . . . so little 
that, so far from that ... (in reference to 
which, it should be noticed that in Latin 
the negative is blended with the verb in 
one idea, which is qualified by adeo)=ta,n- 
tum abest ut : haec dicta adeo nihil move- 
runt quemquam, ut legati prope violati sint, 
these words left them (til so unmoved 
that, etc., or had so little effect, etc., Liv. 
3, 2, 7: qui adeo non tenuit iram, ut gladio 
cinctum in senatum venturum se esse pa- 
lam diceret, who restrained his anger so 
little that, etc. (for, qui non— tenuit iram 
adeo, ut), id. 8, 7, 5 ; so 5,45,4; Veil. 2, 66, 
4 : Curt. 3, 12, 22.— Also with contra in the 
concluding clause : apud hostes Afri et 
Carthaginienses adeo non sustinebant, ut 
contra etiam pedem referrent, Liv. 30, 34, 5. 
— B. Adeo is placed enclitically after its 
word", like quidem, certe, and the Gr. ye, 
even, indeed, jtist, precisely. So, 1. 
Most freq. with pronouns, in order to ren- 
der prominent something before said, or 
foil., or otherwise known (cf. in Gr. eyayye, 
<rvye, ai>T6? ye, etc., Viger. ed. Herm. 489, 
vi. and Zeun.) : argentariis male credi qui 
aiunt, nugas praedicant : nam et bene et 
male credi dico ; id adeo hodie ego exper- 
tus sum, just this (touto ye), Plant. Cure. 
5, 3, 1 ; so id. Aul. 2, 4, 10; 4, 2, 15 ; id. Am. 
1, 1, 98 ; 1. 2, 6 ; id. Ep. 1, 1, 51 ; 2, 2, 31 ; 5, 
2, 40 ; id. Poen. 1, 2, 57 : plerique homines, 
quos, cum nihil refert, pudet • ubi puden- 
dum'st ibi eos deserit pudor, is adeo tu es, 
you are just such a one, id. Ep. 2, 1, 2: 
cui tu obsecutus, facis huic adeo injuriam, 
Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 68 : tute adeo jam ejus verba 
audies, you yourself shall hear what he 
has to say (cOye uKora-t]), Ter. And. 3, 3, 27: 
Dolabella tuo nihil scito inihi esse jncundi- 
us : hanc adeo habebo gratiam illi, i. e. hanc, 
quae maxima est, gratiam (ravTtiv ye t»;v 
xJpiv), Caes. ap. Cic. Att. 9, 16 : haec adeo 
ex illo mihi jam speranda fuerunt, even 
this, Verg. A. 11, 275. — It is often to be 
translated by the intensive and, and just, 
etc. (so esp. in Cic. and the histt) : id adeo, 
si placet, considerate, just that (touto ye 
aKoireire), Cic. Caec. 30, 87 : id adeo ex ipso 
senatus consult o cognoscite, id. Verr. 2, 4. 
64, 143 ; cf. id. Clu. 30, 80 : ad hoc quicum- 
que aliarum atque senatus partium erant, 
conturbari remp., quam minus valerc ipsi 
malebant. Id adeo malum multos post an- 
nos in civitatem reverterat, And just this 
e^VSaii. C. 37, 11; so 37, 2; id. J. 68, 3; 
Liv. 2, 29, 9 ; 4, 2, 2 : id adeo manifestum 
erit, si cognoverimus, etc., and this, pre- 
cisely this, will be evident, if, etc., Quint. 
2, 16, 18 Spald. — It is rarely used with ille: 
i ille adeo ilium mentiri sibi credet, Plaut. 
Am. 1, 2, 6.— Sometimes with the r el. pron. : 
quas adeo haud quisquam liber umquam te- 
tigit, Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 57 ; Cic. Fin. 2, 12, 37. 
— With interrog. pron.: Quis adeo tarn 
Latinae linguae ignarus est, quin, etc., Gell. 
7, 17. — Adeo is joined with the pers. pron. 
when the discourse passes from one person 
to another, and attention is to be particular- 
ly directed to the latter : Juppiter, tuque 
adeo summe Sol, qui res omnes inspicis, 
and thou especially, and chiefly thou, 
Enn. ap. Prob.: teque adeo decus hoc aevi 
inibit, Verg. E. 4, 11; id. G. 1, 24 : teque, 
Neptune, invoco, vosque adeo venti, Poet, 
ap. Cic. Tusc. 4, 34, 73; and without the 
copulative : vos adeo . . . item ego vos vir- 
gin circumvinciam, Plaut. Rud. 3, 4, 25. — 
Ego adeo often stands for ego quidem, equi- 
dem (c7<d?e) : turn libertatem Chrysalo lar- 
gibere: ego adeo numquam accipiam, Plaut. 
Bacch. 4, 7, 30; so id. Mil. 4,4,55 ; id. True. 
4, 3, 73 : ego adeo hanc primus inveni viam, 
Ter. Eun. 2, 2, 1(3 : nee me adeo fallit, Verg. 
A. 4, 96.— Ipse adeo (aurof 7c), for the sake 
of emphasis : atque hercle ipsum adeo con- 
tuor, Plaut. As. 2, 3, 24 : ipsum adeo praesto 
video cum Davo.Ter. And. 2, 5, 4 : ipse adeo 
senis ductor Rhoeteus ibat pulsibus, Sil. 14, 
487. — 2. With the conditional com;,;, si, nisi, 
etc. (Gr. et ye), if indeed, if truly : nihili 
est autem suum qui officium facere immemor 
est, nisi adeo monitus, unless, indeed, he is 
reminded of it, Plaut. Ps. 4, 7, 2 : Si. Num 
illi molestae quippiam hae sunt nuptiae? 
Da. Nihil Hercle : aut si adeo, bidui est aut 
tvidui haec sollicitudo, and if, indeed, etc. 
(not if also, for also is implied in aut), Ter. 
And. 2, 6, 7.-3. With adverbs: nunc adeo 
(vvv ye), Plant. As. 3. 1, 29: id. Mil. 2. 2. 4 ; 



ADEO 

id. Merc. 2, 2, 57; id. Men. 1, 2, 11; id. Ps. 
1, 2, 52 : id. Rud. 3, 4, 23 ; Ter. And. 4, 5, 36 ; 
Verg. A. t), 156 : jam adeo (£>; 7c), id. ib. 
5, 268; Sil. 1, 20; 12, 534; Val. Fl. 3, 70: 
umquam adeo, Plaut. Cas. 5, 4, 23: inde 
adeo, Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 1 : hinc adeo, Verg. 
E.9, 59: sic adeo (outoic 7c), id. A. 4, 533 ; 
Sil. 12, 646 : vix adeo, Verg. A. 6, 498 : non 
adeo, Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 57 ; Verg. A. 11, 436. 
—4. With adjectives = vel, indeed, even, 
very, fully : quot adeo cenae,quas deflevi, 
mortuae ! how very many suppers, Plaut. 
Stich. 1, 3, 59: quotque adeo fuerint, qui 
temnere superbum . . . Lucil. ap. Non. 180, 
2 : nullumne malorum finem adeo poenae- 
que dabis (adeo separated from nullum by 
poet, license) ? wilt thou make no end at 
all to calamity and punishment? Val. 
Fl. 4, 63 : tris adeo incertos caeca caligine 
soles erramus, three whole days we wan- 
der about,Yerg. A. 3, 203; 7, 629.— And 
with comp. or the adv. magis, multo, etc. : 
quae futura et quae facta, eloquar : multo 
adeo melius quam illi, cum sim Juppiter, 
very much filter, Plaut. Am. 5, 2, 3; so id, 
True. 2, 1, 5 : magis adeo id facilitate quam 
alia ullu culpa mea, contigit, Cic. de Or. 2, 4, 
15. 5. With the conjj. sive, aut, vel,™ 
order to annex a more important thought, 
or to make a correction, or indeed, or 
rather, or even only: sive qui ipsi am- 
bissent, seu per internuntium, sive adeo 
aediles perfidiose quoi duint, Plaut. Am. 
prol. 71 : si hercle scivissem, sive adeo jo- 
culo dixisset mihi, se illam amare, id. Merc. 
5, 4, 33; so id. True. 4, 3, 1; id. Men. 5, 2, 
74 ; Ter. Hec. 4, 1, 9 : nam si te tegeret pu- 
dor, sive adeo cor sapientia imbutum foret, 
Pacuv. ap. Non. 521, 10 : mihi adeunda est 
ratio, qua ad Apronii quaestum, sive adeo, 
qua ad istius ingentem immanemque prae- 
dam possim pervenire, or rather, Cic Verr, 
2, 3, 46, 110 ; Verg. A. 11, 369 ; so, atqu4 
adeo: ego princeps in adjutoribus atque 
adeo secundus, Cic. Att. 1, 17, 9.-6. With 
the imperative, for emphasis, like tandem, 
modo, dum, the Germ, so, and the Gr. ye 
(cf. L. and S.), now, J pray : propera adeo 
puerum tollere hinc ab janua, Ter. And. 
4, 4, 20 (cf. ZvWdBeTe 7' wtov, Soph. Phil. 
1003). — C. Like admodum or nimis, to 
give emphasis to an idea (for the most part 
only in comic poets, and never except with 
the positive of the adj. ; cf. Consent. 2023 
P.), indeed, truly, so very, so entirely: 
nam me ejus spero fratrem propemodum 
jam repperisse adulescentem adeo nobilem, 
so very noble, Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 123 : nee sum 
adeo informis, n or am J so very ugly, Yerg. 
E. 2, 25 : nam Caii Luciique casu non adeo 
fractus, Suet. Aug. 65 : et merito adeo, and 
with perfect right, Ter. Hec. 2, 1, 42 : etiam 
num credis te ignorarier aut tua facta adeo, 
do you, then, think: that they are ignor- 
ant of you or your conduct entirely t id. 
Ph. 5, 8, 38. — I). To denote what exceeds 
expectation, even: quam omnium Thebis 
vir unam esse optimam dijudicat, quamque 
adeo cives Thebani rumificant probam, and 
whom even the Thebans (who are always 
ready to speak evil of others) declare to bs 
an honest woman, Plaut. Am. 2, 2, 44. — 
Hence also it denotes something added to 
the rest of the sentence, besides, too, over 
and above, usually in the connection : -que 
adeo (rare, and never in prose; cf. adhuc, 
I.) : quin te Di omnes perdant qui me hodie 
oculis vidisti tuis, meque adeo scelestum, 
and me too, Plaut. Rud. 4, 4, 122 ; cf. id. 4, 
2, 32 : haec adeo tibi me, ipsa palam fari 
omnipotens Saturnia jussit, Verg. A. 7, 427. 
III. After Caesar and Cicero (the 
only instance of this use adduced from Cice- 
ro' s works, Off. 1, 11, 36, being found in a 
passage rejected by the best critics, as B. 
and K.). A. F° r adding an important and 
satisfactory reason to an assertion, and 
then it always stands at the beginning of 
the clause, indeed, for : cum Hanno pero- 
ral s set, nemini omnium cum eo certare ne- 
cesse fuit : adeo prope omnis senatus Han- 
nibalis erat : the idea is, Hdnn-o's speech, 
though so poioerful,was ineffectual, and 
did not need a reply; for all the sen- 
ators belonged to the party of Hanni- 
bal, Liv. 21, 11, 1 ; so id. 2, 27, 3 ; 2, 28, 2; 
8, 37, 2; Tac. Ann. 1, 50, 81 ; Juv. 3, 274 ; 
14^ 233. — Also for introducing a paren- 
thesis : sed ne illi quidem ipsi satis mitem 
gentem fore (adeo ferocia atque indomita 
33 



ADEQ 

ingenia esse) ni subinde auro . . . principum 
animi concilientur, Liv. 21, 20, 8 ; so id. 9, 
26, 17 ; 3, 4, 2 ; Tac. A. 2, 28. — B. When 
to a specific fact a general considera- 
tion is added as a reason for it, so, thus 
(in Livy very often) : haud dubius, facile m 
in aequo campi victoriam fore: adeo non 
fortuna modo, sed ratio etiam cum barba- 
ris stabat, thus not only fortune, but sa- 
gacity r , was on the side of the barbari- 
ans. Liv. 5, 38, 4 : adeo ex parvis saepe 
magnarum momenta rerum pendent, id. 27 
9, 1 ; so id. 4, 31, 5 ; 21, 33, 6 ; 28, 19 ; Quint. 
1, 12, 7 ; Curt. 10, 2, 11 ; Tac. Agr. 1 : adeo 
in teneris consuescere multum est, Verg. G. 
2, 272.— C. I n advancing from one thought 
to another more important=immo, rather., 
indeed, nay: nulla umquam res publica ubi 
tantus paupertati ac parsimoniae honos me- 
rit: adeo, quanto rerum minus, tanto minus 
cupiditatis erat, Liv. praef. 11 ; so Gell. 11, 
7 ; Symm. Ep. 1, 30, 37.— D a With a nega- 
tive after ne — quidem or quoque, so much 
the more or less, much less than, still less 
(post-Aug.) : hujus totius temporis fortu- 
nam ne defiere quidem satis quisquam dig- 
ne potuit : adeo nemo exprimere verbis po- 
test, still less can one describe it by 
words, Veil. 2, 67, 1 : ne tecta quidem ur- 
bis, adeo publicum consilium numquam 
adiit, still less, Tac. A. 6, 15 ; so id. H. 3, 64 ; 
Curt. 7, 5, 35 : favore militum anxius et su- 
perbia viri aequalium quoque, adeo superio- 
rum intolerantis, who could not endure 
his equals even, much less his superiors, 
Tac. H. 4, 80. — So in gen., after any nega- 
tive : quaelibet enim ex iis artibus in pau- 
cos libros contrahi solet : adeo innnito spa- 
tio ac traditione opus non est, so much the 
less is there need, etc., Quint. 12, 11, 16 ; 
Plin. 17, 12, 35, § 179 ; Tac. H. 3, 39.— (The 
assumption of a causal signif. of adeo^ideo, 
propterea, rests upon false readings. For 
in Cael. Cic. Fam. 8, 15 we should read ideo, 
a. and K., and in Liv. 24, 32, 6, ad ea, 
Weiss.) . — See more upon this word in Hand, 
Turs. I. pp. 135-155. 

Adedna, ae, /•> the tutelary goddess 
of neio-comers, Aug. Civ. D. 4, 21. 

adepS, ^pis, comm. (in Plin. and Serv., 
m. ; in Cels., Quint., aud Pallad.,/. ; in Col. 
c. ; cf. Prise. 657 and 752 P. ; Rudd. I. 
p. 34; Koffm. s. v.) [from aAet<pa with in- 
terch. of d and t], the soft fat or grease 
of animals, suet, lard (the hard is called 
sevum). Ai Lit. : suilla, Varr. R. R. 2, 11, 
7 : ursinus, Plin. 28, 11, 46, § 163 : vulpinus, 
ib. : auserinus, ib. 48 : caprina, Col. R. R. 6, 
12, 5 : ad creandas adipes, id. ib. 8, 14, 11. 
— And in the seuse of sevum : adipe, qui 
prope omnes Italas lucernas illuminat, the 
tallow, Aug. de Mor. Manich. 2, 16. — Hence, 
B. M eta ph. J, Of men: non mihi esse 
Lentuli somuum, nee Cassii adipes, nee Ce- 
thegi temeritatem pertimescendam, the cor- 
pulence, * Cic. Cat. 3, 7 : dum sciat (decla- 
mator) sibi quoque tenuandas adipes, Quint. 
2, 10, 6 (v. adipatus, crassus, crassedo). — 2. 
Of fat or fertile earth, marl, Plin. 17, 6, 4, 
§ 42. — 3, In trees, that part of the wood 
which is soft and full of sap, also called 
alburnum, Plin, 16, 38, 72, § 182. 

if^PThe form adipes, assumed by Prise. 
752 and 1293 P., on account of Varr. R. R. 2, 
11, rests upon an error, since not adipes 
ilia, but adeps suilla, should be read 
there, v. Schneid. ad h 1. 

adeptlO, onis, /• [adipiscor], an ob- 
taining, attainment: nos beatam vitam 
non depulsione mali, sed adeptione boni ju- 
dicemus, Cic. Fin. 2, 13, 41 : bonorum (opp., 
malorum evitatio), Quint. 5, 10, 33 : alicujns 
commodi, Cic. Part. Or. 32, 113. 

1. adeptUS, a, urn, Part, of adipiscor. 

* 2. adeptUS, us, m,, = adeptio, an 
obtaining: fidei, Paul. Nol. Ep. 32, 18 (in 
Cic Fin. 3, 14, 48, Henry Stephens reads : ad 
virtutis adeptnm, but the true reading is 
habitum, Madv.). 

ad-equito, &vi, atum, 1, v. n. I, To 
ride to or toward a place, to gallop 
up to. — With ad : equites Ariovisti pro- 
pius tumulum accedere et ad nostros ad- 
equitare, * Caes. B. G. 1, 46.— With in: in 
primos ordines, Curt. 7, 4, 17.— With the 
local adv. quo : quo tarn ferociter adequi- 
tasset, inde se fundi fugarique, Liv. 9, 22, 6. 
— With dat. : portis, Liv. 22, 42, 5 ; so, por- 
ta© Colliuae, Plin. 15, 18, 20, § 76: vallo, Liv. 
34 



ADHA 

9, 22, 4 : castris, Tac. A. 6, 34.— With ace. of 
limit : adequitare Syracusas, Liv. 24, 31 : 
perarmatos adequitare coepit, Curt. 4, 9, 14 
(Vogel now reads here ad perarmatos). — 
II. To ride near to or by: juxta aliquem, 
Suet. Cai. 25 : vehicuio anteire aut circa ade- 
quitare. id. Aug. 64. 

ad-erro. are, 1, v. n., to wander to. — 
With dat. : scopulis, Stat. S. 2, 2, 120 — 
T r o p. : ululatus aderrat auribus, Stat. 
Th. 9, 178. 

*ad-escO, are, 1, v. a., to feed or fat- 
ten: volantia adescata, Cael. Aur. Acut. 1, 
11. 

*adesdum or ades dum (imper. 

from adsum with dum ; ci. : agedum, ma- 
nedum, etc., v. dum), come hither: Sosia, 
adesdum ; paucis te volo, Ter. And. 1, 1, 2. 

* ad-esiiriO, ivi, 4, v. n. [ad, intens.], 
to be very hungry : adesurivit et inhiavit 
acriusjupus, Plaut. Trin. 1, 2^132. 

adesilS 7 a, um, v. adedo, ±*. a. 

(ad-expetO, Sre, false read, in Sen. Ep. 
117,4.) 

adf. Words beginning thus, v. under 
aff. 

adj?. Words beginning thus, v. under 
aggj 

(ad-habltO, are, 1, v. n. : adhabites, a 
false reading for adbites in Plaut. Capt. 3, 

ad-Haereo, haesi, haesum, 2, v. n., 
to cleave or stick to a thing. I, Lit., of 
iron adhering to a magnet : unus ubi ex 
uno dependet, subter adhaerens, Lucr. 6, 
914; cf. id. 3, 557: tota adhaerens (lingua) 
crocodilis, cleaving to his palate, Plin. 11, 
37, 65, § 171.— With in and abl. : tela in 
tuis visceribus, Cic. Vatin. 5, 13 ; so Ov. M. 
4, 693. — With ace. : cratera et corvus ad- 
haeret, Cic. Arat. 541 (so Tert. : humerum, 
de Pall. 5).— With abl. : fronte cuspis, Ov. 
M. 5, 38. — With dat., poet.: tonsis (ovi- 
bus) illotus sudor, Verg. G. 3, 443 : veteri 
craterae limus adhaesit, Hor. Sat. 2, 4, 80 ; 
and in later prose : navis ancoris, is fast- 
ened to them, Tac. A. 2, 23 : stativis castris, 
id. ib. 3,21 ; and : jumento, to stick to, Gell. 
20, 1.— II. Fig. A. In g en., to cling to, 
adhere to : adhaesit homini ad intimum 
ventrem fames, Plaut, Stich. 1, 3, 83 ; and 
of fawning adherence to one, id. As. 1, 3, 
59 : cui canis ex vero dictum cognomen ad- 
haeret, adheres, Hor. S. 2, 2, 56 : nuili for- 
tunae adhaerebat animus, i. e. inconstans 
fuit, Liv. 41, 20 : obsidioni fortiter adhae- 
rentes, Amm. 19, 3.— B. Adhaerere alicui, 
to be close to a person or thing, to be 
near, to hang on, keep close, fe>,etc, (mostly 
post-Cic, esp. in the histt.) : vineis modica 
silva adhaerebat, was close to it, adjoined 
it, Tac. H. 2, 25; so Amm. 18, 2.— Of per- 
sons : procul abesse Romanos : lateri adhae- 
rere gravem dominum, i. e. he (the King of 
Macedon) hangs on them, threatens them 
by his nearness, Liv. 39, 25 : nee umquam 
non adhaerentes, and never departing 
from Jiis side, Suet. Galb. 14 : comitem 
perpetuo alicui adhaerere, Plin. 10, 22, 26, 
§ 51 : tempus adhaerens, the time in hand, 
just the present time, Quint. 5, 10, 46: 
obvio quoque adhaerente, while each one 
adhered to him, Suet. Oth. 6 ; and so 
trop.: adhaeret altissimis invidia, Veil. 1, 
9.— C. To hang on a thing, i. e. to trail or 
drag after, to be the last, sarcastically in 
Cic. : tenesne memoriA. te extremum ad- 
haesisse? hung on the end, i. e. extremo 
loco quaestorem esse factum, Vat. 5 (cf.hae- 
rere, Liv. 5, 2 fin., and Gron. ad h. 1.) ; and 
without sarcasm, Curt, 10, 5, 19. 

ad-haereSCO, haesi, haesum, 3, v. 
inch, [adhaereo], to cleave or stick to, 
to adhere, lit. and trop. (in the trop. sense 
almost exclusively belonging to Cic). I. 
Lit., constr. with ad, in, and abl. or ubi : 
tragnla ad turrim, Caes. B. G. 5, 46: ne 
quid emineret, ubi ignis adhaeresceret, id. 
B. C. 2, 9: tamquam in quodam incili, 
Cael. ap. Cic. Fam. 8, 5: si potes in his lo- 
cis adhaerescere, if you can stick (i. e. 
stay or sojotirn) in such places, id. Att. 4, 
4 : in me omnia conjurationis nefaria tela 
adhaeserunt, Auct. Or. pro Dom. 24 ; cf. ib. 
5 ; ad quamcunque disciplinam, tamquam ad 
saxum, adhaerescunt, Cic. Ac. 2, 3: argu- 
mentum ratio ipsa confirmat, quae simul 
atque emissa est, adhaerescit, sc. ad men- 



AD HI 

tern, sticks fast to, is fastened upon the' 
memory (the figure is derived from mis- 
siles), id. de Or. 2, 53.— With dat. : justitiae- 
honestatique, to be attached or devoted to, 
Cic. Off. 1, 24 — And absol. : oratio ita li- 
bere fiuebat, ut numquam adhaeresceret, 
never was at a stand, faltered, Cic. Brut. 
79 ; cf. ib. 93 (v. haereo) : adhaerescere ad 
oolumnam (sc. Maeniam) ; sarcastically, to 
remain fixed, at the debtor's columns, i.e. 
to be punished as a fraudulent debtor, 
Cic. Sest. 8, 18 ; cf. Liv. 5, 47.— H. Fig., to 
correspond to, to accord- with, to fit to or 
suit : si non omnia, quae praeponerentur a 
me ad omnium vestriim studinm, adhaere- 
scerent, Cic. de Or. 3, 10, 37. 

*adhaese, adv. [adhaereo], hesitat- 
ingly, stammering^ : loqui, Gell. 5, 9. 

* adhaesiQ, onis, / [adhaereo], aw ad- 
hering, adhesion : complexiones et copula- 
tiones et adhaesiones atomorum inter se, 
Cic. Fin. 1, 6, 19, v. Madv. ad h. 1. ; Gloss. 
Placid. Clas. Auct. III. p. 427 Mai. 

adhaesilS, l "is, m. [id.], an adhering r 
adherence (only in Lucr.) : pulveris, Lucr. 
3, 38; 4, 1242: membrornm, id. 5, 842 r 
umoris, id. 6, 472 ; cf. Non. 73, 6. 

* ad -halo, are, v. a., to breathe on : si 
pates centes (fungos) primo (serpens) ad- 
halaverit, Plin. 22, 22, 46, § 95. 

adhamo, are, l,v. a. [hamus], to catch r 
seem e : Qui serius honores adhamaverunt r 
vix admittuntur ad eos, Cic. ap. Non. 2, 5„ 
where Mercer, better reads adamaverunt. 
Adherbal, »lis, m., a Numidian 
prince, the son of Micipsa, slain by Ju- 
gurtha, Sail. J. 5 al. 

ad-hlbeo, "i, itum, 2, v. a. [habeo], to- 
hold toward or to, to turn, bring, add 
to; with ad, in, dat. or absol. I, In 
ge n - A. L i t. : cur non adhibuisti, "dum 
istaec loquereris, tympanum, Plaut. Poen. 5, 
5, 38: hue adhibete auris (ad ea) quae ego 
loquar, id, Ps. 1, 2, 20 : ad tnea formosos vul- 
tus adhibete carmiua, Ov. Am. 2, 1, 37; cf. 
ib. 13,15 : man us medicas ad vulnera.Verg. 
G. 3, 455 : odores ad deos, Cic. N. D. 1, 40 r 
quos negat ad panem adhibere quidquam,. 
praeter nasturtium, to eat with it, Cic. 
Tusc. 5, 34 : alicui calcaria, id. Brut. 56 (cf. 
addere calcar, v. addo) : manus genibus ad- 
hibet, i. e. admovet, genua amplexatur, Ov. 
M. 9, 216 : vincula captis, to put them on 
them,id.Y. 3,293.— B, Trop.: metum ut 
mihi adhibeam, Plaut. Men. 5, 6, 20; cf. 
Quint. 1, 3, 15: nunc animum nobis adhibe 
veram ad rationem, Lucr. 2, 1023 ; Cic. Har. 
Resp. 10, 20 : vacuas auris adhibe ad veram 
rationem, Lucr. 1, 51 ; cf. Ov. M. 15, 238 ; 
Verg. A. 11, 315: ut oratio, quae lumen ad- 
hibere rebus debet, ea obscuritatem afferat, 
Cic. de Or. 3, 13, 50: est ea (oratio) quidem 
utilior, sed raro proficit neque est ad vulgua 
adhibenda, id. Tusc. 4, 28, 60 : adhibere cul- 
tus, honores, preces, diis immortalibus, id. 
N. D. 1, 2 ; cf. Tac. A. 14, 53 : alicui volupta- 
tes, Cic. Mur. 35 : consolationem, id. Brut. 
96 : omnes ii motus, quos orator adhibere 
volet judici, which the orator may wish to 
communicate to the judge, id. de Or. 2, 45 
al. — Hence = addere, adjungere, to add to : 
uti quattuor initiis rerum illis quintam hanc 
naturam non adhiberet, Cic. Ac. 1, 11, 39 r 
ad domesticorum majornmque morem etiam 
hanc a Socrate adventitiam doctrinam adhi- 
buerunt, id. Rep. 3, 3. 

II. Esp. A. Of persons, to bring 
one to a place, to summon, to em- 
ploy (cf. the Engl, to have one tip) : hoc 
temere numquam amittam ego a me, quin 
mihi testes adhibeam. Ter. Ph. 4. 5. 2= so 
Cic. Fin. 2, 21 ; Tac. A. 15, 14 : medicum, 
Cic. Fat. 12: leges, ad quas (sc. defenden- 
das) di$X)SoQmxyx,we are summoned, id. Clu. 
52 : nee, quoniam apud Graecos judices res 
agetur, poteris adhibere Demosthenem, id. 
Tusc. 1, 5, 10 : adhibebitur heros, shall be 
brought upon the stage, Hor. A. P. 227 : 
castris adhibere socios et foedera jungere, 
Verg. A. 8, 56 : aliquem in partem periculi, 
Ov. M. 11, 447 : in auxilium, Just. 3, 6.— B. 
Adhibere ad or in consilium, to send, for 
one in order to receive counsel from him , 
to consult one: neque hos ad concilium ad- 
hibendos censeo,Caes. B. G. 7, 77,3 : in con- 
silium, Plin. Ep. 6, 11, 1; so also absol. : a 
tuis reliquis non adhibemur, we are not 
consulted, Cic. Fam. 4, 7 ; so ib. 10, 25 ; 11^ 



ADHO 

7; id. Off. 3, 20 ; id. Phil. 5, 9 ; Caes. B. G. 
1 20 ; Suet. Claud. 35 ; cf. Cortius ad Sail. 
J. 113, and ad Cic. Fam. 4, 7, 15. — But 
sometimes adhibere in consilium = admit - 
tere in cons., to admit to a consultation. 
—So trop. : est tuum, sic agitare animo,ut 
non adhibeas in consilium cogitationum tua- 
rum desperationem aut timorem, Cic. Fam. 
6, 1.— C. Adhibere aliquem cenae, epulis, 
etc., to invite to a dinner, to a banquet, 
etc.., to entertain : adhibete Penatis et pa- 
trios epulis, etc., Verg. A. 5, 62 ; so Hor. C. 
4, 5, 32 ; Suet. Caes. 73 ; Aug. 74 : in convi- 
vium, Nep. praef. 7. — And absol., to re- 
ceive, to treat: quos ego universos adliiberi 
liberaliter dico oportere, Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 5 : 
Quintum filium severius adhibebo, id. Att, 
10, 12.— D, Adhibere se ad aliquid, to be- 
take or apply one's self to a thing, i. e. to 
devote attention to it : adhibere se remo- 
tum a curis veram ad rationem, Lucr. 1, 44 
(cf. above I. A.); and absol. : adhibere se, 
to appear or to behave one's self in any 
manner : permagni est hominis, sic se adhi- 
bere in tanta potestate, ut nulla alia po- 
testas ab iis, quibus ipse praeest, desidere- 
tur, Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 7. — E. Adhibere ali- 
quid ad aliquid, alicui rei, or with in and 
abl., to put a thing to a determinate use, 
to apply, to use or employ for or in any 
thing definite (therefore, with intention 
and deliberation ; on the contr., usurpare 
denotes merely momentary use ; cf. Cic. 
Lael. 2, 8; and uti, use that arises from 
some necessity, Herz. ad Caes. B. G. 1, 20) : 
adhibere omnem diligentiam ad convalescen- 
dum, Cic. Fam. 16, 9 ; cf. ib. 6 ; Nep. Att. 21 : 
cautionem privatis rebus suis, Cic. Att. 1, 
19: medicinara aegroto, id. ib. 16, 15: hu- 
matis titulum, i. e. inscriptionem addere, 
Liv. 26, 25 : belli necessitatibus patientiam, 
id. 5, 6 : fraudem testamento, Suet. Dom. 2 : 
curam viis, id. Vesp. 5 -. fidem et diligentiam 
in amicorum periculis, Cic. Clu. 42, 118 : 
misericordiam in fortunis alicujus et sapi- 
entiam in salute reip.,id. Rab. Perd. 2: fio- 
res in causis, id. Or. 19 : curam in valetu- 
dine tuenda, Cels. 3, 18 ; and with de : cu- 
ram de aliqua re, Cic. Fam. 2, 7, 3 : modum, 
to set a limit to, to set bounds to : vitio, 
Cic. Tusc. 4, 17 : sumptibus, Suet. Ner. 16 : 
cf. id. Aug. 100 ; id. Tib. 34 : voluptati, Quint. 
9, 3, 74 : memoriam contumeliae, to retain 
it in memory, Nep. Epam. 7. — P. Adhibe- 
re aliquid, in gen., to use, employ, exer- 
cise : neqne quisquam parsimoniam adhi- 
bet, Plaut. Most. 1, 3, 79: fidem, id. Rud. 4, 
3, 104 : celeritatem, Cic. Fam. 10, 21, 2 : ca- 
lumniam, fraudem, dolum, id. Auct. Or. pro 
Dom. 14, 36 : modum quemdam, Cic. Tnsc. 
4, 17, 38 ; Suet. Calig. 2 : nulla arte adhibi- 
ta, Caes. B. C. 3, 26 : sollertiam, Tibull. 3, 4, 
75: querelas, Plin. Ep. 1, 12 : adhibere mo- 
ram =differre, Pompon. Dig. 18, 6, 16.— G. 
In later Lat. : alicui aliquem, to bring up, 
quote one to another as authority for an 
assertion : is nos aquam nxultam ex diluta 
nive bibentis coercebat, severiusque incre- 
pabat adhibebatque nobis auctoritates no- 
bilium medicorum, Gell. 19, 5, 3. 

adhibltio, 6nis,/. [adhibeo] (late Lat.). 
I, An admission (cf. adhibeo, II. C.) : con- 
vivii, to a banquet, Gai. Inst. 1, 1. — II, An 
employing, application (cf. ib. II. F.) : 
cucurbitarum, Marc. Emp. 15. 

adhlbltUS, a, um, Part of adhibeo. 

ad* hiiini o ? * v *t QT n i itum, 4, <$. n., to 

neigh to or after. I, Lit., constr. with dot. 
and ace, also ad and in with ace. : for- 
tis equus yisae semper adhinnit equae, Ov. 
Rem. Am. 634 ; cf. id. A. A. 1, 208 ; Plin. 35, 
10, 36, § 95.— Hence, of lewd persons, Plaut. 
Fragm. ap. Mai. p. 19 ; Prud. ap. Symm. 1, 
57 : aliquem, August, de Mor. Manich. 2, 19 : 
in aliqnam, Arn. 4, p. 135 : so, ad aliquam, 
Vulg. Jer. 5, 8 al. — II. F i g., to strive 
after or long for with voluptuous de- 
sire: admissarius iste ad illius orationem 
adhinnivit, gave his passionate assent to, 
expressed his delight in, etc., Cic. Pis. 28, 
69: virginis delicatas voculas, App. M. 6, p. 
185. 

(ad-horreo, ere, a false read, in Albi- 
nov. 1, '221, for inhorreo.) 

* adhortamen, inis, n. [adhortor], a 
means of exhortation, an exhortation: 
multa mihi apud vos adhortamina suppe- 
tunt, App. Flor. 4, 18, p. 359. 

adhortatiG, r >nis, /. [id.], an exhor- 



A D II U 

tation, encouragement (class.) : omissa 
nostra adhortatione veniamus ad eorum 
sermonem, * Cic. de Or. 2, 3, 11: cum cla- 
more comprobata adhortatio esset, Liv. 4, 
38 ; 9, 13 ; Curt. 3, 11, 9 ; Plin. 8, 42, 65, 
§ 159 ; Quint. 11, 3, 64 ; Suet. Aug. 94 al. 

adhortativns, a, um, adj. [adhortor], 
belonging to exhortation: modus, the 
mood of, Diom. I. p. 328 P. al. 

adhortator, oris, w. [id.], an exhort- 
er, encourager, exciter : operis, Liv. 2, 
58.— Absol, Liv. 7, 32 ; 9, 13 ; 32. 25. 

1. adhortatUS, a, um, Part, of adhor- 
tor. 

2. * adhortatUS. us, ™- [adhortor], 
an exhortation, persuasion : meo adhor- 
tatu, App. Mag. p. 338. 

ad-hortor, ari, atus, 1, v. dep., to 
encourage, urge, exhort one to a thing, 
constr. with ad, in, de, or absol. : nam me 
meae vitae consuetudo ad C. Rabirium de- 
fendendum est adhortata, Cic. Rab. Perd. 1 : 
ne posset aliquando ad bellum faciendum 
locus ipse adhortari, id. Uff. 1, 11, 35 : ali- 
quem ad certam laudem, id. Fam. 1, 7 : lori- 
catos ad discumbendum, Suet. Calig. 45 : in 
bellum, Tac. H. 3, 61 : in ultionem sui, Suet. 
Ner. 41 : de re frumentaria Boios atque 
Aeduos adhortari non destitit, he did not 
cease to incite and spur on the Boii and 
Aedui, in respect to a supply of corn, 
Caes. B. G. 7, 11.— Absol. : milites, Cic. Phil. 
4, 5 : nullo adhortante sibi quisque dux 
et instigator, Tac. H. 1, 38.— Followed by ut, 
ne, or the simple subj. : adhort. adulescen- 
tes,ut turbulenti velint esse, Cic. Phil. 1, 9 : 
tandem Bruto adhortante, ne jamdudum 
operientes destitueret, Suet. Caes. 81 : ad- 
hortor, properent, Ter. Eun. 3, 5, 35: ad- 
hortari se, to rouse or bestir one's self: 
ferus ipse (leo) sese adhortans rapidum in- 
citat animo, Catull. 63, 85. 

^g° Pass. : adulati erant ab amicis et 
adhortati, Cassius ap. Prise. 791 P. : punc- 
tione aliqua adhortati vel titillati, Gael. Au- 
rel. Acut. 2, 3. 

ad-hosplto. avi, v. a., to entertain as 
guest. — Only trop.: Martem atque Con- 
cordiam multis immolationibus sibi adhos- 
pitavere, to propitiate, Diet. Cret. 1, 15^. 

ad-hue <*<#». I. P r o p., of p 1 a c e, to 
this place, hitherto, thus far (designating 
the limit, inclusive of the whole space trav- 
ersed : hence often joined with usque ; cf. 
ad, A. 1. B.) : conveniunt adhuc utriusque 
verba, thus far, to this point, the state- 
ments of both agree, Plaut. True. 4, 3, 20 : 
adhuc ea dixi, causa cur Zenoni non fuisset, 
Cic. Fin. 4, 16, 44; cf Auct. Her. 1, 9, 16: 
his oris, quas angulo iSaetlcae adhuc usque 
perstrinximus, Mel. 3, 6, 1. — Hence, in the 
desig. of measure or degree, so far, to such 
a degree : et ipse Caesar erat adhuc impu- 
dens, qui exercitum et provinciam invito 
senatu teneret. Cic. Fam. 16. 11, 4: so Liv. 
21, 18, 4; Quint. 2, 19, 2 ; 8, 5, 20.— More 
frequently, 

II. Transf. A. Of t i m e, until now, 
hitherto, as yet (designating the limit, to- 
gether with the period already passed ; cf. 
ad, 1. B.): res adhuc quidem hercle in tuto 
est, Plaut. Merc. 2, 3, 48 : celabitur itidem ut 
celata adhuc est, Ter. Phorm. 4, 3, 20 : sicut 
adhuc fecerunt, speculabuntur, Cic. Cat. 1, 

2, 6 : ille vidit non modo, quot fuissent ad- 
huc philosophorum de summo bono, sed quot 
omnino esse possent sententiae, id. Fin. 5, 
6, 16 : haec adhuc (sc. acta sunt) : sed ad 
praeterita revertamur. id. Att. 5. 20 ; so ib. 

3, 14 fin. ; 5, 17, 46 ; id. Agr. 3; 1, 1 : Bri- 
tanni, qui adhuc pugnae expertes, Tac. Agr. 
37 ; so Curt. 7, 7,8 al.— With usque or sem- 
per : usque adhuc actum est probe, Plaut. 
Mil. 2, 6, 107 ; so id. Ps. 4, 7, 14 ; Ter. And. 1, 
5, 27 ; id. Ad. 4, 4, 23 ; 5, 4, 5 ; id. Hec. 4, 1, 
29 ; Cic. Rep. 2, 20 : quod adhuc semper 
tacui et tacendum putavi, Cic de Or. 1, 26, 
119. — With dum in subordinate proposi- 
tions, for the purpose of more accurate 
desig. of time : quae adhuc te carens, dum 
hie rui, sustentabam,u7ic(£ 1 have endured 
during the whole time that I have been 
here, until now, Plaut. Capt. 5, 1, 4: ad- 
huc dum mihi nullo loco deesse vis, num- 
quam te confirmare potuisti, Cic. Fam. 16, 
4 ; so lb. 18, — Hence the adverbial expres- 
sion (occurring once in Plautus) : adhuc lo- 
cornm, until noiv, hitherto: ut adhuc lo- 
coruni feci, faciam sedulo, Capt. 2, 3, 25. — 



ADHU 

Adhuc denotes not merely a limitation of 
time in the present, but also, though more 
rarely, like usque eo and ad id tempus, and 
the Engl, as yet, in the past : adhuc haec 
erant, ad reliqua alacri tendebamus animo, 
Cic. Div. 2, 2, 4 : Abraham vero adhuc sta- 
bat, Vulg. Gen. 18, 22 : unam adhuc a te epi- 
stulam acceperam, Cic. Att. 7, 2 : cum adhuc 
sustinuisset multos dies, Vulg. Act. 18, 18 : 
scripsi etiam illud quodam in libello . . . di- 
sertos me cognosse nonnullos, eloquentem 
adhuc neminem, Cic. de Or. 1, 21 : una adhuc 
victoria Carus Metius censebatur, Tac. Agr. 
45. — B. Adhuc non, or neque adhuc, not as 
yet, not to this time : nihil adhuc, nothing 
as yet, or not at all as yet : numquam ad- 
\mc,never as yet,never yet: cupidissimi ve- 
niendl maximis injuriis affecti, adhuc non ve- 
nerunt, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 27, 65 : me adhuc non 
legisse turpe utrique nostrum est, id. Fam. 
7, 24, 7 ; so id. 3, 8, 25 ; 6, 14 ; 14, 6, 2 ; Mart. 
7, 89, 10 : cui neque fulgor adhuc nee dum 
sua forma recessit, Verg. A. 11, 70: nihil 
adhuc peccavit etiam, Plaut. Pers. 4, 4, 78 r 
nihil adhuc est, quod vereare, Ter. Heaut. l r 
2, 1 : sed quod quaeris, quando, qua, quo, 
nihil adhuc scimus,Cic. Fam. 9, 7,4; so 9, 
17,7; Caes. B.C. 3,57; Nep. Milt. 5: num- 
quam etiam quicquam adhuc verborum est 
prolocutus perperam, Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 92; 
cf. id. Capt. 5, 2, 7. — C. F° r etiam nunc, yet, 
still; to denote continuance (apparently 
not used by Cic.) : stertis adhuc? are you 
still snoring ? Pers. 3,58; adhuc tranquilla 
res est. it is still quiet, Ter. Ph. 3, 1, 15 ; so 
id. Ad. 1, 2, 42 : Ephesi regem est conse- 
cutus fluctuantem adhuc animo, Liv. 33, 
49. 7: so 21. 43. 14: Tac. A. 1. 8. 17: id. 
H. 2, 44, 73 ; 4, 17 ; id. Germ. 28; Suet. Aug. 
5Q, 69; Plin. Ep. 4, 13, 1; Curt. 8, 6, 18: 
quinque satis fuerant ; nam sex septemve 
libelli est nimium : quid adhuc ludere, 
Musa, juvat ? why play still, still more y 
or further? Mart. 8, 3 ; so id. 4, 91.— B. 
Hence also to denote that a thing is still re- 
maining or existing : at in veterum eomico- 
rum adhuc lihris invenio, I yet find in the 
old comic poets, Quint. 1, 7, 22: quippe 
tres adhuc legiones erant, were still left, 
Tac. H. 3, 9; so id. G. 34; id. Ann. 2, 26 ; 
Mart. 7, 44, 1. — With vb. omitted : si quia 
adhuc precibus locus, exue mentem, Verg. 
A. 4, 319.— B. To denote that a thing has 
only reached a certain yomt, now first, fast 
now: cum adhuc {now for the first time) 
naso odos obsecutus es meo, da vicissim 
meo gutturi gaudium, Plaut. Cure. 1, 2, 9 : 
gangraenam vero, si nondum plane tenet, 
sed adhuc incipit, curare non difficillimum 
est, Cels. 5, 26, 34; so Mart. 13, 102.— Hence, 
with deinde or aliquando following : quam 
concedis adhuc artem omnino non esse, sed 
aliquando, Cic. de Or. 1, 58, 246: senatus 
priusquam edicto convocaretur ad curiam 
concurrit, obseratisque adhuc foribus, de- 
inde anertis. tantas mortuo gratias agit, etc.. 
Suet. fit. 11; so Tac. A. 11, 23.— F. To de- 
note that a thing had reached a certain lim- 
it before another thing happened (in prose 
only after Livy), still, yet, while yet: in- 
conditam multitudinem adhuc disjecit, he 
dispersed the m%iltiiude while yet rear- 
ranged, Tac. A. 3, 42. — Or. For etiam, in- 
super, praeterea, to denote that a thing 
occurs beside or along with another (be- 
longing perhaps only to popular language, 
hence once iu Plaut., and to the post- Aug. 
per.), besides, further, moreover: addam 
minam adhuc istic postea, Plaut. True. 5 r 
18: unam rem adhuc adiciam, Sen. Q. N. 4, 
8: sunt adhuc aliquae non omittendae in 
auro differentiae, Plin. 33, 2, 10, § 37 ; so 
Quint. 2. 21. 6: 9. 4. 34: Val. Fl. 8, 429 ; 
Tac. A. 1, 17; id. Agr. 29; ib. 33; Flor. 1, 
13, 17 ; Vulg. Amos, 4, 7 ; ib. Joan. 16, 12 ; 
ib. Heb. 11, 32.— H. In later Lat. adhuc is 
used like etiam in the Cic. per., = en, yet Y 
still, for the sake of emphasis in compari- 
sons ; then, if it enhances the comparative y 
it stands before it ; but follows it, if that 
which the comp. expresses is added by way 
of augmentation ; as, he has done a stilt 
greater thing, and he has still done a 
greater thing (this is the view of Hand, 
Turs. I. p. 166) : turn Callicles adhuc conci- 
tatior, Quint. 2, 15, 28 : adhuc difflcilior ob- 
servatio est per tenores.id. 1, 5, 22 : si mar- 
mor illi(Phidiae), si adhuc viliorem materiem 
obtulisses, fecisset, etc., Sen. Ep. 85, 34 : art- 
hue diligentius, Plin. 18, 4: cui o-loriae am- 
35 



A DIG 

plior adhiic ex opportunitate cnmulus acces- 
sit, Suet. Tib. 17 : Di faveant, majora adhuc 
restant, Curt. 9, 6, 23 ; so Quint. 10, 1 99 ; 
Tac. G. 19 ; Suet. Ner. 10. I. Adhuc some- 
times = adeo, men (in the connection, et 
adhuc, -qne adhuc ; v. adeo, II. ). a. Ita res 
successit meliusque adhuc, Plaut. Bacch. 4, 
9, 18 : Tellurem Nymphasque et adhuc igno- 
ta precatur flumina, Verg. A. 7, 137 : Nil 
parvum sapias et adhuc sublimia cures. Hor. 
Ep. 1, 12, 15 ; go ib. 2, 2, 114 ; Liv. 22, 49, 
10 ; Sen. Ep. 49, 4.— 1>. Absol. : gens non 
astuta nee callida aperit adhuc secreta pec- 
toris licentia joci, Tac. G. 22 : cetera similes 
Batavis, nisi quod ipso adhuc terrae suae 
solo et caelo acrius auimantur, ib. 29, 3 (cf. ; 
ipse adeo under adeo, II., and at the end) ; 
so Stat. S. 1, 2, 55. — See more upon this 
word. Hand, Turs. I. pp. 156-167. 

* adhucine = adhuc ne, adv. inter - 
rog., still? yet? App. M. 9, p. 218, where 
some read adhucne. 

Adiabena, ae, or Adiabene, es,/., 

_ \\dtafitivrj, a region in the northern 
part of ancient Assyria, now Botan, 
Plin. 5, 12, 13, § 66 ; Aram. 23, 6, 20 al — 
Hence, II. Deri vv. A. Adiabenus, 
a, um, adj., pertaining thereto: Monoba- 
zus, Tac. A L 15, 14 ; so ib. 1 : regimen, ib. 2. 
— Adiabeni, orum, m., its inhabitants, 

Plin. 6, 9, 10, § 28.-B. Adiabcmcus, 

a surname of the emperor Sever us, as 
conqueror of Adiabene, Spark Sev. 9 ; 
Sext. Ruf. 21 ; Inscr. Orell. 903 sq. 

t adiantlllll 7 U it., = adiavrov, the 
plant maiden-hair, Plin. 22, 21, 30, § 62 
(pure Lat. : capillus Veneris or capillaris 
herba, App. H^47 ; Cael. Aurel. Tardl 3, 5). 

t adiaphoros, on, = u&td(popo?, in- 

different : nee dolere adiaphoron esse, Varr. 
ap. Non. 82, 14 (better here written as Greek : 
cf, Cic^Fin. 3, 16,53). 

Adiatdrix, ws, m., king- of the Oo- 
tnani, taken prisoner by Augustus at 
Actium, Cic. Fam. 2, 12, 2. 

adi bills d- adeo], accessible (late 
Lat.) : terra, Cassiod. Hist. Eccl. 11, 18. 

adlClO. v. adjicio. 

ad-lgO, egi, actum, 3, v. a. [ago] (ad- 
axint = adegerint, Plaut. Aul. 1, 1, 11 ; Non. 
75, 5 ; cf. adaxi for adegi), to drive, bring, 
or take a person or thiug to a place (syn : 
appello, adduce, affero ). — Constr. usu. 
with ad, but also with ace, dat.,in or local 
adv. I. Lit., of cattle (cf. ago, I. : abigo, 
abigens, etc.) : quis has hue ovis adegit ? 
Plaut. Bacch. 5, 2, 3 : lactantes vitulos" ad 
matres, Varr. R. R. 2, 5, 16 : pecore e lon- 
ginquioribus vicis adacto, Caes. B. G. 7, 
17: equos per publicum, Suet. Galb. 19. 
—Of persons : mox noctu te adiget horsum 
insomnia, Ter. Eun. 2, 1, 13 : aliquem fulmi- 
ne ad umbras, Verg. A. 4, 25 : quis deus 
Italiam vos adegit ? id. ib. 9, 601. —Hence : 
adigere aliquem arbitrum (ad arbitrum), to 
compel one to come before an arbiter 
(like adigere (ad) jus jurandum ; v. infra) : 
flnibus regundis adigere arbitrum non pos 
sis, Cic. Top. 10, 43 ; so id. Off. 3, 16, 66 ; 
id. Rose. Com. 9, 25.— Of things : classem e 
Ponto Byzantium adigi jusserat, Tac. H. 2, 
83 : ceteras navium per fossas, id. A. ll' 
18, and absol. : dum adiguntur naves, i. e. 
in mare impelluntur, id. Ann. 2, 7 : tigna 
flstucis, to drive in by rammers, Caes. B. 
Gr. 4, 17. — E s p. often of weapons, to drive 
home, plunge, thrust, to send to a place : 
ut telum adigi non posset, Caes. B. C. 3 
51 ; cf. id. E. G. 4, 23 ; ao Verg. A. 9, 431 ;' 
Ov. M. 6, 271: hastae ardentes adactae, 
Tac. H. 4, 23 : ferrum jugulo, Suet. Ner. 49 ; 
cf. Liv. 27, 49 : per obscena ferrum, Suet. 
Calig. 58 : ferrum in viscera, Sil. 7, 626.— 
And from the weapons transf. to the wound, 
to inflict (in the poets and Tac.) : alte vnl' 
nus adactum, Verg. A. 10, 850 : ubi vulnus 
Varo adactum, Tac. A. 1. 61 : vulnus ner o-n. 
leam adegit, id. ib. 6, 35. ' ° 

II. Fig- A. To drive, urge, or bring 
one to a situation, to a state of mind, or 
to an act (esp. against his will) : tn, homo, 
adigis me ad insaniam, Ter. Ad. 1, 2, 31 : 
adigit ita Postumia, Cic. Att 10, 9 : acri cu- 
pidine adigi, Tac. A. 15, 33: ad mortem, id. 
ib. 12, 22.— P o e t. with the subj. without 
ut : quae vis vim mihi afferam ipsa adigit, 
Plaut. Rud. 3, 3, 19.— With the inf. : vertere 
morsus exignam in Cererem penuria adegit 
36 



A D I M 

edendi.Verg. A. 7, 114; cf. 6, 696; so Ov. 
Am. 3, 6, 3 ; Sil. 2, 472 ; Stat. Th. 4, 631.— 
So also : tres liburnicas adactis per vim 
gubernatoribus ascendere, Tac. Agr. 28 ; so 
id. A. 4, 45 ; 11, 10 ; id. H. 4, 15.— B. Adige- 
re aliquem ad jns jurandum, jus jurandum, 
or jure jurando, or sacramento (abl.), 1. 1., 
to put one on oath, to cause one to take 
oath, to swear one (from the time of Livy 
oftener with abl. ; so Tac. Just., Flor. ; cf. 
on this point Cortius ad Sail. C.22 ; Held ad 
Caes. B. C. 1, 76 ; Herz. ad Caes. B. G. 7, 67 ; 
Rudd. II. p. 328, no. 16) ; omnibus jus juran- 
dum adactis, Caes. B. G. 7, 67 : cum ad jus 
jurandum populares sceleris sni adigeret, 
Sail. C. 22 : provinciam omnem in sua et 
Pompeii verba jus jurandum adigebat, Caes. 

B. C. 2, 18 : censores ita jus jurandum adi- 
gebant, Liv. 43, 15 fin. ; so Gell. 4, 20 ; 7, 
18 : populum jure jurando adegit, Liv. 2, 1 : 
omnibus junioribus jure jurando adactis. id. 
6, 33 ; so 6, 38 ; 7, 9, 11 al. ; Tac. H. 1 55 • 
ib. 76 ; Just. 22, 4, 5 ; 8, 4, 11 ; Flor. 3, 1, 
13.— Hence ellipt. : in verba adigere, for in 
verba jus jurandum adigere in Tac. and 
Suet. (cf. the passage cited above, Caes. B. 

C. 2, 18) : neque se neque quemquam Bata- 
vum in verba Galliarum adegit, Tac. H. 4, 
61 : provincia Narbon. in verba Vitellii adac- 
ta, id. ib. 2, 14 ; so 4, 59 ; Suet. Vesp. 6.— 
And finally quite absol. : adigere (sc. jure 
jurando, sacramento), to bind by an oath ; 
magno cum assensu auditus . . . universos 
adigit, Tac. H. 4, 15. — C. P oet. = subi- 
gere, to subject: bisque jugo Rhenum. bis 
adactum legibus Istrum, Stat. Th. 1, 19 : in 
faciem prorae pinus adacta novae, brought 
into the form of a ship, Prop. 4, 22, 14. 

t$g° In Caes. B. C. 2, 1 : mare quod adigit 
ad ostium Rhodani, we have a false reading, 
for which Nipperdey restored adjacet. 

ad-imo, emi, emptum, 3, v. a. [emo] 
(adempsit = ademerit, Plaut. Ep. 3 S 2, 27), j 
to take to one's self from a" person or 
thing, to take away, take any thing 
from, to deprive of (syn. : demere, exi- 
mere, auferre, eripere) . t Of things : si ego 
memorem quae me erga fecisti bene, nox 
diem adimat, would take away, consume, 
Plaut. Capt. 2, 3, 57 : multa ferunt anni 
venientes commoda secum ; multa receden- 
tes adimunt, take them, away \oiih them- 
selves, as a fine antithesis to secum ferunt, 
Hor. A. P. 175 : ut istas compedes tibi adi- 
mam, huic dem, Plaut. Capt. 5, 4, 31: me- 
tum, Ter. And. 2, 2, 2 ; so id. Heaut. 3 1, 
13 ; id. Hec. 5, 3, 19 ; id. Phorm. 1, 3.' 9 : 
Juppiter, ingentes qui das adimisque dblo- 
res, Hor. S. 2, 3, 288 : animam, Plaut. Mil. 
3, 1, 137 : poatquam adempta spes est, Ter. 
And. 2,1,4: alicui vitam, Cic. Plane. 42 : 
pecuniam, id. Quint. 15, 49 : somnum, id. 
Att. 2, 16 : libertatem, id. Dom. 9 : exerci- 
tum, id. Phil. 11, 8 : aditum litoris, id. Verr. 
2, 5, 32 : omnia sociis, Sail. C. 12, 5 : arma 
militibus, Liv. 22, 44 : vires ad vincendum, 
id. 23, 18: imperium, id. 22, 27 : pernicita- 



ADIF 

A completing, completion : temporum, 
Tert. adv. Marc. 5, 17. — U, A fulfilling, 
fulfilment: novum (testamentum) Yete- 
ris adimpletio est. Lact. 4, 20. 

* adimpletor, oris, m. [adimpleo], he 
who fills (by inspiration), the inspirer : 
Filius Dei adimpletor prophetarum, Aug de 
Temp. Serm. 144, 3. 

ad-incresco, ere, v. n., to increase, 
Vulg. Eccli. 23, 3. 

* ad-indo, Sre, v. a. , to put in besides : 
subscudes iligneas adindito, Cato, R. R.18,9. 

ad-inflo ; '^ve, v. a., to swell up : psn- 
nas, August. C. D. 19, 23. 

* ad-ingero, 3, v. a., to bring to in 
addition, to heap on : satiram in aliquem, 
Sisenn. ap. Serv. 2. 

* ad-inqniro, 3, v. a., to investigate 
or inquire into further : aliquid, Jul. 
Val. 1, 49 Mai. 

adinstar, more properly ad instar, v. 
instar. 

ad-inveniO, veni, veutum, 4, v. a. [ad. 
intens.}, to find out, to devise,Vu\g. Exod. 
35, 33 ; Dig. 48, 19, 28 ; cf. also Serv. ad 
Verg. A. 6, 603 : lapicaedinae adinventae 
sunt, Labi Ins. : si quis ainventus (for adin- 
ventus) fuerit hoc lecisse, Mur. Ins. 794. 

adinveiltio 7 onis, /. [adinvenio], an 
invention, Vulg. Judic. 2, 19 ; Isa. 3, 8 al. 

adinventor, oris, m. [id.], an invent- 
ory transl. of e<pevpe T Ti?, Cyprian. Ep. 68, 10 

adinventum, h n. [id.], an mven 
Hon, Tert. adv. Gnost. 1. 

ad - invicem, adv., a strengthenec 
form of invicem (q! v.), Aug. de Trin. 7. 

ad-invOlvo ? 3, v. a., read by Alschef- 
ski in Liv. 1, 21, manu ad digitos usque 
adinvoluta, but Weissenb. still reads invo- 
lute . 



tem, Tac. H. 1, 79.— And absol. : Qui prop- 
ter invidiam adimunt diviti, Ter. Phorm. 
2, 1, 46.— P oet. with inf. as object : adi- 
mam cantare severis, Hor. Ep. 1, 19, 9 (cf. 
Gr. a(pacpf)<ro/j.ai aeidetv, I loilt prohibit 
them to sing ; so Ov. Pont. 1, 7, 47 ; Sil. 
9, 425).— II, Poet, of persons, to snatch 
away, to carry off: hanc, nisi mors, mihi 
adimet nemo, Ter. And. 4, 2, 14 : virgo, quae 
puellas audis adimisque leto, Hor. C. 3, 22, 
3. — (For the distinction between demere, 
adimere, eximere, v. Lamb, ad Cic. Fam. 1 
7 ; cf. Cic. Rep. 2, 31 ; Bentl. Hor. C. 4, 15* 
18; and cf. Doed. Syn. IV. pp. 123-126.) 

ad-impleo, evi, etum, 2, v. a., to fill 
up) to fill full (in the class, per., e. g. in Liv 
38, 7, 13, and Plin. 11, 37, 52, § 140, dnb.). I. 
Lit.: Gangem decern fluminibus adimple" 
ri, Aethic. Cosmogr. p. 709 ed. Gron. : quasi 
mare adimpleti sunt, Vulg. Eccli. 50, 3. 

5. T r o p. ; adimpleti tibiarum cantu vo- 
cant deam suam, Jul. Firm, de Err. p. 10 
(cf. adimpletor) : adimplebis me laetiti&, 
Vulg. Psa. 15, 10.— II. Metaph., to ful- 
fil (as a promise, prediction, duty), to per- 
form, = absolvere, satisfacere, praestare : 
aiiquid, uig. 26, 7, 43 : quod dictum est, 
Vulg. Matt. 1, 22 : ut adimpleatur scriptn- 
ra, ib. Joan. 13, 18: legem Christi, ib. Gal. 

6, 2 : Gratia vobis et pax adimpleatur be 
made full, perfect, ib. 2 Pet. 1, 2. 

adimpletio, onis, /. [adimpleo]. I. 



* adipaiis, e, adj. [adeps], of or wit? 
fat, greasy : unguen, Arn. 3, p. 115. 
adipatum. h see the foil. art. 
adipatus, a, um, adj. l&dep$],fiUed oi 
supplied with fat, fatty, greasy. I. L i t. . 
puis, Lucil. ap. Chans. 73 and 74 P. ; hence 
absol.: adipatum i^-eiulium), i,pastr% 
prepared with fat (cf. Charis. 1. c): li 
vida materno fervent adipata veneno, Juv 
6, 630. — II. T r o p. of discourse, coarse 
gross : opimum quoddam et tamquam adi- 
patae orationis genus, Cic. Or. 8, 25 ; alsc 
ap^Non.^69, 6 (al. adipale). 

adipeus, a, um, adj. [id.], of fat: tori 
Hier. Ej>. 147, 8. 

ad-ipiscor, eptus, 3, v. dep. [apiscor] 
to arrive at, to reach. I. Lit.: occep 
sequi ; vix adipiscendi potestas fuit, Plaut 
Ep. 1, 1, 13. — Hence also with ace. , to reach 
to overtake : fugientes Gallos Macedone- 
adepti ceciderunt, Liv. 44, 28 ; cf. Drak. a< 
Liv. 2, 30, 14.— Far oftener, II. Fig., to at 
tain to by effort, to get, obtain, acquire 
to get possession <?/(by overcoming natura 
obstacles ; diff. from impetrare, to read 
or obtain by victory over another's will 
and nancisci, by accident, Doed. Syn III 
pp. 145, 146; IV. p. 369): nuptias effu 
gere ego istas malo quam tu adipiscier, Ter 
And. 2, 1, 32 : senectutem ut adipiscantui 
omnes optant ; eandem accusant adepti 
Cic. de Sen. 2, 4 : summos honores a popult 
Romano, id. Clu. 43 : amplissimos dignitatii 
gradus,id. Fam. 10, 6 : gloriam,Vulg! Eccli 
44, 7 ; 46, 3 : quanta instrumenta ( homo 
habeat ad obtinendam adipiscendamque ss 
pientiam, id. Leg. 1, 22 59 al. ; so Caes. B 
G. 5, 39 ; Nep. Them. 9 ; id. Chabr. 2 ; Sal] 
C. 11, 7; Liv. 1, 32; Veil. 2, 116 ; Tac. A 
11, 22; Suet. Aug. 16; Vulg. Heb. 6, 15.- 
With ex : adeptum esse omnia e natura e 
animo et corpore et vita, Cic. Ac. 1, 5, 19 
cf. id. Leg. 1, 13, 35 ; 2, 23, 59.— With ut 
adepti sunt, ut dies festos agitare possent 
Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 21.— Absol. : non potesti! 
adipisci, Vulg. Jac. 4, 2. 
. lEIT a. iis adipiscendi magistratus, thei 
should strive for public honors (the con 
sequens for the antecedent), Cic. Off. 1, 21 
72. — "h = Nero in adipiscenda morte (Epa- 
phroditi) manu adjutus existimabatur, i. e 
consciscenda, in committing suicide, Suet 
Dom. 14 Oud. ; cf. Ov. Tr. 2, 92 ; Front. 4, 4 
15 ; and : in venire mortem, Verg. A. 2, 645 
— C. Pass. : non aetate, verum ingenio, adi 
piscitur sapientia, Plaut. Trin. 2, 2, 88 : nae< 



AD J A 

adipiscuntur, C. Fannius ap. Prise, p. 791 P. : 
amitti magis quam adipisci, Fab. Maximus, 
ib. ; so esp. adeptus, Cic. de Sen. 2, 4 ; Sail. 
C. 7 ; id. J. 101 ; Tac. A. 1, 7, 9 ; Suet. Tib. 
33 ; cf. Gell. 15, 13 ; Prise. 790 sq. ; Rudd. 
I. p. 288; Kritz ad Sail. C. 7, 3— d. With 
gen. : arma, quis Galba rerum adeptus est, 
Tac. A. 3, 55 ; ib. 6, 45 (here Halm reads 
apisceretur); Rudd. II. p. 120; Zumpt, 
§466. 

adipsatheon, i, n. [ &3i^o? - o <=6?, 

quenching the thirst of the gods], a low, 
thorny shrub, also called erysisceptrum 
or d-;</ clef on, Plin. 24, 13, 69, § 112. 

t adipsOS, i,/., = aa^o? (quenching 
thirst). I. A species of date, Plin. 12, 22, 
47, 5 103. — H, Liquorice, glycyrrhiza, Plin. 
22, 9,11, § 26. 

adltialis, e, adj. [adit us], pertaining 
to entrance : cena, given by a magistrate 
when he entered upon his office, an in- 
augural feast, Varr. R. R. 3, 6, 6 ; Sen. Ep. 
95, 41; 123, 4; Plin. 10, 20, 23, § 45; so, 
epulae, id. 29, 4, 14, § 58. 

adlticulllS, i» m - dim. [id.], "parvus 
aditus," Fest. p. 29 Mull.— The same in the 
fern., aditlCula, ae, Jul. Val. 3, 70 Mai. 

aditlO, onis,/. [L adeo] . I, A going to, 
approach: quid tibi hanc aditio est? (i. e. 
aditio ad hanc, the verbal substantive with 
tlie case of the verb : v. Zumpt, § 681), why 
do you approach her? Plaut. True. 2,7, 

62: praetoris, Dig. 39, 1, 1 al H. here- 

ditatis, the entering upon an inheritance 
(v. 1. adeo, II. A.), Dig. 50, 17, 77 al. 

aditO, avi. v. freq. Lid.], to go to or 
approach often: ad eum aditavere, Enn. 
ap. Diom. 336 P. (Trag. v. 433 ed. Vahl.) ; 
peril, also Col. 6, 3, 4: aditet aviarius qui, 
etc. (instead of habitet) : siadites propius, os 
denasabit tibi, Plaut. Capt. 3, 4, 75; where 
Ritschl reads adbites. 

1. aditllS, a, um, Part, of 1. adeo. 

2. adltns, fis,«?. [1. adeo], a going to, 
approach, access. I, Lit.: quorum abitu 
aut aditu, Lucr. 1, 677 : urbes permultas 
uno aditu atque adventu esse captas, Cic. 
Imp. Pomp. 8 : quo neque sit ventis aditus, 
Verg. G. 4, 9 ; so id. A. 4, 293, 423 ah— With 
ad : aditus ad eum difflcilior, Cic. Att. 15, 
8 ; so id. N. D. 2, 47 fin. ; Ov. F. 1, 173 ; Tac. 
A. 2, 28— With in (cf. 1. adeo) : aditus in id 
sacrarium non est viris, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 45 ; 
so Auct. Or. pro Dom. 42, 110 al. : aditus 
ad me minime provinciales, which are not 
made in the manner customary {with 
the ]>rcetor), Cic. Att. 1, 2.— H. Transf. 
A. The possibility, leave, permission, or 
right of approaching, or of admittance, 
access (cf. accessus) : iaciles aditus ad eum 
privatorum, Cic. Imp. Pomp. 14 ; so id. 
Rose. Am. 38 ; id. Fam. 6, 13 ; Nep. Paus. 
3 ; Liv. 41, 23 ; Hor. S. 1, 9, 56 : homo rari 
adittis, a man rarely accessible, Liv. 24, 
5. — T r o p. : si qui mihi erit aditus de tuis 
fortunis agendi, Cic. Fam. 6, 10 ; so Caes. B. 
G. 5, 41 ; id. B. C. 1, 31. — B. C o n c r ., the 
place through which one approaches a 
thing, an entrance, avenue, etc. (opp. abi- 
tus ; cf. also accessus) : primo aditu vesti- 
buloque prohibere, Cic. Caecin. 12 ; id. Verr. 
2, 2, 66, § 160 : aditus insulae muniti, id. Att. 
4, 16 ; so id. Phil. 1, 10 ; Caes. B. G. 4, 20 ; 
id. B. C. 2, 16 ; Liv. 36, 10 ; Ov. M. 3, 226 ; 
id. F. 6, 157 ; id. H. 18, 44. — Hence t r o p. 
(in Cic. very freq.) : quartus aditus ad initia 
rerum, Varr. L. L. 5, § 8 Miill. : aditus ad 
causam, Cic. Sull. 2: vestibula honesta adi- 
tusque ad causam illustres facere, id. Or. 
15 ; so id. de Or. 1, 21, 47 ; 3, 2 ; id. Off. 2, 9 ; 
id. Font. 5 ; id. Caecin. 25, 72; id. Agr. 2, 
15 ; id. Att. 2, 17 al. 

adjacentia, v - the foil. art. 

ad-jaceo, cui, no sup., 2, v. n., to lie 
at or near, to be contiguous to, to border 
upon (most freq. used of the geog. position 
of a place). — Constr. with dat., ace, ad, 
or absol. (in the histt. very freq.). — (a) 
With dat. : Tuscus ager Romano adjacet, 
Liv. 2, 49, 9 ; man, id. 26, 42, 4 ; Plin. 6, 17, 
21, § 58 ; Front. Strat. 3, 9, 5 : cum Romani 
adjacerent vallo, Tac. A. 1, 65: munitioni- 
bus, id. ib. 4, 48 : adjacet undis moles, Ov. 
M. 11, 729: quae adjacent torrenti Jeboc, 
Vulg. Dent. 2, 37.— Trop. : velle adjacet 
mihi, Vulg. Roin. 7, 18 ; 7, 21. — (/3) With 
ace. : gentes, qnae mare illud adjacent, 
Nep. Tim. 2, 1 : Etruriam, Liv. 7, 12, 6 (v. 



ADJI 

Alschefski and Weissenb. ad h. 1.). — (7) 
With ad : ad Syrtim, Mel. 1, 7, 2 ; so perh. 
also Caes. B. G. 6, 33, 2: quae (regio) ad 
Aduatucos adjacet (for the lect. vulg. Adua- 
tucos or Aduatucis), and id. B. C. 2, 1 ; v. 
a,digo fin. — (8) Absol. : adjacet (via) et 
mollior et magis trita, Qnint. 1, 6, 22 : adja- 
cente Tiberi, Tac. H, 2, 93 ; so, adjacentes 
populi, i. q. propinqui, contiguous, neigh- 
boring, Tac. A. 13, 55.— And adjacentia, 
ium,«,., the adjoining country : lacum in 
adjacentia erupturum, Tac. A. 1, 79 ; 5, 14: 
projecto nitore adjacentia inlustrare, Plin. 
37, 9, 52, § 137. 

* ad-jaculatns, a, um, adj., thrown 
or cast at : fulgor, Mart. Cap. 2, p. 41. 

adjectlCins or -tlUS, a, um [adjicio], 
adj., added- besides (late Lat.) : incom- 
moda, Cassiod. Varr. 11, 8. 

adjectlO, onis,/. [id.], an adding to, 
addition, annexation. I. In gen. : Ro- 
mana res adjectione populi Albani aueta, 
Liv. 1,30: illiberalis, a small addition, 
id. 38, 14 ext. : caloris, Sen. Ep. 189 : litte- 
rarum, Quint. 1, 5, 16 ; also the permission 
of adding, etc. (cf. : accessus, aditus) : Hi- 
spalensibus familiamm adjectiones dedit, 
he granted to them the right of settling 
new families, Tac. H. 1, 78.— More freq., 

11. Esp., as 1. 1. A. In archit. 1. A 
projection hi the pedestal of columns, the 
cornice of the pedestal,Yitr. 3, 2.— B v In 
medicine, a strengthening, invigorating 
remedy : quae (i. e. diseases) non detrac- 
tionibus, sed adjectionibus curantur, Vitr. 
1, 6, 3. — Q a In rhet. , the repetition of the 
same word, e. g. occidi, occidi, Quint. 9, 3, 
28 (in Cic, adjunctio, q. v.). — D. In auc- 
tions, the addition to a bid, Dig. 18, 2, 17 
al. ; cf. adjicio. 

adjectivus. a, um, adj. [id.], in gram., 
that is added to the noun substantive, 
adjective: et significat vel laudem vel vi- 
tuperationem, vel medium vel accidens, ut 
Justus, impius, magnus, albus, Prise, p. 578 
P. ; cf. Macr. S. 1, 4. 

(adjectO, are, l,v.a., false reading in 
Apic. 8, 2.) 

1. adjectllS. a, um, Part., of adjicio. 

2. adjectUS, us, w. [adjicio], an add- 
ing or applying to: odoris (ad naris), 
Lucr. 4, 673 ; so id. 1, 689 : cuneorum, ad- 
dition (opp. exemptus), Vitr. 9, 6. 

ad-jiciO (better adicio), J©ci, jectum, 
3, v. a. [jacio], to throw or cast a thing to, 
to put or place at or near. — Constr. : ali- 
quid alicui rei. I. In gen.: rogum bu- 
stumve novum vetat propius sexaginta pe- 
des adici aedes alienas, to place nearer 
than, Cic. Leg. 2, 24 : hordei numero ad 
summam tritici adjecto, id. Verr. 3, 188 : 
adjectoque cavae supplentur sanguine ve- 
nae, Ov. M. 7, 291 ; so ib. 266 ; 14, 276.— 
More freq. trop. : quo ne imprudentiam 
quidem oculorum adici fas fuit, to turn 
the eyes pryingly to, to direct the sight 
to, etc., Cic. Leg. 2, 14, 36 : Parthus ad- 
jecit Armeniae manum, Veil. 2, 100 : album 
calculum errori, to approve, Plin. Ep. 1, 2. 
—With in : virus in anguis, Ov. A. A. 3, 
7 : telum ex locis superioribus in litus, to 
throw, to hurl, Caes. B. G. 4, 23, 3. — B. 
Transf. to mental objects, to turn or 
direct the mind, eye, etc., to, to fasten 
them upon something. — With dat. or ad : 
qui amabilitati animum adiceret, Plaut. 
Poen. 5, 4, 1 : animum militi, id. Mil. 3, 3, 
34 : ad virginem animum adjecit, Ter. Eun. 
1, 2, 63 : cum ad omnia vestra pauci homi- 
nes cupiditatis oculos adjecissent, Cic. Agr. 
2, 10 : plane videbant adjectum esse oculum 
hereditati, id. Verr. 2, 2, 15, § 37 (diff. from 
adicere oculos, cited above) : adjecit ani- 
mum ad consilium, Liv. 25, 37 : novo etiam 
consilio animum adjecit, id. 28, 33.— H. 
Esp. A. To add or apply to a thing by 
way of increase, to increase, = 7rpoo-TiQe- 
vat (cf. addo). — L i t. and trop. ; constr. 
with ad or dat. : ad bellicam laudem in- 
genii gloriam, Cic. Off. 1, 32 : decus alicui, 
Veil. 2, 36 : aliquantum ea res duci famae 
et auctoritatis adjecit, Liv. 44, 33 : so id. 10, 
7 ; 24, 5 ; Tac. Agr. 26 ; Suet. Oth. 11 ; id. 
Tib. 67 ; id. Calig. 15 ; id. Caes. 38 al. : mo- 
rem ritusque sacrorum adiciam, Verg. A. 

12, 837 : adjecere bonae paulo plus artis 
Athenae, Hor. Ep. 2, 2, 43 ; so Ov. M. 10, 
656; id. P. 1, 8, 56; Vulg. Matt. 6, 27 



ADJU 

and 33 ; also to add a new thought to 
what has preceded (cf. : addo, accedo, adve- 
nio; hence, like addo, in the sing., though 
several persons are addressed) : hue natas 
adice septem, Ov. M. 6, 182.— B. Of a speak- 
er, to add to what has already been said. 
—Constr. with ace. and inf. (only in Veil, 
and in the histt. after the Aug. per.) : adi- 
ciens numquam defuturos raptores Italicae 
libertatis lupos, Veil. 2, 27, 2 ; so, adjecerat 
Tiberius non id tempus censurae nee de- 
futurum corrigendi auctorem, Tac. A. 2, 
33 : adjecit in domo ejus venenum esse, id. 
ib. 4, 21. — Rarely followed by orat. directa : 
cum dixisset . . . adjecissetque : Si quid lmic 
accident, etc., Veil. 2, 32, 1.— With ut and 
subj., Liv. 2, 27.— C. In auctions, 1. 1., to 
add to a bid, to out-bid : liciti sunt usque 
adeo, quoad se efficere posse arbitrabantur ; 
super adjecit Aeschrio, bid on, Cic. Verr. 2, 
3, 33, § 77 B. and K. ; but cf. Zumpt ad h. 1. ; 
Dig. 18, 2, 19.— D, In gen., in the Vulg. 
by Hebraism (cf. 7)0^), to add to do, to 
do further : adjecit Dominus loqui, the 
Lord furthermore spake, Isa. 7, 10 : non 
adiciet,ut resurgat, ib. 24, 20: adiciens dixit 
parabolam, ib. Luc. 19, 11. 

(ad-jubeo, ere, 2, v. a., false read, in 
Plaut. Mil. 4, 4, 50, instead of ut jubeat 
(Ritschl) ; and in Cat. 32, 4, inst. of adju- 
vato.) 

adjudication onis,/. [adjudico], a ju- 
dicial adjudging of a matter, an adju- 
dication,'!)^. 10, 2, 36 ; 26, 5, 78 al. 

ad - judlCOi &vi, atunj, 1, v. a., to 
grant or award a thing to one, as judge, 
to adjudge (opp. abjudico). — With ace. 
and dat. I, L i t. : me est aequum frui 
fraternis armis mihique adjudicarier, Poet, 
ap. Auct. Her. 2, 26, 42 : regnum Ptolemaeo, 
Cic. Agr. 2, 17 ; 2, 43 : mulierem Veneri in 
servitutem, id. Div. in Caecil. 17, 56 : Bruto 
legiones, id. Phil. 10, 6; so id. Off. 1, 10; 
Liv. 3, 72 ; Val. Max. 7, 3 ; Suet. Aug. 32 
al. : nemo dubitabat, quin domus nobis 
esset adjudicata, Cic. Att. 42 ; so Caes. B. 
G. 7, 37 ; cf. Sen. Hipp. 109. — And poet, 
of Augustus : si quid abest (i. e. dicioni Ro- 
manorum nondum subjectum) Italis adju- 
dicat armis, i. e. like a judge, he subjects 
the nations to the Roman sway, merely 
by his arbitrary sentence, Hor. Ep. 1, 18, 
57: causam alicui, to decide in one's fa- 
vor, Cic. de Or. 2, 29, 129.— H. In gen., 
to assign or ascribe a thing to one : Pom- 
peius saepe hujus mihi salutem imperii ad- 
judicavit, has ascribed to me, Cic. Att. 1, 
19 : optimum saporem ostreis Lucrinis ad- 
judicavit, conceded, Plin. 9, 54, 79, § 168. 

fJSg" For adjudicato in Plaut. Men. 1, 3, 6, 
Ritschl reads t u judicato. 

adjuero= adjuvero, v. adjuvo. 

ad-jug*0, no perf., atum, 1, v. a., to 
yoke or fasten to or together, to unite. 
I, Lit., in the lang. of gardening : palmi- 
tes, Col. 4, 17, 6 : pampinos adjugatae (vi- 
tis), Plin. 17, 22, 35, § 175— II. In gen., 
to join or add to something : mater est 
terra, ea parit corpus, animam aether adju- 
gat, Pac. ap. Non. 75, 11 (Rib. Trag. Rel. 
p. 88) ; so, blandam hortatricem adjugat 
Voluptatem, id. ib. 75, 13 (Rib. Trag. Rel. 
p. 100) : adjugat corpora, of the sexes, Lact. 
Opif. Dei, 6. 

adiumentum, h n - ta contraction of 
adjuvamentum, from adjuvo], a means of 
aid ; help, aid,assistance,support(c\a.s$.); 
nihil aderat (in ilia puella) adjumenti ad 
pulchritudinem, Ter. Phorm. 1, 2, 55 : esse 
alicui magno adjumento ad victoriam, Cic. 
Brut. 1, 4 : Quam ad rem magnum attuli- 
mus adjumentum hominibus nostris, id. Off. 
1,1: adjumenta et subsidia consulates, id. 
Mur. 18 : adjumenta salutis, id. Sen. 27 : 
multis aliis adjumentis petitionis ornatus, 
id. Mur. 53 : mihi honoribus, id. Imp. Pomp. 
24 ; id. Fin. 5, 21 ; id. Fam. 13, 30; Sail. J. 
45, 2 ; Quint, prooem. § 27 ; Ov. P. 4, 13, 
31 al. 

adjunctio, onis,/. [adjungo], a join- 
ing or binding to, a union or conjunction 
(Cicero ; esp. in his rhet. writings). I. I n 
gen. : si haec (SC. <pv<rtnr} r\ Trpor Ta t^kvo) 
non est, nulla potest homini esse ad homi- 
nem naturae adjunctio, Cic. Att. 7, 2, 4 ; so, 
animi, Q. Cic. Pet. Cons. 6, 21.— U. Esp. 
A. An addition: virtutis, Cic. Fin. 2,13, 

37 



ADJU 

39 : verborum, id. Part. Or. 5, 16.— Hence, 
ft In rhet. 1, A limitation or restric- 
tion made by an addition, a limiting 
or restricting adjunct : esse quasdarn earn 
adjunctione necessitudines . . . illic, in su- 
periore, adjunctio (i. e. exceptio) est haec: 
nisi malint, etc., Cic. Inv. 2, 57, 171.— 2. 
A figure of speech, ace. to Forcell. = av\±- 
irkoKt], repetition of the same tvord, Cic. 
de Or. 3, 54, 206 (as" an example, v. Agr. 2, 
9 : Quia legem tulit ? Rullus. Quis majorem 
partem populi suffrages prohibuit? Rul- 
lus.) ; ace. to Auct. Her., we have an ad- 
junctio when the verb stands either at the 
beginning or at the end of a clause, as opp. 
to conjunction i. e. when the verb is inter- 
posed amid the words, 4, 27, 38 ; cf. Quint. 
9, 1,33, and 9, 3, 62. 

adjunctlVUS, a, urn, adj. [adjungo], 
that is joined or added.— In gram. : con- 
junctiones, conjunctions that govern the 
sabj. mood, Prise, p. 1028 P. : modus, the 
subjunctive mood, Diom. p. 331 p. 

* adjunctor, oris, m. [id.], one who 
adds, joins, or unites (used only by Cic, 
in strong indignation) : ille Galliae ulterio- 
ris adjunctor, i. e. Pompey, by whose in- 
fluence Gallia Transaipina was granted to 
Caesar, in addition to Gallia Cisalpina, Cic. 
Att. 8,3, 3. 

ad-jung"0, lix 'i nctum, 3,-e. a., to add, 
join, annex, or bind to any thing. I. 
L i t., o f c a 1 1 1 e, to yoke, to harness (cf. : 
jugo, juginn, jungo, etc.) : adjunxere feras 
(preceded by bijugos agitare leones), Lucr. 
2, 604 : tauros aratro, Tib. 1, 9, 7 : plostello 
mures, Hor. S. 2, 3, 247 : tigribus adjunctis 
aurea lora dabat, Ov. A. A. 1, 552 ; so id. Am. 
1, 1, 26 ; Gell. 20, 1.— Hence, ft Transf. 
A. Of persons or things, to join or 
add to.— With ad or dat. : ad probos te 
adjunxeris, Plaut. Aul. 2, 2, 59 ; where the 
figure of yoking is closely adhered to (v. the 
connection): adjunge te ad currum, Vulg. 
Act. 8, 29: socium quaerit, quern adjun- 
gat sibi, Plaut. As. 2,2, 22 : comitem T. Vol- 
turcinm, Cic. Cat. 3, 4: se comitem fugae, 
id. Att. 9, 10, 2 : ei proxime adjunctus fra- 
ter fuit. id. Brut. 28 : viro se, Verg. A. 8, 13 : 
adjuncti sunt Paulo et Silae, Vulg. Act. 17, 
4 : accessionem aedibus,Cic. Off. 1, 39 : ulmis 
vites, Verg. G. 1, 2 : classem lateri castro- 
rura, id. A. 9, 69 ; so esp. freq. of places, 
lying near, adjacent: huic fundo conti- 
neutia quaedam praedia et adjuncta merca- 
tur, Cic. Caec. 4 ; Nep. Dion. 5 ; Curt. 8, 1 ; 
cf. id. 5, 4 ; Sil. 8, 642.— T r o p. : ad malam 
aetatem adjungere cruciaturn, Pac. ap. Nun. 
2, 1 : imperium credat gravius esse, vi quod 
fit, quam illud quod amicitia adjungitur, 
the command which is put upon him, 
given him, with kind feeling, Ter. Ad. 1, 
1, 42. — Hence, adjungere aliquem sibi, to 
bind to one's self, to enter into friendship 
with, to make one a friend : familiam co- 
lere, adjuvare, adjungere, Ter. Ad. 5, 8, 4 ; 
Cic. Mur. 19 ; so Q. Cic. Pet. 7 ; Nep. Ale. 5, 
9 ; id.Eum. 2; so,agros populo Romano, Cic. 
Agr. 1, 2 : totam ad imperium pop. R. Cilici- 
am, id. Imp. Pomp. 12, 35 : urbem in socie- 
tatem, Liv. 37, 15 : sibi aliquem beneficio, to 
lay one under obligation to one's self, to 
obUge: quern beneficio adjungas, Ter. Ad. 
1, 1, 47 ; also without beneficio : ut paren- 
tes propinquosque eorum adjungeret, Tac. 
A. 3, 43. — ft Met. of mental objects, to 
apply to, to direct to (very freq. and 
class.) : animum ad aliquod studium, Ter. 
And. 1, 1, 29 : fidem visis, to give credit 
to, Cic. Ac. 1, 11 ; id. Div. 2, 55 : hue ani- 
mnm ut adjungas tuum, Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 61 : 
diligentia vestra nobis adjungenda est, Cic. 
Clu. 1 : ut aliquis metus adjunctus sit ad 
gratiam, id. Div. in Caecil. 7, 24: suspicio- 
nem potius ad praedam quam ad egesta- 
tem, to direct suspicion rather to Mm 
who possesses the booty, than to him who 
lives in poverty, id. Rose. Am. 31.— C. To 
add, or join something to a thing as an ac- 
companiment, to annex, to subjoin, to let 
follow or attend : audi atque auditis hosti- 
mentum adjungito, hear and let requital 
follow ivhat is heard, Enn. ap. Fest. s. v. 
redhostire, p. 270 Mull. (Trag. v. 154 Vahl.) : 
huic voluptati hoc adjunctum est odium, 
Plant. Cure. 1, 3,34 : istam juris scientiam 
cloquentiae tamquam ancillulam pedise- 
quamque adjunxisti, Cic. de Or. 1, 55, 236. — 
Hence of a new thought or circumstance, to 
38 



ADJU 

add it to the preceding : quod cum dice- 
rem, illud adjunxi: mini tecum ita,etc.,Cic. 
Fam. 5,2 : satis erit dictum, si hoc unum ad- 
juuxero, Nep. Eparn. 10 : His adjungit, Hy- 
lan nautae quo fonte relictum Clamassent, 
Verg. E. 6, 43 (v. addo, adjicio, etc.) : ad ce- 
teras summas utilitates,haec quoque oppor- 
tunitas adjungatur, ut, etc., Cic. Imp. Pomp. 
17,50: Adjuncto vero, ut iidem etiam pru- 
dentes haberentur, id. Off. 2, 12.— Hence, 
D. In rhet.: adjuncta, w., collateral 
circumstances : loci argumentorum ex ad- 
junctis repeti possunt, ut quaeratur, quid 
ante rem, quid cum re, quid postea evene- 
rit, Cic. Top. 12 ; so id. ib. 18 ; cf. conse- 
quens. — Hence, adjunctus, a, um, P. a. 
A, Joined, added to, or connected with 
a thing: quae propiora hujus causae et 
adjunctiora sunt, Cic. Clu. 10 : ventum ad 
veram et adjunctissimam quaestionem, Am. 
7, p. 243.— Hence, ft adjunct a, 5mm, 
n., additional circumstances, adjuncts, 
things closely connected with, belonging 
or suitable to: semper in adjunctis aevo- 
que morabimur aptis. Hor. A. P. 178. — Adv. 
not used. 

adjtir amentum, i, n. [adjuro], a con- 
juring, entreating (late Lat.), Vulg. Tob. 
9,5. 

adjuratio. onis, /. [id.], a swearing 
to something by something, swearing, 
adjuration : adjuratione suae salutis, by 
swearing by her own safety, App. M. 2, 
p. VIZ fin. : divini nominis,Lact. 2, 17. 

a dj fir at or. oris, m . [id.], one who con- 
jures a thing, a conjurer (late Lat.),Al- 
cim.2,312. 

adjurat5l*lliS, a, um, adj. [adjurator], 
pertaining to swearing : cautio, Cod. 12, 
26, 4, § 2 ; 12, 30, 3, § 3- 

1. ad-juro, tl vi, atum, 1, v. a., to swear 
to, to confirm by an oath. — With ace, or 
ace. and inf., or ut. I. Lit. : earn suam 
esse filiam sancte adjnrabat mihi, Plaut. 
Cist. 2, 3, 27 ; Ter. Hec. 2, 2, 26 : adjuras- 
que id te me invito non esse facturum, Cic. 
Phil. 2, 9 ; id. Q. Fr. 2, 8 ; 3, 5 ; id. 9, 19 ; 
Liv. 7, 5 ; Suet. Aug. 31 ; id. Ner. 24 ; id. Tit. 
9 ; Ov. H. 20, 159 ; Stat. Th. 7, 129 ; Just. 24, 
%—Absol. : adjurat, Cic. Att. 2, 20. — ft 
Transf. A, To swear by any person or 
thing : per omnes deos adjuro, ut, etc., 
Plaut. Bacch. 4, 6, 8 : per omnes tibi adju- 
ro deos numquam earn me deserturum, Ter. 
And. 4, 2, 11; Cic. Phil. 2, 4.— In the poetry 
of the Aug. per . after the manner of the Greek, 
with the ace. of that by which one swears 
(cf. 6/j.vv/jli Toy? Oeovv, in L. and S.) : adjuro 
Stygii caput implacabile fontis, Verg. A. 12, 
816 : adjuro teqne tuomque caput, Cat. 66, 
40.— ft To swear to something in addi- 
tion: censores edixerunt, ut praeter com- 
mune jus jurandum haec adjurarent, etc., 
Liv. 43, 14. — C. In later Lat., to conjure 
or adjure, to beg or entreat earnestly : 
adjuratum esse in senatu Taciturn, ut opti- 
mum aliquem principem faceret, Vop. Flor. 
1. — ft In the Church Fathers, to adjure 
(in exorcising) : daemones Dei nomine ad- 
jurati de corporibus excedunt, Lact. 2, 15. 

2S. adjuro, i- q- adjuvero, v. adjuvo. 

* adjutabilis, e, adj, [adjuto], help- 
ing, suited to aid, serviceable : opera, 
Plaut. Mil. 4, 4, 8. 

adjuto, "vi, atum, 1, v. freq. [adjuvo] 
(ante'class. ; esp. in Plaut. and Terence, and 
in later Lat.), to help, to be serviceable to, to 
assist : aliquem, Att. ap. Non. 424, 2 : isto- 
cine pacto me adjutas ? Plaut. Ps. 1, 1, 81 ; 
id. Cas. 3, 3, 17 ; id. True. 2, 5, 26 ; 2, 7, 8 : 
Pamphilum, Ter. And. 1, 3, 4 ; id. Heaut. 3, 
1,7; 2, 35 ; id. Ad. prol. 16 ; id. Phorm. prol. 
34 : funus, id. ib. 1, 2, 49.— With two ace. : 
id adjuta me, quo id fiat facilius, Ter. Eun. 
1,2,70.— With dat.pers. : adjuta mihi, Pac. 
ap. Don. ad Ter. Ad. prol. 16 ; cf. Ruhnk. ad 
Ter. Hec. 3,2, 24. — Also on a coin : deus ad- 
juta Romanis, Eckh. D. N. 8, p. 223 : sal- 
tern nobis adjutasses, Petr. Fragm. Trag. 62 
Burm. — Pass. : adjutamur enim atque ali- 
mur certisab rebus, Lucr. 1, 812. 

1. adjtiior, atus, l,v. dep., i.q. adjuto, 
and also ante-class, (found in Pac.,Afran., 
and Lucil.) : adjutamini et defendite, Pac. 
ap. Non. 74, 2 : Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 89 ; Pac. 
ap. Non. 477, 26 : me adjutamini, Afran. ib. : 
magna adjutatus diu, Lucil. ib. 



ADJU 

2. adjutor., oris, m. [adjuro], one wha 
helps, a helper, assistant, aider, promot- 
er (class, through all periods). I. In gen. : 
hie adjutor meus et monitor et praemon- 
strator, Ter. Heaut. 5, 1, 2 : ejus iracundiae, 
id. Ad. 1, 1, 66 : ad banc rem adjutorem dari, 
id. Phorm. 3, 3, 26 : adjutores ad me resti- 
tuendum multi fuerunt, Cic. Quint. 9 : in 
psaltria hac emunda/fer. Ad. 5, 9, 9 : hono- 
ris, Cic. Fl. 1 : ad praedam, id. Rose. Am. 2, 
6 ; so id. de Or. 1, 59 • id. Tusc. 1, 12 : tibi 
venit adjutor, id. N. D. 1, 7 : L. ille Torqua- 
tus auctor exstitit,id. Sull. 34; id. Off. 2, 15 ; 
3, 33 ■ id. Fin. 5, 30 ; id. Att. 8, 3 ; 9, 12 ; 
Caes. B. C. 1, 7 ; Sail. J. 82 ; Liv. 29, 1, 18: 
nolite dubitare libertatem consule adjutore 
defendere, toith the aid of the consul, Cic. 
Leg. Agr. 16 ; and so often, id. Verr. 1, 155 ; 
id. Font. 44 ; id. Clu, 36 ; id. Mur. 84.— ft 
E sp., a common name of a military or civil 
officer, an aid, adjutant, assistant, dep- 
uty, secretary, etc.: comites et adjutores 
negotiorum publicorum, Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 3 : 
dato adjutore Pharnabazo, Nep. Con. 4 ; so 
id. Chabr. 2 ; Liv. 33, 43 ; Suet. Aug. 39 ; id. 
Tib. 63 ; id. Caiig. 26 : rhetorum (i. e. hypo- 
didascali), Quint. 2, 5, 3 ; Gell. 13, 9 ; and 
in the inscriptions in Orell. 3462, 3200 al. ; 
under the emperors an officer of court, 
minister (v. Veil. 2, 127; cf. Suet. Calig. 
26) ; usu. with ab and the word indicative 
of the office (v. ab fin.) : adjutor a rationi- 
bus, Orell. Inscr. 32 : a sacris, ib. 2847 : a 
commentariis ornamentorum, ib. 2892. — 
Also with gen. : adjutor cornicularii, ib. 
3517: haruspicnm imperatoris, ib. 3420 al. 
— In scenic language, adjutor is the one 
who, by his part, sustains or assists the hero 
of the piece (Trpwra-yiowirr^), to which the 
class, passage, Cic. Div. in Caecil. 15, refers ; 
cf. Heind. ad Hor. S. 1, 9, 46 : in scena post- 
quam solus constitit sine apparatu. nullis 
adjutoribus, with no subordinate actors, 
Phaedr. 5, 5, 14; Suet. Gramm. 18; Val. 
Max. 2,4,?io.4. 

adjtitdri um , i,«-. [adjutor], help, aid, 
assistance, support (rare ; prob. not before 
the Aug. per.) : magnam Thracum manum 
in adjutorium belli secum trahebat, Veil. 
2, 112 Ruhnk. : ignis, Sen. Ep. 31 : juris, 
Quint. 3, 6, 83.— In plur., Col. 12 praef. 

adjutrix, icis,/. [id.], she that helps, 
an assistant, helper^ etc. I, In gen. 
(class.) : aliqua fortuna merit adjutrix tibi, 
Plaut. Poen. 5, 2, 13; id, Trin. prol. 13: 
matres filiis in peccato adjutrices solent 
esse, Ter. Heaut. 5, 2, 39; id. Eun. 5, 2, 46,: 
id. Hec. prol. alt. 24, 40 ; 4, 4, 83 : Messa- 
na tuorum adjutrix scclerum, Cic. Verr. 2, 
4, 8, § 17 : Minerva adjutrix consiliorum 
meorum, Auct. Or. pro Jjom. 57 : quae res 
Plancio in petitione fuisset adjutrix, Cic. 
Plane. 1 : assentatio vitiorum adjutrix, id. 
Lael. 24, 89 : hanc urbem habebat adjutri- 
cem scelerum, id. Verr. 2, 5, 62, § 160.— ft 
Esp. : legiones adjutrices, legions raised 
by the proconsul in the provinces for the 
purpose of strengthening the veteran 
army, Tac' H. 2,43; 3, 44; cf. Suet. Galb. 
10 ; cf. Gruter, Ins. 193, 3 ; 414, 8 ; 169, 7 al. 
1. adjutuS, a, um, Part, of adjuvo. 
* 2. adjiitUS, fts, m. [adjuvo], help, 
aid : unins adjutu, Macr. S. 7, 7. 

ad-jUVOj jiivi, jutum,l,'». a. (very rare 
juvavi, juvatum ; hence, adjuvaturus, Petr. 
Sat. 18 : adjuro or adjuero=adjuvero, Enn. 
ap. Cic. Sen. 1, 1 : adj uerit = adjnverit, Ter. 
Phorm. 3, 3, 4), to give aid to, to help, as- 
sist, support : aliquem. (Adjuvare applies 
to every kind of help or support; while 
auxiliari is only used of one who, from 
his weakness, needs assistance, and subve- 
nire of one who is in difficulty or embarrass- 
ment ; cf. Manut.adCic. Fam.1,7.) I. In 
gen. : Tite, si quid te adjuero curamve 
levasso quae nunc te coquit, etc., Enn. ap. 
Cic. Sen. 1, 1 (Ann. v. 339 Vahl.) : di me 
etsi perdunt, tamen esse adjutam expetunt, 
Pac. ap. Non. 97, 14 (Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 102) : 
miseras, inopes, aeruginosas aliquo auxilio, 
Plaut. Rud. 1, 4, 39 : opera me adjuves, Ter. 
Phorm. 5, 3, 3 : me adjuves in hac re, id. 
And. 3, 3, 10 : id spero adjuturos deos (i.e. 
in ea re), id. ib. 3, 2, 42: ad verum proban- 
clum auctoritas adjuvat, Cic. Quint. 23: si 
nihil ad percipiendam colendamque vir- 
tutem litteris adjuvarentur, id. Arch. 7, 16 : 
maerorem orationis lacrimis suis, id. de Or. 



A D M I 

•2, 47 : Q. Hortensii opera rein publican! ad- 
jutant (esse), id, Phil. 10, 26 : si nos medio- 
cris fortuna rei publieae adjuverit, Plane, 
.ap. Cic. Fam. i0, 15: aliquem in filiarum 
eollocatione, id. Off. 2, 16 : auxiliis et copiis, 
i. e. militibus auxiliariis, id. Fam. 1, 7; cf. 
Liv. 29, 5 : sua sponte eos adjutum profec- 
ius, Nep. Chabr. 2 ; id. Milt. 2 ; id. Phoc. 2 : 
Antiochum Aetolosque adjuturos pronun- 
tiat, Liv. 34, 37 : fortis fortuna adjuvat, Ter. 
Phorra. 1, 4. 25, and Liv. 34, 37 : aliquem ad 
helium . id. ■?<!. X ; cf. id. 27, 15 Drak. : adjutus 
casu, Suet. Tib. 13 : suffragio, id. Vitell. 7 : 
man n alieujus, id . Dom. 14 : adjuvare preces, 
id. Ner. 21 : pennis adjutus amoris,Ov. M, 1, 
540 ; so Juv. 6, 504 ; Sil. 6, 249 ; cf. id. 5, 
326.— II. E s p. A. To help, cherish (esp. 
a state of mind), to sustain: jam tu quo- 
que hujns adjuvas insaniam, Plaut. Am. 2, 
2, 166 : ferendus error immo vero etiam ad- 
juvandus, Cic. Att. 12, 43 : clamore Romani 
adjuvant militem suum, animate, encour- 
age, Liv. 1, 25 ; so Curt. 3, 6 : ignem, Liv. 
34, 39 : forinam cura, Ov. M. % 732. — B. 
Absol. (very rare), to profit, avail, be 
of itxe, be profitable (syn. : utile est, ope- 
rae pretium est, convenit). (a) Impers. : 
in re mala animo si bono utare. adjuvat. 
Plaut. Capt. 2, 1, 10. — (/J) With subject: 
solitudo aliquid adjuvat, Cic. Att. 12, 14 : 
alteri non multum adjuvabant, Caes. B. G. 
7, 17 : adjuvat hoc quoque, Hor. S. 2, 5, 73. 

r^g*" Rare constructions, a. With a whole 
subjective clause with quod as subject : 
multum eorum opinionem adjuvat, quod 
{the circumstance that) sine jumentis . . . 
ad iter profectos videbant, Caes. B. C, 1, 69. 
— b. With two ace. : irrides in re tanta ? 
neque me quidquam consilio adiuvas ? Ter. 
Heaut. 5, 2, 29 ; cf. Rudd. II. p. 179, n, 75.— 
C. With tit or ne : ut amplissimum nomen 
eoiisequereniur, unus praeter ceteros adju= 
visti.Cic.Q. Fr. 1, 1, 15: adjuvat o, nequis li- 
minis obseret tabellam. Cat. 324.— d. With 
inf. : adjuvat enim (pater, the male) incu- 
bare, helps to hatch, Plin. 11, 24, 29, § 85 — 
C. With the dat, of the person and the ace. 
of the thing : operam mutuam dent et mes- 
seni banc nobis adjuvent, Gell. 2, 29; cf. 
adjnto. — Hence, adjuvans, antis. P. a., 
mbst, with gen. : non haec adjuvantia cau- 
sarum, sed has ipsas esse omnium causas, 
Cic Univ. 14. 

adl. Words beginning thus, v. under all. 

* ad-maturo, are, v. a., to bring to 
maturity; fig., to mature, ripen: adma- 
.turari defectionem civitatis, Caes. B. G. 7, 
54,2. 

admenSUSj a, um, Part, of admetior. 

* ad-meo, are, v. n., to go to or ap- 
proach : admeabunt monstra natatu, Paul. 
]NoL 17, 119. 

ad-metior, mensus, 4, v. dep., to 
measure out to: vinum eniptoribus, Cato, 
R. R. 154 : frumentum alicui, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 
31 ; so Suet. Aug. 41 ; Curt. 8, 12.— Pass. : 
quod (sc. vinum) admensum erit, meas- 
ured out, Cato, R. R. 148. 

AdmetuS, *, w. I. In mythology, a 
Icing of Phera 3 , in Thessaly, the husband 
of Alcestis, whose sheep Apollo was con- 
demned by Jupiter to tend for a long 
time, Serv. ad Verg. G. 3, 9; 'id. A. 7, 761 
<cf. Alcestis). — II. In hist, a king ofjhe 
Molossi, the friend and protector of The- 
mistocles, Nep. Them. 8, 

* ad-migro. are, 1, v. n., lit,, to go 
to a place ; hence, t r op,, to come to, to be 
added to: ad paupertatem si admigrant 
infamiae, Plaut, Pers. 3, 1, 19. 

adminiculabundus, a, um [admi- 
niculo], supporting one's self, Auct. Itin. 
Alex. 21 Mai. 

* adminicula tor, oris, m. [id.], one 
who supports, a supporter, assistant; 
t r o p. : f irone Cicerb adminiculatore et 
quasi admiuistro in studiis litterarum usus 
est, Gelh 7,^3,8. 

adminiCUlo, avi, atum, 1, v. a. [ ad- 
mini culum] (orig. belonging to agriculture 
and botany), to pi-op up, to support. I, 
Lit.: vites adminiculatae sudibus, Plin. 14, 
1, 3, § 13 ; so Col. : vitem adminiculate ar- 
borique jungito,de Arb. 16 (Cic. has for this 
adminiculor, q. v.).— II. Tr op., =adjuvo 
(only ante- and post-class.) : adminiculavi 
voluntatem tnam scribendo, Varr. ap. Non. 
77, 16 : tribunicio auxilio adminiculate id. 
ap. Prise, p. 791 P. : id ipsum, quod diei- 



ADMI 

mus, ex illis quoque Homericis versibus 
adminiculari potest, i. e, confirmari, Gell. 2, 
30 ; so id. 14, 2 : Di vitam hominum admi- 
niculantes, Censor. 3. — Hence Varr. L. L. 
8, § 44 Mull., calls adverbs partes admini- 
culandi (orationem), auxiliaries of dis- 
course. — Hence, adminiculatus, a, 
um, P. a., supported; hence, w ell fur- 
nished or provided : memoria adminicu- 
latior, Gell. praef. 1. 1. 

* ad min iculor, atus, l, v. dep. [id.], 

i. q. adminiculo, to support, prop (a vine) : 
ars agricolarum, quae circumcidat, ampu- 
tet. erie-at. extollat. admin icnletur. etc.. 
* Cic. Fin. 5, 14, 39 ; v. Madv. ad h. 1. (Pris- 
cian considers this dep. as the usual form, 
and hence gives the example cited from 
Varro under adminiculo as an exception, 
Prise, p. 791 P. ; cf. id. 927 ib.). 

adminiCUium, i, 't ■ [ad-man us],p r o p. , 
that on which the hand may rest, then 
in gen., a prop, stay, support. I. Lit. 
A. Orig. in the language of vine-dressers, 
the stake or jiole to ichich the vine clings, 
and by ichich it is supported. : vites cla- 
viculis adminicula, tamquam manibus ap- 
prehendunt, atque ita se erigunt, ut ani- 
mantes, Cic. N. D. 2, 47 : adminiculornm or- 
dines, capitum jugatio, id. Sen. 15 ; so Plin. 
17, 24, 36, § 215 ; cf. Drak. Liv. 6, 1, 4.— 
Hence, B. * n gen., of any prop, stay, or 
support, assistance : adminicula hominum, 
i.e. oxen, implements of agriculture, etc., 
Varr. R. R. 1, 17 ; Liv. 21, 36 : motam (Ju- 
nonem) sede sua parvi molimenti adminicu- 
lis, id. 5, 22 : adminicula gubernandi addi- 
dit Tiphys,»?e«??.5 of steering, Vie rudder, 
Plin. 7, 56, 57, § 20£ ; cf. id. 11, 37, 61, § 162. 
— II. Trop., support, aid, auxiliary, 
assistant (class.) : ad legionem cum itant, 
adminiculum eis danunt aliquem cognatum, 
an assistant, Plaut. Most. 1, 2, 48: hanc 
igitur partem relictam explebimus, nullis 
adminiculis, sed, ut dicitur, Marte nostro, 
Cic. Off. 3, 7 : natura solitarium nihil amat, 
semperque ad aliquod tamquam adminicu- 
lum adnititur, id. Lael. 23 fin. : quo primo 
adminiculo erecta erat (urbs), eodem innisa 
M. Furio principe stetit, Liv. 6, 1 : id senec- 
tuti suae adminiculum fore, id. 10, 22 : egere 
adminiculis, ut in commune consulat, Tac. 
A. 12, 5 ; so, in militia aut via fessus admini- 
culum oro, id. ib. 14, 54 : nullius externi in- 
digens adminiculi, Amm. 24, 8 ; 21, 12 ; 14, 
6 : Quibus debetis esse adminiculo, Yule. 
Esth.16, 20. 

ad- mini ster, tri, m., he who is near 
to aid or assist, a servant, an attendant, 
assistant; lit. and trop. (class.)— Absol. : 
Jovi se consiliarium atque administrum da- 
tum, Cic. Leg. 3, 19, 43 : cum neque beilum 
gerere sine administris posset, Sail. J. 74. — 
With gen. : puer victus cotidiani admini- 
ster, Cic. Rose. Am. 28, 77 : administri et 
satellites Sexti Naevii, id. Quint. 25, 80 : sa- 
telles atque administer audaciae, id. Cat. 
1, 3, 4 : administer ipsius cupiditatum, id. 
Verr. 2, 2, 54: rerum transactor et admi- 
nister, id. ib. 2, 69 : socius et administer 
omnium consiliorum, Sail, J. 29, 2. — With 
ad : administris ad ea sacrificia Druidibus 
utuntur, Caes. B. G. 6, 16. 

administra, ae , /■ [administer], a 
female servant, assistant, or helper, a 
handmaid.— Lit. and fig.: u Gamillam 
qui glossemata interpretati dixerunt admi- 
nistram," Varr. L. L. 7. § 34 Mull. : multae 
sunt artes eximiae hujus administrae comi- 
tesque virtutis, Cic. Imp. Pomp. 13, 36. 

aduiinistratlG, onis, /, [administro], 
I. Lit, a ministration, aid, assistance: 
quae nee haberemus, nisi manus et ars ac- 
cessissent, nee his sine hominum admini- 
stratione uteremur, Cic. Off. 2, 3, 12: aquae, 
the right distribution of, Vitr. 9, 8, 10. — 
Hence, H. Fig., the direction, manage- 
ment, or administration of a thing, i. q. 
curatio, procuratio : utrnm (di) omni cura- 
tione et administratione rerum vacent, Cic. 
N. D. 1, 1, 2 : rerum magnarum agitatio at- 
que administratio, id. Inv. 2, 54, 163 : mun- 
di, id. N. D. 2, 34, 86 ; so id. Fam. 1, 9 ; 15, 
1 : portus, the use of, Caes. B. C. 1, 25 ; 2, 
2 ; Liv. 34, 6 ; Tac. Agr. 19 ; so absol. : Ideo 
habentes administrationem ministry, Vulg. 
2 Cor. 4, 1. 

* administratiuncula, ae, /. dim . 

[administratio], a little administration, 
Cod. Th. 8, 4, 10. 



ADMI 
* administrativus, a, um, adj. [ad. 

ministro],^ or suitable for the admin- , 
istration of a thing, practical : (rheto- 
rice ars) activa vel administrativa, Quint. 2, 
18,5. 

administrator, oris, m. [id.], lit., he 

that is near to aid, assist, etc., in the 
care of a thing ; hence, a manager, con- 
ductor (cf, administro) : (imperator est) ad- 
ministrator quidam belli gerendi, Cic. de Or. 
1, 48, 210 : rerum civitatis, Dig. 3, 4, 10 al. 

administratdrius, a, um, adj. [&&- 
ministrator], performing the duties of an 
assistant, helper ; serving, ministering : 
angeli, qui sunt administratorii spiritus, 
Hier. ad Jes. 46, 11 ; cf. Vulg. Hebr. 1, 14. 

ad-ministro, avi, atum, 1, v. a. I, 
Lit., to be near as an aid, to attend 
upon, to assist, to serve (ministrum esse 
ad aliquam rem ) : conduetam esse earn, 
quae hie administraret ad rem divinam tibi, 
Plaut. Ep. 3, 3, 37 : omnia per sacerdotes 
administrabuntur, Vulg. Num. 18, 7 : David 
in sua generatione cum administrasset, ib. 
Act. 13, 36 : mel ad principle convivii et ia 
secundam mensam administratur, is served 
up,V&rr. R. R. 3, 16, 5.— Hence, with esp. 
ref, to the object, II. Fig., to take charge 
of, to manage, guide, administer, exe- 
cute, accomplish, do, perform, etc. (the 
most usual signif. of this word ; very freq. 
in Cic. and the histt.) : a nobis omuia po- 
puli R. semper et belli adjumenta et pacis 
ornamenta administrata sunt, Cic. Verr. 2, 
5, 47 ; so, provinciam, to govern, id. ib. 2, 4, 
64: leges et judicia, id. Div. in Caecil. 22: 
rem publicam, id. Off. 1, 25 ; so Liv. 6, 6, 
11 ; cf. Drak. Liv. 6, 6, 11 : beilum, Cic. 
Imp. Pomp. 2 ; id. Div. 2, 36 (a military 
t. t.) ; cf. with exercitus, id. Inv. 1, 34, 58 ; 
Herz. ad Caes. B. G. 2, 20, and Cortius ad 
Sail. J. 92, 9 ; Caes. B. G. 5, 50 ; id. B. C. 
1, 25, 26; Nep. Chabr. 2 ; id. Eum. 5 al. : 
rem familiarem. Cic. Inv. 1, 25 : negotium 
alieujus, id. Fam. 13, 11 : neque ab uno om- 
nia imperia administrari poterant, be is- 
sued, given, Caes. B. G. 2, 22 : classem, id. 
B. C, 3, 18 : navem, to guide, steer, id. ib. 
3, 14 : legionarii, qui dextram partem ope- 
ns admin istrabant, i.e. tcho conducted the 
siege on the right side, id. ib. 2, 8: illu- 
striores legationes, Nep. Dion. 1 : oppida et 
fines alieujus, Sail. J. 22 ; cf. also Suet. Caea. 
76 • id. Tib. 8 ; id. Vitell. 5 ; id. Vesp. 4 ; so 
absol. (the ace. must be supplied from that 
which precedes) : neque administrandi (sc. 
navigium) neque repellendi facultas daba- 
tur, Hirt. B. Al. 21 : milites neque pro opere 
consistere neque inter vineas sine periculo 
administrare poterant, nor. . .pursue their 
work without peril, Sail. J. 92. 9 : si cele- 
riter administraverint (sc. hoc opus), Vitr. 1, 
5, p. 19 Rod. (others translate administrare 
in this place, to put the hand to, to render 
service, to do one's duty, etc.). — Unus. : 
virtutem, innocentiam, diligentiam alieujus. 
to employ, Cato ap. Cic. Fam. 15, 5. 

admirabilis, e, adj. [admiror]. I. 
Worthy of admiration, admirable, won- 
derful : admirabilis in dicendo vir, Cic. de 
Or. 1, 2 : O clementiani admirabilem, id. 
Lig. 2, 6: gravitatem atque constantiam, 
id. Phil. 13, 41 : scientia, id. ib. 9, 10. — 
Ironically: o admirabilem impudentiam, 
audaciam, temeritatem, Cic. Phil. 3, 7, 18 ; 
so, o admirabilior oratio, id. Or. 35- mag- 
nitude pop, R. admirabilior adversis rebus 
quam secundis, Liv. 22, 37 : admirabilem 
licentiam, Cic. Fat. 16 : quain admirabile est 
nomen, Vulg. Psa. 8, 2 : de tenebris vos voca- 
vit in admirabile lumen suum, ib. 1 Pet. 2, 
9. — II. That produces wonder, wonder- 
ful, astonishing, strange, rare, para- 
doxical: haec napahoSa illi, nos admira- 
bilia dicamus, Cic. Fin. 4, 27 ; cf. id. Par. 
praef. and Par. 4 : admirabile genus (cau- 
sae), a quo alienatus est animus eorum qui 
audituri sunt, id. Inv. 1, 15, 20 : concursus, 
id. ib. 10, 7 : gloria, id. ib. 3, 26.— Cornp. : 
non esse admirabilius Romanos Graecia pel- 
li quam Hannibalem Italia pulsum esse, 
Liv. 42, 50 ; also Flor. 4, 2^ 47. — Sup. not 

used. — Adv. .* admirabiliter (only in 

the posit.). 1. Admirably, Cic. N. D. 2, 
53, 132 ; id. Opt. Gen. Or. 6, 37 ; id. Att. 5, 
14, 2.-2. Paradoxically, strangely, ira- 
paSofwf, Cic. Tusc. 4, I6^?i. 

admirabilltas, atis,/ [admirabilis], 
the quality that produces admiration or 
39 



ADMI 

wonder, admirableness, wonderfulness (vis, 
quae admirationem excitat) : quanta sit 
aelmirabilitas caelestium rerum atque ter- 
restrium, Cic. N. D. 2, 36: cum admirabili- 
tate maxima, id. ib. 2, 40: haec animi de- 
spicientia admirabilitatem magnam facit, 
excites great admiration of the possessor of 
this virtue, id. Off. 2, 11. 

admirablllter, a & v - , v. admirabilis. 

admlrandus, a j um i Y - admiror ^n. 

admiratlO. onis, / [admiror], I. An 
admiring, admiration. — Absol. : tua divi- 
na virtus admirationis plus habet quam 
gloriae, Cic. Marc ell. 26: qui (plausus) non 
numquam ipsa admiratione compressus 
est, id. Deiot. 34 : perspicua admiratione 
declaratur, id. Balb. 2; id. Off. 2, 10, 36.— 
More freq. with gen. of object: copiose sa- 
pienterque dicentis, Cic. Off. 2, 14: si quid 
fuit in isto studio admirationis, id. Mur. 
25: admiratione afflciuntur ii, id. ib. 2, 10: 
admiratio nonnulla in bestiis aquatilibus. 
id. N. D. 2, 48, 124 al. : cuivis inicere admi- 
rationem sui, Nep. Iph. 3: hominis admi- 
ratio, Cic. Arch. 4 : admiratio viri, Liv. 9, 8 ; 
so id. 7, 34 ; Suet. Ner. 52 al. ; in magna ad- 
miratione esse, to be greatly admired, Plin. 
36, 5, 10, § 32. — In plur.: haec sunt, quae 
admirationes in bonis oratoribus efficiunt, 
Cic. de Or. 1, 33; so id. Brut. 84, 290; Vitr. 
7, 13. — II. Wonder, surprise, astonishment 
(cf.: admiror, admirabilis): hocmihimaxi- 
mam admirationem movet, Cic. Phil. 10, 2; 
so, habere, id. Fam. 5, 12, 18 ; divitiarum, 
id. Off. 2, 20; id. de Or. 2, 62; id. Or. 3 al. : 
admiratio ancipitis sententiac, Liv. 21, 3: 
non sine admiratione, Suet. Calig. 19; so 
Plin. 7, 12, 10, § 56; 16, 26, 44, § 107 : ut ad- 
mirationem faciam populo, Vulg. Isa. 29, 
14: miratus sum illam admiratione magna, 
ib. Apoc. 17, 6. — Also with quod: (Decium) 
admiratio incessit, quod nee pugnam ini- 
rent, etc. , Liv. 7, 34, 12. 

admirator. <~>ris, m. [id.], an admirer : 
alictijus, Phaedr. 4, 21, 21 ; Sen. Ep. 94, 70; 
mundi, id. Cons, ad Helv. 8 : antiquitatis 
nimius adirnrator, Quint. 2, 5, 21 al 

ad-miTOr, atus, 1, v. dtp., to wonder 
at, to be astonished at, to regard with ad- 
miration, to admire, to be in a state of 
mind in which something pleases us by 
its extraordinary greatness, its sublimity, 
or perfection ; while mirari signifies to 
be surprised at, to have the feeling of 
the new, singular, unusual. I. In gen. : 
quorum ego copiam non modo non con- 
temno, sed etiam vehementer admiror, 
Cic. de Or. 1. 51: ingenium tuum, Crasse, 
vehementer admirans, id. ib. 1, 20 fin.: res 
gestas, id. Brut. 94, 323: quern et admiror 
et diligo, id. Ac. 2, 36; so id. Scaur. 1, 4: 
magnitudinem animi, id. Fam. 1, 7; Nep. 
Dion. 2; id. Alcib. 11: ilium, Verg. G. 4, 215 
(cf. mirari in Hor. C. 4, 14, 43, and the Gr. 
tiavna&iv, Eurip. Med. 1144). — H, E sp. 
A. To gaze at passionately, to strive after 
a thing from admiration of it, to desire to 
obtain it : nihil hominem nisi quod hone- 
stum decorumque sit, aut admirari aut op- 
tare aut expetere oportere, Cic. Off. 1, 20 ; 
nil admirari prope res est una, Numici, So- 
laque quae possit facere et servare beat'um, 
not to be brought by any thing into an im- 
passioned state of mind , or into a state of 
desire or longing (as in the Gr. ^ flaujua- 
X,giv; ace. to Pythagoras the limit of all 
philos. effort), Hor. Ep. 1, 6, 1.— 3. More 
freq., to fall into a state of wonder or as- 
tonishment at a thing, to wonder at, be as- 
tonished at. — Const r. with ace. ace. with 
inf., de, super aliquam rem, with a relat. 
clause, quod, cur, etc.: quid admirati estis? 
why are you so surprised ? Plaut. Am. prol. 
99: admiratus sum brevitatem epistulae, 
Cic. A tt. 6, 9 : hoc maxime admiratus sum, 
mentionem te hereditatum ausum esse fa- 
cere, id. Phil. 2, 16 fin.; so Xcp. Alcib. 1 ; 
id. Epam. 6, 3 : de diplomats admiraris, 
quasi, etc., Cic. Att. 10, 17 : de Dionysio 
sum admiratus. qui, etc., id. ib. 9, 12 ; so 
id. Mur. 19: super quae admiratus pater, 
Vulg. Tob. 5, 10 ; ib. Act. 13, 12 : cave quid- 
quam admiratus sis, qua causa id fiat, Ter. 
Heaut. 4, 6, 22 : admirantium. unde hoc 
studium exstitisset, Cic. N. D. 1, 3: admira- 
tur quidnam Vettius dicturus sit, id. Verr. 
3, 167 : admiror, quo pacto, etc. , Hor. S. 1, 4. 
99 : admiratus sum, quod, etc. , Cic. Att. 6, 9 : 
ne quissit admiratus. cur, etc., id.Off. 2, 10, 35. 
40 



ADMI 

jgST Pass. : Propter venustatem vesti- 
mentorum admirari, to be admired, Canu- 
tius ap. Prise. 792 P. — Part. fut. pass. : 
admirandus, a , um, to be admired; 
admirable, wonderful : suspicienda et ad- 
miranda, Cic. Div. 2, 72, 148 : quo magis 
pravitas eorum admiranda est, Sail. J. 2, 4. 
—Hence also adj., = admirabilis: patiens 
admirandum in modum. Nep. Ep. 3; expo- 
suit quae in Italia viderentur admiranda, 
id. Cat. fin. : admiranda spectacula, Verg. 
G. 4, 3: vir subtilis et in plurimis admiran- 
dus, Quint. 3, 11, 22. — Comp. and adv. not 
used. — Sup. is found in Salv. Ep. 8: admi- 
randissimi juvenes; cf. Barth, Adv. 35, 9. 

ad-miSCeOj scui , xtum (better than 
-stum), 2, v. a., to add to by mingling, to 
mix with, mingle with, to admix (in admi- 
scere there is a ref. to a principal constit- 
uent, to w r hich something is added; in im- 
miscere, to the intimate union of the in- 
gredients: in permiscere, to the removal 
of their distinct characteristics). I, Lit, 
constr. with the abl. of that with which 
any thing is mingled: aer niulto calore ad- 
mixtus, Cic. N. D. 2, 10, 27 (cf. on the contr. 
ib. § 26 : aquae adinixtum calorem ; and 
soon after: admixtum calorem): genus ra- 
dicis admixtum lacte, Caes. B. C. 3, 48.— 
With in with ace: admixtis in heminam 
seminis resinae coclearibus duobus, Plin. 
26, 10, 66, § 104. — With cum : admiscent 
torrefacta sesama cum aniso, Col 12, 15. — 
II. Transf. A. Of things, to mingle in, 
to mix with, to add to, etc. : nee tamen ad- 
miscent in eorum corpus inane, Lucr. 1, 
745: deus bonis omnibus mundum imple- 
vit; mali nihil admiscuit, Cic. Univ. 3: se 
admiscere atque implicare hominum vi- 
tiis, id. Fragm. ap. Aug. de Trin. 14, 19: sed 
hoc cum iis rationibus admisceri nolo, be 
mixed up, id. Att. 7, 1: admiscere huic ge- 
neri oratioms illud alterum, id. de Or. 2, 
49: versus admiscere orationi, id. Tusc. 2, 
11, 26: admiscenda venus est timori, Ov. 
A. A. 3, 609: non admixtus fidei, Vulg. Heb. 
4, 2; ib. Eccii. 23, 10.— B. Of persons. I. 
To mix up with, to add or join to : his An- 
tonianos milites admiscuerat, Caes. B. C. 3, 
4: expeditos antesignanos admiscuit, id. ib. 
3, Ihfin.: ad id consilium admisceor, Cic. 
Phil. 12. 16: admiscerenturne plebeii, i. e. 
whether the plebeians should be admitted to 
the number of the decemvirs, Liv. 3, 32, 7 : 
admixti funditoribus sagittarii, Curt. 3, 9; 
Verg. A. 7, 579.-2. To involve or entangle 
in a thing : se, to interfere or meddle with : 
ita tu istaec tua misceto, ne me admisceas, 
Ter. Heaut. 4, 5, 35 : ne te admisce : nemo 
accusat, Syre, te, id. ib. 5, 2, 22: ad id con- 
silium admiscear? Cic. Phil. 12,7: Treba- 
tium vero meum, quod isto admisceas ni- 
hil est, implicate, involve in, id. Q. Fr. 3, 1, 
3. — Hence, admixtUS, a, urn, P. a., that 
is mingled with something, mixed, not sim- 
ple : simplex animi natura est, nee habet 
in se quidquam admixtum, Cic. de Sen. 21: 
nihil est animis admixtum, nihil concre- 
tum, nihil copulatum, nihil coagmentatum, 
nihil duplex, id. Tusc. 1, 29. — Comp., sup., 
and adv. not used. 

admissarius, a , um , adj. [admitto], 

sc. equus, asinus, etc., a horse, ass, etc., that 
is used for breeding, a stallion, etc.: equus, 
Varr. R. R. 2, 7: asinus, id. ib. 2, 8.— Hence, 
metaph. subst, %%. Of a sensual, lewd man : 
scitus admissarius, Plaut. Mil. 4, 3, 19 : ad- 
missarius iste, sic ad ill i us orationem ad- 
hinniit, *Cic, Pis. 28, 69 (cf. adhinnio) ; Sen. 
Q. N. 1, 16. 

admiSSlO, *">nis,/ [id.]. I. An admit- 
ting of the male to the female,Yaxr. R. R. 2, 
1, 18. — II. Admission to a prince, an audi- 
ence (post-Aug.): quibus admissionis libe- 
rae jus dedisse'nt, Plin. 33, 3, 12, § 41 : ad- 
missionum tuarum felicitas, Plin. Pan. 47: 
primae et secundae admissiones, Sen. Ben. 
6, 33; cf. Lipsius ad Tac. A. 6, 9. (Special 
officers of reception were appointed, whose 
charge was called oiflcium admissionis, the 
office of chamberlain, Suet. Vesp. 14 ; and 
the superintendent of them was called ma- 
agister admissionum, chief marshal, lord 
chamberlain, Amm. 15, 5.) — HI, The en- 
trance upon an inheritance, Cod, 6, 15, 5. 

adlXlissidnalis, is? m - [admissio], one 
who introduced those who came to an audi- 
ence, an usher of the privy chamber, a sen- 



ADMI 

eschal (late Lat.), Lampr. Alex. Sev. 4; Cod. 
Th. 6, 35, 7 al. 

t admissivae, aves, the birds which 
permitted (admittebant) to do that in ref- 
erence to which they were consulted, ace. to 
Paul, ex Fest. p. 21 Miill. ; cf. admitto, II. B. 

admissor, oris? m - [admitto], one that 
allows himself to do a thing, a perpetrator 
(late Lat.), Lact. upit. 63; Aug. Cic. Div. 
7, 3 ; cf. admitto, II. C. 

adxnissum, h n - [id. 1. a wrong done, a 
trespass, fault, crime: judicia. quae etiam, 
nullo admisso consequi possent, Cic. Part. 
Or. 35: tale admissum, Liv. 25, 23; de ad- 
missis Poppeae, Tac. A. 11, 4; cf. admitto,, 
II. C. 

admissura, ae > / L^.J, the admitting 
of a male to a female, Varr. R. R. 2, 1 med.; 
so id. ib. 2, 4, 8 ; Col. 6, 24, 1 ; Plin. 8, 42, 66, 
§ 164; Stat S. 5, 2, 24; Vulg. Gen. 30, 42. 

1. admisSUS, a , um > Part, of admitto. 

2. admisSUS, iis, m. [admitto]. I. A 
letting in or admission: solis admissu, PalL 
4, 9, 4; 6, 2, 2.— H.=admissura, Veg. Vet. 4. 
7, 3. 

admistio (better admist-, q- v.) r 

onis, f. [admisceo], a mixture .- olei admi- 
stione conspersus, Vulg. Lev. 7, 12. 

admistus^ v. admixtus. 

ad-mitto, mlsi, missum, 3, v. a. (ad- 
misse sync, for admisisse, Plaut. Mil. 4, 7, 4: 
admittier arch, for admitti, as Verg. A. 9, 
231), orig. to send to ; hence with the ac- 
cess, idea of leave, permission (cf: aditus r 
accessus), to suffer to come or go to a place, 
to admit. — C o n s t r. with in and ace. (in 
and abl. is rare and doubtful), ad, or dat. 
(class.). I. Lit. A. In gen. : ad earn 
non admissa sum, Ter. Hec. 2, 1, 41 ; so 
Eun. 2, 2, 50 : quam multis custodibus opus 
erit, si te semel ad meas capsas admisero, 
Cic. Div. in Caecil. 16 : in cubiculum. id. 
Phil. 8, 10 : iucem in thalamos, Ov. A. A. 3, 
807 : domum ad se filium, Nep. Tim. 1 : ple- 
bem ad campestres exercitationes, Suet. 
Ner. 10: aliquem per fenestram, Petr. Sat. 
79; cf. Ov. A. A. 3, 605: admissis intra 
moenia hostibus, Flor. 1, 1.— B. Ksp. \ m 
Of those who admitted one on account of 
some business; and under the emperors, 
for the purpose of salutation, to allow one 
admittance or access, to grant an audience 
(the t. t. for this; v.jidmissio, admissiona- 
lis; opp. exciudere, uic. uat. 1, 4, 10; Plin. 
Pan. 48; cf. Schwarz ad h. 1. 47, 3): nee 
quemquam admisit, admitted no one to his 
presence, Cic. Att. 13, 52 : domus clari ho- 
minis, in quam admittenda hominum cu- 
jusque modi multitude, id. Off. 1, 39: Ca- 
sino salutatum veniebant ; admissus est 
nemo, id. Phil. 2, 41, 105; Nep. Con. 3; id. 
Dat. 3; Suet. Aug. 79: spectatum admissi, 
Hor. A. P. 5: admittier orant, Verg. A. 9, 231: 
turpius eicitur quam non admittitur lio- 
spes, Ov. Tr. 5, 6, 13: vetuit ad eum quem- 
quam admitti, Nep. Eum. 12; Curt. 4, 1, l", ; 
promiscuis salutationibus admittebat et 
plebem, Suet. Aug. 52.— M e tap h. : ante 
fores stantem dubitas admittere Famam, 
Mart. 1, 25. — 2. Of a harlot : ne quemquam 
interea alium admittat prorsus quam me 
ad se virum, Plaut. As. 1, 3, 83 ; Prop. 3, 20, 
7. — Also of the breeding of animals, to put 
the male to the female (cf. : admissarius, 
admissura, admissus), Varr. R. R. 3, 9, 22: 
3, 10, 3 ; Plin. 8, 43, 68 al. ; cf. id. 10, 63, 83 ; 
Just. 1, 10; Col. 6, 37; 7, 2.— Also used of 
the female of animals, Varr. R. R. 2, 7, and 
Non. 69, 85.-3. Admittere aliquem ad con- 
silium, to admit one to counsel or consulta- 
tion : nec ad consilium casus admittitur, 
Cic. Marc. 2, 7: horum in numerum nemo 
admittebatur nisi qui, etc., Nep. Lys. 1 
Halm. — Hence: admittere aliquem ad ho- 
nores, ad officium, to admit him to, to con- 
fer on, Nep. Eum. 1 ; Suet. Caes. 41 ; Prop. 
2,34, 16 ; Sen. Here. Oet. 335.-4. Of a horse, 
to let go or run, to give loose reins to (cf. : 
remittere, immittere, less emphatic than 
concitare ; usu. in the part, perf.) : admis- 
so equo in mediam aciem irruere, Cic. Fin. 
2, 19, 61: equitesadmissis equis ad suos re- 
fugerunt, Caes. B. C. 2, 34: Considius equo 
admisso ad eum accurrit, came at full speed, 
id. B. G. 1, 22: in Postumium equum infes- 
tus admisit Liv. 2, 19- so Ov. H. 1, 36; id. 
M. 6, 237. — Hence of the hair, to let it flow 
loosely : admissae jubae, Ov. Am. 2, 16, 50 aL 



ADMO 



AD MO 



II. Fig. A. Of words, entreaties, etc., 
to permit a tiling to come, to give access 
or grant admittance, to receive : paeis men- 
tionem adniittere auribus, Liv. 34, 49 ; so 

30, 3: nihil quod salutare 'esset, ad auris 
admittebant, id. 25, 21 : quo facilms aures 
judicum, quae post dicturi erimus, admit- 
tant, Quint. 4, 3, 10. —Hence also absol. : ad- 
niittere precationem, to hear, to grant, Liv. 

31, 5 Gron. ; Sil. 4, 698: tunc admitte jo- 
cos, give admittance to jesting, i. e. allow it, 
Mart. 4, 8.— So also: aliquid ad animum, 
Liv. 7, 9: cogitationem, Lact. 6, 13, 8.— B. 
Of an act, event, etc., to let it be done, to 
allow, permit ( u fieri pati," Don. ad Ter. 
Eun. 4. 6. 23).— With ace. of thing: sed tu 
quod cavere possis stultum admittere est, 
Ter. 1. c. : quod semel admissum coerced 
non potest, Cic. Fin. 1, 1, 4: non admittere 
litem, id. Clu. 116 : aspicere ecquid jam 
mare admitteret, Plin. Ep. 6, 16, 17 : non 
admittere illicita, Vulg. 2 Mace. 6, 20.— With 
subj. clause : hosti non admissuro, quo mi- 
nus aggrederetur, Tac. H. 2, 40.— With ace. 
and inf. : non admisit quemquam se se- 
qui. Vulg. Marc. 5, 37 ; so ace. of person 
alone: non admisit eum, ib. 5, 19. — Hence, 
in the language of soothsayers, 1. 1. of birds 
which give a favorable omen, — addlco, to 
be propitious, to favor : inpetritum, inau- 
guratum'st, quovis admittunt aves, Plaut. 
As. 2, 1, 11 : ubi aves non admisissent, Liv. 
1 36. 6 ; id. 4, 18 al. (hence : adxissi vae : 
aves, in Paul, ex Fest p. 21 Hull.).— C. Of 
an unlawful act, design, etc., to grant ad- 
mittance to one's self; hence, become guilty 
of. to perpetrate, to commit (it thus expresses 
rather the moral liability incurred freely; 
while committere designates the overt act, 
punishable by civil law, Herz. ad Caes. B. 
G. 3, 9; freq. and class.), often with a re- 
flexive pron., in me, etc. {ace): me hoc 
delictum admisisse in me. vehementer do- 
let. Ter. Ad. 4, 5, 48 : ea in te admisisti 
quae, etc., Cic. Phil. 2, 19, 47: tu nihil ad- 
mittes in te formidine poenae, Hor. Ep. 1, 
16,53: admittere in se culpam, Plaut. Trin. 
1. 2, 61; Ter. Phorm. 2, 1, 40: scelera, quae 
in se admiserit, Lucil. 27, 5 Mull. : quid urn- 
quam Habitus in se admisit, ut, etc., Cic. 
Clu. 60, 167 : quantum in se facinus, Caes. B. 
G. 3, 9. — And without such reflexive pron. : 
cum muitos multa admisse acceperim, 
Plaut. Mil. 4, 7, 4 : quid ego tantum sce- 
leris admisi miser? Ter. Heaut. 5, 2, 83; so, 
si Milo admisisset aliquid, quod, etc., Uic. 
Mil. 23 fin. : dedecus. id. Verr. 1, 17 : com- 
missum facinus et admissum dedecus con- 
fitebor, id. Fam. 3, 10, 7 : tantum dedecus, 
Caes. B. G. 4, 25 : si quod facinus, id. ib. 6, 
12 : fiagitium, Cic. Clu. 128 : fraudem, id. 
Rab. 126: malencium, id. Sext. Rose. 62: 
scelus, Nep. Ep. 6: facinus miserabile, Sail. 
J. 53, 7: pessimum facinus pejore exem- 
plo, Liv. 3, 72, 2 : tantum dedecoris, id. 4, 
2 ; so 2, 37 ; 3, 59 al. 

admixtio (better than admist-), 

onis, /. [admisceo], a mingling; in con- 
crete, an admixture: animus omni ad- 
mixtione corporis liberatus, Cic. de Sen. 
22, 79 ; so, terreni, Pall. 1, 5, 1 : ardor nul- 
la admixtione concretus, Cic. N. D. 2, 45, 
117.— In plur., Varr. R. R. 1, 9, 2 al. 

1. admixtus (better than admist-)? 

a, um, P. a., from admisceo. 

* 2. a dmix tus (better than ad- 
mist-)) r.s, m. [admisceo], = admixtio, a 
mingling ; in concreto, an admixture : nul- 
lo admixtu voluptatis, Macr. S. 2, 1. 

adm dderate, adv. , v. admoderor. 

* ad-mdderor, ari, 1, v. dep. , to keep to 
or within due limits, to moderate : nequeo 
hercle equidem risu admoderarier, Haut. 

Mil. 4, 2, hi. — Hence, * admdderate, 

adv. .fitly, suitably : humanis rationibus ad- 
moderate temporamutare annorum, in con- 
formity with the ways of men, Lucr. 2, 169. 

* ad-illdditlor, ari, 1, v. dep. , in mu- 
sic, to accord or harmonize with : Padus 
electriferis admoduletur alnis, Claud. Nupt. 
Hon. 11. 

ad-mddum, adv - [modus], prop. , to the 
measure or limit {scarcely found in the 
poets, except the comic poets); as, postea 
ubi occipiet fervere, paulisper demittito, 
usque admodum dum quinquies quinque 
numeres, quite to the limit till you count, 
until you count, Cato, R. R. 156, 2 (like fere 
and omnino, freq. put after its word). — 



Hence, I, To a (great) measure, in a high 
degree, much, very.— With adj., P. adj., vbs., 
and adv. (a) With adj. : admodum cau- 
sam gravem, Lucil. 29, 19 Mull. : admodum 
antiqui, Cic. Phil. 5, 47 : admodum amplum 
et excelsum, id. Verr. 4, 74 : utrique no- 
strum gratum admodum feceris, id. Lael. 
4, 16; so id. Verr. 2, 3, 10: nee admodum 
in virum hononlicum, Liv. 6, 34, 8: in quo 
multum admodum fortunae datur, Cic. 
Fin. 5, 5, 12 : neque admodum sunt multi, 
Nep. Keg. 1, 1: admodum magnis itineri- 
bus Caes. B. G. 7, 56 : admodum pauci, Cic. 
Phil 3,36; 14, 27; id. N. 1). 3, 69; Tac. G 
18 : pauci admodum. Liv. 10, 41 : iter an- 
gustum admodum, Sail. J. 92 : admodum 
nimia ubertas, very excessive, Col. 4, 21: 
admodum dives, Suet. Caes. 1 : brevis ad- 
modum, id. ib. 56.— And strengthened by 
quam, q. v. (only before and after the 
class, per.) : hie admodum quam saevus est, 
very cruel indeed, Plaut. Am. 1, 3, 43 : voce 
admodum quam suavi, Cell. 19, 9 (on this 
use of quam, cf. Rudd. II. p. 307, n. 15).— 
(3) With part. adj. : admodum iratum se- 
nem Ter. Phorm. 3, 1, 13 : iratum admo- 
dum 1 , id. Ad. 3, 3, 49: natio admodum de- 
dita religionibus, Caes. B. G. 6, 16 : prorae 
admodum erectae, id. ib. 3, 13: admodum 
mitigati, Liv. 1, 10 : munitus admodum, 
Tac. A. 2, 80: admodum fuit militum vir- 
tus laudanda, Caes. B. G. 5, 8.— Esp. is it 
joined (like Koni&rj in Dem.) with w T ords 
denoting age ; as,'puer, adulescens, juve- 
nis, senex, to enhance the idea (for which 
in some cases the dim. or the prefix per- 
is used; as.puellus, aduiescentuius,peradu- 
lescentulus) : Catulus admodum turn adu- 
lescens. Cic. Rab. Perd. 7, 21 ; id. Off. 2, 13, 
47 ; Tac. A. 1, 3 : puer admodum, Liv. 31, 
28; Sen. Brev. Vit. 7, 3; Quint. 12, 6, 1: ad- 
modum infans, Tac. A. 4, 13 : juvenis ad- 
modum, id. H. 4, 5 : fratres admodum juve- 
nes, Curt. 7, 2, 12 : admodum senex, Eutr. 
8, 1: admodum parvulus, Just. 17, 3: non 
admodum grandem natu, Cic. Sen. 4, 10. — 
Also with dim.: neque admodum adule- 
scentulus est, Naev. ap. Sergium ad Don. 
Keil, Gr. Lat. IV. p. 559 (Rib. Com. Fragm. 
p. 11): hie admodum adulescentulus est, 
Plaut. Trin. 2, 2, 90 ; so Nep. Ham. 1, 1 (cf. 
peradulescentulus, id. Eum. 1. 4), and Tac. 
A. 4, 44.— (7) With verbs (in earlier Latin, 
mostly with delectare, diligere. placere ) : 
haec anus admodum frigultit, Enn. ap. 
Fuig. p. 175: irridere ne videare et gestire 
admodum, Plaut. Most. 3, 2. 125 : neque ad- 
modum ? pueris abscessit, Naev. Rib. Com. 
Fragm. p. 11 : me superiores litterae tuae 
admodum delectaverunt. Cic. Fam. 5, 19; 
id. Att. 7, 24 : ejus familiarissimos, qui me 
admodum diligunt, id. Fam. 4, 13 : stoma- 
cho admodum prodest, Plin. 20, 3, 7, § 13 : 
bucinum pelagio admodum adligatur. id. 
9, 38, 62, § 134: (familia) ipsa admodum 
floruit, Suet. Tib. 3 : Marius auctis admo- 
dum copiis . . . vicit, Flor. 1, 36, 13 Halm.— 
(5) With adv. : haec inter nos nuper no- 
titia admodum est, Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 1 : si 
quando demerslmus, aut nihil superum aut 
obscure admodum cernimus, Cic. Ac. ap. 
Non. 7, 57: acipenser, qui admodum raro 
capitur, id. de Fato ap. Macr. S. 2, 12: raro 
admodum admomtu amicorum . . . uti so- 
lebat, Curt. 4, 13, 25 : ubi satis admodum 
suorum animos est expertus, Liv. 34, 13, 4 
Weissenb. (Hertz cancels satis) : quae maxi- 
me admodum oratori accommodata est, 
Auct. ad Her. 4, 12, 17 (Oudendorp regarded 
this as a mere pleonasm, and Hand seems 
to agree with him; Klotz and B. and K. 
adopt after Goerenz the reading maxime ad 
modum oratoris, but Hand condemned this 
form).— II. To 'a (full) measure, fully, com- 
pletely, wholly, quite, absolutely. A. Of num- 
ber (not used in this way by Cic. Tac, or 
Suet.): noctu turres admodum CXX. exci- 
tantur, full 120 Caes. B. G. 5, 40 : sex mi- 
iia hostium caesa; quinque admodum Ro- 
manorum, Liv. 22, 24, 14; 42, 65, 3; 44, 43, 
8: mille admodum hostium utraque pugna 
occidit, id. 27, 30, 2: in laevo cornu tfac- 
triani ibant equites, mille admodum, a 
round thousand, Curt. 4, 12, 3 : mille ad- 
modum equites praemiserat, quorum pau- 
citate Alexander, etc., a thousand, but not 
more (as the context requires), id. 4, 9, 24: 
congregati admodum quingenti sponsoshos- 
tes consectantur, trucidatisque admodum 
novem milibus, etc, Just. 24, 1. 



ADMO 

IKS- The meaning, circiter, fere; about^ 
near, or nearly, which used to be assigned] 
to this head, as by Graevius ad Just. 24, 26, 
Gronovius ad Liv. 27, 30, 2, is rejected by 
recent scholars, as Hand, Turs. I. p. 175 sq., 
and by Corradini, Lex. Lat. s. h. v. 

g B Of time: legati ex Macedonia exac- 
to admodum mense Februario redierunt, 
when February was fully ended, Liv. 43, 11. 
9: Alexandri Alius, rex Syriae, decern an- 
nos admodum habens, ,;'itsi ten years, Liv. 
Epit. 55: Dost menses admodum septem 
occiditur, Just. 17, 2, 3.— C. With negatives, 
just, at all, absolutely : equestris pugna 
nulla admodum fuit, no engagement with 
the cavalry at all, Liv. 23, 29, 14: armorum 
magnam vim transtulit, nullam pecuniam 
admodum, id. 40, 59, 2 : horunc ilia nihi- 
lum quidquam facere' poterit admodum, 
Plaut. Merc. 2, 3, 65: Curio litteiarum ad- 
modum nihil sciebat, Cic. Brut. 58, 210 : ora- 
torem plane quidem perfectum et cui nihil, 
admodum desit, Demosthenem facile dixe- 
ris, id. 9, 35: alter non multum. alter nihil 
admodum scripti reliquit (by the latter ie 
meant Antonius, who indeed, ace to Brut 
44, 163, left a treatise de ratione dicendi, 
but no written oration at all, by which his- 
eloquence could be judged), id. Or. 38, 132; 
id. Clu. 50, 140; id. Or. 2, 2, 8; apcovela a 
tropo genere ipso nihil admodum distat, 
Quint. 9, 2, 44; quia nihil admodum super 
vite aut arbore colenda sciret, Gell. 19, 12. 
— J>. In emphatic affirmative or corrobo- 
rative answers, — maxime (Gr. ndw -ye), 
exactly, just so, quite so, certainly, yes (freq. 
in Plaut. , only twice in Ter. ) ; cf. the re- 
mark of Cic. : scis solere, frater, in hujus- 
modi sermone, ut transiri alio possit, dici 
Admodum aut Prorsus ita est, Leg. 3, 11, 
26 : nempe tu hanc dicis, quam esse aiebas 
dudum popularem meam. Tr. Admodum, 
Certainly, Plaut. Rud 4, 4, 36 : num quid- 
nam ad filium haec aegTitudo attinet ? iVtV 
Admodum, It does, id. Bacch. 5, 1, 24 : 4, 1, 
40 ; id. Rud. 1, 5, 10; 1, 2, 55; 3, 6, 2; id. Ps. 
4 7, 54 : Advenis modo ? Pa. Admodum, 
Yes, Ter. Hec. 3, 5, 8; id. Phorm. 2, 2, 1. 

4®= Admodum with an adj. may have 
the same force as in II., in: quandam for- 
mam Ingenii, sed admodum impolitam et 
plane rudem, absolutely without polish and 
altogether rude, Cic. Brut. 85, 294, compared 
with; (oratorem) plane perfectum et cui 
nihil admodum desit, id. ib. 9, 35, where 
the same adverbs occur. 

* ad-moenio, ire > 4 > v - a - > t0 draw near 

the walls, to besiege, invest: oppidum. Plaut. 
Ps. 1, 3, 150 (but not id. ib. 2, 1, 11; cf. 
Ritschl ad h. L ; and id. Cist. 2, 2, 5, for ad- 
moenivi, admovi is a more correct read- 
ing; v. admoveo). 

ad-mdlior, itus, 4, v. dep., to move 
or bring one thing to or upon another 
(not in Cic). I. In gen.: ubi sacro ma- 
nus sis admolitus, put the hand to, lay 
hands on, Plaut. As. 3, 2, 24: manus rnoii, 
App. M. 6, 10 : dejerantes sese neque ei 
manus admolituros, i. e. vim illaturos, id. 
Flor. 1, 7 : velut de industria rupes praeal- 
tas admolita natura est, has piled up, Curt. 
8, 10, 24 : imagini regis manus admolitus, 
App. Flor. p. 344, 14 Elm.— H. Esp. as a 
mid. voice, to exert one's self to reach a 
place, to strive or struggle toward a place: 
ad hirundinum nidum, Plaut. Rud. 3, 1, 6. 

admdne-faC10,Sre, 3, v. a. [admoneo], 
to admonish, dub. in Cic. Plane. 34, 85, where 
B. and K. read admoneo ; cf. also Wunder 
ad h. 1. : in the Gloss. Gr. Lat, it also oc- 
curs as a transl. of v-Ko^vn^ariK^- 

ad-mdneo, ui, itum, 2, v. a. , to bring 
up to one's mind, to put one in mind of (in 
a friendly manner), to remind, suggest, ad- 
vise, warn, admonish (by influencing more 
directly the reason and judgment; while 
in adhortor the admonition is addressed 
immediately to the will, Doed. Syn. 1, 164: 
"Moneo, et admoneo hoc diflerunt, quod 
monemus futura. admonemus praeterita; 
ilia ut caveamus et discarnus, haec ut re- 
cordemur." Aus. Popma, p. 29 ; cf. Ellendt ad 
Cic. Brut. 3, 11 : "in monente benevolentia, 
in adnionente memoria,' , Ernest, no. 1663). 
I, I n gen., constr. absol. and with ali- 
quem alicujus rei or de aliqua re, aliquant, 
rem (Sallust employs them all) ; with ut or 
ne. when an action follows; with ace. and 
inf.Q? a rel. clause,when merely an histor- 



41 



A D M O 

ical fact is brought to view, Zumpt, § 439 
.und 615. ( a ) Absol. : qui admonent amice, 
.docendi sunt, Cic. N. D. 1, 3 : amicissime 
.admonere, id. Att. 7, 26: si sitis admone- 
ret, profluente aqua vitam tolerat, Tac. A. 
15, 45 fin. : admonitus in somnis, Yulg. 
Matt. 2. 22. — (8) Aliquem alicujus rei : ad- 
monebat aliutn egestatis, alium cupiditatis 
suae, Sail. C. 21 : quoniam nos tanti viri 
res admonuit, id. J. 95: admonere aliquem 
foederis, Liv. 35, 13; 5, 51: judices legum 
et religionis, Suet. Tib. 33: admonitus hu- 
jus aeris alieni, Cic. Top. 1, 5: aetatis et 
condicionis admoneri, Suet. Dom. 2 ; cf. 
Drak. ad Liv. 2, 36, 6.— And with ace. of per- 
son omitted: adversae res admonuerunt 
religionum, Liv. 5, 51 ; 5, 46, 6 : veterum 
xecentiumque admonens, Tac. H. 3, 24. — 
(y) Aliquem de aliqua re : de aede Tellu- 
ris et de porticu Catuli me admones, Cic. 
Q. Fr. 3, 1, 4: ut aliquid aliquando de doc- 
trinae studiis admoneamur, id. Rep. 1, 9: 
de moribus civitatis tempus admonuit, Sail. 
C. 5 : admonuit eos de auxiliis Dei, Yulg. 
2 Mace. 8. 19.— Sometimes in passing from 
a subject already discussed to a new one, 
= docere, dicere, to treat of to speak of: de 
multitudine (verborum) quoniam quod sa- 
tis esset admonui, de obscuritate pauca di- 
-cam, Varr. L. L. 6, § 40 Mull.— (5) With two 
ace. (in gen., only with illud, istuc, quod, 
multa, res, etc.): ridiculum est te istuc me 
admonere, Ter. Heaut. 2, 3, 112: illud te 
.esse admonitum volo, Cic. Cael. 3, 8 : jam 
illud non sunt admonendi, ut, etc. , id. Off. 
2, 19, 68: illud me praeclare admones, id. 
Att. 9, 9: sin quippiam esseni admonitus, 
id. Fam. 5, 8: multa praeterea ostentis, 
multa extis admonemur, id. N. D. 2, 66: 
earn rem nos locus admonuit, Sal!. J. 79.— 
(e) With ace. and inf.: admonuisti etiam 
dictum aliquod inpetitionem tuam dici po- 
tuisse, Cic. Plane. 34, 85 B. and K. : et me- 
minerant et admonebant alii alios, suppli 
cium ex se, non victoriam peti, Liv. 28, 19 : 
nostri detrimento admonentur diligentius 
•stationes disponere, Auct. B. G. 8, 12.— (£) 
With a rel. clause : meus me sensus, quanta 
vis fraterni sit am oris, adtnonet, Cic. Fam. 
5, 2. — (,)) With ut or ne : admonebat me 
res, ut, etc. , Cic. Off. 2, 19, 67 : Caninius no- 
ster me tuis verbis admonuit, ut scribe- 
rem, id. Fam. 9, 6: ea res admonet, ut, etc., 
Tac. A. 3, 25 ; so, corresp. with moneo Sen 
Ep. 24, 16.— (0) With the simple subj. (in 
the historians) : simulque admonerentlibe- 
ris suis prospiceret, Nep. Ph. 1; nisi Sene- 
ca admonuisset venienti matri occurreret, 
Tac. A. 13, 5: admonuit negotiis abstine- 
ret, Suet. Tib. 50: illud me admones, cum 
ilium videro, ne nimis indulgenter, et cum 
gravitate potius loquar, Cic. Att. 9, 9, 2 
(where ut is to be supplied from the pre- 
ceding m).—{t) With a simple inf. (so most 
freq. after the Aug. per., but also in Cic): 
ut mos erat istius atque ut eum suae libi- 
dines facere admonebant, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 24, 
§ 63: easdem decedcre campis admonuit! 
Verg. G. 4, 186; so, Matrem Admonuit ra- 
tibus sacris depellere taedas, id. A. 9, 109 : 
sol acrior ire lavatum admonuit, Hor.' S. 1 
6, 125 ; so Ov. M. 3, 601 ; 6, 150 : nihil agere 
quod non prosit, fabella admonet, Phaedr. 
3, 17; Tac. A. 15, 67: regrediendum (sc. 
esse sibi), Tac. Agr. 25.— ( K ) With ad and 
the gerund.: ad thesaurum reperiendum 
Cic. Div 2, 65, 134.— (A) With abl. of means 
or cause : de quibus (discordiis) i'psis his 
prodigiis a dis immortalibus admonemur, 
Cic. Ear. Resp. 21, 44: proximi diei casu 
admoniti omnia ad defensionem Darave- 
runt, Caes. B. C. 2, 14: divina admonitus 
plaga, Vulg. 2 Mace. 9, 11.— H. E sp. A. 
To recall a thing to memory, to bring to 
remembrance (without any accessory no 
tion of admonition) ; with ace. or gen. : cum 
memor anteactos semper dolor admonet 
annos, Tib. 4, 1, 189 Mull, (some read here 
admovet): admonuit dominae deseruitque 
Venus, id. 1, 5, 40 : nomen, quod possit 
equorum Admonuisse, Ov. M. 15, 543.— JJ. 
Of a creditor, to remind a debtor of his" 
debt, to ask payment, to dun : cum tibi co- 
tidie potestas hominis fuisset admonendi, 
verbum nullum facis, Cic. Quint. 12; so id. 
Top. 1 fin.~Q m In the poets and in later 
Lat., to urge or incite to action (cf. admo- 
uitor): telo admonuit bijugos, Verg. A. 10, 
586 ; so Spart. Sever, llfin. : liberos verberi- 
bus, Sen. Clem. 1, 14; id. Const. Sap. 12 fin 
42 



ADMO 

admonitio. onis, / [admoneo]. f = A 
reminding, recalling to mind, suggestion : 
illud ne indignum quidem admonitione, in- 
gens in epilogis verti discrimen, Cic. Quint. 
6j 1, 37 : tanta vis admonitionis inest in lo- 
cis, ut, etc., id. Fin. 5, 1: qua admonitione 
succurrit quod Varro tradit, etc., PI in. 19, 
1, 2, § 8: unius admonitione verbi in me- 
moriam reponuntur, Quint. 11, 2, 19: unius 
admonitione verbi. id. 6, 1, 37. — Hence, 
transf. : admonitio morbi, or doloris, the 
returning sensations of a former sickness : 
si qua admonitio doloris supersit, Plin. 25, 
8, 49, § 88; admonitionem morbi sentire, 
id. 24, 17, 101, § 158.— H. A friendly, mild 
admonition (cf. Cic. de Or. 2, 83 : admonitio, 
quasi lenior objurgatio; v. admoneo, 1.): 
admonitio et praeceptum, Cic. Off. 1, IQfin.; 
so id. de Or. 2, 70: si aliter sentirem certe 
admonitio tua me reprimere aut si dubi- 
tarem, hortatio impellere posset, Plane, ap. 
Cic. Fam. 10, 4. — m. Correction, chastise- 
ment : plures admonitione notavit. Suet. 
Aug. 39 : admonitio fustium. Dig. 48,' 19, 7. 
admdnitor, oris, m. [id.]. I. He that 
reminds or admonishes one of something, a 
monitor : misi ad te quattuor admonitores 
non nimis verecundos, Cic. Fam. 9, 8: sc 
id. Top. lfin.— H. One that urges to action, 
an admonisher (cf. admoneo, II. C. ) : admo- 
nitorque operum caelo clarissimus alto Lu- 
cifer ortus erat, Ov. M. 4 664 : admonitor 
praecepti, Cod. Th. 8, 8, 7. 

* admdnitdrium, », "• [id.], an ad- 
monition, a reminding, Dig. Ep. ad Trib. 12. 

* admdnitrix, icis, / [id], she. that 
reminds or admonishes, a female monitor : 
-quid adhuc egeo tui, malum, admonitricis ? 
Plaut. True. 2 L 6, 20. 

* admdmtum, i, «. [id], a remind- 
ing, an admonition : cohortationps rnn^- 
lationes, praecepta, admouita, Cic. de Or. 
2, 15, 64 B. and K. ; where others read mo- 
nita. 

1. admonitus, a, um, Part of admo- 
neo. ' 

2. admonitus,, us, m. [admoneo], used 
only in the abl. \ m A reminding, sugges- 
tion (class. ) : acrius de Claris viris locorum 
admonitu cogitamus, Cic. Fin. 5, 2; Ov. R. 

A. 729 : admonitu Allobrogum 'praetorem 
misi, Cic. Cat. 3, 3, 8; Ov F. 3, 612- Caes 

B. C. 3, 92; Liv. 1, 48; Curt. 4, 13, 25; Tac! 
H. 3, 81.— II, Instance, request: admonitu 
tuo perfeci libros, Cic. Att. 13, 18: ut Attici 
admonitu earn reflciendam curaret, Nep 
Att. 20; Liv. 1, 48.— HI, Reproof: acrior 
admonitu est, Ov. M. 3, 564. 

ad-mordeo, rsum, 2, v. a. (perf ad- 
memordi, Plaut. Aul. Fragm. ap. Gell. 6, 9. 
0), to bite at or gnaw, to bite into (cf. accldo^ 
to cut into). I, L i t. : admorso signata in 
stirpe cicatrix, Verg. G. 2, 379.— So of Cleo- 
patra: bracchia admorsa colubris, Prop. 4 
10, 53. -II. Fig., of a miser, to bite, i. a 
get possession of some of one's property, to 
fleece him : lepidum est, triparcos, vetulos 
bene admordere, Plaut. Pers. 2, 3, 14 : jam 
admordere nunc mihi lubet, i. e. aggredi et 
ab eo aliquid corradere, id. Ps. 4, 7, 24. 

1. admorsus. a, um. Part, of admor- 
deo. ' 

*2. admorsus, us, m. [admordeo], a 
biting at, a gnawing, a bite ; trop. : vereor 
ne libellus iste admorsu dun dentis uratur, 
Symm. Ep. 1, 15. 

admdtlO, unis, / [admoveo], a put- 
ting, moving, or bringing to, an applying ; 
in music: digitorum, the application of the 
fingers : itaque ad pingendum, ad scafpen- 
dum, ad nervorum eliciendos sonos apta 
manus est admotione digitorum, Cic. N. D. 
2, 60. 150; cf. : animis judicum admovere 
orationem tamquam fldibus manum, id. 
Brut. 54, 200: spongiarum cum aqua fri- 
gida expressarum admotio gutturi CaeL 
Aur. Tard. 2, 6. 

admdtus, a , um, Part, of admoveo. 

ad-md Veo, movi, motum, 2, v. a. (ad- 
moram, admorim, etc., sync, for admove- 
ram, admoverim, etc., Verg. A. 4, 367; Ov. 
P. 3, 7, 36), to move a person 'or thing- 
to bring, conduct, lead, carry, etc. , to or to- 
ward a place (syn. : adduco, adicio, adhibeo, 
appello). I, Lit. A. In gen., constr. with' 
ad or with dot. (in the histt., of an army, 
implements for besieging, etc. ; class, at 
all periods): dum ne exercitum propius ur- 



ADMU 



bem Eomam CC milia admoveret, Cic. Phil. 
6, 3, 5 : copias in locum, Liv. 42, 57 ■ signa 
Achradinae, id. 25, 24 ext; so Flor. 1 24- 
3, 23 : castra, Sil. 1, 296.— Hence, also, some- 
times absol, to draw near, to approach to 
bring near : jam admovebat rex, Curt! 9, 
4 : jam opera admoventi deditio est facta 
Liv. 32, 32: scalas moenibus, Tac. A. 13, 39,' 
— T r o p. : quot admovi illi fabricas ' quot 
fallacias ! Plaut. Cist. 2, 2. 5 (where former- 
ly admoenivi was erroneously read) : tam- 
quam aliqua machine admota, capere Asi- 
nii adulescentiam, Cic. Clu. 13 ; so also ■ 
ignes ardentesque laminae cete'rique cru- 
ciatus admovebantur (sc. civi Romano), id. 
Verr. 2, 5, 63: dolorum faces, id. Off. 2,' 10 
37: cumque quasi faces ei doloris admo- 
verentur, id. Tusc. 2, 25, 61: fasciculum ad 
nares, id. lb. 3, 18 fin. : pecus flagrantibus 
ans, Verg. A. 12, 171: admotae hostiap (^. 
aris), Tac. A. 2, 69; so Suet. Calig. 32; Luc. 
7, 165 : Hannibalem admotum, i. e. adduc- 
tum altaribus, led or conducted to, Liv 21 
1; labra poculis, Verg. E. 3, 43: ignes tem- 
plis, Tib. 3, 5, H: exercitum Ariminum 
Liv. 28, 46: vultum ad auditores, Auct! 
Her. 3, 15 : animam admotis fugientem sus- 
tinet herbis, Ov. M. 10, 188: (opes) Stygiis 
admoverat umbris, id. ib. 1, 139: manus 
operi, to apply, id. ib. 10, 254: capiti diade- 
ma, Suet. Caes. 79: digitum scripturae id. 
Aug. 80 : oscula, to give a kiss, Ov. M.' 10 
644: aliquem ad munera publica, to pro- 
mote, advance, Suet. Tib. 10: infantes papil- 
lae, to put to, id Tib. 44 al. : gressum, to ap- 
proach nearer, Stat. Th. 11, 560 (cf. : addere 
gressum).— B. Esp. j,. To bring one thing 
near to another, and in the pass. poet, of 
places, to lie or be situated near : nocturna 
ad lumina linum nuper ubi extinctum ad- 
moveas.Lucr. 6,901: quae nisi admoto igne 
ignem concipere possit, Cic. de Or. 2, 45 
fin. : culina ut sit admota, i. e. near or 
close by, Varr. R. R. 1, 13, 2 : genus admo- 
tum Superis, nearly related, Sil. 8, 295: ad- 
mota Nilo Africa, Juv. 10, 149.— Hence, ali- 
quem alicui, to bring one near another, i. e. 
to make friends, to reconcile : mors Agrippae 
admovit propius Neronem Caesari, Veil. 2, 
96.-2. With the access, idea of regard to 
an object to be attained, to move, bring or 
apply a thing to; e. g. admovere aures'(or 
aurem), to lend an ear to : manus (or ma- 
num) operi, to put one's hand to a work, 
etc. : accessi, adstiti, animam (my breath) 
compressi, aurem admovi, Ter. Phorm. 5 
6, 28: admovere aures et subauscultando 
excipere voces, Cic. de Or. 2, 36 (cf. : aures 
adhibere, id. Arch. 3 : praebere aures, Ov. 
Tr. 3, 7, 25; and: tenere aures, id. ib. 4 10, 
49 ) ; and aures, poet, for auditores : cum 
tibi sol tepidus plures admoverit aures 
Hor. Ep. 1, 20, 19 : admovent manus vec- 
tigalibus populi Rom., Cic. Agr. 1. 4 : Ov 
M. 15, 218 ; Liv. 5, 22, 4 : in marmoribus' 
quibus Nicias manum admovisset, which he 
had put Ms hand to, Plin. 35, 11, 40, § 133; 
Curt. 6, 7: ruderibus purgandis manus pri- 
mus admovit, Suet. Vesp. 8. But some- 
times manus admovere signif., to lay vio- 
lent hands on, to attack or assault : num- 
quam deos ipsos admovere nocentibus ma- 
nus, Liv. 5, llfin. al.— II. Fig., of mental 
objects, to put, apply, or direct to any thing : 
quid praedicem . . . quot stimulos admoverit 
homini, put the goad to, Cic. Sest. 5, 12 : mu- 
lier saevissima est, Cum stimulos odio pu- 
dor admovet, Juv. 10, 328: num admoveri 
possit oratio ad sensus animorum inflam- 
mandos, Cic. de Or. 1, 14, 60: animis judi- 
cum admovere orationem, tarnquam fldibus 
manum, id. Brut. 54, 200: sed alia quaedam 
sit ad eum admovenda curatio (just before : 
adhibenda oratio; cf. adhibeo), id. Tusc. 4 
28, 61: mentem ad voces alicujus, to direct 
to, attend to, Auct. Harusp. Resp. 10 : serus 
enim Graecis admovit acumma chnrt\s, not 
until late did (the Roman) apply his wits to 
Greek literature, Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 161 : terro- 
rem, to strike with terror, Liv. 6, 10 ; 41, 17 : 
spes est admota, Ov. M. 11, 454 ; spes cupi- 
ditati admota occaecavit anirnum, Liv. 43, 
10; id. 27, 43: desiderium patriae ! to instil 
or infuse.Curt. 6, 2 al. 

ad-muglO, H, *, v. n., of oxen, to low or 
bellow to: admugit femina tauro, Ov. A. A. 
1, 279: submissis admugit cornibus Apis, 
Claud. Cons. Honor. 4, 576 ; id. Rap. Pr. 3, 44a 
* ad-mulceo, ere, 2, v. a. , to stroke, ca- 
ress : nares, Pall. 4, 12, 2. 



ADOL 

admurmnrsrtlO, onis, / [admurmu- 

ro], a murmuring, murmur. I. In disap- 
probation : vestra admurmuratio facit, Qui- 
rites, ut agnoscere videamini, qui haec fe- 
cerint, Cic. Imp. Pomp. 13, 37: Qui non ad- 
murmuratione, sed voce et clamore abjecti 
hominis furorem fregistis, id. Pis. 14, 32; 
id. Verr. 6, 12, 27; 7, 16, 41.— H. In appro- 
bation : grata contionis admurmuratio, Cic. 
Verr. 2, 15, 45 : secundae admurmurationes 
cuncti senatds, id. Q, Fr. 2, 1, 3. 
ad-murmuro, "vi, atum, l, v. n., to 

murmur with approbation or disapproba- 
tion (cf. acclamo) : quam valde universi ad- 
murmurarint, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 16 : admur- 
murante senatu neque me invito, id. Att. 
1 13 2. — Impers.: cum esset admurmura- 
tum, Cic. de Or. 2, 70, 285. 

* ad-murmuror, & tns , ari, v. dep. 

Same as preceding: ad hoc pauca admur- 
murati sunt, Front, ad Caes. Ep. 2, 1. 

ad-mutllo, avi, atum, 1, v. a. , to crop 
or clip close, to shave ; hence, trop. , to de- 
fraud, cheat, fleece one of his money (only 
in Plaut.) : tu Persa's, qui me usque admu- 
tilavisti ad cutem, you have shorn me to 
the skin. Plaut. Pers. 5, 2, 48; id. Mil. 3, 1, 
173 ; id. Capt. 2, 2, 19 (cf. the simple verb, 
Ter. Hec. 1, 1, 8). 

adnascor. v. agnascor. 

adnato, v. annate 

adnatuS, a , um , v - agnascor. 

adnavig-O, v. annavigo. 

adneCtO, v. annecto. 

ad-nepos (atn-h otis, m. , a son of the 
abnepos or of the abneptis, i. e. the grand- 
son of a great-grandson, or of a great- 
granddaughter, i. e. a fourth - grandson ; 
corresponding in the descending line to 
atavus in the ascending. So in the epitaph 
of the emperor Commodus : divi nebvae 
adnepoti, Orell. Inscr. 887 ; so Dig. 38, 10, 

1, § 7 al. 

ad-neptis (atn-), is,/, a daughter 
of the abnepos or of the abneptis, i. e. a 
granddaughter of a great-grandchild, i. e. 
a fourth granddaughter, antith. to the ata- 
via, Dig. 38, 10, 1, § 7. 

adnomen, adnominatio, adnosco, v. 
agnomen, agnominatio, agnosco. 

adn-, For all words in adn- not found 
here, v. under ann-. 

ad-ObruO. ^re, 3, v. a., to cover up with 
earth, to bury : alte circumfodero ct ado- 
bruere. Col. 4, 15, 3 ; so 2, 11, 12 ; 5, 5, 2 ; 11, 

2, 54 al. 

adolabilis, v. aduiabms. 

addlatlO, «~>nis, / > = adoratio, a read, 
in Tert. Apol. 25 fin. 

$ addlefactus, a, um, set on fre, kin- 
dled : arbores adolefactae, fragm. of the 
Fratr. Arval., Grut. Inscr. p. 121 [1. adoleo- 
facio]. 

t Addlenda, ae, / [1. adoleo], appears 
to be the name of a Roman goddess, who 
presided over the burning of trees struck by 
lightning : (immolavit) adolendae. oommo- 
lendak. defervxdae. oves. ii. , etc., Frat. 
Arval., Orell. Inscr. 961 and 2270. 

1. ad-oieO ? U1 - ultum, 2, v. a. [oleo]. 
I. To magnify; hence, in sacrificial lan- 
guage, to which this word chiefly belongs, 
to honor, to worship, or to offer in worship, 
to sacrifice, burn, according as it has such 
words as deos, aras, etc., or hostiam, visce- 
ra, and tura, for its object; v. explanation 
of this word in Non. 58, 21: " Adolere ver- 
bum est proprie sacra reddentium, quod 
sign ifi cat votis ac supplicationibus numen 
auctius facere;" and "Adolere est urere, 
Verg. in Bucol. [8, 65], verbenasque adole 
pinguis et mascula tura. Adolere, augere, 
honorare, propitiare; et est verbum sacra- 
tum, ut macte, magis aucte," etc.; so Serv. 
ad Verg. A. 1, 704: "Flammis adolere pe- 
nates. l. e. colere, scd adolere est proprie 
augere. In sacris autem, sar' ev<ptyj.«riJ.6v, 
adolere per bonum omen dicitur. nam in 
aris non adolentur aliqua, sed cremantur," 
and ad E. 8, 65: " Adole: incende, sed kclt 
€v<pr)jj.i(rfjibv dicitur; nam adole est auge" 
(not used in Cic): sanguine conspergunt 
aras adolen+que altaria donis, cover the al- 
tar with gifts, Lucr. 4, 1237 : castis adolet 
dum altaria taedis,Verg. A. 7,71: verbenas- 
que adole pingues et mascula tura, id. E. 
8, 65 (on which Scrv. 1. 1.) : flammis adolere 



ADON 

penates, id. A. 1, 701: viscera tauri, Ov. F. 
3, 803; 1, 276: focos, Stat. Th. 1, 514: cruo- 
re captivo adolere aras, to sprinkle the al- 
tars with the blood of captives, Tac. A. 14, 
30: precibus et igne puro altaria adolentur, 
id. H. 2, 3 : adolere honores, to honor the 
gods by offered gifts : Junoni Argivae jus- 
sos adolemus honores, Verg. A. 3, 547: nul- 
los aris adoleret honores, Ov. M. 8, 741. — 
II. In later Lat., in gen., to burn, consume 
by fire : ut leves stipulae demptis adolen- 
tur aristis, Ov. M. 4, 192: id (corpus) igne 
adoleatur, Col. 12, 31: ut Aeneida, quam 
nondum satis elimAsset, adolerent, Gell. 
17, 10: quas (prunas) gravi frigorc adolcri 
multas jusserat, Eutr. 10, 9. 

* 2. ad-dleo, ere< v. n. [oleo], to give 
out or emit a smell or odor, to smell : unde 
hie, amabo, unguenta adolent ? Plaut. Cas. 
% 3, 19 (cf. aboleo). 

addlesC-, v. adulesc-. 

ad-dleSCO, Svi (rare ui, Varr. ap. Prise. 
872 P. ; adolesse sync, for adolevisse, Ov. 
H. 6, 11), ultum, 3, v. inch. [1. adoleo], to 
grow up, to grow (of everything capable of 
increase in magnitude). I. I n g e n. A. 
Lit., of men, animals, plants; seasons, pas- 
sions, etc. ; but esp. of age: postquam ado- 
levit ad earn aetatem. uti, etc., Plaut. Cas. 
prol. 47 : ubi robustis adolevit viribus aetas, 
Lucr. 3, 450; cf. 4, 1035; 2, 1123: adultum 
robur, id. 2, 1131 ; 5, 798 : postquam adolue- 
rit haec juventus, Varr. ap. Prise, p. 872 P. : 
qui adoleverit, Cic. N. D. 1, 35: viriditas 
herbescens. quae sensim adolescit, id. Sen. 
15, 51: ter senos proles adoleverat annos, 
Ov. F. 3, 59 : adolescere ramos cernat, id. 
M. 4, 376: adolesse segetes, id. H. 6, 11: si- 
mul atque adoleverit aetas, Hor. S. 1, 9, 34: 
cum matura adoleverit aetas, Verg. A. 12, 
438. — Hence, transf. from age to the per- 
son, to grow up, come to maturity, mature : 
adulta virgo, Liv. 26, 50 al. : arundines non 
sine imbre adolescunt, Plin. 9, 16, 23, § 56: 
in amplitudinem, id. 12, 1, 3, § 7 : in cras- 
situdinem, id. 13, 7, 15, § 58; so 16, 34, 62, 
§ 151 ; 8, 14, 14, § 36 al. : ac dum prima 
novis adolescit frondibus aetas, Verg. G. 2, 
362 : quoad capillus adolesceret, Gell. 17, 9. 
— g i Fig., to grow, increase, augment, to 
become greater : cupiditas agendi adolescit 
una cum aetatibus, Cic. Fin. 5, 20: ratio 
cum adolevit, id. Leg. 1, 7 : ingenium brevi 
adolevit, Sail. J. 63, 3 : postquam res publica 
adolevit, id. C. 51, 40 ; id. J. 2 : quantum 
superbiae socordiaeque Vitellio adoleverit, 
Tac. H. 2, 73: Cremona numero colonorum, 
adolevit, id. ib. 3, 34 : ver adolescit, ad- 
vances, id. A. 13, 36 ; 2, 50 : caepe revire- 
scit, decedente luna, inarescit adolescente, 
Gell. 20, 8. — II. Esp., in sacrificial lang., 
to be kindled, to burn (cf. 1. adoleo) : Pan- 
chaeis adolescunt ignibus arae, Verg. G. 4, 
379. — Hence, addleSCenS, entis, v. adu- 
les-. — adultllS, a i um - F - a -i grown up, 
adult. A. Lit. 1. Of living beings: Ab 
his ipsis (virginibus), cum jam essent adul- 
tae, Cic. Tusc. 5, 20, 58 ; so. virgo, id. Brut. 
96, 330; Liv. 26, 50; Hor. C. 3, 2, 8 al. ; cf. : 
adultae aetate virgines, Suet. Aug. 69: pue- 
ri, Quint. 2, 2, 3 : liberi, Suet. Tib. 10: Alius, 
id. Claud. 39 ; catuli, Plin. 9, 8, 7, § 22 : lo- 
custae, id. 11, 29. 35. § 105 : fetus (apum), 
Verg. G. 4, 162. — Comp. : (hirundinum) pul- 
lorum adultiores, Plin. 10, 33, 49, § 92.-2. 
Of things (concrete and abstract) ; vitium 
propagine, Hor. Epod. 2, 9: crinis, Stat. 
S. 2, 122 : lanugo, Amm. 16, 12 al. : aetas, 
Lucr. 2, 1123; Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 68, § 160: 
aestas, advanced, Tac. A. 2, 23: autumnus, 
id. ib. 11, 31: nox. id. H. 3, 23. — B. Fig., 
grown, matured, adult : populus adultus 
jam paene et pubes, Cic. Rep. 2, 11 ; so, 
qui non nascentibus Athenis, sed jam adnl- 
tis fuerunt, id. Brut. 7, 27 ; cf. : nascenti ad- 
huc (eloquentiae) nee satis adultae, Tac. Or. 
25: res nondum adultae, Liv. 2, 1, 6: pestis 
rei publicae (of Catiline), Cic. Cat. 1, 12, 30: 
auctoritas nondum adulta, Tac. A. 1, 46: 
conjuratio, id. ib. 15, 73; cf. : incipiens ad- 
huc et necdum adulta seditio, id. H. 1, 
31 al. 

t addminatlO, onis, /, a good or fa- 
vorable omen, in Gloss. Gr. Lat. 

1. AdoneUS, ei, m. ( trisyl. ). I. — 
Adonis, Plaut. Men. 1, 2, 35 ; App. M. 2, 
p. 126. — II. An epithet of Bacchus, Gr. 
'AdaJi/eik, tup, Aus. Epigr. 30, 6 ; cf. id. ib. 
28. 



ADOP 

2. AddneuS, a , um , ad J- , pertaining to 
Adonis : caedes, Aus. Mon. de Histt. 3 : lu- 
sus, Grut. Inscr. 1123, 7. 

Adonia. orum, n., -rei "A&wvta, the fes- 
tival of Adonis. It returned annually in 
June, about the time of the summer sol- 
stice, and was celebrated (even in Rome; 
cf. Manso, Essays on Myth.) with alternate 
lamentations and exultations, on account 
of the death of Adonis, Amm. 22, 9. This 
festival was a symbol of the dying and re- 
viving again of nature; cf. Hier. ad Ez. 8; 
Creuz. Symb. 2, 86 ; Bottig. Sab. 1, 261 sq. 

addnidium, ii, n - , v . adonium, II. 

AddniS, nis or nidis, m., ="k&Mvi<t and 
J 'A<5a>v {nom. Adon, Venant. Carm. 7, 12 and 
18; gen. Adonis, Hin. 19, 4, 19, § 49; dat. 
Adonidi, Cic. N. D. 3, 23 ; ace. Adonidem, 
Claud. Nupt. Hon. et Mar. 16 : Adonim, 
Prop. 3, 5, 37, ace. to Mliller, Adonem : 
Adonem, Serv. ad Verg. E. 10, 18 ; Arnob. 
4, p. 184; voc. Adoni, Ov. Met. 10, 542; abl 
Adone, App. M. 8, p. 213). I. A son ofCiny- 
ras, king of Cyprus, beloved by Venus on 
account of his extraordinary beauty ; he 
was torn in pieces in the chase by a wild 
boar, which Mars (ace. to some, Diana) 
sent against bim out of jealousy, but was 
changed by Venus to a flower, which bore 
the name Adonium, and was yearly be- 
wailed by her on the anniversary of his 
death, Ov. M. 10, 503 sq ; Macr. S. 1, 21 ; 
Serv. ad Verg. E. 8, 37 ; cf. with 10, 18, and 
Adonia: Adonis horti, Gr. Khirot 'Abwvtdos, 
pots of lettuce and other plants, which blos- 
som quick, but wither as soon, Plin. 19, 4, 
19, § 49 ; cf. Bottig. Sab. 1, 264.— H. A name 
of the Sun-god among the Assyrians and 
Phoenicians, Macr. S. 1, 21. — HI, A name 
ofaflsh, i. q. exocoetus, Plin. 9, 19, 34, § 70. 

t adonium, ii> n ? = a^viov. I, Ace. 

to some a plant, a species of southernwood, 
bearing a flower of golden color or blood- 
red, as if from the blood of Adonis ; ace. 
to others, a mode of cultivating flowers, as 
if Adonis horti, the garden of Adonis, Plin. 
21, 10, 34, § 60.— II. In gram., the Adonic 
verse, composed of a dactyl and spondee, 
___-_:=: ) Serv. 1820 P.; Grot. 2, 104; 
e. g. Hor. C. 1, 4 : terruit urbem ; visere 
montes, etc. , said to have been so named 
because used in the festival of Adonis; 
also addnidium, Mar. Vict. % p. 2518 P. 

ad-dperio, <xm, ertum, 4, v. a., to cover 
up or over (not used before the Aug. per., 
and gen. in the part. perf. pass.): capite 
adoperto, Liv. 1. 26; id. Epit. 89, and Suet. 
Ner. 48 : purpureo adopertus amictu, Verg. 
A. 3, 405 : tempora adoperta cucullo, Juv. 
8, 145 : adopertam floribus humum, Ov. M. 
15, 688; cf. id. ib. 8, 701: hiems gelu, id. F. 
3, 235: aether nubibus, id. ib. 2, 75: lumi- 
na somno, id. M. 1, 714: tenebris mors, Tib. 
1, 1, 70 : foribus adopertis, with closed doors. 
Suet. Oth. 11. — In the verb.fnit: Quidam 
prius tuto sale sex horis (ova) adoperiunt, 
Col. 8, 6 : pellem setis adoperuit, Lact. Op. 
Dei, 7. — Hence, adoperte, a ^v. , v. the 
foil. art. 

adoperte, adv - [adoperio], covertly, in 
a dark, mysterious manner : denuntiare, 
Mart. Cap. 8, p. 303. 

addpertum. i, n. [id.], that which is 
mysterious, a mystery, App. M. 2. 

* ad-opinor, * T h v - ^P-i to think, sup- 
pose, or conjecture further (=opmando ad- 
icio) : adopinamur de signis maxima par- 
vis, Lncr. 4, 816. 

adoptaticius (not -titius), a, um, 

adj. [adopto], adopted, received in the place 
of a child ; only in Plaut. , Poen. 5, 2, 85 : De- 
marcho item ipse fuit adoptaticius, ib. 100. 

Ace. to Festus, it signifies the son of one 

who is adopted: ex adoptato filio natus, 
p. 29 Mull. 

adoptatlO, onis, /. [id. ; access, form 
of adoptio, by which it was supplanted 
after the class, per.], an adopting, receiving 
as a child, vin0ea-ia: quid propagatio nomi- 
nis, quid adoptationes flliorum. Cic. Tusc. 1, 
14, 31: adoptatio Theophani agitata est, id 
Balb. 25, 57: ipsum ilium adoptatione in 
regnum pervenisse, Sail. .1. 11, 6 : quod per 
praetorem fit, adoptatio dicitur; quod per 
populum, arrogatio, Gell. 5, 19; Tert. adv. 
Gent. 2, 1. 

adovtator, 6ris > m - [ id -]> one ifiai 
43 



ADOP 



adopts another, an adopter, Gell. 5, 19: Dig. 
37, j), 1, § 12 med. 

adoptlo, onis,/ [v. adoptatio], a taking 
or receiving of one in the place of a child 
(also of a grandchild, Dig. 1,7, 10), an adopt- 
ing, adoption (properly of one still under 
paternal authority, in patria potestate ; on 
the rontr., arrogatio referred to one who 
was already independent, homo sui juris. 
The former took place before the praetor 
or other magistrate and live witnesses, by 
a threefold mancipatio, i. e. sham sale; the 
latter could only be effected before the as- 
sembled people in the comitia curiata, 
Gell. 5, 19 ; Just. Inst. 1, 11 ; Dig. 1, 7. More 
used than adoptatio, q. v.) : emancipare flli- 
um alicui in adoptionem,Cic. Fin. 1.7: dare 
se alicui in adoptionem,Vell. 2, 8, 2; Suet. 
Tib. 2; cf. Liv. 45, 40: adscire aliquem per 
adoptionem, Tac. A. 1, 3 ; or, in adoptio- 
nem, id. H. 2, 1: inserere aliquem familiae 
per adoptionem, Suet. Claud. 39 Jin. : adsci- 
tus adoptione in imperium et cognomen- 
tum, Tac. A. 11, 11: adoptio in Domitium 
festinatur, id. ib. 12, 25 : adoptionem nuncu- 
pare, to make known, to announce, id. H. 1, 
17: adoptio consularis, performed by a con- 
sul. Quint, prooem. 6, 13 Spald. al. — ff, 
Transf., of plants, the ingrafting, Plin. 
prooem. 1, 16.— Of bees, the admittance to 
or reception in a new hive: ut tamquam 
novae prolis adoptione domicilia confir- 
mentur, Col. 9, 13, 9.— In eccl. Lat., in spir- 
itual sense of adoption as children of God: 
adoptionem flliorum Dei, Vulg. Rom. 8, 23 ; 
ib. Gal. 4, 5 ; ib. Ephes. 1, 5. 

adoptlVTlS, a, um, adj. [adopto], per- 
taining to adoption, made or acquired by 
adoption, adoptive : Alius, an adopted son : 
P. Scipio, Fragm. ap. Gell. 5, 19 (opp. natu- 
ralis, a son by birth) : flliorum neque natu- 
ralem Drusnm neque adoptivum Germani- 
cum patria caritate dilexit, Suet. Tib. 52 : 
pater adoptivus, who has adopted one as son 
(or grandson, v. adoptio), an adoptive fa- 
ther, Dig. 45, 1, 107 : frater, soror, etc., a 
brother, sister, etc., by adoption, not by 
birth, ib. 23, 2, 12, and 38, 8, 3; so also, ta- 
rn ilia, the family into which one has been 
received by adoption, ib. 37, 4, 3: adoptiva 
sacra, of the family into which one has been 
adopted (opp. paterna) : neque amissis sa- 
cris paternis in haec adoptiva venisti, Cic. 
Dom. 13, 35 : nomen, received by adoption 
(opp. nomen gentile), Suet. Ner. 41 : nobili- 
tas, nobility acquired by adoption, Ov. F. 4, 
22.— Transf, of the ingrafting of plants 
(cf. adoptio) : flssaque adoptivas accipit ar- 
bor opes, bears fruits not natural to it, in- 
grafted, Ov. Med.Fac. 5; Mart. 13, 46: quae 
sit adoptivis arbor onusta comis, Pall, de 
Insit. 20; cf. 144, 1G0 (cf.Verg. G. 2, 82: Mi- 
raturque (arbos) novas frondes et non sua 
pom a). 

ad-opto, Svi, atum, 1, v. a., to take to 
one's self by wish, choice ( optando ) ; to 
choose, select I.Ingen.: sociam te mihi 
adopto ad meam salutem, Plaut. Cist. 4, 2, 
78 : qui manstutorem me adoptavit bonis, 
who has chosen me as a guardian of his 
property, id. True. 4, 4, 6 : quern sibi ilia 
(provincia) defensorem sui juris adoptavit, 
Cic. Div. in Caecin. 16 Jin. : eum sibi patro- 
num, id. ib. 20, 64: quern potius adoptem 
aut invocem.Vatin.ap. Cic. Fam. 5, 9: Fra- 
ter, Pater, adde; Ut'cuique est aetas, ita 
quemque facetus adopta (i. e. adscisce, ad- 
junge, sc. tuo alloquio, Cruqu.), make him 
ty thy greeting a father, brother, etc. , i. e. 
call him, Hor. Ep. 1, 6, 55 : Etruscas Tur- 
nus adoptat opes, strives after, Ov. F. 4, 
880. — Hence : adoptare se alicui, to give or 
attach one's self to : qui se potentiae causa 
Caesaris libertis adoptSsset, Plin. 12, 1, 5, 
§ 12. —II. Esp. as t. t, to take one in the 
place of a child or grandchild, to adopt 
(diff. from arrogo; v. adoptio). A. Lit., 
constr. with aliquem, also with ab aliquo 
aliquem (from the real father, a patre natu- 
ral^, Plaut. Poen. prol. 74 (cf. id. ib. 4, 2, 82) : 
adoptat ilium puerum subreptitium sibi 
filium, id. Men. prol. 60: filium senatorem 
populum Romanum sibi velle adoptare, 
Cic. Dom. 14: adoptatus patricius a ple- 
beio, id. Att. 7, 7 : Ib qui hunc minorem 
Scipionem a Paulo adoptavit, id. Brut. 19, 
77: adoptavit eum heredemque fecit ex 
dodrante, Nep. Att. 5, 2 : adoptatus testa- 
mento, Suet. Tib. 6 : adoptari a se Pisonem 
44 



ADOR 

pronuntiat, Tac. H. 1, 18: Pisonem pro con- 
tione adoptavit, Suet. Galb. 17: quem ilia 
adoptavit, Vulg. Exod. 2, 10.— With in and 
ace: in regnum, Sail. J. 22, 3: in familiam 
nomenque, Suet.Caes. 83 : in successionem, 
Just. 9, 2.— B. Fig.: servi in bona liber- 
tatis nostrae adoptantur, are, as it were, 
adopted into freedom, are made partici- 
pants offeedom, Flor. 3, 20 ; and of in- 
grafting (cf. adoptivus) : venerit insitio: fac 
ramum ramus adoptet, Ov. R. Am. 195; so 
Col. 10, 38. Those who were adopted com- 
monly received the family name of the 
adoptive father, with the ending -anus, 
e. g. Aemihanus, Pompomanus, etc. — Hence 
Cic. says ironic, of one who appropriated to 
himself the name of another: ipse se adop- 
tat : et C. Stalenus, qui se ipse adoptaverat 
et de Staleno Aelium fecerat, had changed 
himself from a Stalenus to an jEHus, Brut. 
68, 241 ; and Vitruv. : Zoilus qui adoptavit 
cognomen, ut Homeromastix vocitaretur, 
had himself called, 7, 8. So: ergo aliquod 
gratum Musis tibi nomen adopta. Mart. 6, 
31; in Pliny, very often, adoptare aliquid 
(also with the addition of nomine suo or 
in nomen), to give a thing its name : Baetis 
Oceanum Atlanticum, provinciam adop- 
tans, petit, while it gives to the province the 
name (Baetica), Plin. 3, 1, 3, § 9: A Zmyr- 
na Hermus campos facit et nomini suo 
adoptat, id. 5, 29, 31, § 119; so 25, 3, 7, § 22: 
in nomen, id. 37, 3, 12, § 50 ; so also Sta- 
tius, Theb. 7, 259. 

ador. <jris and oris, n. [cf. 1. edo, gdo/xai, 
Engl to eat, Goth, ita, Sanscr. admi ; and 
Ang.-Sax. ata = Engl. oat, and Sanscr. an- 
nam (for adnam) = food, corn], a kind of 
grain, spelt, Triticum spelta, Linn. (ace. to 
Paul, ex Fest. : Ador farris genus, edor 
quondam appellatum ab edendo, vel quod 
aduratur, ut fiat tostum, unde in sacrificio 
mola salsa efflcitur, p. 3 Mull.: Ador fru- 
menti genus, quod epulis et immolationi- 
bus sacris pium putatur, undo et adorare, 
propitiare religiones, potest dictum videri, 
Non. 52, 20) : cum pater ipse domus palea 
porrectus in horna Esset ador loliumque, 
Hor. S. 2, 6, 89 : adHris de polline, Aus. Mon. 
de Cibis, p. 238; Gannius ap. Prise, p. 700; 
satos adoris stravisse, id. ib.: ardor adoris, 
id. ib. (Ador is often indeclinable, ace. to 
Prise, p. 785, 100 P.) 

* adorabllis, e, adj. [adoro], worthy 
of adoration, adorable : beneficium deae, 
App. M. 11, p. 265. 

adoratlO, onis,/ [id.], worship, adora- 
tion, irpQ<TKvvr)<ns (rare; not in Liv. 30, 16, 
5, where the correct read, is adulation!, 
Weissenb. ) : propitiare deos adoratione, 
Plin. 29, 4, 20, § 67.— In plur., App. M. 4, 
p. 155. _ >!-*-, 

adorator, Bris, m. [id.], one who 
adores, a worshipper, Tert, de Spec. 8 : Vulg. 
Joh. 4, 23. 

* ad-ordino, are, v. a., to set in order, 
to arrange ; patellam, Apic. 4, 2. 

adorea, ae, and adoreum, i, see the 

foil, art., II. A. and B. 

1. adoreUS, a, um, adj. [ador], pertain- 
ing to spelt, consisting of spelt. I. Adj. : 
far adoreum = ador, Cato, R. R. 83 ; Varr. 
R. R. 1, 9, 4; Col. 11, 2, 74 sq.: semen, Cato, 
R. R. 34; Col. 2. 6, 1: liba. Vers. A. 7. 109: 
bellaria, Stat. S. 1, 6, 10. — IJ, Subst A 
adorea (adoria, Paul, ex Fest. p. 3 Mull. \ 
see below), ae,/ {sc. donatio), a reward of 
valor (in early ages this usually consisted 
of grain) ; hence, trop., glory, fame, re- 
nown : gloriam denique ipsam a farris ho- 
nore adoream appellabant, Plin. 18, 3, 3, 
§ 14; id. 8, 9, 19, § 83 : praeda agroque ado- 
reaque afl'ecit populares suos, Plaut. Am. 1, 
1, 38: pulcher fugatis Ille dies Latio tene- 
bris, Qui primus alma risit adorea, in lord- 
ly honor, viz. by the defeat of Hasdrubal, 
Hor. C. 4, 4, 41. (Festus gives another ex- 
planation for the signif. honor, renown, 
etc.: adoriam laudem sive gloriam dice- 
bant, quia gloriosum eumj)utabant esse, 
qui farris copia abundaret, if est. p. 3 Mull.). 
— B. adoreum, i, n. (sc. far), L q. ador, 
spelt, Col. 2, 8, 5. 

2. AdoreUS, h m -, « mountain ofGa- 
latia, in the neighborhood ofPessinus, with 
the source of the river Sangarius, now El- 
mah Dagh, Liv. 38, 18, 8. 

ad-drio. ire, v. a., the act. form of 



ADOK 

adorior, to attack, to assail: tunc ipsos ado- 
riant, Naev. ap. Prise, p. 801 P. (Trag. Rel. 
p. 8 Rib.). — Hence also pass, adortus, Aur. 
Fragm. Naev. ap. Prise, p. 791 P. ; and, ace. 
to some, Flor. % 6, 46, where Halm reads 
adoratam. 

ad-drior, ortus, 4, v. dep. (part, ador- 
sus, Gell. 9, 2, 10 ; see the passage at the 
end of this art. ; the second and third pers. 
of the pres. ind., ace. to the fourth conj. : 
adoriris, adoritur; forms analogous to org- 
ris, oritur, of the simple verb occur in 
Lucr. 3, 513; Lucil. ap. Prise, p. 8t0 P.), 
to rise up for the purpose of going to 
some one or something, or of undertaking 
something great, difficult, or hazardous 
(clandestinely, artfully, when a hostile ap- 
proach is spoken of; while aggredi indi- 
cates a direct, open attack from a distance : 
aggredimur de longinquo ; adorimur ex in- 
sidiis et ex proximo; nam adoriri est quasi 
ad aliquem oriri, i. e. exsurgere, Don. ad 
Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 50; cf. the same ad Heaut, 4, 5, 
9). I, I n g e n. , to approach a person in 
order to address him, to ask something of 
him, to accost, etc. (cf. accedo, adeo) : cesso 
hunc adoriri ? (quasi de improviso alloqui, 
Don.), Ter. Heaut. 4, 5, 9: si ab eo nil fiet, 
turn hunc adorior hospitem, id. Phorm. 4, 
2, 15.— II. Esp. £ # To approach one with 
hostile intent, to assault, assail, Lucil. ap. 
Prise, p. 886 P. : inermem tribunum gladiis, 
Cic. Sest. 37: a tergo Milonem, id. Mil. 10: 
navem, id.Verr. 2, 5,34/n. : impeditos ado- 
riebantur, Caes. B. G. 4, 26 : hos Conon ador- 
tus magno proelio fugat, Nep. Con. 4: ur- 
bem vi, Liv. 1, 53 : oppugnatio eos aliquanto • 
atrocior quam ante adorta est, id. 21, 11; 
cf. 21,28: praetorem ex improviso in itine- 
re adortus, Tac. A. 4, 45 : variis crimina- 
tionibus, id. ib. 14, 52: minis, id. H. 1, 31: 
jurgio, Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 50 : senatum. Suet. 
Caes. 9.— Also absol, Hirt. B. Afr. 69.— B. 
To enter upon any course of action, esp. to 
engage in or undertake any thing difficult 
or dangerous; with ace. or inf. : commuta- 
re animum quicumque adoritur, Lucr. 3, 
515 : ne convellere adoriamur ea, quae non 
possint commoveri, Cic. de Or. 2, 51, 205 ; 
id. Att. 13, 22: 'HpaKXeiSiov, si Brundisi- 
um salvi, adorlemur (sc. scribere), id ib. 
16, 2 • Auct. Her. 2, 4 : majus adorta nefas, 
Ov. P. 2, 2, 16: hi dominam Ditis thalamo. 
deducere adorti, Verg. A 6, 397; cf. id ib 7 
386; Cat. 63, 11.— So esp. in the histt., Nep.' 
Dion. 6: hanc (Munychiam) bis tyrannii 
oppugnare sunt adorti, id. Thras. 2, 5 ; so. 
also Liv. 2, 51 ; 28, 3 ; 37, 5, 32 ; 40, 22 ; 43 
21 ; 44, 12 ; cf. also 3, 44 : hanc virginem 
Appius pretio ac spe pelllcere adortus.— 
Once in the form of the part. perf. ador- 
sus : qui Hippiam tyrannum interflcere 
adorsi erant, Gell. 9, 2, 10. 

t adoriOSUS, adj- , in the Gloss. Gr. 
Lat. as translation of evdotjos, that has often 
obtained the adorea, celebrated. 

adornate, adv., v. adornoym. 

ad-Orno, "Vi, iitum, 1, v. a., to prepare 
a thing for some definite object, to get ready Y 
to furnish, provide, jit out, equip, Koo-neoj, 

1. In gen. (class. ; esp. freq. in Plaut. and 
Cic): quin tu mihi adornas ad fugam vi- 
aticum, Plaut. Ep. 5, 1, 9: nuptias, id. Cas. 

2, 6, 67 ; so also id. Aul. 2, 1, 35 : fugam, Ter. 
Eun. 4, 4, 6 (cf. : fugam aut furtum parat, 
id. Phorm. 1, 4, 14) : maria classibus et prae- 
sidiis, Cic. Imp. Pomp. 12, 35: forum comi- 
tiumque adornatum, ad speciem magni- 
fico ornatu, ad sensum cogitationemque 
acerbo et lugubri, id.Verr. 2, 1, 22: ut accu- 
sationem et petitionem consulatus adornet 
atque instruat, prepare, id. Mur. 22, 46 ; te- 
stium copiam, to produce, id. Clu. 6: inve- 
nire et adornare comparationem criminis, 
id. ib. 67 : contra haec Pompeius naves 
magnas onerarias adornabat, Caes. B. C. 1, 
26 ; omni opulentia insignium armorum 
bellum adornaverant, Liv. 10, 38. — Ante- 
class, constr. with inf. : tragulam in te in- 
icere adornat, Plaut. Ep. 5, 2, 25.— And ab- 
sol. : adorna, ut rem divinam faciam, Plaut. 
Rud. 4, 6, 2 ; Ter. Eun. 3, 5, 34.— H. To put 
an ornament upon one ; hence, to decorate, 
adorn, embellish with something (mostly in 
the Aug. per. ; esp. in the histt. ) : aliquem 
aliqua re : (Numa) fiaminem insigni veste 
et curuli regia sella adornavit, Liv. 1 20: 
triumphum, Veil. 2, 122; so Suet. Aug. 29; 
id. Tib. 43; id. Calig. 45; id. Ner. 12; 38; 



ADOE 

■Curt. 3, 3. 13; IT al— Trop.: tantis adorna- 
tus virtutibus, Veil. 2, 2 : praecipuis donis, 
id. 2, 121 : bene facta suis verbis, Plin. Ep. 
1, 8, 15: adornata verbis, Tac. A. 1, 52: le- 
gem leviter (sc. verbis) adornabit, ut jus- 
tarn, Quint. 7, i, 47.— Hence, *adornate, 
adv.: declamabat splendide atque adorna- 
te, brilliantly and elegantly (opp. circum- 
cise ac sordide), Suet. Rhet. 6. 

ad-oro, avi, fitum, 1, v. a. I. In the 
earliest per., to speak to or accost one, to ad- 
dress ; hence, also, to treat of or negotiate a 
matter with one : adorare veteribus est al- 
loqui, Scrv. ad Verg. A. 10, 677: immo cum 
gemitu populum sic adorat, App. Met. 2, 
p. 127 ; 3. p. 130 : adorare apud antiquos 
significabat agere: unde et legati oratores 
dicuntur,quia mandata populi agunt,Paul. 
ex Fest. p. 19 Mull. ; cf. oro and orator. — 
Hence, also, in judicial lang., to bring an 
accusation, to accuse; so in the Fragm. of 
the XII. Tab. lex viii.: sei (si) adorat fvr- 

TO QVOD NEC MANIFESTVM ERIT, FeSt. S. V. 

nec, p. 162 Mull. — II. In the class, per., to 
sp?ak to one in order to obtain something 
of him; to ask or entreat one, esp. a deity, 
to pray earnestly, to beseech, supplicate, im- 
plore ; constr. with ace. , ut, or the simple 
subj. : quos adorent, ad quos precentur et 
supplicent, Li v. 38, 43 : affaturque deos et 
sanctum sidus adorat, Verg. A. 2, 700 : in 
rupes, in saxa (volens vos Turnus adoro) 
Ferte ratem, id. ib. 10, 677 : Junonis prece 
numen. id. ib. 3, 437 : prece superos, Ov. Tr. 

1, 3, 41: non te per meritum adoro, id. H. 
10, 141.— With the thing asked for in the 
ace. (like rogo, peto, postulo) : cum hostia 
caesa pacem defim adorasset, Liv. 6, 12 
Drak. — With ut : adoravi deos, ut, etc., 
Liv. 7, 40; Juv. 3, 300: adorati di, ut bene 
ac feliciter eveniret, Liv. 21, 17 : Hanc ego, 
non ut me defendere temptet, adoro, Ov. P. 

2, 2. 55. — With the subj. without ut, poet. : 
maneat sic semper adoro, / pray, Prop. 1, 
4, 27. — I ff Hence, A. Dropping the idea 
of asking, entreating, to reverence, honor, 
adore, worship the gods or objects of nat- 
ure regarded as gods ; more emphatic 
than venerari, and denoting the highest 
-degree of reverence (Gr. irpoa-KweTv); the 
habitus adorantium was to put the right 
hand to the mouth and turn about the en- 
tire body to the right (dextratio, q. v.); cf. 
Plin. 28, 2, 5, § 25; Liv. 5, 21; App M. 4, 28. 
— Constr. with acc. y dat, with prepp. or 
absol. ( a ) With ace: Auctoremque viae 
Phoebum taciturnus adorat, Ov. M. 3, 18: 
Janus adorandus, id. F. 3, 881: in delubra 
non nisi adoraturus intras, Plin. Pan. 52: 
large deos adorare, Plin. 12, 14, 32, § 62: 
nil praeter nubes et caeli numen adorat, 
Juv. 14, 97: adorare crocodilon, id. 15, 2. — 
Ineccl. Lat. of the worship of the true God: 
adoravit Israel Deum, Vulg. Gen. 47, 31 : 
Dominum Deum tuum adorabis, ib. Matt. 
4, 10 : Deum adora, ib. Apoc. 22, 9 ; so of 
Christ: videntes eum adoraverunt, ib.Matt. 
28, 17; adorent eum omnes angeli Dei, ib. 
Heb. 1. 6.— (/?) With dot. (eccl.): adorato 
(imperat. ) Domino Deo tuo, Vulg. Deut. 26, 
10: nee adorabis deo alieno, id. Ttal. Ps. 80, 
10 Mai (deum alienum, Vulg. ): qui ado- 
rant sculptibus, ib. ib. 96, 7 Mai (sculptilia, 
Vulg.). — (y) With prepp. (eccl.): si adora- 
vens coram me, Vulg. Luc. 4, 7 : adorabunt 
in conspectu tuo, ib. Apoc. 15, 4: adorent 
ante pedes tuos, ib. ib. 3, 9; 22, 8.— (6) 
Absol. (eccl.): Patres nostri in hoc monte 
adoraverunt, Vulg. Joan. 4, 20 bis. ; ib. Act. 
24, 11. — And, B. The notion of religious 
regard being dropped, to reverence, admire, 
esteem highly : adorare priscorum in inve- 
niendo curam. Plin. 27, 1, 1, § 1 : Ennium sic- 
ut sacros vetustate lucos adoremus, Quint. 
10, 1, 88: veteris qui tollunt grandia templi 
pocula adorandae rubiginis, Juv. 13, 148: 
nee tu divinam Aeneida tenta, Sed longe se- 
quere et vestigia semper adora, Stat. Th. 
12, 816.— C. Under the emperors the Ori- 
ental custom being introduced of worship- 
ping the Caesars with divine ceremony, to 
worship, to reverence : C. Caesarem adorari 
ut deum constituit, cum reversus ex Syria. 
non aliter adire ausus esset quam capite 
velato circumvertensque se, deinde pro- 
cumbens. Suet. Vit. 2; App. M. 4, 28; Min, 
Fel. % 5: non salutari, sed adorari se jubet 
(Alexander), Just. 12, 7 : adorare Caesarum 
imagiaes, Suet. Calig. 14: coronam a judi- 
<5ibus ad se delatam adoravit, did obeisance 



ADRU 

before, id. Ner. 12 : adorare purpuram prin- 
cipis, i. e. touched his purple robe and 
brought it to the mouth in reverence, Amm. 
21, 9.— Of adulation to the rabble, to pay 
court to : nee deerat Otho protendens ma- 
nus, adorare volgum. Tac. H. 1, 36. 

jg^p This word does not occur in Cic. ; for 
in Arch, 11, 28, where adoravi was given by 
Mai in Fragm. p. 124, Halm reads adhorta- 
tus sum, and B. and K. adornavi. 

adortus an d adorsus, a > um i Part. 
of adorior. 

* ad-OSCUlor. ari, v. dep. , to give a kiss 
to, to kiss : manus, Diet. Cret. 2, 51. 

adp-. Words beginning thus, v. under 
app-. 

adquiesco, adquiro, adquisitio, 

v. acquiesco, etc. 

ad-quo, adv. , i. q. the later quoad re- 
versed, how far, as far as, as much as ; 
only in two.examples : iratus essem ad quo 
liceret, Afran. ap. Non. 76, 9 (Com. Rel. 
p. 196 Rib.): ut scire possis, ad quo te ex- 
pediat loqui, Afran. 1. 1. (p. 200 Rib.); cf. 
Hand, Turs. I. p. 178. 

adr-, for all words in adr- not found 
here, v. under arr-. 

t adrachne, ts,f = u6pa%vt], the wild 

strawberry-tree : Arbutus adrachne, Linn. ; 
Plin. 13, 22, 40, § 120; 16, 21, 33, § 80; 17, 
24, 37, § 234 (Sillig and Jan in all these pas- 
sages read andrachle). 

ad- r a do, s h sum - 3, v. a. [ad, miens.], to 
scrape, shave, or pare close. I. Lit.; sco- 
bina ego illam actutum adraserim, Plaut. 
ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 68 Mull.: adrasum cacu- 
men, lopped off, Plin. 17. 19, 30, § 138: scal- 
pello acuto (sarmentum) in modum cunei 
adradito, Col. de Arb. 8: conspexit Adra- 
sum quendam, newly shaved, Hor. Ep. 1, 7, 
50.— II, Fig.: AeiToi'/p7toi/ illud, nescio an 
satis, circumcisum tamen et adrasum est, 
i. e. if it be not yet completed, still it is 
nearly so (the fig. is prob. derived from 
sculpture), Plin. Ep. 2, 12 Keil. 

Adramytteos, Adramytteum, 
Adramyttium, », n.,= t A&pa t ximeiov, a 
maritime town in Mysia, not far from the 
foot of Ida, now Adramyti. Mel. 1, 18, 2; 
Plin. 5, 30, 32, § 112; Cic. Fl. 28, 68; Liv. 

37, 19, 8 ai. ; hence : Adramyttenus, 

a, um, adj. : homo, Cic. El. la, 31: Xeno- 
cles, id. Brut. 91, 316. 

Adrana, ae, f , a river of Hesse, in 
Germany, now the Eder, Tac. A. 1, 56. 

Adrastea or Adrastia, ae, / , = 

'Adpcca-reta. I, The daughter of Jupiter and 
Necessity (so called from an altar erected to 
her by Adrastus), the goddess who rewards 
men for their deeds, and who esp. punishes 
pride and arrogance : quod necsinit Adra- 
stea, Verg. Cir. 239: ineffugibilis, App. de 
Mund. p. 75; Amm. 14, 11. — H. A city of 
Mysia, later called Parium, Plin. 5, 32, 40, 
§ i41; Just. 11, 6, 10. 

AdrasteilS or -ius, a, um, adj., per- 
taining to Adrastus: Arion, the horse given 
to Adrastus by Neptune, Stat. S. 1, 1, 52: 
Adrasteo pallore perfusus, Amm. 14, 11 
(with ref. to Verg. A 6, 480; cf. Adrastus). 

Adrastis, idis, patr.f, — 'AdpatrW?, a 
female descendant of Adrastus : Creon Adra- 
stida leto Admovet, i. e. Argia, daughter of 
Adrastus, and wife of Polynices, Stat. Th. 
12, 678. 

AdrastUS, i, m -i ="A5pao-Tor, king of 
Argos, father-in-law of Tydeus and Polyni- 
ces. who, ace. to the fable, saw them both die, 
and turned so pale from grief that he never 
recovered his former complexion; hence: 
pallor Adrasti,'Verg. G. 480 Serv. ; cf. Ov. P. 
1, 3, 79 ; id. F. 6, 433 ; Stat. Th. 4, 74 al. 

adraSUS. a - 1,m - Part, of adrado. 

adrectarius, a. um, v. arrectarius. 

adrectus (arr-), a, um, P. a., v. ar- 

rigo. 

ad-re mig'o, ; ~ re > i, v - n - ■, t° row t° °r 
toward: litori classis, Flor. 1, 18, 4; so id. 
3,7, 3; 2,8, 12^ 

Adria, Adriacus, Adrianus, 
AdriatlCUS. etc, , v. Hadria, etc. 

ad-rdrO. * ire - 1> v - a - [r°s], to bedew : 
herbam vino, Marc. Emp. 34. 

Adrumetum, v Radium-. 

t ad-rumo, are, 1- ■"■ ^ - ace. to Fest . to 
make a noise ; quod verbum quidam a ru- 



ADSU 

mine, id est parte gutturis, putant deduci, 
Fest. p. 9 Miill. 

* ad-rUO, tire, 3, v. a. , to scrape up, to 
heap up : terra adruenda, Varr. R. R. 1, 35. 

adsc-. Words beginning thus, v. under 
asc-. 

adsc-, adsi-, adso-. Words begin- 
ning thus, v. under asse-, assi-, asso-. 

adsp-. Words beginning thus, v. under 
asp-. 

adst-. Words beginning thus, v. under 
ast-. 

adsu-. Words beginning thus not found 
here, v. under assu-. 

ad-sum (Ribbeck has written assum in 
Novius by conj. from suum of the MSS., 
Com. Trag. p. 262 ; in Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 67, 
adsum must be pronounced assum. as the 
pun on the word requires, Roby, I. p. 49), 
adfui (affui, Merkel, L. Miiller), adesse. v. n. 
(arfui =adfui, S. C. de Bacch. ; arf — adfu- 
erunt, ib. ; arfuise = adfuisse, ib. ; v. ad 
init.; adsiem = adsim, Verg. Cat. 5, 6 (di- 
cam, Rib.) : adsiet, Cato, R. R. 141, 4; Plaut. 
As. 2, 4, 9; Ter. Ad. 4, 4, 11: adsient, id. 
Phorm. 2, 18, 3 : adfore now and then takes 
the place of adfuturus esse, and adforem 
of adessem, which is written with one s, 
adesent, in S. C. de Bacch. ), to be at or near 
a person or place, to be somewhere, to be 
present (opp. absum, to be distant, re- 
moved, absent). I, Lit. (a) Absol : vi- 
sus Homerus adesse potta, Enn. ap. Cic. Ac. 
2, 16, 51 (Ann. v. 6 Vahl.), imitated by Verg. 
A. 2, 271, and Ov. M. 7, 635; v. below: He- 
gio adsum; si quid me vis, impera, Plaut. 
Capt. 5, 3, 1; so id. True. 2, 6, 33; 4, 3, 52: 
quasi adfuerim simulabo. id. Am. 1, 1, 45. 
—{/3) With adv. or adj. : etsi abest, hie ades- 
se erum Arbitror, Plaut. Ps. 4, 7, 11 : Philo- 
laches jam hie aderit, id. Most. 5, 1, 29; and 
id. Ps. 1, 2, 48 : quod adest praesto, Lucr. 5, 
1412 : ut quasi coram adesse videare, cum 
scribo aliquid ad te, Cic. Fam. 15, 16; id. 
Att. 5, 18, 3; Verg. A. 1, 595: non quia ades 
praesens dico hoc, Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 39. — (-y) 
With prepp.: ad exercitum, Plaut. Am. 1, 
3, 6 : in tabernaculo, id. ib. 1, 1, 269 : adsum 
apud te. id. Poen. 1, 2, 67: mulier ad earn 
rem divinam ne adsit, Cato, R. R. 83 : ad 
portam, Cic. Div. 1, 27, 57: ante oculos 
maestissimus Hector Visus adesse mihi, 
Verg. A. 2, 271: ante oculos eadem mihi 
quercus adesse . . . visa est, Ov. M. 7, 635. 
— ( 3 ) With dat : adsum praesens prae- 
senti tibi, Plaut. Ps. 5, 1, 27 : dvm. ne. 

MINVS. SENATORIBV9. C. ADESENT, S. C. de 

Bacchanalibus: portis, Verg. A. 2, 330: se- 
natui, Tac. A. 4, 55 : convivio, Suet. Tib. 
61 Jin.: quaestioni, id. ib. 62: pugnae, id. 
Oth. 9. 

II. Trop. A. Of time, to be present, be 
at hand : dum tempestates adsunt, Lucr. 1, 
178: Vesper adest, Cat. 62, 1: jamque dies 
aderit, Ov. M. 3, 519; 9, 285; 12, 150: ade 
rat judicio dies, Liv. 3, 12: cum jam partus 
adesset, Ov. M. 9, 674.— B. Of other abstr. 
things, to be present, to be at hand (incor- 
rectly made syn. with the simple esse), (a) 
Absol. : nunc adest occasio benefacta cu- 
mulare, Plaut. Capt. 2, 3, 63 : ad narrandum 
argumentum adest benignitas, id. Men. 
prol. 16: omnia adsunt bona, quern penes 
est virtus, id. Am. 2, 2, 21: ut tranquillitas 
animi et securitas adsit, Cic. Off. 1. 20: tanti 
aderant morbi vesicae et viscerum, ut, etc., 
Cic. Fin. 2, 30— (/?) With dat.: hominum 
quis pudor paulum adest, Ter. And, 4, 1, 6 : 
vigilantibus hinc aderant solacia somni, 
Lucr. 5, 1405: vis ad resistendum nulli ad- 
erat. Veil. 2, 61; 2, 21: vim adfore verbo 
Crediderat, Verg. A. 10, 547 : tantus decor 
adfuit arti, Ov, M. 6, 18: simplicitas pue- 
rilibus adfuit annis. id. ib. 5,400: quantus 
adest equis Sudor, Hor. C. 1, 15, 9: uti mox 
Nulla fides damnis adsit, id. Ep. 1, 17, 57: 
quousque patieris. Caesar, non adesse caput 
reipublicae ? to be in his place, to be present, 
Tac. A, 1, 13 et saep.— C. Animo or aniinis, 
to be present in mind, with attention, inter- 
est, sympathy; also, with courage (cf. ani- 
mus); to give attention to something, to 
give heed, observe, attend to ; also, to be fear- 
less, be of good courage : ut intellegeretis 
eum non adfuisse animo, cum ab ill is causa 
agcretur, Cic. Caecin. 10,/m. : adestote om- 
nes animis. qui adestis corporibus. id. SulL 
11. 33; id. Phil. 8, 10, 30 (cf. Ter. And. prol 
24, and Phorm. prol. 30: adeste aequo ani- 

45 



ADUL 

mo) : quam ob rem adeste animis, judices, 
et timorem, si quern habetis, deponite, Cic. 
Mil. 2, 4: ades animo et omitte timorem, 
id. Rep. 6, 10 fin. — J} n Poet., to be present 
with one, to be associated with, to attend : 
Tu ducibus Latiis aderis, cum laeta Tri- 
umphum Vox cauet, Ov. M. 1, 560 ; of the 
cypress: aderis dolentibus, id. ib. 10, 142. 
— ES. T° t> e P r ^sent ivith one's aid or sup- 
port ; to stand by, to assist, aid, help, pro- 
tect, defend, sustain (esp. freq. of advocati ; 
cf. absum ) : ibo ad forum atque aliquot 
mihi amicos advocabo, ad hanc rem qui 
adsient, Ter. Phorm. 2, 1, 82; id. Eun. 4, 6, 
26 : omnes enim hi, quos videtis adesse in 
hac causa, etc., Cic. Rose. Am. 1; id. Verr. 
2, 2, 29 ; id. Sull. 29 ; id. Phil. 2, 37, 95 ; 
Quint. 1, 4; 8, 30 et saep. : ego tamen tuis 
rebus sic adero ut difflcillimis, Cic. Fam. 

6, 14 fin.; so id. Att. 1, 1: Camulogenus 
suis aderat atque eos cohortabatur, Caes. 

B. G. 7, 62 : dictator intercession! adero, 
Liv. 6, 38 : cui sententiae adest Dicaear- 
chus, Plin. 2, 65, 65 : Aueram Arrionillae, Ti- 
monis uxori, Plin. Ep. 1, 5, 5; 2, 11, 2: quod 
ille adversus privatum se intemperantius 
adfuisset, had taken part, Suet. Claud. 38 
Bremi. — With infi : non Teucros delere 
aderam, Sil. 9, 532 ; so of a protecting, aid- 
ing divinity, esp. in invocations, adsis, ad- 
sit, etc. : adsis, o Tegeaee, favens, Verg. G. 
1, 18; id. A. 4, 578: adsis, o Cytherea, id. 
Cat. 6, 11 : ades, Dea, muneris auctor, Ov. 
M. 10, 673; so, Hue ades, Tib. 1,7, 49: di 
omnes nemorum, adeste, Ov. M. 7, 198 : no- 
stris querelis adsint (dii), Liv. 3, 25: fru- 
gumque aderit mea Delia custos, Tib. 1, 5, 
21 : si vocata partubus Lucina veris adfuit, 
Hor. Epod. 5, 6: origini Romanae et deos 
adfuisse et non defuturam virtutem, Liv. 
1, 9; 5, 51 al. — To be present as a witness: 
(testes) adsunt cum adversariis, Cic. Fl. 23 ; 
promissi testis adesto, Ov. M. 2, 45 ; hence 
the t. t. scribendo adesse, to be present as a 
witness to some writing or contract (usually 
placed at the beginning of the writing), S. 

C. de Bacch. ap. Cic. Fam. 8, 8, 5 and 6 al. — 
P, Involving the idea of motion, to come, 
to appear (most freq. in post-Aug. prose): 
adsum atque advenio Acherunte, Enn. ap. 
Cic. Tusc. 1, 16, 37 ; jam ego hie adero, 
Plaut. Aul. 2, 3, 7; Ter. And. 4, 2, 32; id. 
Heaut. 3, 1; 96 ; id. Eun. 4, 7. 41 : hi ex Afri- 
ca jam adfuturi videntur, Cic. Att. 11, 15: 
Hymen ades o Hymenaee, Cat. 62, 5 : Gal- 
li per dumos aderant, Verg. A. 8, 657 ; 11, 
100 : hue ades, o formose puer, id. E. 2, 45 ; 

7, 9; Ov. M. 8, 598; 2, 513 (cf. also ades- 
dum): ecce Areas adest, appears, is ar- 
rived, id. ib. 2, 497; so 3, 102; 528; 4, 692; 
5, 46; 8, 418; 9, 200, 304, 363, 760; 11, 349; 
12, 341; 13, 73, 82, 662, 906: adfore tempus, 
quo, etc., id. ib. 1, 256; cum hostes ades- 
sent, i. e. appropinquarent, Liv. 2, 10 : truci 
clamore aderant semisomnos in barbaros, 
Tac. A. 4, 25 : infensi adesse et instare, Sail. 
J. 50: quod serius adfuisset, Suet. Aug. 94 
al. — In App. with ace: cubiculum adero, 
Met. 2, p. 119 Elm. : scopulum aderunt, ib. 
5 ? p. loo. — Gr. As judicial t. t. , to appear 
before a tribunal: C. Verrem altera actione 
responsurum non esse, neque ad judicium 
adfuturum . . . quod iste certe statue rat 
non adesse, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 1 : augures ad- 
sunt, id. Dom. 34 : augurem adesse jusse- 
runt, Veil. 2, 10 ; cf. Brisson. de Form. V. 
p. 446. — H, Of the senate, to attend, to con- 
vene : edixit ut adesset senatus frequens 
a d. viii. Kal. Decembris, Cic. Phil. 3, 19: 
ne sine causa videretur edixissc, ut senatus 
adesset, id. ib. 24. 

adt-. Words beginning thus, v. under 
att-. 

Aduatuca, ae , /• in tne Tab - Peuting, 
Adliaca, a fortress in the country of the 
Eburones, the Netherlands, between Maes- 
tricht and Louvain, now Tongres, Caes. B. 
G. 0, 32. 

Aduatuci or Aduatici, orum, m., a 
people of Gimbrian origin in Gallia Belgi- 
ca, whose capital, ace. to D'Anville, was 
Falais sur la Mehaigne (ace. to Reich. Orb. 
Antiq. this town was i. q. Aduatuca), Caes. 
B. G. 2, 4 ; 2, 16, 29 al. 

adulabilis (not adol-) e, adj. [adu- 
lor], suited to flatter, flattering, adulatory : 
sermo, Amm. 14, 11 : sententia, id. 31, 12 ; 
cf. Non. 155, 30. 

adulans, anus, v. adulor, P. a. 
46 



ADUL 

adu!aater ? adv-, v. adulor, P. a. 

adulatlO. 5ms, / [adulor], a fawning, 
like that of a dog (adulatio est blandimen- 
tum proprie canum, quod et ad homines 
tractum consuetudine est, Non. 17, 4). — In 
the post-Aug. historians, esp. in Tac., very 
freq. for a servile respect exhibited by bow- 
ing the body= adovatio. J, Lit.: canum 
tarn iida custodia tamque ainans dommo- 
rum adulatio, Cic. N. D. 2, 63. — So of doves, 
a billing, Plin. 10, 34, 52, § 104.— Of men 
toward animals, Col. 6, 2, 5. — J% m Fig., 
low, cringing flattery, adulation : m amiei- 
tiis nullam pestem esse majorem quam 
adulationem, blanditiam, assentationem, 
Cic. Lael. 25, 91: pars altera regiae adula- 
tionis (i. e. adulatorum) erat, Liv. 42, 30: 
humi jacentiuin adulationes, id. 9, 18; cf. 
Curt. 8, 6; so Tac. A. 1, 13, 14; 2, 32; 3, 2; 
4, 6 ; 5, 7 ; 15, 59 ; id. G. 8, etc. ; Suet. Aug. 
53 ; Plin. Pan. 41, 3 al. 

adulator, oris, m. [id], a low, cringing 
flatterer, a sycophant (homo fallax et levis, 
ad voluptatem facit ac dicit omnia, nihil ad 
veritatem, Cic. Lael. 25, 91; cf. id. ib. 25, 
93) : nolo esse laudator, ne videar adulator, 
Auct. Her. 4, 21; so Quint. 12, 10, 13; Suet. 
Vit. 1: versabilium adulatorum, Amm. 14, 
11, 2. 

adulatOriUS, a, nm, adj. [adulator], 
flattering, adulatory (rare) : dedecus, Tac. 
A. 6, 32 fin. — Adv.: adulatorie. flatter- 
ingly, fawningly : agere rem, August. Ep. 
148. 

adulatrix, icis,/ [id.], a female flat- 
terer : adulatrices exterae gentes, Treb. 
Poll. Claud. 3 ; so Tert. Anim. 51. 

adulescens (° nl y adol- in tne vero 

and part, proper), entis (gen.plur. usu. adu- 
lescentium, e. g. Cic. Tusc. 5, 27 al. : adule- 
scentum, Plaut. Ps. 1, 3, 130). A. -P. «■• , grow- 
ing up, not yet come to full growth, young : 
eodem ut jure uti senem liceat, quo jure 
sum usus adulescentior, Ter. Hee. prol. alt. 
3 : uti adulescentior aetati concederet, etc. , 
Sail. H. 1, 11 ( Fragm. ap. Prise. 902). — 
Trop. , of the new Academic philosophy: 
adulescentior Academia, Cic. Fam. 9, 8, 1. — 
Sup. and adv. not used. — B. Subst. comm. 
gen., one who has not yet attained matu- 
rity, a youth, a young man; a young woman, 
a maiden (between the puer and juvenis, 
from the 15th or 17th until past the 30th 
year, often even until near the 40th ; but 
the same person is often called in one place 
adulescens, and in another juvenis, e. g. 
Cic. Fam. 2, 1, with Att. 2, 12 ; cf. id. Top. 
7; often the adulescentia passes beyond 
the period of manhood, even to senectus ; 
while in other cases adulescentia is limited 
to 25 years, Cic. Tusc. 2, 1, 2 Goer. : "Pri- 
mo gradu usque ad annum XV. pueros dic- 
tos, quod sint puri, i. e. impubes. Secun- 
do ad XXX. annum ab adolescendo sic no- 
minates," Varr. ap. Censor, cap. 14. " Ter- 
tia (aetas) adulescentia ad gignendum adul- 
ta, quae porrigitur (ab anno XIV.) usque 
ad vigesimum octavum annum," Isid. Orig. 
11, 2, 4. Thus Cicero, in de Or. 2, 2, calls 
Crassus adulescens, though he was 34 years 
old; in id Phil. 2, 44, Brutus and Cassius, 
when in their 40th year, are called adule- 
scentes; and in id. ib. 46, Cicero calls him- 
self, at the time of his consulship, i. e. in 
his 44th year, adulescens ; cf. Manut. ap. 
Cic. Fam. 2, 1, p. 146): tute me ut fateare 
faciam esse adulescentem moritfus, Plaut. 
Mil. 3, 1, 67: bonus adulescens, Ter. And. 
4, 7, 4: adulescentes bonfi indole praediti, 
Cic. Sen. 8, 26 : adulescens luxu perditus, 
Ter. Ad. 4, 7, 42: adulescens perditus et 
dissolutus, Cic. Tusc. 4, 25; Vulg. Gen. 34, 
19 ; ib. Matt. 19, 20. — Homo and adule- 
scens are often used together: amanti ho- 
mini adulescenti, Plaut. Trin. 4, 2, 94; Ter. 
Phorm. 5, 9, 53 ; Cic. Fam. 2, 15 : hoc se la- 
bore durant homines adulescentes, Caes. B. 
G. 6, 28; Sail C. 38; id. J. 6; Liv. 2, 6.— 
Fern. : optimae adulescenti facere injuri- 
am, Ter. And. 3, 2, 8 : Africani filia adule- 
scens, Cic. Div. 1, 18 fin. The young Ro- 
mans who attended the proconsuls and 
propraetors in the provinces were some- 
times called adulescentes (commonly con- 
tubernales), Caes. B. C. 1, 23; 1, 51. Some- 
times adulescens serves to distinguish the 
younger of two persons of the same name : 
Brutus adulescens, Caes. B. G. 7, 87: P. 



ADUL 

Crassus adulescens, id. ib. 1, 52, and 3, 7*. 
L. Caesar adulescens, id. B. C. 1, 8. 

adulescentia (not adol-), ae,/ [adu- 
lescens], the age of the adulescens, the time 
between the age of the puer and juvenis, i. e. 
from the 15th to the 'SQth year, ttie time of 
youth, youth, =z e<pr\/3 In, hXiKia, (cf. adule- 
scens) : quid enim ? Citius adulescentia© 
senectus quam pueritiae adulescentia ob- 
repit ? Cic. Sen. 2 : qui adulescentiam flo- 
rem aetatis, senectutem occasum vitae ve- 
lit definire, id. Top. 7, 32 : Nemo adulescen- 
tiam tuam contemnat, Vulg. 1 Tim. 4, 12 : 
ineunte adulescentia, Cic. Off. 2, 32 : jam a 
prima adulescentia, id. Fam. 1, 9 fin. : ab 
adulescentia sua, Vulg. Gen. 8, 21: in adu- 
lescentia = adulescens, Suet. Claud. 41. 

* adulescentior (not adol-), ari, v. 
dep. [id.], to behave like an adulescens: tu 
adhuc adulescentiaris, Varr. ap. Non. 71, 30. 

adulescentula (not adol-) ae, j: 

dim. [id.], a very young maiden ; also as a 
term of endearment for an adult: salve- 
to, adulescentula, good morrow, my child, 
Plaut. Rud. 2, 4, 3 ; Ter. And. 1, 1, 91 : adu- 
lescentula speciosa, Vulg. 3 Reg. 1, 3 : adu- 
lescentula virgo, ib. ib. 1, 2 : adulescentu- 
lae, ib. Tit. 2, 4. 

adulescentulus (not adol-), h ™ 

dim. [id.], a very young man, — leavioxo? 
(when 27 years old, Cicero calls himself 
adulescentulus, Or. 30; cf. Gell. 15, 28, and 
Quint. 12, 6. So Sail. C. 49 calls Caesar adu- 
lescentulus, although he was then 33, or 
perhaps 35 years old): neque admodum 
adulescentulust, Naev. Com. Rel. p. 11 Rib. • 
id. ib. p. 29 : Rhodius adulescentulus, Ter. 
Eun. 3, 1, 33 : modestissimus, Cic. Plane. 
11; Vulg. Gen. 4, 23: adulescentulus et Vir- 
go, ib. Ezech. 9, 6. — Also; a young soldier, 
a recruit, Cic. Rep. 1, 15 B. ; cf. Nep. Paus. 
4 and Ham. 1. Sometimes it indicates con- 
tempt : Proveniebant oratores novi, stulti 
adulescentuli, Naev. ap. Cic. Sen. 6, 20: im- 
berbis adulescentulus, Cic. Dom. 14. 

adulescenturio (not adol-), ire, 
v. n. [id.], to behave like an adulescens: in- 
cipio adulescenturire et nescio quid nuga- 
rum facere, Laber. ap. Non. 74, 15 (Com. 
Rel. p. 299 Rib.). 

adulo. avi, atum, 1, v. a. (a rare form 
for adulor; hence Prise. 791 P. ranks this 
form, as an exception, among the other ac- 
tive forms of the deponents, adipiscor, ad- 
miror, auxilior, etc. ; cf. Don. p. 1756 P. and 
Ars Consent, p. 2054 P.), to fawn like a dogr 
(canes) gannitu vocis adulant, Lucr. 5, 1070: 
Cauda nostrum adulat sanguinem (the eagle), 
strokes, i. e. wipes off our blood, Cic. poet. 
ap. Tusc. 2, 10, 24, as trans, of Aeschyl. 
Prometh. Solut. : Dionysium, Val. Max. 4, 3, 
ext. 4. — Pass., to be flattered : nee adulari 
nos sinamus, Cic. Off. 1, 26, 91: tribunus 
militum adulandus erat, Val. M. 2, 7, 15: 
adulati erant ab amicis, Cass. ap. Prise, 
p. 791 P. 

adulor, atus, lj v - ^ e P- [ acc - t-° Lobeck, 
the -ulo, -ulor is connected with 'iWetv (cf. 
eiAva), eXi/u, and volvo), and thus denoted 
orig. the wagging of the tail and fawning 
of brutes; Fest. p. 21 Mull., thought adulor 
was a form ofadludo, to play with; cf. Ger. 
wedeln and Eng. to wheedle], to cling to one 
fawningly, to fawn as a dog ; and trop., of 
cringing flattery, which is exhibited in words 
and actions, to flatter in a c j ringing man- 
ner, to fawn upon (while assentari signified 
to yield to one in everything, to assent to 
what he says, and is used only of men; and 
blandiH, to be soft and pleasing in manner, 
to flatter by honeyed words as well as by 
captivating manners; cf. Cic. Lael. 25). — 
Constr. with acc, more rarely with dat, 
Rudd. II. p. 136; Zumpt, § 389. I, In 
gen.: ferarum Agmen adulantum, Ov. M. 
14, 45 : Quin etiam blandas movere per aera 
caudas, Nostraque adulantes comitant ves- 
tigia, id. ib. 14, 257: caudam more adu- 
lantium canum blande movet, Gell. 5, 14: 
hi ( canes) furem quoque adulantur, Col. 
7, 12. — Me ton.: horrentem, trementem, 
adulantem omnis videre te volui: vidi, Cic. 
Pis. 41 : aperte adulantem nemo non videt, 
id. Lael. 26 : aut adulatus aut admiratus for- 
tunam sum alterius, id. Div. 2, 2, 6; Liv. 
45, 31: queincunque principem, Tac. H. 1, 
32: Neronem aut Tigellium, id. A. 16, 19: 
dominum. Sen. de Ira, 2, 31; Nep., Liv., 
and Curt, have the dat. : Antonio, Nep. 



ADUL 

Att. 8 : praesentibus, Liv. 36, 7 : singulis, 
Curt. 4, 1, 19. — In the time of Quint, the 
use of the dat. was predominant : huic non 
hunc adulari jam dicitur, 9, 3, 1 ; yet Tac. 
preferred the ace, v. the passages cited 
above.— II. Es P- of the ser vile reverence 
paid to Asiatic kings, irpoaxwetv ; cf. adula- 
tio: more adulantium procubuerunt: con- 
veniens oratio tarn humili adulationi fuit, 
Liv 30, 16 : more Persarum, Val. Max.jt, 
7, ext. 2; so id. 6, 3, ext. 2.— Hence, adu- 
lans antis, P. a., flattering, adulatory: 
verba? Plin. Fan. 26: quid adulantius? Tert. 
adv. Marc. 1. 27.— Sup. is wanting.— *Adv. : 
^dulsiJiteryflatteringly,fawningly, Fulg. 
Contin. Verg. p. 153. 



1. ad-ulter, Sri,™., and adultera, ae 

y: [alter, ace. to Fest. : adulter et adultera di- 
cuntur, quia et ille ad alteram et haec ad alte- 
rum se conferunt, p. 22 Mull.], orig. one who 
approaches another {from unlawful or crim- 
inal love), an adulterer or adulteress (as an 
adj. also, but only in the poets). I, Prop. : 
quis ganeo, quis nepos, quis adulter, quae 
mulier infamis, etc., Cic. Cat. 2, 4: sororis 
adulter Clodius, id. Sest. 39; so id. Fin. 2, 
9- Ov. H. 20, 8; Tac. A. 3, 24; Vulg. Deut. 
22 22: adultera, Hor. C. 3, 3, 25; Ov. M. 10, 
347 ; Quint. 5, 10, 104 ; Suet. Calig. 24 ; Vulg. 
Deut. 22, 22; and with mulier: via mulie- 
ris adulterae. ib. Prov. 30, 20; ib. Ezech. 16, 
■.Y2. —Also of animals : adulter, Grat. Cyncg. 
i'14: Claud. Cons. Mall. Theod. 304: adulte- 
ra. Plin. 8, 16, 17, § 43.— Poet, in gen. of 
unlawful love, without the access, idea of 
adultery, a paramour : Danae'n munierant 
<-atis nocturnis ab adulteris, Hor. C. 3, 16, 
i sq. ; so id. ib. 1, 36, 19; Ov. Ib. 338.— H. 
Adulter solidorum, i. e. monetae, a counter- 
feiter or adulterator of coin, Const. 5, Cod. 
Th.— HI The offspring of unlawful love: 
nothus, a bastard (eccl. ) : adulteri et non 
filii estis,Vulg. Heb. 12,8. 

2. adulter, -tera, -terum, adj. 
(Rudd. I. p. 51, n. 36), for adulterinus, adul- 
terous, unchaste : cr\nes, finely-curled hair, 
like that of a full-dressed paramour, Hor. 
C. 1, 15, 19 : mens, that thinks only of illicit 
love, Ov. Am. 3, 4, 5 : clavis, a key to the 
chamber of a courtesan, id. A. A. 3, 643. — 
II Transf., counterfeit, false: imitatio 
pol'idi, Cod. Th. 9, 22, 1. 

adlllteratlO, onis, / [adultero], an 
adulteration, sophistication: crooi, Plin. 21, 
6, 17, § 32; so prooem. 1, 2. 

adulterator, oris, m. [id.], a coun- 
terfeiter : monetae. Cod. Th. 11, 21, 1 ; Dig. 
48,' 19, 16 fin. 

adulteratrix, T cis, /, = adultera, 
Gloss. Gr. Lat. as trans, of /j,oLxa\i?. 

adulterinus, a , um < ad J- [adulter]. 

I, Adulterous : liberi adulterino sanguine 
nati, Plin. 7, 2, 2, § 14; and of animals, not 
full-blooded : pullus adulterinus et degener, 
id. 10, 3, 3, § 10.— But oftener, H. That has 
assumed the nature of something foreign (cf. 
the etym. of adulter), not genuine, false, 
counterfeit, impure : symbolum, a false 
seal, Plaut. Bacch. 2, 3. 32 ; cf. Paul, ex Fest. 
p. 28 Mull. : adulterina signa dicuntur ali- 
enis anulis facta; and Cic: testamentum 
signis adulterinis obsignare, Clu. 14: num- 
mus. id. Off. 3, 23: semina, Varr. R. R 1, 
40 : claves. Sail. J. 12. 

adulteriO, °nis. A word formed by 
Laberius = adulter, ace. to Non. 70, 5; or 
adulterium. ace. to Gell. 16, 7, the latter of 
whom censures this form. 

adulteritas, atis, = adulterium, La- 
ber. ap. Gell. 16, 7. 

adulterium, «, n - [adulter]. I, Adul- 
tery: Adulterium est cum aliena uxore 
coire. Quint. 7, 3, 10: qui in adulterio de- 
prehenditur, Cic. de Or. 2, 68, 275 : mulie- 
rem in adulterio deprehensam, Vulg. Joan. 
8, 3 : cum aliqua facere, Cat. 67, 36 : inire, 
Veil. 2, 45 : adulteria exercere. Suet. Aug. 
69: adulterio cognoscere alicujus uxorem, 
Just. 22, 1 : vasa adulteriis caelata, decora- 
ted with immodest figures, Plin. 14, 22, 28, 
§ 140.— Of brutes: nee (elephanti) adulteria 
novere, Plin. 8, 5, 5, § 13; id. 10, 34, 52, 
g 104. — Of plants, an ingrafting, inocula- 
ting, Manil. 5, 266.— H. Adulteration : om- 
nia in adulterium mellis excogitata, Plin. 
14, 9. 11, § 80: mercis, id. 19, 3, 15, § 44. 

adultero, avi ? atum, 1, v. n. and a. 
[id.], to commit adultery, to pollute, defile. 



ADUN 

I Lit., absol. or with ace: latrocinari, 
fraudare, adulterare, Cic. Off. 1, 35 : jus es- 
set latrocinari: jus adulterare: jus testa- 
menta falsa supponere, id. de Leg. 16, 43: 
qui dimissam duxerit, adulterat, Vulg. Matt. 
5, 32 : matronas, Suet. Aug. 67 ; cf. id. Caes. 
6.— Also of brutes: adulteretur et columba 
milvio, Hor. Epod. 16, 32. — As verb, neutr. 
of a woman : cum Graeco adulescente, Just. 
43, 4.— Froq., H. Fig., to falsify, adulter- 
ate, or give a foreign nature to a thing, to 
counterfeit : laser adulteratum cummi aut 
sacopenio aut fab& fracta, Plin. 19, 3, 15, § 40 : 
jus civile pecunia, Cic. Caecin. 26: simula- 
tio tollit judicium veri idque adulterat, id. 
Lael. 25, 92 ; id. Part. 25, 90 : adulterantes 
verbum, Vulg. 2 Cor. 2, 17. — Poet, of Pro- 
teus : faciem, changes his form, Ov. F. 1, 
373. 

adultus, a , um , p a., from adolesco. 
* adumbratim, adv. [adumbro], 
sketched in shadow, a la silhouette, in gen- 
eral or in outline (opp. adamussim) : quasi 
adumbratim paulum simulata videntur, as 
it were covered with shadows, dimly resem- 
bling, Lucr. 4, 363. 

adumbratlO, onis,/ [id], a sketch in 
shadoiu, a la silhouette, a perspective sketch 
or draft (cf. adumbro). I. Lit.: scenogra- 
phia est frontis et laterum abscedentium 
adumbratio, Vitr. 1, 2— H. F ig., a sketch, 
outline : nulla est laus oratoris, cujus in 
nostris orationibus non sit aliqua, si non 
perfectio at conatus tamen atque adum- 
bratio, * Cic. Or. 29. — Hence, B. A false 
show, the semblance of a thing, pretence : in- 
sidiosa beneflcii adumbratio, Val. Max 7, 
3, 8; cf. Cic. Off. 1, 14,, 44. 

ad-umbrO, & Y h atum, 1, v. a. , to bring 
a shadow over a thing, to cast a shadow on, 
to shade or overshadow by something. I. 
I n g e n. A. L j l - , constr. : aliquid aliqua 
re (so only in later authors): palmeis tege- 
tibus vineas, Col. 5, 5 : adumbrantur stra- 
mentis uvae, id. 11, 2, 61.— B. Trop. : 
ut notae quoque litterarum, non adumbra- 
tae comarum praesidio, totae ad oculos 
legentium accederent, Petr. Sat. 105. — H, 
E s p. in painting, to sliade, to represent an 
object with the due mingling of light and 
shade, <jma~fpa<pea> (therefore not of the 
sketch in shadow, as the first outline of 
a figure, but of a picture already fully 
sketched, and only wanting the last touch- 
es for its completion): quis pictor om- 
nia, quae in rerum natura sunt, adum- 
brare didicit? Quint. 7, 10, 9: Quod pictor 
adumbrare non valuit, casus imitatus est, 
Val. Max. 8, 11 fin. — B. F i g- 1 . To rep- 
resent a thing in the appropriate manner : 
quo in genere orationis utrumque oratorem 
cognoveramus, id ipsum sumus in eorum 
sermone adumbrare conati, Cic. de Or. 3, 4 ; 
2, 47; id. Fin. 5,22: rerum omnium quasi 
adumbratas intellegentias animo ac mente 
concipere, i. e. preconceptions, innateideas, 
Gr. TrpoX^eir, id. Leg. 1, 20. — 2. Torepre- 
sent a thing only in outline, and, consequent- 
ly, imperfectly : cedo mini istorum adum- 
bratorum deorum lineamenta atque formas, 
these semblances, outlines of deities (of the 
gods of Epicurus), Cic. X. D. 1, 27: consec- 
tatur nullam eminentem effigiem virtutis, 
sed adumbratam imaginem gloriae. imper- 
fectly represented, id. Tusc. 3. 2. — Hence, 
adumbratUS, a , um, P. a. A. Deline- 
ated only in sem b lance, coun terf cited, feigned, 
false : comitia (opp. vera), Cic. Agr. 2, 12, 
31: indicium, id. Sull. IS fin.: Aeschrio, 
Pippae vir adumbratus, id. Verr. 2, 3, 33, 
§ 77 : laetitia, * Tac. A. 4, 31.— Also, B. De- 
vised in darkness, dark, secret : fallaciae, 
Amm. 14, 11. — Comp., sup., and adv. not 
used. 

adunatio, °nis, / ( like the verb a duno, 
only in later authors), a malcing into one, a 
uniting, a union, tvoxnr, Cyp. Ep. 57 (60 
Oxon.), 61 (62 ib.) ; Cassiod. Ep. 4, 33 and 36. 

adunatus, a , um , Fart - of aduno. 

aduncitas, iitis, /• [aduncus], the cur- 
vature of a point inwards, hookedness, 
aduncity : rostrorum, * Cic. N. D. 2, 47, 
122 ; so, rostri, Plin. 8, 27, 41, § 97 ; 10, 71, 
91, § 196. 

ad-UllCUS, a i um < aa J-i bent inthe man- 
ner of a hook, hooked : nasus, a hooked or 
aquiline nose, * Ter. Hcaut. 5, 5, 18 (on the 
contr. reduncus nasus, a snub or turned-up 
nose) : serrula adunca ex omni parte den- 



ADVE 

tium et tortuosa, Cic. Clu. 48: corpuscula. 
curvata et quasi adunca, id. N. I). 1, 24: 
ungues, id. Tusc. 2, 10: baculum aduncum 
tenens, quem lituum appellaverunt. Liv. 
1, 18: aliis cornua adunca, aliis redunca> 
Plin. 11,37, 45, § 125.— Poet.: magni prae- 
pes adunca Jovis, i. e. the eagle, Ov. F. 6, 
196. — Comp., sup., and adv. not used. 

ad-uno, avi, atum, 1, v. a., to make one, 
to unite (in Just, several times, elsewhere 
rare, except in the Chr. fathers) : cum adu- 
nata omnis classis esset, Just. 2, 12 ; so 7, 
1 ; 15, 4 ; Pall. 3, 29 ; 4, 10 ; Lact. Opif. D. 
17 al. (Non. reads also, in Cic. Off. 3, 8, 35, 
erroneously, adunatam for adjunctam, B. 
and K.). 

ad-urgeo ere, v. a. , to press to or close 
to, press against— L i t. : dens digito adur- 
gendus, Cels. 7, 12, 1.— P o e t. : (aliquem) re- 
mis volantem, i. e. to pursue closely, Hor. 
C. 1, 37, 17. 

ad-uro, ussi ) ustum, 3, v. a., to set fire 
to, to kindle, to set in aflame, to burn, singe^ 
scorch (cf. accendo), etc. I, A. Lit., of 
food: hoc adustum est, *Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 71; 
so Hor. S. 2, 8 68; 90: splendor quicun- 
que est acer, adurit Saepe oculos, * Lucr. 4, 
330: Dionysius candente carbone sibi adu- 
rebat capillum, Cic. Off. 2, 7, 23; cf. id. Tusc. 
5, 20, 58.— So of the Indian sages: sine ge- 
mitu aduruntur, suffer themselves to be 
burned, Cic. Tusc. 5, 27, 77 : ignes caelestes 
adussisse complurium vestimenta diceban- 
tur, Liv. 39, 22. — So in Cels., of the burn- 
ing or cauterizing of a diseased limb: o* 
eodem ferramento adurendum, 8, 2; cf. id. 
5, 26, 21 ; 33: flammis aduri Colchicis, Hor. 
Epod. 5, 24 : in desertis adustisque sole,. 
Plin. 19,1,4, § 19. — B. Transf., to hurt, 
damage, consume ; of locusts : multa con- 
tactu adurentes, Plin. 11, 29, 35, § 104.— 
So of wind, to blast, from its effects : (arbo- 
res) aduri fervore aut fiatu frigidiore, Plin. 
17, 24, 37, § 216.— And also of cold and 
frost, to nip, to freeze : ne frigus adurat, 
Verg. G. 1, 92 : nee vernum nascentia fri- 
gus adurat poma, Ov. M. 14, 763: adusta 
gelu, id. F. 4, 918: rigor nivis multorum 
adussit pedes, Curt. 7, 3: (leonis adipes) sa- 
nant adusta nivibus, Plin. 28, 8, 25, § 89.— 
II. F i g-> P oet - of tlie flre (flame) of love, to 
burn, inflame : Venus non crubescendis 
adurit Ignibus, Hor. C. 1, 27, 14; cf.: ar- 
dores vincet adusta meos, Ov. H. 12, 180. — 
Hence, aduStUS, a , um > p a - A. Burned 
by the sun ; hence, scorched, made brown, 
and, in gen., brown, swarthy : si qui forte 
adustioris coloris ex recenti via essent, Liv. . 
27, 47 : adustus corpora Maurus, Sil. 8, 269 : 
lapis adusto colore, Plin. 2, 58, 59, § 149.— 
B Subst. : adusta, orum, n. , burns upon 
the flesh, Cels. 5, 27. 

ad-USque, f° r usque ad (like abusque 
for usque ab); hence, I. Prep, with ace, 
to, quite or even to, all the way to, as far as 
(rare, not used in Cic, and for the most 
part only in the poets of the Aug. per. (me- 
tri gratid) and their imitators among later 
prose writers); adusque columnas,Verg. A. 
11, 262: adusque Bari moenia piscosi, Hor. 
S. 1, 5, 96 ; 97 ; Gell. 15, 2. — II. Adv., a 
strengthened form for usque, throughout, 
wholly, entirely : oriens tibi victus adusque 
qua, etc. , Ov. M. 4, 20 : adusque deraso ca- 
pite, App. M. 2, p.' 147 (cf. Plaut. Bacch. 5, 
2, 7: attonsae hae quidem umbrae usque 
sunt), v. Hand, Turs. I. p. 189. 

adustio, onis, / [aduro]. I, A kin- 
dling, burning ; a burn (concrete only in 
Pliny): ulcera frigore aut adustione facta, 
Plin. 32. 4, 14, § 34: adustiones sanat (lac- 
tuca), id. 20, 7, 26, g 61.— Also of plants^ 
e. g. vines, a rubbing, galling, Plin. 17, 15, 
25, § 116 al. — II. An inflammation : adu- 
stio infantium, quae vocatur siriasis, Plin. 
30, 15, 47, § 135.-^0^., a burned state, picis, 
Plin. 14, 20, 25, § 127. 
adustus a ) um , £*■ a - 1 from a duro. 
(ad-Utor, -USUS, a f alse reading in 
Cato, R. R. 76, 4. instead of abusus.) 

*advecticius (not -tins), a , um . ad o- 

[adveho], brought to a place from a dis- 
tance, foreign : vinum, Sail. J. 44, 5. 

* advectlO, onis,/ [id.], a bringing ov 
conveying, transportation : longa, Plin. 9, 
54, 79, § 169. 

* advectO, * re , v.freq. [id.], to carry 
or convey to a place often : rei frumentariae 
copiam Tac. A. 6, 13. 

47 



A D V E 

advector, oris, m. [adveho], one who 
-conveys or carries a thing to a place, a car- 
rier : advector equus, App. Flor. p. 363 (but 
in Plaut. As. 2, 2, 92, the correct reading is 
adveniortm, Fieck.). 

1. advectUS, a, um, Part, of adveho. 

* 2 S advectllS, tls. m. [adveho], = ad- 

vectio, a bringing or conveying to a place: 

iaec de origine et advectu deae, Tac. H. 

4, 84. 

ad-Veto, xi , ctum, 3, v. a. (advexti — 
advexisti, Plaut. Merc. 2, 3, 56 ; advexe = 
advexisse, id. ib. 2, 2, 61), to conduct, carry, 
convey, bear, bring, etc. , a person or thing 
to a place ; and pass. , to be carried, to ride, 
to come to a place upon a horse, in a car- 
riage, ship, etc. (syn.: invehere, inferre, de- 
ferre; class., and in the histt. very freq. ) : 
earn hue mulierem in Ephesum advehit, 
Plaut. Mil. 2, 1, 35; id. Merc. 2, 3, 56; so 
id. ib. 2, 1, 35 ; id. T rin. 4, 2, 88 al. : islam 
nunc times, quae advectast, Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 
81: ex agris frumentum Romam, Cic. Verr. 
2, 3, 74 : ad urbem advectus, id. Phil. 2, 31, 
77: sacerdos advecta (curru) in fanum, id. 
Tusc. 1, 47 : equo advectus ad fluminis 
ripam, id. Div. 1, 28; sestertium sexagies, 
quod advexerat Domitius, Caes. B. C. lj 
23 : vasa aerea advexerunt populi. Vulg. 
Ezech. 27, 13 : Marius Uticam advehitur, 
Sail. J. 86 Jin. : in earn partem citato equo 
advectus, Li v. 2, 47 : quae (naves) advexerant 
legatos, id. 23, 38; 42, 37 al. — So Tac. A. 2, 
45; id. H. 5, 16; id. G. 2; Suet. Ner. 45; 
Curt. 6, 2; Verg. A. 5, 864; 8, 11; Ov. H. 5, 
90; Pers. 5, 134 al.— Also: humero adve- 
hit, Val. Fl. 3, 69. — In Verg. and Tac. also 
with ace. pers. : advehitur Teucros, Verg. 
A. 8, 136 : equo collustrans omnia ut quos- 
que advectus erat, etc., Tac. A. 2, 45 ; so 
id. H. 5, 16. 

t ad-VelltatlO, onis, / [velitor], a 
skirmish of words, logomachy : jactatio 
quaedam verbomm flgurata ab hastis ve- 
litaribus, Paul, ex Fest.p. 28 Mull. 

ad-velo, ^ r c, 1, v. a., to put a veil on a 
person or thing, to veil; poet., to wreathe or 
crown : tempora lauro, * Verg. A. 5, 246 ; 
and. besides only Lampr. Com. 15. 

advena, ae (ace. to Valer. Prob. 1439 
and 1445 P.,m.,/., and n,, like verna ; cf., how- 
ever. Prise. 677 P. : Inveniuntur quaedam 
ex coinmunibus etiam neutri generi ad- 
juncta, sed ngurate per uUo^TijTa, ut 
advena, mancipium) [advenio], one who 
comes to a place ; a foreigner, stranger, or 
alien; and adj., strange, foreign, alien, etc. 
. (syn. : peregrinus, externus, exterus, alie- 
nus. alienigena ; opp. indjgena, native ; 
ciass both in prose and poetry). I. Lit: 
defessus perrogitandod advenas F*uit de 
gnatis, Pac. ap. Prise, p. 634 P. (Trag. Rel. 
p. 116 Rib.): advena anus paupercula 
* Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 44: volucres, Varr. R. r! 
3, 5 : advenam gruem, Hor. Epod. 2, 35 : 
illas (ciconias) hiemis, has (grues) aestatis 
advenas, Plin. 10, 23, 31, § 61 : Zeno Citieus 
advena, Cic. Tusc. 5, 11 fin. : advena posses- 
sor agelli, Verg. E. 9, 2 : exercitus advena, 
id. A. 7, 38; id. ib. 10, 460 : Tibris advena, 
as flowing from Etruria into Hue Roman 
territory, Ov. F. 2, 68: amor advena, love 
for a foreign maiden, id. A. A. 1, 75: ad- 
venae reges, Liv. 4, 3; Vulg. Gen. 19, 9: ad- 
venae Romani, ib. Act. 2, 10. — H. Fig., a 
stranger to a thing, i.e. ignorant, unskilled, 
inexperienced = ignarus: ne in nostra patria 
peregrini atque advenae esse videamur 
Cic. de Or. 1, 58, 249; cf.: non hospites, sed 
peregrini atque advenae nominabamur, id. 
Agr. 2, MJin.; hence poet, with gen. : belli 
Stat. Th. 8, 556. 

ad-veneror, ari, 1, v. dep., to give hon- 
or to, to adore, worship : Minervam et Ve- 
nerem, Varr. R. R. 1, 1, 6: Prosequiturque 
oculis puer adveneratus (duces) euntes, Sil. 
13,704. 

* advenientia, ae,/ [advenio], an ar- 
rival ; cohortium, Sisenn. ap. Non. 161 fin. 
ad-veniO, veni, ventum, 4, v. a., to 
come to a place, to reach, arrive at (syn. : 
accedere, adventare, ad ire, appellere, ades- 
se)-, constr. absoL, with ad, in, or ace. J 
Lit.: verum praetor advenit, Naev. ap' 
Non. 468, 27 (Bell. Pun. v. 44 Vahl.): ad 
vos adveniens, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 2 16 
38 (Trag. v. 14 Vahl.): ad forum, plaut 
-Capt. L 2, ; so id. Cure. 1. 2. 55 • 
48 



A I) V E 

id. Am. prol. 32 ; cf. id. Men. 5, 2, 6 : ad- 
venis modo? Admodum, Ter. Hec. 3, 5, 
8 ; Caecil. ap. Non. 247, 6 : procul a pa- 
tria domoque, Lucr. 6, 1103: ad auns, id. 6, 
166; so id. 3,783; 4, 874; 6, 234: in mon- 
tem Oetam, Att. ap. Non. 223, 2 : in provin- 
ciam, Cic. Phil. 11, 12 (so Ov. M. 7, 155: 
somnus in ignotos oculos) : ex Hyperboreis 
Delphos,Cic. N. D. 3, 23: est quiddam, ad- 
venientem non esse peregrinum atque ho- 
spitem, id. Att. 6, 3 ; Verg. A. 10, 346 ; Ov. 
Tr. 1, 9, 41. — With simple ace. : Tyriam ur- 
bem, Verg. A. 1, 388: unde hos advenias 
labores, Stat. Th. 5, 47 (whether in Tac. A. 

1, 18, properantibus Blaesus advenit, the 
first word is a dat. , as Rudd. II. p. 135, sup- 
poses, or an abl. absoL, may still be doubt- 
ed). — Also with sup. : tentatum advenis, 
Ter. Phorm. 2, 3, 41; so id. ib. 2, 3, 13.— H. 
Transf £. Poet, in adding an entire 
thought as an amplification of what pre- 
cedes (for accedo, q. v.): praeter enim 
quam quod morbis cum corporis aegret 
Advenit id quod earn de rebus saeoe futu- 
ris Macerat, etc., beside that it often suffers 
with the body itself this often occurs, that it 
is itself tormented in regard to the future, 
etc., Lucr. 3, 825. — B. Inthe_pe»/, the act 
of coming being considered as completed, 
to have come, i. e. to be somewhere, to Repres- 
ent (v. adventus, B. ; cf. Herz. ad Caes. B. G. 

2, 27); of time: interea dies advenit, quo 
die, etc., appeared, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 15; so, 
ubi dies advenit, Sail. J. 113, 5: advenit 
proflciscendi hora, Tac. H. 4, 62: tempus 

meum nondum advenit, Vulg. Joan. 7, 6. 

C. To come into one's possession, to accrue, 
Sail. J. Ill ; cf. Liv. 45, 19 med. — n a To 
come by conveyance, to be brought ; of a 
letter : advenere litterae (for allatae sunt), 
Suet. Vesp. 7. 

adventicius ( not -tius) a, um, adj. 

[advenio], that is present by coming, coming 
from abroad, foreign, strange (extrinsecus 
ad nos pervemens non nostrum, aut nostro 
labore paratum, Ern. Clav. Cic. ; opp. propri- 
us, innatus, insitus, etc. ; in Cic. very freq., 
elsewhere rare). I, In gen. : genus (avi- 
um), Varr. R. R. 3, 5, 7 (cf. advena) : Mithrida- 
tes magnis adventiciis copiis juvabatur, Cic. 
Imp. Pomp. 9, 24; so, auxilium, id. Verr. 
2, 4, 37 : externus et adventicius tepor, id. 
N. D. 2, 10 : externa atque adventicia visio, 
proceeding from the senses, id. Div. 2, 58J 
128: doctrina transmarina et adventicia, 
id. de Or. 3, 33 : dos, given by another than 
the father, Dig. 23, 3, 5.— H. Esp. £. 
That is added to what is customary, or hap- 
pens out of course, unusual, extraordinary : 
fructus, Liv. 8, 28; so, casus, Dig. 40, 9, 6. 
— S. That is acquired without one's own 
effort: adventicia pecunia, obtained, not 
from one's own possessions, but by inherit- 
ance, usury, presents, etc., Cic. In v. 2, 21; 
id. Rab. Post. 17: humor adventicius, rain, 
Varr. R. R. 1, 41, 3 : adventiciae res, Sen. ad 
Helv. 5. — C . That pertains to arrival (ad- 
ventus): adventicia cena, a banquet given 
on one's arrival, Suet. Vit. 13 (cf. advento- 
rius). — Adv. phrase: ex adventicio, from 
without, extrinsically : quidquid est hoc, 
quod circa nos ex adventicio fulget, liberi' 
honores, etc. , Sen. Consol. ad Marc. 10. 

adventO, avi, atum, 1, v. freq. [id.], 
to come continually nearer to a point (coti- 
dianis itineribus accedere et appropinqua- 
re, Manut. ad Cic. Fam. 2, 6 init), to come 
on, to approach, to arrive at or come to (esp. 
with the access, idea of speed, haste; only 
a few times in Cic, and never in his ora- 
tions; in the histt. used esp. of the advance 
of the enemy's army in military order, and 
the like, cf. Herz. ad Auct. B. G. 8, 20 ; 
hence without the signif. of a hostile attack, 
which adoriri and aggredi have) ; constr. 
absoL, with adv.,prepp., the dat., or ace, 
cf Rudd. II. p. 136. («) AbsoL: multi alii 
adventant, Enn. ap. Macr. 6, 15 (Trag. v. 73 
Vahl.): te id admonitum advento, Plaut. 
Aul. 2, 1, 24 : quod jam tempus adventat, 
advances with rapid strides, Cic. de Or. 1, 
45, 199 : adventans senectus, id. Sen. 1, 2 : 
tu adventare ac prope adesse jam debes' id. 
Att. 4, 17 : Caesar adventare, jam jamque 
adesse ejus equites falso nuntiabantur, Caes. 
B. C. 1, 14; Auct. B. G. 8, 20.— (/3) With adv. 
of place : quo cum adventaret. etc., Auct. 
B. G. 8, 26.— ( 7 ) With prepp. : ad Italiam, 
Cic. Fam. 2, 6, 1: ad urbem, Verg A. 11,514: 
sub ipsam finem= id. ib. 5, 428: in subsidi- 



A D V E 

um, Tac. A. 14, 32.— (<5) With dat.: adven- 
tante i'ataii urbi ciade, Liv. b, 33: accipien 
do Armeniae regno adventabat, Tac. A. 16, 
23 : portis, Stat. Th. 11, 20. 2.— (e) With ace. 
(cf. advenio) : propinqua Seleuciae adven- 
tabat, Tac. A. 6, 44: barbancos pagos ad- 
ventans, Amm. 14, 10 ; so of name of town : 
postquam Romam adventabant, Sail. J. 28. 
adveiltor, oris, m. [advenio], one that 
arrives, a guest, visitor. I, In gen., Plaut. 
As. 2, 2, 92. — So in two inscriptions, Orell. 
2287, and Grut. 444, 8; cf Barth. Adv. 
p. 1487. — H, Esp., one that comes to a pot- 
house, visitor, customer, Plaut. True. 1, 2, 2 : 
adventores meos non incuses, id. ib.' 2 7." 
55, etc. ; so App. M. 10, p. 248. ; 

adventoiia, ae,/, see the foil. art. II. 
adventexittS, a , um, adj. [adventor], 
that pertains to an arrival or to a guest, cf 
adventicius: hospitium, in which strangers 
were received, Inscr. ap. Mur. 470, 9. — H. 
Subst: adventoria, ae, / (sc. cena). a 
banquet given on one's arrival, Mart. 12 
praef. 

adventUS, <~ lS {9 e n. adventi, Ter. Phorm. 
1, 3, 2; cf. Prise, p. 712 P.), m. [advenio], a 
coming, an approach, arrival (class., al.<=o 
mplur.). I. £^ Lit: Beluarum [haec] 
ferarum adventus ne taetret loca, Pac. ap. 
Non. 178, 8 (Trag. Rel. p. 114 Rib. ) : adven- 
tum Veneris fugiunt venti. Lucr. 1. 7- in 
adventu Titi, Vulg. 2 Cor. 7,' 6 : ad urbem, 
Cic. Mil. 19 : in urbes, id. Imp. Pomp. 5 : ut 
me levarat tuus adventus, sic discessus af- 
flixit, id. Att. 12, 50 : praestolabor adventum 
tuum, Vulg. Judic. 6, 18: adventibus se of- 
ferre, i. e. advenientibus obviam ire, Cic. 
Fam. 6, 20: lucis, Sail. J. 96: consulis Ro- 
mam, Liv. 22, 61 fin. — Sometimes of the 
approach of an enemy : nisi adventus ejus 
appropinquasset, Nep. Iph. 2 ; so Cic. Rep. 
2,3, 6; Vulg. 2 Mace. 14, 17.— B. Transf, 
the state of having arrived, an arrival, the 
being present by arriving (cf. advenio, B.): 
quorum adventu altera castra ad alteram 
oppidi partem ponit, Caes. B. C. 1, 18: ho- 
rum adventu tanta rerum commutatio est 
facta, id. B. G. 2, 27.— H. Fig.: adventus 
in animos et introitus imaginum, Cic. N. D. 
1, 38, 105 : malorum, id. Tusc. 3, 14 : exspec- 
tantes adventum gloriae Dei, Vulg. Tit. 2 
13: nuptiarum, Paul. Sent. 2, 21. ' 

* ad-VerbdrO, are, v. a. , to strike on a 
thing ; with ace. : adverberat unguibus ar- 
mos, Stat. Th. 9, 686. 

adverbialis. e, adj. [adverbium], per- 
taining to an adverb, adverbial: super et 
subter adverbiales sunt, i. e. are sometimes 
used as adverbs, Charis. II. p. 182 P.: nomi- 
na, derived from adverbs, Prise. IV p. G19 
P.: adjectivum, derived from an adverb, as 
externus from extra, id. II. p. 579. 

adverbiallter, adv. [id.], in gram., in 
the manner of an adverb, adverbially. Diom 
p. 403; Charis. 197; Prise. 1012 P. 

ad-verbium, ii, n. [verbum], in gram., 
an adverb, In-ippfi/ia; ace. to Priscian's 
expl. : pars orationis indeclinabilis, cujus 
signincatio verbis adicitur, p. 1003 P • 
Quint. 1, 5, 48; 50; 9, 3, 53; 11, 3, 87 al. ' 
(ad-vereor, £ri, a false reading in Att. 
ap. Non. 280, 5, instead of at vereor v Trag 
Rel. p. 145 Rib.) 

(ad-Verro, Sre, a false reading in Stat 
Th. 4, 712. instead of advolvensque. ) 
adversaria, orum, see the foil. art. I. 
adversarius, a, um, adj. [adversus]. 
I, Turned toward one or lying before one's 
eyes ; hence, adversaria, orum ( sc. 
scripta), in mercantile language, a book at 
hand in which all matters are entered tempo- 
rarily as they occur, a waste-book, day-book, 
journal, memoranda, etc. : Quid est quod 
neglegenter scribamus adversaria? quid est, 
quod diligenter conficiamus tabulas? Qua 
de causa? Quia haec sunt menstrua, illae 
sunt aeternae: haec delentur statim, illae 
servantur sancte, etc., Cic. Rose. Com. 2, 
5 and 7. 

II, Standing opposite or opposed to one, 
as an antagonist, in any kind of contest in 
which the contending parties may be the best 
friends, e. g. in elections, auctions, discus- 
sions, etc. (cf. Doed. Syn. 4, 395 ; in gen., 
only of persons, while contrarius is used 
of things, Front. Differ. 2198 P. ). A. A <tf- • 
tribunusseditiosis adversarius, Cic. Clu. 34, 



ADVE 

*94: vis juri adversaria, id. Caecin. 2: opinio 
oratori, id. de Or. 2, 37 : duces, id. Phil. 3, 
8: populus, adversarius, invidus etiam po- 
ientiae, in hostile opposition to those in 
power, Nep. Timotli. 3: factio, id. Phoc. 3: 
frater, Hor. Ep. 1, 18, 63 al. — B. SubsL : 
adversariuS, b w., an antagonist, op- 
ponent, adversary, an enemy, rival (the 
most usual class, signif. of the word) : va- 
lentiorem nactns advcrsariam, Plaut. Capt. 
prol. 64 : injuria adversarium, Ter. Hec 
prol. alt. 14 ; cf. id. Ad. prol. 2 : tribuni 
plcbis illias adversarii, defensores rnei, 
Cic Mil. 15 ; so id. Quint. 2; id. Vatin. 1; 
id Har. Repp. 16, 24; Nep. Dion. 7; Hor. S. 
1, ;), 75. — Of wrestlers and other athletae: 
pugiles etiam cum feriunt adversarium . . . 
ingemiscunt, Cic. Tusc. 2, 23. 56 ; also, in 
auctions, of opposing bidders : res major 
est quam facultates nostrae praesertim 
adversario et cupido et locuplete, Cic. Att. 
12, 43; cf id. lb. 13, 31.— In Cic. also in the 

f,>m.: adversaria, ae: est tiDi gravis 

adversaria constituta et parata, incredibilis 
quaedam exspectatio, id. Fain. 2,4. 2; and 
m the neutr. plur. : adversaria, tirurn, 
the arguments, assertions of the antagonist, 
Cic. Or. 35, 122. 

j(]cg=* The histt. more freq. than Cic. and 
Hor. use adversarius like hostisfor an ene- 
my in war : adversaries in fuga esse, Nep. 
Them. 4 : muititudo adversariorum, id. 
Dat 6: montem occupat, ne forte cedenti- 
bus adversariis receptui foret, Sail. J. 50; 
Suet. Caes. 30, 36, 68; id. Dom. 1; Curt. 3, 
11; Vulg. Deut. 20, 4; Aur.Vict. Vir. lllustr. 
75. 8; 69. 2; cf. advosem in Fest. p. 25 Mull. 

adversatio, onis,/ [adversor], an op- 
posing, opposition, Tert. adv. Gnost. 5; id. 
-de Pudic. 15. 

adVCrsatlVUS, a, um, adj. [id.], ad- 
versative; in gram. : conjunctiones adver- 
sativae, which have an adversative signif. 
as opp. to each other, as tamen, quam- 
quam. etsi. etiamsi. etc.. Prise. 1030 P. ; 
while quamqnam, etsi. etc.. \vc now desig- 
nate as concessive in relation to tamen. 

* adversator, oris, to. [id.], one who 
opposes a thing, an opponent : adversator 
nialis. App. de Deo Socrat. p. 44. 

adversatrix (archaic advor-), Icis , 
f. [adversator], a female antagonist or 
adversary (in Plaut. and Ter., and then 
.again in Tert.): nunc assentatrix, dudum 
advorsatrix, Plaut. Most. 1, 3, 100 ; Ter. 
Heaut. 5, 3, 4; Tert. de Anim. 31: quin tu 
in ea re mini fuens advorsatrix. 

adverSatUS, a ura : Part of adversor. 

adverse, adv., v. adverto. 1. ad versus 
B. fin. 

adversio, onis. / [adverto], a turning 
or directing one thing to or toward anoth- 
er: animi, Cic. Arch. 7, 16; Tert. adv. Marc. 

2, i3. : „ 

t adversipedes. ain-tn-oiSer, antipo- 
des, Gloss. Gr. Lat. 

adversitas, atis,/ [ad versus], opposi- 
tion, contrariety. J m I n gen.: magnam 
adversitatem scorpionibus et stellionibns 
putant esse, a great natural hostility, an- 
tipathy. Plin. 11, 25, 30, § 90. — H. Esp , 
misfortune, suffering, Cassiod. 

+ adversitor (archaic advor- 

oris. m. [adversus], one who goes to meet 
another ; a slave who went to meet his mas- 
ter, in order to conduct him home : " advor- 
sum ierant proprie locutus est, nam adver- 
si tores dicuntur." Don. ad Ter. Ad. 1, 1, 1; 
cf. also Plaut. Most. 4, 1, 23, and 2, 32. 
Among the dramatis personse of the Mos- 
tellaria of Plautus, phaniscvs advorsitor 
is found; but the word is nowhere used in 
the play itself. 

adverso (archaic advor-) -"ire, verb. 
freq. [adverto], toturnto a thing: animum 
advorsavi sedulo, ne, etc., Plaut. Rud. 2 
2, 1 

adversor (archaic advor- ntus, 1, 
v. dsp. [adversus]: alicui, to stand oppo- 
site to one, to be against, i.e. to resist or op- 
pose (in his opinions, feelings, intentions, 
etc ; while resist ere and obsistere denote 
resistance through external action, Doed. 
Syn 4. 3<i,i : cf. adversarius: class.: freq. in 
Cic); constr. with dat or abso'.: idem ego 
arbitror nee tibi advorsari certum est de 
istac re usquarn, soror, Plaut. Aul. 2, 1, 
4 



A I) V E 

21: meis praeceptis. id. As. 3, 1. 5; so id. 
Trin. 2, 1, 108: mini, Ter. Hec. 4.4. 32; 2, 

2, 3: liujus libidini, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 31, § 81: 
ornamentis tuis. id. Sull. 18, 50: Isocrati, 
id. Or. 51, 172 : 'commodis, Tac. A. 1, 27 : 
adverpantos imperio Domini, Vulg. Deut. 1, 
43: invita Minerva., id est, adversante et 
repugnante natura, Cic Off. 1, 31: non ad- 
versatur jus, quo minus, etc., id. Fin. 3, 
20: adversante vento. Tac. H. 3, 42: adver- 
sautibus amicis, id. Ann. 13, 12: adversans 
factio, Suet. Caes. 11: adversantibus diis, 
Curt. 6, 10: non adversata petenti Annul t, 
Verg. A. 4, 127 ; Vulg. 2 Thess. 2, 4 al. 

4®=* a. In Tac. constr. also adversari ali- 
quem, H. 1, 1; 1, 38.— b. In Plaut. pleon- 
astic, adversari contra. Cas. 2, 3, 35, and ad- 
versari adversus aliquid, Mer. 2, 3, 43. 

1. adversus (archaic advor-), a, 

urn, turned toward, opposite, in front of 
etc. , v. adverto, P. a. 1. 

2. adversus aud adversum (ar- 
chaic advor-); adv - and P*'zp-: adv., op- 
posite to, against; prep., toward, against, 
before, etc. ; v. adverto, P. a. 2. 

ad-verto (archaic advor-) ti, sum. 

3, v. a., to turn a thing to or toward a place 
(in this signif. without animus ; mostly 
poet. ; syn. : observare, animadvertere, vi- 
dere, cognoscere). J, Lit. A. I 11 gen., 
with in or dat.: ilia scbO hue advorterat in 
hanc nostram plateam. Ter. Eun. 2, 3,51: in 
quamcunque doinus lumina partem, Ov. M. 
(5, 180; cf id. ib.8,482: malis nuinen, Verg. 
A. 4, 611: hoc aures, hue, quaeso, advertite 
sensus, Sil. 16. 213; cf. id. 6, 105.— B. Es P-, 
a naut. t. t., to him, direct, steer a skip to a 
place : classem in portum, Liv. 37, 9 Drak. ; 
terrae proras, \*erg. A. 7, 35; id. G. 4, 117 
al. : Colchos puppim, Ov. H. 12,23. — Ab- 
sol.: profugi advert ore coloni, landed, Sil. 
1, 288 ; hence also transf. to other things : 
aequore cursuin, Verg. A. 7, 196 ; pedem n- 
pae, id. ib. 6, 386: urbi agmen, id. ib. 12. 
555: adverti with ace. poet, for verti ad: 
Scythicas adverti tnr oras, Ov. M. 5, 049 (cf. 
adducor litora remis, id. ib. 3, 598, and 
Rudd. II. p. 327). 

II. Fig. A. Animum (in the poets and 
Livy also animos, rarely mentem) adver- 
tere; absol, or with adv. or ad aliquid, or 
alicui rei, to direct the mind, thoughts, or 
attention to a thing, to advert to, give at- 
tention to, attend to, to heed, observe, re- 
mark : si voles advortere animum, Enn. 
ap. Var. L. L. 7, § 89 Mull. (Trag. v. 386 
Vahl.) : facete advortis animum tuum ad 
animum meum, Plaut. Mil. 1, 1, 39: nunc 
hue animum advortite ambo, id. ib. 3, 1, 
169 : advertunt amnios ad religionem, 
Lucr. 3, 54: monitis animos advertite no- 
stris, Ov. M. 15, 140 : animum etiam le- 
vissimis rebus adverterent, Tac. A. 13, 
49. — With ne, when the object of atten- 
tion is expressed: ut animum advertant, 
ne quos offendant. Cic. Off'. 2, 19, 68 : ad- 
verterent animos. ne quid novi tumultus 
oriretur, Liv. 4, 45. — B. Animum adverte- 
re, to observe a thing by directing the mind 
to it, to observe, to notice, to remark, to per- 
ceive (in the class, period contracted to ani- 
madvertere, q. v.). — Constr. with two ac- 
cusatives, animum advertere aliquid (where 
aliquid may be regarded as depending on 
the prep, in comp., Moby. J? 1118, or on ani- 
mum advertere, considered as one idea, to 
observe), with ace. and inf., or ret. clause 
(the first mode of construction, most fre- 
quent with the pronouns id, hoc, ilhid. etc., 
is for the most part ante-class., and ap- 
pears in Caes., Cic, and Kail, as an archa- 
ism) : et hoc animum advorte, Plaut. Ps. 1, 
3, 43 : hanc edictionem, id. ib. 1, 2, 10: haec 
animum te advertere par est, Lucr. 2. 125: 
animum adverti columellam e dumis emi- 
nentem, Cic. Tusc. 5, 23, 65; id Inv. 2, 51, 
153: Postquam id animum advertit, Caes. 
B. G. 1, 24; 4, 12 : quidam Ligus animum 
advortit inter saxa repentls cocleas. Sail. J. 
93, 2. In Vitruv. once with nine: ut etiam 
possumus hinc animum advertere, as we 
can hence perceive, Vitr. 10, 22, 262. — With 
the ace. and inf.: postquam tantopere id vos 
velle animum advorteram, Ter. Phorm. 5.8, 
16 : animum advertit magnas esse copiasho- 
stium instructas, Caes. P. G. 5, 18: cum ani- 
mum adverteret locum relictom esse. Auct. 
B. Alex. 31; ib. 46.— With the rel. clause: 
nunc quam rem vitio dent, quaeso, animum 



ADVE 

advortite, Ter. And. prol. 8: quid ille spe- 
rare possit, animum adverte, Dolab. ap. 
Cic. Fain. 9, 9 : quam multarum rerum ipse 
ignarus esset . . . animum advertit, Liv. 24. 
48. Sometimes advertere alone — animum 
advertere; so once in Cicero's letters : nam 
advertebatur Pompeii familiares assentiri 
Volcatio, Earn. 1, 1 (although here, as well as 
almost everywhere, the readings fluctuate 
between advertere and animadvertere; cf. 
Orell. ad h. 1. ; animadvertebatur, B. and 
K.). So Verg. in the imp. : qua ratione 
quod instat, Confieri possit, paucis, adverte, 
docebo, attend! Verg. A. 4, 115. — In the 
histt , esp. Tac. and Pliny, more frequently: 
donee advertit Tiberius, Tac. A. 4. 54: Ze- 
nobiam advertere pastores. id. ib. 12, 51 : 
advertere quosdam cultu externo m sedi- 
bus senatorum, id. ib. 13, 54: quotiens no- 
vum aliquid adverterat, id. ib. 15, : J t Q al. : 
hirudo quam sanguisugam appellari adver- 
to, Plin. 8,10, 10, § 29: ut multos adverto 
credidisse, id. 2, 67, 67, § 108. still more 
rarely, advertere animo: aninns advertite 
vestris, Verg. A. 2. 712: hanc scientiam ad 
nostros pervenisse ammo adverto, Plin. 25, 
2, 3, § 5; cf. Drak. ad Liv. 4, 27, 8.— (J. To 
draiv or turn something, esp. the attention of 
another, to or upon one's self('m the histt.): 
gemitus ac planctus militum aures oraque 
advertere, Tac. A. 1,41: octoaquilae impera- 
torem advertere, id. ib. 2. 17: recent la vete- 
raque odia advertit, drew them on himself, 
id. ib. 4, 21 al. — U, To call the attention of 
one to a definite act, i. e. to admonish of it, 
to urge to 'it (cf. II. A.): non docet admo- 
nitio, sed advertit, i. e. directs attention, 
Sen. Ep. 94: advertit ea res Vespasiani ani- 
mum, ut, etc., Tac. H. 3, 48. — J3. Adverte- 
re in aliquem, for the more usual animad- 
vertere in aliquem, to attend to one, i. e. to 
punish one (only in Tac): in P. Marcium 
consules more prisco advertere, Tac. A. 2, 
32: ut in reliquos Sejani liberos advertere- 
tur, id. ib. 5, 9 (cf. id. Germ. 7, 3: animad- 
vertere). — Hence, 1, adversus (archaic 
advor-), a , um, P. a., turned to or to- 
ward a thing, with the face or front to- 
tvard, standing over against, opposite, be- 
fore, in front of (opp. aversus). J\, m In 
gen.: solem adversum intueri, Cic. Somn. 
Scip. 5 : Iris . . . Mille trahens varios adverso 
sole colores, Verg. A. 4, 701; id. G. 1, 218: 
antipodes adversis vestigiis stant contra 
nostra vestigia, Cic. Ac. 2,39 : dentes adversi 
acuti (the sharp front teeth) morsu dividunt 
escas, Cic. N. D. 2, 54 : quod is collis. tantum 
adversus in latitudinem patebat, quantum 
etc., Caes. B. G. 2, 8 Herz. So. hostes ad- 
versi, who make front against one advancing 
or retreating, id. ib. 2, 24: L. Cotta legatus 
in adversum os funda vulneratur, in front, 
Caes. B. G. 5, 35; cf. Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 1; Liv. 
21, 7 fm. al.; hence, vulmis adversum, a 
wound in front (on the contr., vulnus aver- 
sum, a wound in the back), Cic. Har. Resp. 
19: adversis vulneribus. Aur.Vict. Vir. ll- 
lustr. 35, 4: judicibus cicatrices adversas 
ostendere.Cic. de Or. 2, 28: cicatrices popu- 
lus llomanus aspiceret adverso corpore 
exceptas, id. Verr. 5, 3: impetus hostium 
ad versos, Auct. B. Alex. 8 : Romam advorso 
colle evadnnt, ascend the hill in front. Sail. 
J. 52 : adversa signa, Liv. 30. 8 : legiones 
quas Visellius et C. Silius adversis itineri- 
bns objecerant, i. e. marches in which they 
went to meet the enemy. Tac. A. 3. 42 : sed 
adverso fulgure (by ajlash of lightning fall- 
ing directly before him) pavefactns est Nero, 
Suet. Xer. 48': armenta egit Hannibal in 
adversos montes. Quint. 2, 17, 19; cf. Lucr. 
3, 1013; so Hor. S. 1, 1, 103; % 3, 205: qui 
timet his adversa. the opposite of this, id. 
Ep 1, 6, 9 al.— Hence, of rivers: fiumine ad- 
verso. up the stream, against the dream: in 
adversum tinmen contendere, Lucr. 4, 423: 
adverso feruntur flumine. id. 6, 720; so 
Verg. G. 1, 201: adverso amne, Plin. 18, 6, 
7, § 33; adverso Tiber i suuvehi, Aur. Vict. 
Vir. lllustr. 22, 3 (opp. to secunda aquft, 
down stream, with the stream: rate in secun- 
dam aquam labcnte, Liv. 21, 47, 3); and of 
winds, opposed to a vessel's course, head 
winds, contrary winds, consequently un- 
favorable, adverse .- navigationes adversis 
ventis praecluduntur, Auet B Alex. 8: ad- 
versissimi navigantibus vent!, Caes. B. C. 
3, 107.— Subrt. : adversum, ^ i],e oppo- 
site : hie ventus a septentriohibus oriens 
adversum tenet Athenis proficiscentibus. 
49 



ADVE 

holds the opposite to those sailing from 
Athens, i. e. blows against them, Nep. Milt. 1 
(so Nipperdey ; but v. Hand, Turs. I. p. 183). 
— Adv. : ex adverso, also written exadverso 
and exadversum, opposite to, over against, 
€K tov Ivavriov : portus ex adverso urbi 
positus, Liv. 45, 10.— With gen.: Patrae ex 
adverso Aetoliae et fluminisEveni, Plin. 4, 
4, 5, § 11. — Without case: cum ex adverso 
starent classes, Just. 2, 14; so Suet. Caes. 
39 ; Tib. 33.— In adversum, to the opposite 
side, against: et duo in adversum immissi 
per moenia currus, against each other, Prop. 
3, 9, 23; so Gell. 2, 30; cf. Verg. A. 8, 237; 
in adversum Romani subiere, Liv. 1, 12; 
7, 23. — B. I n hostile opposition to, ad- 
verse to, unfavorable, unpropitious (opp, se- 
cundus ; frequent and class. ) : conqueri for- 
tuaam adversam, Pac. ap. Cic. Tusc. 2, 21, 
50 : hie dies pervorsus atquc advorsus mihi 
obtigit, Plaut. Men. 5, 5, 1: advorsus nemi- 
ni, Ter. And. 1, 1, 37: mentes improborum 
mihi infensae et adversae, Cic. Suii. 10: ac- 
clamatio, id. de Or. 2,83: adversa avi ali- 
quid facere, vet. poiit. ap. Cic. Div. 1, 16: 
adversis auspiciis, Aur. Vict. Vir. Illustr. 
64, 6 : adversum omen, Suet. Vit. 8 : adver- 
sissima auspicia, id. Oth. 8: adversae res, 
misfortune, calamity, adverse fortune : ut 
adversas res, sic secundas immoderate fer- 
re levitatis est, Cic. Off. 1, 26 ; cf. : adversi 
casus, Nep. Dat. 5 : adversae rerum undae, 
a sea of troubles, Hor. Ep. 1, 2, 22 : omnia 
secundissima nobis, adversissima illis acci- 
disse, Caes. ap. Cic. Att. 10, 9 (the sup. is 
found also in Caes. B. C. 3, 107): quae ma- 
gistrate ille dicet, secundis auribus, quae 
ab nostrum quo dicentur, adversis accipie- 
tis ? Liv. 6. 40 : adversus annus frugibus, id. 
4, 12: valetudo adversa, i. e. sickness, id. 
10, 32 : adversum proelium, an unsuccess- 
ful engagement, id. 7, 29; cf. 8, 31: adverso 
rumore esse, to be in bad repute, to have a 
bad reputation, Tac. Ann. 14, 11: adversa 
subsellia, on which the opposition sit, Quint. 
6, 1, 39.— Sometimes met. of feeling, con- 
trary to, hated, hateful, odious: quis omnia 
regna advorsa sint, Sail. J. 83; cf. Lac. 2, 
229 Bentl. — Comp.: neque est aliud adver- 
Sins, Plin. 32, 4, 14, § 35.—* Adv. : «£ ver _ 
Se, self contradictorily, Gell. 3, 16. — ^d- 
Versum, ', subst. , esp. in the plur. adver- 
sa, misfortune, calamity, disaster, adversi- 
ty, evil, mischief: advorsa ejus per te tecta 
sient, Ter. Hec. 3, 3, 28: nihil adversi, Cic 
Brut. 1, 4: si quid adversi accidisset Nep. 
Ale. 8; cf. Liv. 22, 40; 35, 13: secunda fe- 
lices, adversa magnos probant, Plin. Pan. 
31; esp. freq. in Tac. : prospera et adversa 
pop. Rom., Ann. 1,1: adversa tempestatum 
et fluctuum, id. Agr. 25; so id. A. 3, 24; 
45; 2, 69; 4, 13 al.— Subst : adverSUS, 
i, m., an opponent, adversary (rare): mul- 
tosque mortalis ea causa advorsos habeo, 
Sail. C. 52, 7. —In Quint, also once ad- 
versa, ae , /, subst, a female opponent or 
adversary : natura noverca fuerit, si facul- 
tatem dicendi sociam scelerum, adversam 
innocentiae, invenit, 12, 1, 2. — C. In rhet., 
opposed to another of the same genus, e. g 
sapientia and stultitia : ' ' Haec quae ex 
eodem genere contraria sunt, appellantur 
adversa," Cic. Top. 11. 

2. adversus or adversum (archaic 
advor-) (hke rursus and rursum, prorsus 
and prorsum, quorsus and quorsum), adv. 
andprep. , denoting direction to or toward an 
object (syn. : contra, in with ace., ad, erga). 
A. Adv. : opposite to, against to, or toward 
a thing, in a friendly or hostile sense: ibo 
ad vorsum, Plaut. As. 2, 2, 29: facito, ut ve- 
nias advorsum mihi, id. Men. 2, 3, 82: ob- 
secro te, matri ne quid tuae advorsus fuas, 
Liv. And. ap. Non. s. v. fuam, 111, 12 (Trag.' 
Rel. p. 3 Rib.}: quis hie est, qui advorsus 
it mihi ? Plaut. Men. 3, 2, 22 : adversus re- 
sistere, Nep. Pelop. 1, 3 : nemo adversus 
ibat, Liv. 37, 13, 8 al. In Plaut. and Ter. 
advorsum ire, or venire, to go to meet; also 
of a slave, to go to meet his master and bring 
him from a place (hence adversitor", q. v.): 
solus nunc eo advorsum hero ex plurimis 
servis, Plaut. Most. 4, 1, 23: ei advorsum 
venimus, id. ib. 4, 2, 32 ; Ter. Ad. 1, 1, 
2 Ruhnk.— B, Prep, with ace, toward of 
against, in a friendly or a hostile sense. 
1. In a friendly sense. ( a ) Of place, turned 
to or toward, opposite to, before, facing, over 
against: qui cotidie unguentatus adver- 
50 



ADVE 

sum speculum ornetur, before the mirror, 
Scipio ap. Gell. 7, 12: adversus advocatos, 
Liv. 45, 7, 5: medicus debet residere illu- 
stri loco adversus aegrum, opposite to the 
patient, Cels. 3, 6: adversus Scyllam ver- 
gens in Italiam, Plin. 3, 8, 14, § 87: Lerina, 
adversum Antipolim, id. 3, 5, 11, § 79.— (/3) 
In the presence of any one, before : egone ut 
te advorsam mentiar, mater mea? Piaut. 
Aul. 4, 7, 9: ldque gratum fuisse advorsum 
te habeo gratiam. / am thankful that this is 
acceptable before {to) thee, Ter. And. 1, 1, 15 : 
paululum adversus praesentem fortitudi- 
nem mollitus. somewhat softened at such 
firmness (of his wife), Tac. A. 15, 63.— Hence 
very often with verbs of speaking, answer- 
ing, complaining, etc., to declare or express 
one's self to any one, to excuse one's self or 
apologize, and the like : te oportet hoc pro- 
loqui advorsum illam mihi, Enn. ap. Non. 
232, 24 (Trag v. 385 Vahl.): immo si audi- 
as, quae dicta dixit me advorsum tibi, what 
he told me of you, Plaut. Bacch. 4, 4, 47: de 
vita ac morte domini fabulavere advorsum 
fratrem illius, Afrau. ap. Non. 232, 25: mu- 
lier, credo, advorsum ilium res suas con- 
queritur, Titin. ib. 232, 21 : utendum est ex- 
cusatione etiam adversus eos, quos invitus 
oflendas, Cic. Oft'. 2, 19, 68; Tac. A. 3, 71.— 
With that to which a reply is made, to (= 
ad) : adversus ea consul . . . respondit, Liv. 
4, 10, 12; 22, 40, 1; cf. Drak. ad 3, 57, 1.— 
(7) In comparison, as if one thing were 
held toward, set against, or before anoth- 
er (v. ad, I. D. 4.); against, in comparison 
with, compared to : repente lectus adversus 
veterem imperatorem comparabitur, will 
be compared with, Liv. 24, 8, 8: quid autem 
esse duo prospera bella Samnitium adver- 
sus tot decora populi Rom., id. 7, 32, 8.— 
{6) Of demeanor toward one, to, toward : 
quonam modo me gererem adversus Cae- 
sarem, Cic. Fam. 11, 27, 11 : te adversus me 
omnia audere gratum est, i. e. on my ac- 
count, on my behalf, for my advantage, id. 
ib. 9, 22, 15 : lentae adversum imperia au- 
res, Tac. A. 1. 65. — Esp. often of friendly 
feeling, love, esteem, respect toward or for 
one (cf. Ruhnk. ad Ter. And. 4, 1, 15 ; Manut. 
ad Cic. Fam. 9, 22; Reusing, ad Cic. Off. 1, 
11, 1; Hab. Syn. 49): est enim pietasjusti- 
tia adversus deos, Cic. N. D. 1, 41, 116; id. 
Off. 3, 6, 28: adhibenda est igitur quaedam 
reverentia adversus homines, id. ib. 1, 28, 
99 Beier : sunt quaedam officia adversus 
eos servanda, a quibus injuriam accepe- 
ris, id. ib. 1, 11, 33 : adversus merita in- 
gratissimus, Veil. 2, 69, 5 : summa adver- 
sus alios aequitas erat, Liv. 3, 33, 8: ob 
egregiam fidem adversus Romanos, id. 29, 
8, 2 ; so id. 45, 8, 4 al. : beneficentia adver- 
sus supplices utendum, Tac. A. 11, 17.— 
More rarely ( t ) of the general relation of an 
object or act to a person or thing (v. ad. I. 
D. 1.), in relation, in respect, or in regard to 
a thing: epistula, ut adversus magistrum 
morum, modestior, as addressed to a censor 
of manners, Cic. Fam. 3, 13, 8: quasi adver- 
sus eos acquieverit sententiae, in regard to 
the same, Dig. 49, 1; 3, 1-— 2. In a hostile 
sense, against (the most usual class, signif. 
of this word): "Contra et adversus ita dif- 
ferunt, quod contra, ad locum, ut: contra 
basilicam; adversus, ad animi motum, ut: 
adversus ilium facio ; interdum autem 
promiscue accipitur," Charis. p. 207 P. ; cf. 
Cort. ad Sail. J. 101, 8: advorsum legem 
accepisti a plurimis pecuniam, Plaut. True. 
4, 2, 48: advorsum te fabulare illud. against 
thy interest, to thy disadvantage, id. Stich. 
4, 2, 11: stultus est advorsus aetatem et 
capitis canitudinem, id. ap. Fest. s. v. cani- 
tudinem, p. 47: advorsum animi tui iibidi- 
nem, Ter. Hec. 4, 1, 19: adversum leges, ad- 
versum rem publicam, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 84, 
§ 195 : respondebat, sr paret, adversum 
edictum fecisse, id. ib. 2, 3, 28, § 69: me 
adversus populum Romanum possem rle- 
fendere, id. Phil. 1, 13 al.— In the histt., of 
a hostile attack, approach, etc.: gladiis dis- 
trictis impetum adversus montem in co- 
hortes faciunt, Caes. B. C. 1, 46 : adversus 
se non esse missos exercitus, Liv. 3, 66: 
bellum adversum Xerxem moret, Aur. Vict. 
Caes. 24, 3 : copiis quibus usi adversus Ro- 
manum bellum. Liv. 8, 2, 5 : adversus vim 
atque injuriam pugnantes, id. 26, 25, 10 
al. : T. Quintius adversus Gallos missus 
est, Eutr. 2. 2: Athenienses adversus tan- 
tam tempestatem belli duos duces deligunt, 



AD VO 

Just. 3, 6, 12 al.— Among physicians, of pre*- 
ventives against sickness, against (v. ad, I. 
A. 2.): adversus profusionem in his auxili 
urn est, Cels, 5, 26 ; 6, 27 al. : frigidus jam 
artus et cluso corpore adversum vim ve- 
neni, Tac. A. 15, 64.— Trop.: egregium ad- 
versus tempestatesreceptaculum, Plin. Ep. 
2, 17, 4 ; so id. ib. 2, 15, 36. — Hence : flrmus, 
invictus, fortis adversus aliquid (like con- 
tra), protected against a thing, firm, fixed, 
secure : advorsum divitias animum invic- 
tum gerebat, Sail. J. 43, 5 : invictus adver- 
sum gratiam animus, Tac. A. 15, 21 : adver- 
sus convicia malosque rum ores flrmus ao 
patiens, Suet. Tib. 28: Adversus omnes for- 
tis feras canis, Phaedr. 5, 10, 1 ; and in opp. 
sense: infirmus, inferior adversus aiiquid, 
powerless against, unequal to : fama, infir- 
missimum adversus vivos fortes telum, 
Curt. 4, 14: infirmus adversum pecuniam, 
Aur. Vict. Caes. 9, 6 : inferior adversus la- 
borem, id. Epit. 40, 20. 

4®=- a. Adversus is rarely put after the 
word which it governs: egone ut te advor- 
sum mentiar, Plaut. Aul. 4, 7, 9: nunc ad- 
versus, Nep. Con. 2, 2; id. Tim. 4, 3: quos 
advorsum ierat, Sail. J. 101,8.— b. It some- 
times suffers tmesis: Labiemnn'ad Ocea- 
num versus proficisci jubet, Caes. B. G. 6, 
33: animadvortit fugam adsevorsuin fieri, 
Sail. J. 58 : animum advortere ad se vorsum, 
exercitum pergere, id..ib. 69: ad Cordubam 
versus iter facere coepit, Auct. B. Hisp. 10 
and 11; cf. inversus: in Galliam vorsus 
castra movere, Sail. C. 56 ; Sulp. ap. Cic. 
Fam. 4, 12; Traj. ap. Plin. Ep. 10, 78; the 
Eng. to-ward : to us ward, Psa. 40, 5 ; and 
the Gr. els-de: eU aAa<5e, Hom. Od.10, 351. 

ad- Vesper aSCit, a vit, 3, v. impers. 
and inch. , it approaches evening, it is getting 
to be evening, twilight is coming on : adve- 
sperascit, Ter. And. 3, 4, 2; Vulg. Luc. 24, 
29: cum jam advesperasceret, Cic. Verr. 2, 
4, 65, etc.; id. Fin. 4, 28: nisi advesperAsset, 
Auct. B. Hisp. 24 : cum advesperavisset, 
Plin. 7, 52, 53, § 178: advesperascente die, 
Vulg. Prov. 7, 9. 

ad-Vlgilo, are, 1, v. n. , to watch by or at, 
to keep guard over, to be watchful, vigilant 
for ; constr. with ad or dat. , Rudd. II. p. 136. 
I. Lit.: ad custodiam ignis, Cic. Leg. 2, 12 : 
parvo nepoti, Tib. 2, 5, 93: vallo, Claud. 
Eutr. 2, 419.— II. Fig., to bestoiv care or 
attention upon a thing, to watch, to watch 
for. ( a ) Absol. : exqu'ire. heus tu!, advigila 
Plaut. Pers. 4, 4, 63 : tanto magis te advigi- 
lare aequomst, Ter. Phorm. 1, 4, 26 : si ad- 
vigilaveris, id. And. 4, 1, 19.— (/3) With pro .- 
si advigilamus pro rei dignitate, Q. Cic. Petr. 
Cons./m.— ( 7 ) With dat. : stupris, Claud. L. 
Stil. 2, 140: sibi, Manil. 1, 81. 

ad- VIVO, Sre, v. n. I, To live with one; 
joined with cum by pleonasm : comvgi 

DVLC1SSIMO CVM QVO ADVIXIT SINE QVERELA 

per anxos xx. , Inscr. Grut. 1145, 8 ; 1115, 8 
(Orell. 3094). — II. To live, with the access, 
idea of continuance, to live on, to continue 
living : dum adviveret, Vulg. Josh. 4, 14 ; 
donee advivet, Dig. 34, 3, 28: quamdiu ad- 
vixerit, ib. 3, 4, 4; 30. 

advocamentum, h n "> = advocatio: 

veniam advocamenti peto, Plin. Ep. 5, 8, 11, 
where the better read, is advocandi, Keil. 

advocatlO, onis. / [advoco], a calling 
to or summoning (in the class, per. only as 
t. t. in judicial lang.). I. Lit., abstr., legal 
assistance, judicial aid (v. advoco and ad- 
vocatus): tu in re militari multo es cau- 
tior quam in advocationibus. Cic. Fam. 7, 
10. — II. Transf. A. Concr., legal as- 
sistance, the ivhole body of assistants, counsel 
{= the bar) : haec advocatio, Cic. Sest. 56 ; 
so id. Quint. 14 ; id. Rose. Com. 5 ; id. Caecin. 
15; id. Sull. 29; id. Verr. 2, 1,49; id. Dora, 
21; Liv. 3, 47 al.— B. The time allowed for 
procuring legal assistance : ut binas advo- 
cationes postulent, Cic. Fam. 7, 11 Manut. ; 
Quint. Decl. 280.— Hence, C. Any kind of 
delay or adjournment (freq. in Seneca) : 
ratio advocationem sibi petit, ira festinat, 
Sen. de Ira, 1, 16; so id. Cons, ad Marc. 10; 
id. Q. N. 7, 10. — J>. Consolation, Tert. Pa- 
tient. 11 ; v. advoco, II. C. 

advocator, « r ' s ^ ™. [id.]: qui advo- 
cat, an advocate (eccl. Lat. ): Deus divituin 
aspernator, mendicorum advocator, Tert. 
contr. Marc, 4, 15. 

1. advdcatuS, a urn, Part of advoco. 



ADVO 

2. advocatus, h m - 5 a legal assistant, 
counsellor, etc., v, advoco/ra. 

ad-VOCO, avi, atum, 1, v. a., io call or 
summon one to a place, esp. for counsel, aid, 
etc. ; constr. absol. , with ad, ire, or daf . J, 
In gen. A. Lit.: ego Tiresiam advocabo 
et consulam quid faciendum censeat, Plaut. 
Am. 5, 1, 76: contionem, Cic. Verr. 2, 3. 80: 
aliquem ad obsignandum, id. Att. 12, 18; 
so Liv. 1, 39: viros primarios in consilium, 
Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 7, § 18 ; so Liv. 42, 33 : ego 
vos, quo pauca monerem, advocavi, Sail. C. 
60: eo (i. e. in aedem Concordiae) sena- 
tum advocat, id. ib. 47 : (Deus) advocabit 
caelum desursum, Vulg. Psa. 49, 4 : advo- 
cari gaudiis, to be invited, Hor. C. 4, 11, 13: 
aegro, Ov. R. Am. 110: causis, Quint. 11, 1, 
38. — B. Trop. : animum ad se ipsum ad- 
vocamus, we turn the mind upon itself, call 
the thoughts home, Cic. Tusc. 1, 31 : non de- 
siderat fortitudo advocatam iracundiam, 
id. ib. 4, 23; so id. Ac. 2, 27; id. Tusc. 5, 38. 

— II. Esp. A. In judicial lang., t, t., to 
avail one's self of some one in a cause, as 
aid. assistant, witness, counsellor, etc., to 
call in : aliquem alicui, Plaut. Cas. 3, 3, 6; 
so id. Bacch. 2, 3, 28; id. Ps. 4,7, 59: aliquot 
mihi Amicos advocabo, Ter. Phorm. 2, 1, 
83: viros bonos complures advocat, Cic. 
Quint. 21 : in his, quos tibi advocasti, id. ib. 
2 al. — Also used of the friend of the plain- 
tiff or defendant, who calls in his friends to 
aid in the suit; Oppianicus in judicio Sca- 
mandri aderat, frequens advocabat, Cic. 
Clu. 19. — Hence, transf. to other things, to 
call to one's aid, to call to for help, to sum- 
mon : desuper Alcides telis premit omnia- 
que arma Advocat, Verg. A. 8, 249 : secretas 
artes, Ov, M, 7, 138: ad conamina noctem, 
Sil. 9, 82; Sen. Troad. 613: aliquid in tute- 
lam securitatis suae, Veil. 2, 108: vires 
suas, Sen. Ben. 6, 2. — B. To get a respite, 
to delay, Plin. Ep, 5, 8 ; v. advocatio, II. C. 

— C. To give consolation, to console (in 
imitation of the Gr. vapaKaXeiv), Tert. adv. 
Marc. 14. 

jg®= In the phrase advocapit conctos, 
in the song of the Fratres Arvales, Mrotef. 
(Gr. II. 290) explains advocapit as an old 
imperat,, instead of advocabite. 

Hence, advocatus. ii w~ A. I n the 
class, per., in judicial lang., one who is 
called by one of the parties in a suit to 
aid as a witness or counsel, a legal assist- 
ant, counsellor (diff. from patronus or ora- 
tor, who spoke for a client engaged in a 
suit; from cognitor, who appeared in the 
name of such parties as had themselves 
been at first in court; and from procurator, 
who appeared for such as were absent. As- 
con, ad Cic. Div. in Caecil. 4; Ruhnk. ad 
Ter. Eun. % 3. 48; Heind. ad Hor.S. 2, 5, 38; 
v. Smith's Diet. Antiq.): quaeso, ut advo- 
catus mihi adsis neve abeas, Plaut. Am. 4, 
3, 3; so id. Men. 5, 2, 47; id. Mil. 5, 26; id. 
Poen. 3, 1, 23; 6, 11; id. Trin. 5, 2, 37 al. : 
adversusne ilium causam dicerem, cui ve- 
neram advocatus ? Ter. Ad. 4, 5, 43 ; so id. 
Eun. 2, 3, 49 ; 4, 6, 26 ; id. Ad. 4, 5, 11 : quis 
eum umquam non modo in patroni, sed in 
laudatoris aut advocati loco viderat, Cic. 
Clu. 40; id. Phil. 1,7: venire advocatum 
alicui in rem praesentem, id. Off. 1, 10, etc.; 
Liv. 42, 33, 1. — B. In the post- Aug. per., 
for patronus, orator, etc., who conducted a 
process for any one, an advocate, attorney, 
etc., Quint. 12, 1, 13; cf. id. 12, 1, 25; 5, 6 
Jin.; 9, 3, 22; Plin. Ep. 7 5 22; Tac. A. 11, 
5, 6; Suet. Claud. 15 and 33. — C. Esp., in 
eccl. Lat., of Christ as our intercessor, advo- 
cate : advocatum habemus apud Patrem, 
Jesum Christum, Vulg. 1 Joan, 2, 1. — D. 
Transf, in gen., an assistant, helper, 
friend : se in fugam conferunt una amici 
advocatique ejus, Cic. Caecin, 8, 22. 

* advdlatus, fiS, m. [advolo], a flying 
to : tristi advolatu, Poet. ap. Cic. Tusc. 2, 
10, 24. as a transl. from the Gr. of Aeschyl. 
Prometh. Solut. 

advolitans, antis, Part, [ad-volito], 
flying often to, flattering about : papilio lu- 
minibus advolitans, * Plin. 11, 19, 21, § 65: 
advolitans noctua, * Prud. adv. Symm. 2. 

ad-vdlo, avi, fitum, 1, v. n., to fly to or 
toward ; constr. with ad, in, dat, or ace, 
Rudd. II. p. 136. I. Lit., of birds: avis 
advolans ad eas avis, Cic. N. D. 2, 49 : in 
agrum Volaterranum palumbium vis e mari 
advolat, Plin. 10, 29, 41, § 78 al. : papilio lu- 



AE AC 

minibus lucernarum advolans, id. 28, 10, 
45, § 162.— II. Metapb., of other things, to 
fly to, run to, come to (class.): vox mihi 
advolavit ad auris, Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 69 ; so 
id. Rud. 2, 3, 3 ; id. Merc. 5, 2, 23 ; imago ad 
nos, * Lucr. 4, 316 : ad urbem, Cic. Sest. 4 
fin, : in Formianum, id. Att. 2, 13: Larino 
Romam, id. Clu. 6: ejus (Britanniae) t'ldw- 
\ov mihi advolabit ad pectus, id. Earn. 15, 
16 : hostes ex omnibus partibus ad pabula- 
tores, Caes. B. G. 5, 17: classem advolatu- 
ram esse, id. B. C. 2, 43: inauxilium, Suet. 
Galb. 20 : fama advolat Aeneae, Verg. A. 10, 
511; Manil. ap. Prise. 760 P.— With ace: 
rostra Cato advolat, Cic. Att. 1, 14 med.; 
VaL Fl. 4, 300. 

ad-volvo, v *> vootum, 3, v. a., to roll 
to or toward. I. In gen.: robora focis, 
Verg. G. 3, 377; so id. A. 6, 182: advolvi 
(for advolvere se) ad ignem, Plin. 11, 37, 70, 
§ 185 : advolvit saxum magnum ad ostium 
Vulg. Matt. 27, 60; Marc. 15, 46.— H. Esp., 
of suppliants, to throw one's self at the feet 
of any one, to fall at. fall prostrate before : 
genibus ejus advolutus est, Veil. 2, 80: om- 
nium genibus se advolvens, Liv, 8, 37 fin. : 
advolvi genibus, id. 28, 34 : tuis advolvimur 
aris, Prop. 4, 16, 1. — With ace: genua pa- 
trum advolvuntur, Sail. Fragm. ap. Serv. 
ad Verg. A. 1, 311: cum Tiberii genua ad- 
volveretur, Tac. A. 1, 13 ; cf. id. ib. 6, 49 ; 15, 
71. — Trop. : magnusque advolvi tur astris 
clamor, rolls, i. e. rises or ascends, Stat. Th. 
5, 143. 

advorsum, advorsus, advorto, 
etc., v. adversum, adversus, etc. 

£advosem: " adversarium, hostem, 
dixere veteres," Fest. p. 25 Mull. 

t adynamon vinum = u<Wcn-or oi- 

t'or, weakened wine (half wine and half 
water): ex ipso vino quod vocant adyna- 
mon, Plin. 14, 16, 19, § 100. 

t adytum, h n - , — abvrov (not to be en- 
tered), the innermost part of a temple, the 
sanctuary, ivhich none but priests could en- 
ter, and from which oracles were delivered. 
I, Lit. : in occultis ac remotis templi, 
quae Graeci uSvtcz appellant, Caes. B. C. 3, 
105: aeternumque adytis effert penetrali- 
bus ignem, Verg. A. 2, 297: isque adytis 
haec tristia dicta reportat, id. ib. 2, 115; 6, 
98; Hor. C. 1, 16, 5.— In gen., a secret 
place, chamber; of the dead, a grave, tomb, 
in Verg. A. 5, 84, and Juv. 13, 205 : descrip- 
tionem cubiculorum in adytis, chambers 
in secret pljLces, i. e. inner chambers, Vulg. 
1 Par. 28, 11.— II. Fig.: ex adyto tam- 
quam cordis responsa dedere, the inmost re- 
cesses, * Lucr. 1, 737. 

jggp In Attius also masc. ady tus, us : ady- 
tus augura, in Non. 488, 4 (Trag. Rel. p. 217 
Rib. ). 

* adzelor. ari , v - dep., to be zealous 
against one, to be angry with^Xulg. 4 Esdr 
16, 49. 

ae, see tlie letter A. 

Aea ? ae i/) = Am (land). In the fable 
of the Argonauts, a peninsula in Colchis, 
round which the Phasis flowed, Val. Fl. 1, 
742, and 5, 426. 

AeaCldeiUS, a , um, adj., pertaining to 
the jEacidiE ( the posterity of JUacus ) : 
regna, i. e. ^Egina, Ov. M. 7, 472. 

AeaCldes. ae, =A\aKidn?,patr. m. (voc. 
Aeacida, Enn. ap. Cic. Div. 2, 56; Ov. H 3, 
87; Aeacido, id. ib. 8, 7; gen, plur. Aeaci- 
dum, Sil. 15, 392), a male descendant of 
2Eacus,an JEacide. I. In gen.: stolidum 
genus Aeacidarum, Enn. ap. Cic. Div. 2, 56; 
Ov. M. 8 3; Sil. 15, 292; Just. 12, 15.— H. 
Esp., his son Phocus, Ov. M. 7, 668.— His 
sons Telamon and Peleus, Ov. M. 8. 4. — His 
son Peleus alone, Ov. M. 12, 365. — His grand- 
son Achilles, Verg. A. 1, 99; Ov. M. 12, 82; 
96; 365. — His great-grandson Pyrrhus, son 
of Achilles, Verg. A. 3, 296.— iTts later de- 
scendants, Pyrrhus, king of Epirus, Enn. 
ap. Cic. Div. 2, 56 : Aeacidarum genus, Cic. 
Off. 1, 12; and Perseus, king of Macedon, 
conquered by JEmilius Paulus, Verg. A. 6, 
839; Sil. 1,627. 

AcaCldinus, a , um 3 a dj. , pertaining to 
the JEacid.e (Achilles): Aeacidinis minis 
animisque expletus, Plaut. As. 2, 3, 25. 

AeaClUS, a > um, adj., Macian: flos, 
the hyacinth (as springing from the blood 
of Ajax, grandson of JEaxius), Col. 10, 175. 

AeaCUSj i, nt., = aIuko? (Gr. ace. Aea- 



AEDE 

con, Ov. M. 9, 434), ace, to the fable, son of 
Jupiter byEuropa, king of Mgina, father of 
Peleus and Telamon, grandfather of Achilles 
and Ajax ; on account of his just govern- 
ment made judge in the lower regions, with 
Minos and Rhadamanthus : quam psene ju- 
dicantem vidimus Aeacum! Hor. C, 2, 13, 
22 ; cf. Ov. M. 3, 25. 

Acaea, ae , /•■> = Main, ace. to fable r 
the island in the Tyrrhene Sea where the 
Circe of Homer had her abode, and where, 
ace. to Plin. 3, 5, 9, § 58, the later Circeii 
was situated, now called Monte Circello, 
Ace. to Mela, 2, 7 med., it was the abode of 
Calypso. 

Aeaeus> a ? um ; adj., = Alalor. I, Be- 
longing to sEa, in Colchis, Colchian : Circe, 
since Circe is said to have been earlier in 
Colchis, Verg. A, 3, 386 ; Ov. M. 4, 205. — 
Hence, B. Transf, belonging to Circe: 
artes, magic arts, such as Circe practised, 
Ov. Am. 2, 15, 10 : carmina, magic words, 
charms, spells, id. ib. 1, 8, 5.— H. Aeaea pu- 
ella, Calypso, because she had her residence 
in Aeaea, Prop. 4, 11, 31. 

A eas, antis, m., a river of Epirus, Mela, 
2, 3, 13 ; Plin. 3, 23, 26, § 145 ; Ov. M. 1, 
580; Luc. 6,361. 

Aebura. ae ;/- a city of Hispania Tar- 
raconensis, now Cuerva, Liv. 40, 30, 3. 

AebutlUS, a, name of a Roman gens, 
Cic. Att. 16, 2, 5; id. Caecin. 1; id. Fl. 37, 
93 al. — Hence ; Aebutia lex, s0 called 
from its author, the tribune Aebutius; en- 
acted A.U.C. 520, Cic. Agr. 2, 8; Gell. 16, 
10,8. 

Aecae, arum, /, a city of Apulia, 
southeast of Luceria, now Troja, Liv. 24, 
20, 5.— Hence, AeCaiii ? orum, m., the in- 
habitants of Mcae, Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 105. 

Aeculanum or Aeclanum. i, "•, 

a city of the Hirpini in Samnium, now Le 
Grotte, Cic. Att. 7, 3, 1 ; id. ib. 16, 2, 4; Inscr T 
Orell. 5019. — Hence : Aeculani, orum, 
m., the inhabitants of ^Ec, Plin. 3, 11, 16, 
§ 105; Inscr. Grut. 444, 5; and: Aecula- 

nenses or Aeclanenses, ium, the 

same as Aeculani, Inscr. Orell. 838, 862; 
3108 al. 

aedepol, = edepol, v. Pollux. 

aedes and aedis ( tne form aedes is 
found in Liv. 2, 21, 7 ; 2, 8, 14; 2, 9, 43 al., 
and now and then in other writers, but 
aedis is more common, as in Cic. Verr. 
4, 55, § 121; id. Par. 4. 2, 31; Vitr. 4, 7, 1; 
Varr. 5, 32, 156 al. ; Liv. 1, 33, 9 al. ; Plin. 
36, 6, 8, § 50), is,/, a building for habita- 
tion. [Aedis domicilium in edito positum 
simplex atque unius aditus. Sive ideo 
aedis dicitur, quod in ea aevum degatur, 
quod Graece cuaW vocatur, Fest. p. 13 Miill. 
Curtius refers this word to cw'0a>, aostus, 
as meaning originally, fire-place, hearth; 
others, with probability, compare e3o?, 
Zbpa, and sedes. ] I. Sing., a dwelling 
of the gods, a sanctuary, a temple (prop., 
a simple edifice, without division into 
smaller apartments, while templum is a 
large and splendid structure, consecrated 
by the augurs, and belonging to one or 
more deities; cf. Manut. ad Cic. Fam. 4, 7; 
but after the Aug. period aedes was used 
for templum ; cf. Suet. Caes. 78 with id. ib. 
84): haec aedis, Varr. ap. Non. 494, 7: sena- 
tum in aedem Jovis Statqris vocavi, Cic, 
Cat. 2, 6 : aedis Martis, Nep. Fragm. ap. 
Prise, p. 792 P. : aedes Mercurii dedicata 
est. Liv. 2, 21 : hie aedem ex marmore 
molitus est, Veil. 1, 11, 5: inter altare et 
aedem, Vulg. Luc. 11, 51; aedem Concor- 
diae, Plin. 33, 1, 6, § 19: aedes Veneris geni- 
tricis, Suet. Caes. 78; v. above; id. ib. 10: 
aedem Baal, Vulg. 4 Reg. 10, 27 ; ib. Act. 19, 
24 al. : haec ego ludo, quae nee in aede so- 
nent, i. e. in the temple of the Muses, or of 
the Palatine Apollo, where poems were pub- 
licly recited, Hor. S. 1, 10, 38 ; cf. : quanto 
molimine circumspectemus vacuam Eoma- 
nis vatibus aedem, id. Ep. 2, 2, 94. — Plur. in 
this sense generally in connection with sa- 
crae, divinae, deorum, and only when sever- 
al temples are spoken of: aedes sacrae,Cie. 
Dom. 49 ; cf. Suet. Aug. 30, 100 : Capitolii 
fastigium et ceterarum aedinm, Cic. de Or. 
3,46; cf. Liv. 38, 41: Deorum aedes. Suet. 
Cat. 21; cf. id. Ner. 38; id. Claud. 21 al.— 
II A dwellina for men. a house, habitation. 



AEDI 

abode (syn. domus; usu. only in the plur., 
as a collection of several apartments ; but 
in the earliest period the sing, also may 
have had this signif., though hut few cer- 
tain examples of it have been preserved in 
the written language ; cf. Plaut. As. 1, 3, 67 : 
hie noster quaestus aucupii simillimust 
. . . aedis nobis areast, auceps sum ego): 
aedes probae et nulchre aedificatae. Plant- 
Merc. 5, 2, 60 ; id. Most. 1, 2, 18: ultimae, 
Ter. Heaut. 5, 1, 29: apud istum in aedibus, 
Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 19, § 50, and soon after: in 
mediis aedibus; cf. Verg. A. 2, 512: liberae, 
a house that is rent-free, Liv. 30, 17 : priva- 
tae, Suet. Ner. 44 al.— Hence sometimes 
used for a part of the domus, a room, an 
apartment, chamber : insectatur omnes 
domi per aedls, Plaut. Cas. 3, 5, 31; Yer^ 
G. 2, 462; cf id. A. 2, 487 (v. also Gell. 4, 14; 
Curt. 8, 6; Hor. C. 1, 30, 4).— In Plaut,, by 
comic license, aedes for familia: credo her- 
cle has sustollat aedis totas atque hunc in 
crucem. Mil. 2, 3, 39: ut ego suffringam his 
talos totis aedibus, to break the legs of this 
whole house (i. e. family), True. 2, 8, 7: ab 
aedibus, denoting office (cf. ab), a castellan : 
cvm ah aedikvs essem, Inscr. Grut. 697, 1.— 

* B. Met., the cells (or hive) of bees : clau- 
sis cunctantur in aedibus, Verg. G. 4, 258. — 

* C. T r o p. : fac, sis, vacivas aedis auri- 
um, mea ut migrare dicta possint, the 
chambers of your ears, Plaut. Ps. 1, 5, 54.— 

* D. Aedes aurata, a gilded funeral struc- 
ture, on which the dead, body of Ccesar was 
laid, a catafalque. Suet. Caes. 84. 

aedlCUla, ae, / dim. [aedes], a small 
building intended for a dwelling. J m For 
gods, a chapel, a small temple : cum "aram 
et aediculam et pulvinar dedicasset, Cic. 
Dom. 53: Victoriae, Liv. 35, 9; 35, 41: aedi- 
culam in ea (domo) deo separavit, Vulg. 
Judic. 17, 5; also a niche or shrine for the 
image of a god : in aedicula erant Lares ar- 
gentei positi, Petr Sat. 29 fin. : aediculam 
aerearn fecit, Plin. 33, 1, 6, § 19; 36, 13, 19, 
§ 87.— Hence on tombstones, the recess in 
which the urn was placed, Inscr. Fabrett. 
c. 1, 68.— II. For men, a small house or 
habitation (mostly in plur.; cf. aedes II) 
Ter. Phorm. 4, 3, 58; Cic. Par. 6, 3; Vulg.' 
4 Reg. 23, 7. —Sing, in Plaut., a smalt room, 
a closet: in aediculam seorsum concludi 
volo, Epid. 3, 3, 19 sq. 

aedifaCIO, ere, 3, v. a., = aedifico: La- 
beo, Dig. 19, 260 Torrentinus, where others 
read aedificare. 

* aedifex. ficis, m., =z aediflcator, 
Tert. Idol. 12. 

aedificatlO, onis, / [aedifico]. I, 
A b s t r. , the act of building, a buildina or" 
constructing. ( a ) Absol. : si ad horum hix- 
uriam dirigas aedificationem, Varr. R. R. 
1,13: immensa et intolerabilis, Cic Pis 21* 
so id. Q. Fr. 2, 2; Vulg. 2 Para. 16, 6.— (8) 
With gen. : urbium, Vulg. Judith, 5, 10.— 
II. Concr., a building, a structure, edi- 
fice, Cato ap. Gell. 13, 23 : domum tuam et 
aedificationem omnem perspexi, Cic. Fam. 
5, 6: aediilcationes templi, Vulg. Matt. 24, 
!■ — III. Fig-, building up, instructing] 
edification. ( a ) Absol.: loquitur ad aedifi- 
cationem, Vulg. 1 Cor. 14, 3; 14, 26.— (8) 
With gen.: ad aedificationem Ecclesiae 
Vulg. 1 Cor. U L 12 ; ib. Eph. 4, 12. 

* aedif icatiuncula, ae, / dim, [ae- 

dificatio], a little building .- ecquid de ilia 
aedifieatiuncula rnandavisses, Cic. Q Fr 3 
1, 2, § 5. ><«■.. 

aedlficator, oris, m. [aedifico]. i s 
A builder : vocaberis aediflcator saepium* 
Vulg. Isa. 58, 12 ; in the class, period only 
trop. , — dri,i±iovpy6? : mundi, the maker, ar- 
chitect, Cic. Univ. 2 : aedificatores mundi, id. 
N. D. 1, 9.— II. From the Aug. period adj. 
(cf. Br. Nep. Ages. 4, 2) with the access, 
idea of inclination or passion, that is fond 
of building: nemo illo minus fuit emax 
minus aediflcator, Nep. Att. 13 ; Juv 14 ? 
86; Col L 4, 8; Flor. 1,8,4. ' 

aedif icatorius, a. urn, adj. [\A.],per- 
taining to building. I, Lit.: aedificatoria 
eomnia, Tert. Anim. 47. —Hence, subst. : 
aedificatoria, ae, / , = architectura, 
Boeth. Aristot. Top. 3, 1, p. 680.— H Fig.- 
verbum aedificatorium mortis, i.'e. that 
was the cause of death, Tert. Cam. Christ 
17. 

* aedif icialis, e, adj. , pertaining to 

52 



AEDI 

! a building [aedes] : Priam us ad aram Jo vis 
acdificialis confugit (so called because he 
was worshipped in the building ; cf. Fest. 
s. v. Herceus, p. 101 Miill.), Diet. Cret. 5, 
12. 

aedif icium, i, n. [aedifico], a build- 
ing of any kind, an edifice, structure, even 
though not suitable for a dwelling (while 
aedes designates only a structure for habi- 
tation).— Hence : aedes aedificiaque, Liv. 
38,38; Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 9 fin. : exstruere aedi- 
ficium in aiieno, id. Mil. '21: omnibus vicis 
aedificiisque incensis, Caes. B. G. 3, 29 ; 
Nep. Att. 13, 2 ; Sail. J. 23 ; Liv. 5, 41 : aedi- 
ficiorum prolapsiones, Suet. Aug. 30; cf. id. 
Oth. 8 : regis, Vulg. 3 Reg. 9, 1 : paries aedi- 
ficii, ib. Ezech,41, 12.— In late Lat., =aedi- 
ficatio : aedificium domus Domini, Vulg. 
3 Reg. 9, 1 : murorum, ib. 1 Mace. 16, 23. 

aedifico, iivi, atum, 1, v. a. [aedes- 
facio]. lit. to erect a building, to build ; and 
in gen., to build, raise, erect, or establish 
any thing. I. Lit.: aedificare cum sit 
proprie aedem facere. ponitur tamen Kara- 
XpnartKu^ in omni genere constructionis. 
1 est. p. 13 Mull. ; hence in the first signif 
for the most part ( a ) Absol.: aedificare 
diu cogitare oportet, Cato, R. R. 3, 1 : ecce 
aedificat, Plaut. Mil. 2, 2', 56: ad quern 
(usum) accommodanda est-aedificandi de- 
scriptio, Cic. Off. 1, 39, 138; id. ib. 2. 23, 83: 
tnbus locis aedifico, reliqua reconcinno, id. 
Q. Fr. 2, 6: lautius, id Leg. 2, 1, 3: belle, id. 
Att. 9, 13 al. : accuratius ad frigora atque 
aestus vitandos, Caes. B. G. 6, 22 : dim it, 
aedificat, mutat quadrata rotundis, Hor. 
Ep, 1, 1, 100; so id. S. 2, 3, 308.— (8) With 
object: domum, Cic. Q. Fr. 2, 4; so Vulg. 
Exod. 1, 21: casas, Hor. S. 2, 3, 247. — H, 
In gen., to build, construct, etc. : navim" 
Plaut. Mer. prol. 87 : piscinas, Varr. R.' 
R. 3, 17, : navem, Uic. Verr. 2, 5, 18 : 
urbem, id. ib. 2, 4, 53 ; so Vulg. Exod. 1, 
11: oppida, ib. 2 Para. 26, 6: turrim. ib. 
Matt. 21, 3 : murum, ib. 2 Para. 33, 14: por- 
ticum, Cic. Dom. 43: hortos, id. Att. 9, 13: 
equum, Verg. A. 2, 16: mundum, Cic. Tusc. 
1, 25: tot adhuc compagibus altum aedifi- 
cat caput, i. e. makes it, by bands and hair 
ornaments, a high tower, Juv. 6, 501. HI. 
Fig., to build up, establish : rem publicam" 
Cic. Fam. 9, 2.— And (eccl.) in a religious 
sense, to build up, instruct, edify. ( a ) Ab- 
sol: caritas aedificat, Vulg. 1 Cor. 8, 1: non 
omnia aedificant, ib. ib. 16, 23. — (8) With 
object : semetipsnm, Vulg. 1 Cor. 14, 4: al- 
terutrum, ib. 1 Tliess. 5, 11. 

$ aedllatUS, i»s, m., = aedilitas [ae- 
dilis], Fest. p. 13 Miill. 

acdlllClUS (riot aedllit-), a um, adj. 
[id.], pertaining or belonging to an cedile : 
munus, Cic. Oil". 2, 16: repulsa, i. e. in aedi- 
litate petenda, id. Plane. 21: scriba, of an 
aidiie, id. Clu. 45 : largitio, Liv. 25, 2 ; cf. 
Cic. Off. 2, 16 : veetigal aediliciorum,' sc. 
munerum, paid to the cediles to defray the 
expense of public exhibitions, id. Q. Fr. 1, 1 
9 - — aedlllClUS, i, m. (sc. vir), one who 
had been an o?dile {as consularis, who had 
been consul), an excedile, Varr. R. R. 1, 7 
10: aedihcius est mortuus, Cic. Brut, 28'; 
so id. Vatin. 7; edictum, an ordinance of 
the cedile on entering upon his office (v. 
edictum), Dig. 21, 1 : aediiiciae edictiones 
Plaut. Capt. 4 2, 43. ' 

aedllis, is, m. (abl aedili, Tac. A. 12, 
64; Serv. ad Verg. A. 7, 4; Dig. 18, 6, 13; 
but aedile is more usual. Charis. p. 96 P. • 
Varr. 1, 22; Cic. Sest. 44, 95: Liv. 3, 31- 
Plin. 7, 48, 49, § 158; Inscr. Orell. 3787, 8 : 
cf. Schneid. Gr. II. p. 221; Koffm. s. v.) 
[aedes]. an ozdile, a magistrate in Rome 
who had the superintendence of public 
buildings and works, such as temples, the- 
atres, baths, aqueducts, sewers, Jughiuays, 
etc.; also of private buildings, of markets, 
provisions, taverns, of weights and meas- 
ures (to see that they were legal), of the 
expense of funerals, and other similar func- 
tions of police. The class, passages apply- 
ing here are: Plaut. Rud. 2, 3, 42; Varr L 
L. 5, § 81 Mull. ; Cic. Leg. 3, 3 ; id. Verr 2 
5, 14 ; id. Phil. 9, 7 ; Liv. 10, 23 ; Tac. A. 2, 



AEDU 



85 ; Juv. 3, 162 ; 10, 101 ; Fest. s. h. v. p. 12 ■ 
cf. Manut. ad Cic. Fam. 8, 3 and 6.— Fur- 
ther, the aediles, esp. the curule auiiles 
(two in number), were expected to exhibit 
public spectacles; and they often lavished 
the most exorbitant expenses upon them, 



in order to prepare their way toward higher 
offices, Cic. Off. 2, 16; Liv. 24, 33 ; 27, 6. 
They inspected the plays before exhibition 
in the theatres, and rewarded or punished 
the actors according to their deserts, Plaut. 
Trin. 4, 2, 148 ; id. Cist. ep. 3 ; for tins pur- 
pose they were required by oath to de- 
cide impartially, Plaut. Am. prol. 72.— It 
was the special duty of the aediles plebeii 
(of whom also there were two) to preserve 
the decrees of the Senate and people in the 
temple of Ceres, and in a later age in the 
public treasury, Liv. 3, 55. The office of 
the aediles curules (so called from the sella 
curulis, the seat on which they sat for 
judgment (v. curulis), while the aediles ple- 
beii sat only on benches, subsellia) was cre- 
ated A.U.C. 387, for the purpose ofholding 
public exhibitions, Liv. 6, 42, first from the 
patricians, but as early as the following 
year from the plebeians also, Liv. 7, 1.— 
Julius Csesar created also the office of the 
two aediles Cereales, who had the superin- 
tendence of the public granaries and other 
provisions. Suet. Caes. 41.— The free towns 
also had aediles. who were often their only 
magistrates, Cic. Fam. 13, 11; Juv. 3, 179- 
10, 102; Pers. I, 130; v. further in Smith's 
Diet. Antiq. and Niebuhr's Rom. Hist 1 689 
and 690. 

jgQP Plant, uses the word once adject. ; 
aedilesjudi, ceditic sports, Poen. 5, 2, 52. 

aedilitas, iitis, / [aedilis], the office of 
an osdile, aidileship : aedilitatem gore re 
Plaut. Stich. 2, 2, 29: petere, Cic. Quint. 
25: aedilitate fungi, id. Off. 2, 16: inunus 
aedilitatis, id. Verr. 3, 12. 36: praetermissio 
aedilitatis, id. Off. 2, 17: curulis aedilitas 
id. liar. Resp. 13, 27: inire, Suet Caes. 9; 
id. Vesp. 2; id. Claud. 38 al—Ptur.: splen- 
dor aedilitatum, Cic. Off. 2, 16, 57. 

ae dill till S, a, um, v. aedilicius. 

aedis, v. aedes. 

* aeditimor or aeditumor [an ear 

lier form for aodituor], an, v. dep., to keep 
or take care of a temple : aeditumor'in tem- 
plo tuo, Pompon, ap. Gell. 12, 10. Nonius 
quotes the same passage, 75, 15, but reads 
aedituor. 

aedltimus (aeditu-) (an earlier form 
for aedituus, and first used in the time of 
Varro; v. the first quotation), 1, m., one who 
keeps or takes care of a temple, the keeper 
or overseer of a temple, le P o<f>u\aZ : in aedem 
Telluris veneram, rogatus ab aeditumo, ut 
dicere didicimus a patribus nostris, ut cor- 
ngimur a recentibus urbanis: ab aedituo 
Varr. R. R. 1, 2 : Aeditimus ... Pro eo a 
plerisque nunc aedituus dicitur, Gell 12 
10; Varr. R. R. 1, 69; id. L. L. 6, 2: limi- 
nium productionem esse verbi (Servius) 
volt, ut in finitumo, legitumo, aeditumo 
Cic. Top 8, 36. 

* aeditua, ae, / [aedituus], a female 
overseer of a temple, Inscr. Orell. 2444.— 
Trop : cum omnes templum simus Dei, 
ejus templi aeditua et antistes pudicitia 
est, Tert. Cult. Fern. 1. 

* aedltuallS, e, adj. [id.], pertaining 
to a temple-keeper, Tert. Pudic. 1(5. 

* aedltuens, entis, m., = aedituus, a 
keeper of a temple, Lucr. 6, 1275, referred 
to by Gell. 12, 10 fin. 

aedituus, i, m. [aedes-tueor; quasi a 
tuendis aedibus appellatus. Gell. 12, 10], a 
keeper of a temple, a sacristan, tepotp\>\ a £ 
(first used in polite language in the time of 
Varro for aeditumus; v. the word and the 
passage cited from Varr. ). I. Lit., Plaut. 
Cure. 1,3,48: aeditui custodesque mature 
sentiunt, etc., * Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 44 : suet. 
Dom. 1 al. It belonged also to the office 
of the aeditui to conduct strangers through 
the temple, and point out its curiosities- 
hence Horace says : quales aedituos habeat 
virtus, what panegyrists, Ep. 2, 1, 230.— II. 
I n g e n. , priests, ministers (eccl.): erunt 
in sanctuario meo aeditui, Vulg Ezech 44 
1; ib.Ose. 10, 5. ' 

t aedon (trisyl.), onis,/, =in3aV, the 
nightingale: tristis aC : don, Sen. Agam 670- 
so Petr. Sat. 131 ; Calp. Eel. 6, 8. ' 

aedonius, a, um, adj. (pentasyl ) [al- 
don], pertaining to the nightingale : vox, 
Auct. Pan. ad Pison. 257; Lact. Phoenic. 47. 

Aedui (Haed-), orum, m., a tribe in 
Gallia Celtica friendly to the Romans, now 
Departements de la G0ted'Or,de la Niivre 



AEGK 

tie Saone el Loire, et du Rhone, Caes. B. G. 
1, 10, 11, 23, etc. ; Cic. Att. 1, 19 ; Mel. 3, 2, 
4; Plin. 4, 18, 32, § 107 al.— Hence, Aedui- 
CUS (Haed-)' a > am, adj. , pertaining to 
the JEdui : stemma, Aus. Par. 4, 3. 

AcctacuS. a, Bm, adj., belonging to 
Metes, king of Colchis: fines, i. e. Colchis, 
Cat u 11. 64, 3 ; from 

Aeetes, Aeetas, or Aeeta, ae, m., 

= At^Tf??, fcing' of Colchis, ace. to the fable, 
sow o/jSoZ and Perm, daughter ofOceanus; 
father of Medea, by whose aid the Argo- 
nauts took from him the golden fleece, Cic. 
N. D. 3, 21; Ov. H. 12, 29, 51; Hyg. 3, 22 
and 23; Serv. ad Vcrg.G. 2. 140 and 141.— 
Hence, Aeetias, iadis, pair, f, daughter 
of Metes, l. e. Medea, Ov. M. 7, 9; 320.— 
Aectinc, es,/., the same as preced. (from 
Aeetes, as Xerine from Nereus), Ov. H. 6, 
103. — AeetlS, idos, pair, f, = Aeetias, 
daughter of Metes, Val. Fl. 8, 233; Albin. 2, 
110.— AeetlUS, a, am, adj., pertaining to 
Metes, = Aeetaeus, Val. Fl. 8, 379. 

Acg*ac, iirum, / plur. , = Aljai I. ^ 
ciYr/ o/ CiUeia, now ^lyas, Luc. 3, 227. — H, 
A small town on the western coast of Eu- 
bcea. now Limni, Stat. Th. 7, 371. 

Aegaeon, mils, m., = aI^cu'wv. I, ^4 
giant- monster* the other name of Briareus, 
Verg. A. 10, 565; Stat. Ach. 1, 209.— H. -4 
sea-god, ace. to the fable, the son of Pontus 
and Terra, Ov. M. 2, 9.— B. Melon, for the 
Mgean Sea, Stat. Th. 5, 288. 

AegraeilS, a , um, adj., Mgean; hence, 

Mare Aegaeum {\iiaiov u-tAeryor, to, 

or ttoi/to? A^ttio?, o, Xen. Oec. 20, 27), Me 
Mgean Sea. extending eastwards from the 
coast of Greece to Asia Minor, now called 
the Archipelago, and by the Turks the White 
Sea, to distinguish it from the Black Sea: 
insula Delos in Aegaeo mari posita, Cic. 
Imp. Pomp. 18.— In the poets also absol: 
Aeg'aeum, i, n -, f° r Aegaeum mare: in 
pateuti Aegaeo. Hor. C. 2. 16, 1 ; Pers. 5, 
142; cf. Burm. Prop. 3, 5. 51. [The etymol. 
was unknown even to the ancients. Ace. 
to some, from vEgeus. father of Theseus, 
who threw himself into this sea; ace. to 
Varr. L. L. 6, 2 fin., from alfes, goats, since 
the sea, from the many islands rising out 
of it, resembled a flock of goats; Strabo 
derives the name from JEgsase, a town in 
EubcBa.] — Hence, adj. : AegaeilS, a. um, 
pertaining to the Mgean Sea : gurges, Cic. 
Arat. 422: tumultus, Hor. C. 3, 29, 63: Xep- 
tunus. Verg. A. 3, 74: Cyclades, which lie 
in it. Ov. fr. 1. 11. 8: Venus, since she was 
said to have sprung from the iEgean Sea, 
Stat. Th. 8, 478. 

Aerates, um./, the Mgates, three isl- 
ands in the Mediterranean, west of Sicily, 
not far from the promontory of Lilybozum, 
where the Carthaginians were conquered by 
the Romans, 241 B.C., Nep. Ham. 1; Li v. 
21,10; Sil. 1, 60; 6, 684. 

aewer, gra, grum, adj. [Curtius pro- 
poses to connect it with en-et^m, to press, 
drive; a\*{i$, storm-wind; cuyer, waves; and 
Sanscr. egami, to tremble; trembling, shak 
ing, being a common symptom of illness], 
designates indisposition, as well of mind as 
of body (while aegrotus is generally used 
only of physical disease; class. ; m Cic. far 
more frequent than aegrotus; Celsus uses 
only aeger, never aegrotus). I. Lit., of 
the body, ill, sick, unwell, diseased, suffer- 
ing. (J) Of men : homines aegri m'orbo 
gravi, Cic. Cat. 1, 13: graviter aegrum fuis- 
se, id. Div. 1, 25; id. Tusc. 2, 25, 61: mfirma 
atque aegra valctudo, id. Brut. AS fin. ; aegro 
corpore esse, id. ad Quir. I fin. : ex vulnere, 
id. Rep 2, 21 : vulneribus, Nep. Milt. 7 : pe- 
dibus. Sail. C. 59, 4; so Liv. 42. 28; Tac. H. 
3, 38 : Wernsd. Poet. L. Min. 6, 197, 8 : stoma- 
ch us, Hor. S. 2, 2, 43 : anhebtus, shortness 
of breath, V erg. A. 5, 432. — At a later period 
constr. with gen. or ace. : Psyche aegra 
corporis, animi saucia, App. M. 4, 80, p. 310 
Oud. (cf. id. lb. 5, 102, p. 360 Oud. : Psyche 
corporis et anuni alioquin infirma ; and 
Liv. Andron. ap. Prise, p. 725 P. : inops, 
aegra samtatis. where, however, Bothe sus- 
pects aegra to be a gloss.): memini, me 
quondam pedes tunc graviter aegrum, Gell. 
19, 10. — Subst, a sick person, Cic. Div. 2, 3: 
ne aegri quidem omnes convalcscunt, id. 
N. D. 2, 4: aegro adhibere medicinam, id. 



AEGE 

de Or. 2,44, 186: vicinum funus acgros cxa- 1 
nimat, Hor. S. 1. 4, 126: ungebant oleo mul- 
tos aegros, Vulg. Marc. 6,16; lb. Act. 5, 16. 
— Hence, ab aegris servus, an attendant on 
the sick, a nurse (cf. ab) : d. m. sextorio 

AVG. LIB. AB AECxRIS CVBIOVLARIORVM, Inscr. 

Orell. 2886. — (fi) Of brutes : sues aegri, 
Verg. G. 3, 496; so Col. 6, 5, 1: avidos in- 
lidit in aegrum Cornipedem cursus, i. e. 
wounded, Stat. Th. 11, 517.— ( T ) Of plants, 
diseased : seges aegra. Verg. A. 3, 142 : aegra 
arbor, Pall. Febr. 25, 23: vitis, id. Mart. 7, 

4. — II. Fig. A. Of the mind, troubled, 
anxious, dejected, sad, sorrowful, etc., of any 
agitation of the passions or feelings, of love, 
hope, fear, anxiety, sorrow: aeger animus, 
Sail. J. 74 : aegris animis legati superve- 
niunt. Liv. 2, 3, 5 ; cf. Drak. ad h. 1.: scri- 
bendi cacoethes aegro in corde sene^cit, 
Juv. 7, 52: aegri mortales, i. e. miseri (bei- 
Aot fipoToi, bifvpot, ttoAvttovqi), Verg. A. 2. 
268; constr. with abl., gen., and ab. (a) 
With abl. : Medea animo aegra, amore sae- 
vo saucia, Enn. ap. Cic. Cael. 8 (the later 
edd. animo aegro, as B. and K.): animus 
aeger avaritia. Sail. J. 31 : amore, Liv. 30, 
11: curis, Verg. A. 1, 208 al. — (/j) Within. 
of respect (cf. Drak. ad Liv. 30, 15, 9; Rudd. 
II. p. 73; and Roby, II. S 1321): aeger con- 
silii, infirm in- purpose. Sail. Fragm. ap. 
Arusian, p. 212 Lind., and Stat. Th. 9, 141: 
animi, Liv. 1, 58; 2, 36; Curt. 4, 3, ll.—O/ 
cause : rerum temere motarum, Flor. 3, 17, 
9: morae, Luc. 7, 240: delicti, Sil. 13, 52: 
pericli, id. 15, 135: timons. id. 3, 72. — (?) 
With ab : A morbo valui. ab animo aeger 
fui, Plaut. Ep. 1, 2, 26. — B. Trop., of a 
diseased condition of the state, suffering, 
weak, feeble: maximc aegra ct prope dc- 
posita rei publicae pars, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 
2: qui et semper aegri aliquid esse in re 
publica volunt, Liv. 5, 3; Flor. 3, 23 al.— 
Of the eyes, evil, envious : reccntem alio- 
rum felicitatem aegris oculis introspicere. 
Tac. H. 2. 20 (Halm here reads acribus). 
— Of abstr. things, sad, sorrowful, griev- 
ous, unfortunate (class., but for the most 
part poet.): numquam quidquam meo ani- 
mo fuit aegrius, Plaut. Am. 3, 2, 29 (where 
aegrius may be the adv. ; v. aegre below) : 
dolores aegri. Lucr. 3, 905 : luctus, id. 3, 
933: amor, Verg. G. 4, 464: mors, id. ib. 3, 
512: spes, i. e. faint, slight hope, Sil. 9, 543: 
tides, wavering, id. 2, 392 al. — As subst. : 
aegrum, *, n - : Pl us aegri ex abitu viri 
quam ex adventu voluptatis cepi, more 

I pain, Plaut. Am. 2, 2, 11 : sed cui nihil ac- 
I cidit aegri, Lucr. 5, 171. — Adv. : aegre.— 
' Iji t. a. Object, (a) Uncomfortably : nescio 
j quid meo animost aegre, disturbs my mind, 
\ vexes, annoys me, Plaut. Merc. 2, 3, 35; so, 
1 aegre esse alicui, often in Plaut. and Ter. 
(like bene or male esse al icu i) ; Plaut. Bacch. 

5. 1. 26; id. Capt. 3, 5, 43; Ter. Hec. 2. 1, 63 
! al. ; cf. opp. volupe, volup: si illis aegrest, 
J mini quod volup est, Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 152. — 
| Absol. : aegre est, Ter. Ad. 1, 2, 57. — Also: 
j aegre facere alicui, to vex, hurt, Plaut. Cas. 
i 3,4,17; Ter. En n. 5, 5,31 ; and: aegre aud ire 
■ aliquid ex aliquo, any thing annoying, dis- 
j agreeable, id. Hec 5, 1, 39. — ( f i) With diffi- 
I culty or effort (opp. facile): omnis conglu- 

tinatio recens aegre. mveterata facile di- 
vellitur, Cic. deSeu. 20. 72; cf. : inveteratio, 
ut in corporibus. aegrius depellitur quam 
perturbatio, id. Tusc. 4, 37, 81; and; onme 
bellum sumi facile, ceterum aegerrime de- 
si nere, Sail. J. 83, 1 : nee magis versutue nee 
quo ab caveas aegrius. Plaut. As. 1, 1, 106: 
j aegre rastris terrain nmantur, Verg. G. 3, 
534 al. : non aegre persequi iter, Col. 9, 8, 
9 ; so, haud aegre. Curt. 4, 3, 10 ; 10, 8, 22. 
— More freq., (7) = vix, Gr. juo-ytr, hardly, 
scarcely: aegre nimis risum continui, Plaut. 
As. 3, 2, 36 : aegre me tenui, Cic. Att. 10, 11 : 
aegre fero, v. fero: aegre abstinere quin. 
etc., Liv. 2, 45 : aegre stantes, Tac. Agr. 30 
al. — Hence often vix aegreque in connec- 
tion. Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 27; Flor. 2, 10; Macr. 
Somn. Scip. 1, 7 ; id. S. 1, 7 ; App. M. 1, 
p. 111. — |> o Subject., with griff regret, 
displeasure, or dislike, unwillingly, reluc- 
tantly : discessit, aegre ferens, distempered, 
vexed (opp. laetus),Cic. Div. 1, 33^.: aegre 
pati, Liv. 1, 9 et saep. ; aegre tolerarc, Tac. 
Agr. 13 : si alibi plus perdideriin, minus 
aegre habeam, i. e. feram, Plaut. Bacch. 5, 
1, 16 : aegre carere. Cic. Imp. Pomp. 5, 13. 
— Cotnp.: quod aegrius patimur, Liv- 7, 13: 



A E G 1 

aegrius accipcrc, Tac. Ann. 4, 71. — Sup.: 
aegerrime ferre, Sail. J. 87 : aegerrime pati, 
Poet. ap. Cic. Tusc. 1, 44, 105. 

Aeg-eria, *• q- Egcria, q. v. 

1. Aegreus (dissyl.), 5i, m., = Al T ew, 
son of Pand'ton, king of Athens,* and father 
of Theseus, Hyg. Fab. 37, 41 ; Serv. ad Verg. 
A. 3, 74; Ov. M. 7, 402 sq. ; id. F. 2, 41 al. 

2. Aeg-eilS, a, um (trisyl.), adj.. i. q. 
Aegaeus. 

Aegiale, ^ /, daughter or grand- 
daughter of Adrastus, wife of Diomedes, 
king of Argos, Stat. S. 3, 5, 48; cf. Serv. ad 
Verg. A. 8, 9. 

AegialeilS (qnadrisyl), ei, m., = \i- 
■yiaXevs. I. Son of Metes, brother of Me- 
dea, commonly called Absyrtus ; he was 
cut to pieces by his sister in her llight, and 
scattered upon the sea-shore, Pac. ap. Cic. 
K. D. 3, 19. 48; Just. 43, 3.— II. Son of 
Adrastus, one of the Epigoni before Thebes, 
slain by Laodamas, Hyg. Fab. 71. 

AegldeS, ae , P air - ™-> — Aifel&r}?, a de- 
scendant of Mgeus. I. Theseus, Ov. H. 4, 
59; id. Tr. 5, 4, 26. — H. Descendants in 
gen. children, grandchildren ofMgeus, Ov. 
H. 2, 67. 

AegienseS, ium, v. Aegium. 

aegilopa, ae,/, v. aegilops. 

f aegllopilim. h n -^ = alfiXwTnov, a 
disease of the eyes, a lachrymal fistula, an 
ulcer in the inner corner of the eye, Plin. 
22,21, 26. § 54: from 

t aegilops, opis. and aegilopa, ae, 

/, = ai7iA(ov|/. I. ^1 disease oj the eyes, a 
lachrymal fistula, a tumor in the inner cor- 
ner of the eye (so called from ai'£, cuyor, goat, 
and on//, eye, since goats are most subject to 
this disease), Cels. 7, 7, 7; Plin. 35, 6, 14, 
§ 34, the form aegilopa, id. 21, 19, 77, § 132. 
— II, A kind of oak with edible acorns : 
Quercus aegilops, Linn., Plin. 16, 6, 8, § 22; 
16, 8, 13, § 33.— HI. A weed or tare among 
barley : Avena sterilis, Linn., or Aegilops 
ovata, Linn.. Plin. 25, 13, 93, § 146; 18, 17, 
44, § 155. — IV. A kind of bulbous plant, 
Plin. 19, 5, 30, § 95 (Sillig, aegilipa). 

AegimiirilS, i,/, = -\; 7£ uo P or, an isl- 
and situated over against CartJtage, now Zo- 
wamour or Zimbra, Plin. 5, 7. 7. § 42; Liv. 
30, 24, 9 ; Auct. B. Afr. 44 ; Flor. 2. 2, 30. 

Aegina. ae,/ , = a 171 va. I, An island 
in the Saronic gulf earlier called (Enone or 
CEnopia, now Eghina, Mel. 2, 7, 10; Plin. 
4, 12, 19, § 57; Cic. Off. 3, 11, 46 al. — Hence, 
Aeginensis, ©> a dJ-- of JEgina. — Subst. , 
a native or an inhabitant ofMgina, Val. 
Max. 9, 2, 8 ext. — Aegineta ? ae, m., i. q. 
the preceding, Cic. Off. 3, 11. — Aegiue- 
ticilS, a ? um 5 adj., pertaining to Mgina: 
aes, Plin. 34, 2, 3, § 8.— II. The mother of 
Macus, Ov. M. 7, 474. 

Aeginiensis, 1S ? m > an inhabitant of 
JEginium (see the foil. art. ), Liv. 44, 46, 3. 

Aeginlum, l h n - — &h< viov i a for- 
tress in Thessaly, now Stages, Caes. B. C. 
3, 79; Liv. 32, 15; 36, 13; 44, 46; 45, 27; 
Plin. 4, 10, 17, § 33. 

Aegipan. an is, or Gr. anos (dat. plur. 
Aegipanis, Mart. Cap. 6, p. 215), m., =Atyl- 
ttdv. I. Goat-Pan, i. c. goat-shaped Pan, 
a well-known sylvan deity with goafs feet 
and rough body, Hvg. Astr. 2, 28. — H. Ace. 
to Mel. 1, 4, 10; 1, 8, 10; and Plin. 5, 8, 8, 
§ 46, a kind of goat-shaped men in Africa, 
perh. the baboon. 

Aegira, ae i/> = Ai^e/pa- I, ^ town 

in Achaia, Mel. 2, 3, 10 ; Plin. 4, 5. 6, § 12. 
— II Another name of the island Lesbos, 
Plin.'s, 31, 39, § 139. 

aegris. idis, /., = al 7 (V, ido?. I. The 
mgis. A. The shield of Jupiter, Verg. A. 8, 
354; Sil. 12, 720.— B. The shield of Minerva, 
with Medusa^ s head, Verg. A. 8, 435: con- 
tra sonantem Palladis aegida, Hor. C. 3, 4, 
57; so Ov. M. 2, 753; 6, 78 al. — Hence. II, 
Transf. £i. A shield, defence. — So only 
Ovid of the jewelry by which maidens try 
to conceal their ugliness: decipit hac ocu- 
los aegide dives Amor, R. Am. 346. — B. In 
the larch -tree, the wood nearest the pith. 
Plin. 16, 39, 73, § 187- 

* aegl-SOHUS, a > am, adj. [aegis], sound- 
ing xoith the ccgis : pectus (of Pallas), Val 
Fl. 3, 88. 

53 



AEGR 

AegisthuS, i, »»-, = AiVcrtfo?, Me sow 
*)/ Thyestes, who murdered Atreus and Aga- 
memnon, with whose wife, Clytcernnestra, he 
lived in incest, and was finally slain by 
Orestes, Cic, N. D. 3, 38; Ov. R. Am. 161.— 
Hence, Pompey called Caesar JEgisthus, on 
account of his adulterous connection with 
Mucia, Suet. Caes. 50. 

t aegithus, i, »»., = at'-yiflor, a smaZZ 
fti'rd, considered by some the titmouse, Pa- 
rus caeruieus, Linn. ; by others £Ae red Ziw- 
nei, Fringilla linaria, Linn., Plin. 10, 74, 95, 
§ 206; cf. Aristot. Hist. An. 9, 15. 

Aegium, or Aegion, », »•» a ioww l " n 

Achaia, one of the twetve Achcean cities, situ- 
ated on the river Selinus, now Vostitza, Mel. 
2, 5, 10; Plin. 4, 5, 6, § 13; Lucr. 6, 585; Li v. 
38, 30.— Hence, A. Aegienses, ium, wi., 
the inhabitants of Achaia, Liv. 38, 30; Tac. 
A 4. 13. — B. Aegius, a, ura, adj.. per- 
taining to JEgium: vitis, a kind of vine. 
Plin. 14, 3, 4, § 42. 

Aeg-le ? es, / , = at7\ n (brightness). I. 
.4 nymph, daughter of Jupiter and Xecera : 
Aegle Nai'adum pulcherrima, Verg. E. 6, 
21. — II. One o/ £Ae Hesperides, daughter 
of Atlas, Serv. ad Verg. A. 4, 484.— HI, A 
daughter of the Sun, sister of Phaethon, 
Hyg. Fab. 154 and 156. 

t aegocephalos, i, wi., = a^oK^a- 

\ Q c (goat's bead), an unknown bird, in Plin. 

11, 37, 80, § 204. 

t aeg*oceras, atis, «., = al^oKepM 

{goat's horn), a plant, the fenugreek (in pure 
Lat. : siticia or siliqua) : Trigonella foenum 
graecum, Linn., Plin. 24, 19, 120, § 184. 

t aeg*dcerds, otis, m. , = alyoKepai?, the 

wild goat (in pure Lat. capricornus) , used 
only poet, as a sign of the zodiac, Lucr, 5, 
615: humidus, Luc. 9^536. 

jggg^ Also aeffdceros, i> *»■ ■* sedem 
aegoceri, Caes. Germ. Arat. '213 : Aegoceron 
Cancrumque tenet, Luc. 10, 213. 

t aeg'dlethron, '-i n -i = at76\€0po<r 
(goat ' s bane) , a jjZcmi in Pontus, pr ob. Azalea 
pontica, Linn., injurious to cattle, and esp. 
to goats. Plin. 21, 13, 44, § 74. 

t aegOllOS, i 5 m -, = ai'yw\ios, an un- 
known bird ; ace. to Harduin, a kind of 
screech owl, Plin. 10, 60, 79, § 165. 

Aeg*on, onis, m., = Aiywv. I. The 
JEgean Sea (only in the poets). Stat. Tii. 5, 
56; Val. Fl. 1, 629; 4, 715.— H. The name 
of a shepherd, Verg. E. 3, 2 ; 5, 72. 

' t aegonychos, i,f.,=aiy6w$ (goat's 

hoof), a plant, usu. called lithospermon, 
Plin. 27, 11, 74, § 98. 

t aeg-ophthalmos, i, m. , =aL*f6<p6 a \- 

/no? (goat's eye), an unknown gem, Plin. 37, 
11, 71, § 187. 

Aeg'OS Flumen, n- [trans, of AI769 
norajuoi, Goat rivers], a river and town in 
the Thracian Ohersonesus, not far from the 
Hellespont, where Lysander defeated the 
Athenians, 404 B.C., Nep. Lys. 1; id. Ale. 
8 ; id. Con. 1 ; Mel. 2, 2, 7 ; Plin. 2, 58, 59, 
§ 149. 

aegTe, adv., v. aeger /n. 

* aegreo, t? re [aeger], v. n. . to be ill : 
morbis cum corporis aegret, Lucr. 3, 824; 
cf. Lachm. and Munro ad h. 1., and Prise, 
p. 826 P. 

aegresCO, Sre, 3, v. inch. n. [aegreo], 
to become ill, to grow sick (not in Cic). I. 
L i t. : morbis aegrescimus isdem, * Lucr. 
5, 349 : aegrescunt corvi, Plin. 10. 12, 15, 
§ 32. — II. Fig. A. To grow worse : vio- 
lentia Tumi exsuperat magis, aegrescitque 
(1. e. aspenor lit) medendo, * Verg. A. 12, 
45 : in corde sedens aegrescit cura parentis, 
Stat. Th. 1, 400, — B. To be troubled, anx- 
ious, afflicted, grieved: rebus laetis, Stat. 
Th. 2, 18: his anxia mentem Aegrescit cu- 
ris (mentem, Gr. ace.), id. ib 12, 193: solli- 
citudine, Tac. A. 15, 25 fin. 

aeg-rimonia 7 ae, f. [aeger ; as acri- 
monia from acer]. Only of the mind, sor- 
row, anxiety, trouble, etc.: aliquem aegri- 
monia afflcere, Plaut. Stich. 3, 1, 5 : dum 
abscedat a me liaec aegrimonia, id. Rud. 4, 
4, 146: ferrem graviter, si novae aegrimo- 
niae locus esset, * Cic. Att. 12, 38, 2 : tristis, 
Hor. Epod. 17, 73: deformis, id. ib. 13, 18: 
vetus, Plin. 28, 8. 27. § 103. (For its dis- 
tinction from aerumna, v. that word. ) 

54 



AEGR 

aegritudo, ""£•/ [aeger], illness, sick- 
ness (both of body and mind ; while aegro- 
tatio denotes only physical disease). I. 
Lit., of the body of men and brutes (only 
after the Aug. per.): visi sunt (elephanti) 
fessi aegritudine, Plin. 8, 1, 1, 9 3: metu et 
aegritudine fessus, Tac. A. 2, 29; so id. ib. 
2, 69; Curt. 3, 5; Flor. 4, 7; Eutr. 9, 5 al.— 
Also of plants: sunt enim quaedam aegri- 
tudines (flcorum) et locorum, Plin. 17, 24, 
37, § 223.— Far oftener. H. Of mind, grief 
sorrow, care, etc. {class.; lreq. in the Cice- 
ronian philos.), Pac. ap. Non. 322, 18; 13, 
29: aegritudo animam adimit, Plaut. Trin. 
4, 3, 84 ; so id. Bacch. 5, 1, 24 ; id. Capt. 4, 

2, 2 ; id. Cure. 2, 1, 9 ; id. Men. prol. 35 ; id. 
Merc. 2, 3, 24 ai. : praeclare nostri, ut alia 
multa, molestiam, sollicitudinem, angorem 
propter similitudinem corporum aegrorum, 
aegritudinem nominaverunt; and soon af- 
ter: ut aegrotat io in corpore, sic aegritudo 
in animo, Cic. Tusc. 3, 10 ; so id. ib. 3, 7 ; 9 ; 
12; 13; 14; 26; 4, 7; 15; id. Fam. 5, 13 fin. 
al. ; Sail. J. 84.— In the plur., Ter. Heaut. 

3, 2, 28 ; Cic. Tusc. 3, 19 ; 4. 15 ; Sen. Ep. 50. 
aegTOr, oris, m - t ae g er ; ae acror from 

acer], illness, sickness, disease, only in Lucr. 
6, 1132 (for in id. 6, 1259, the correct read. 
is maeror, v. Lachm. ad h. 1.). 

' aegrotaticius, a, um, adj. [aegroto], 
that is often ill, Gloss, lsid. 

aegrotat!©, on is,/ [aegroto], illness, 
sickness, disease, infirmity (prop, only of the 
body, while aegritudo also desig. that of the 
mind; much used in the philos. writings 
of Cic. ) : ut aegrotatio in corpore, sic aegri- 
tudo in animo, Cic. Tusc. 3, 10: cum san- 
guis corruptus est, iporbi aegrotationesque 
nascuntur, id. ib. 4, 10: aegrotationes no- 
stras portavit, Vulg. Matt. 8, 17; ib Jer. 16, 
4.— The distinction between aegrotatio and 
morbus Cicero gives as follows : Morbum 
appellant totius corporis corruptionem, 
aegrotationem morbum cum imbecillitate, 
Cic. Tusc. 4, 13, 29.— Only by catachresis, of 
the mind, morbid state or condition, disease, 
hut never strictly for aegritudo.— Thus Cic- 
ero says, after giving, in the passage above 
quoted, the distinction between morbus and 
aegrotatio, in reference to the body: sed 
in animo tantum modo cogitatione possu- 
mus morbum ab aegrotatione sejungere. — 
So also: no 111 en insaniae signifieat mentis 
aegrotationem et morbum, id est insanita- 
tem et aegrotum animum, quam appellA- 
runt insaniam, Cic. Tusc. 3, 4; and: aegro- 
tationes animi, qualis est avaritia, gloriae 
cupiditas, etc., id. ib. 4, 37, 79. — In Pliny, 
of plants, 17, 24, 37, § 231. 

aegroto, l " lV ij utum, 1, v. n. [aegrotus], 
to be ill, sick. I, L i t. , of men and brutes : 
vehementer diuque, Cic. Clu. 62: gravissi- 
me aegrotans, id. Fin. 2, 13 : graviter, id. 
Tusc. 1, 35: leviter, id. Off. 1, 24: periculo- 
se. id. Att. 8. 2 : aegrotavit usque ad mor- 
tem, Vulg. I^a. 38, 1 : aegrotare timenti, 
Hor. Ep. 1,7. 4: morbo. id. S. 1. 6. 30: aegro- 
tare coepit, Vulg 2 Reg. 13, (5: quia armen- 
tum aegrotet in agris, Hor. Ep. 1, 8, 6. — Of 
plants: (vites) aegrotant, Plin. 17, 24, 37, 
§ 226: aegrotant poma ipsa per se sine ar- 
bore, id. 17, 24, 37. § 228. — H. F i g. A. Of 
the mind: ea res, ex qua animus aegrotat, 
Cic. Tusc. 4, 37, 79: aegrotare animi vitio, 
Hor. S. 2, 3, 307.— B. Of other abstr. things, 
to languish, etc. (cf. jaceo): in te aegrotant 
artes, Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 34; 1, 1, 8: languent 
officia, atque aegrotat fama vacillans, duties 
are neglected, reputation sickens and stag- 
gers, * Lucr. 4, 1124. 

aegrotus, a, um, adj. [aeger], ill, sick, 
diseased (in Cic. rare). I. Prop., of the 
body: facile omnes, cum valemus, recta 
consilia aegrotis damus, Tt;r. And. 2, 1, 9: 
aegroto, dum anima est, spes esse dicitur, 
Cic, Att. 9, 10; id. Fam. 9, 14: cum te aegro- 
tum non videam, Vulg. 2 Esdr. 2. 2 ; ib. 
Ezech. 34. 4: corpus, Hor. Ep. 1, 2, 48: leo, 
id. ib. 1, 1. 73 al.— II. T r o p., of the mind: 
omnibus amicis morbum inicies gravem, 
ita ut te videre audireque aegroti sient. sick 
of seeing and hearing you, Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 
39 (for the constr. of the inf. here, v. Roby, 
II. 6 1360 sq.): animus. Att. an. Non. 469. 
23; Ter. And. 1. 2, 22; 3, 3, 27; Cic. Tusc. 
3, 4. — So of the state: hoc remedium eat 
aegrotae et prope desperatae rei publicae, 
Cic. Div. in Caecil. 21, 70. 



A EMI 

Aegyptiacus, a, um, adj. , Egyptian 
(a later lorm for the class. Aegyptius) : li- 
bri, Cell. 10, 10: lingua, Vulg. Gen 41, 45: 
incantationes, ib. Exod. 7, 11 : partes, Cod. 
Th. 13, 5, 14.— Adv.: Aegyptiace, after 
the Egyptian manner : loqui. Treb. Poll. 30, 
Tyr. 30. 

aeg"yptilla 5 ae, /, a precious stone 
once found in Egypt, prob. a kind of onyx, 
Plin. 37, 10, 54. g 148; lsid. Orig. 16, 11, 3. 

+ Aegyptini: Aetliiopes, Paul, ex Fest, 
p. 28 Mull. 

Aegyptius, a > um > adj., — Ai^i'TTTto?, 
Egyptian (the class, word for the later 
Aegyptiacus in Cell., Plin., and Treb.): 
rex, Cic. Pis. 21: acetum, a superior kind 
of vinegar^ id. Hor tens. ap. Non. : bell urn, 
Nep. Dat. 3 : litus, Plin. 6, 28, 32, § 142 : 
mare, id. 5, 9, 10, § 54: classes, Suet. Caes. 
39: vir, Vulg. Gen. 39, 1: ancilla, ib. ib. 16, 
1; ib. Act. 21, 38 al. — Hence. H e Subst: 
AegyptlUS, ii, m., an Egyptian: quid 
igitur censes? Apim ilium sanctum Aegyp- 
tiorurn bovem, nonne deum videri Aegvp- 
tns? Cic. N. D. 1, 29; id. Rep. 3, 9; Caes.'B. 
C. 3, 110; Vulg. Exod. 2, 14; ib. Act. 7. 22 al 

1. AegyptUS, »,/,= A j ( >ttto9, Egypt, 
sometimes reckoned by the ancients as be- 
longing to Asia: Asiae prima pars Aegyp- 
tus, Mel. 1, 9 : proxima Africae incolitur 
Aegyptus, etc., Plin. 5, 9, 9, § 48; Cic. Agr. 
2, 16 ; Caes. B. C. 3, 106 ; Vulg. Gen. 12, 10 ; 
ib. Matt. 2, 13. 

2. Aegyptus, i, w*. , ace. to the fable, 
a king of Egypt son ofBelus (ace. to others, 
of Neptune), and brother of Dan ails. He 
had fifty sons, to whom the fifty daughters of 
Danails were espoused, Hyg. Fab. 168. 

AelianuS, a, um, adj., originating 
from anJEiius : oratiuncuiae, composed by 
the Stoic philosopher L. JElius, Cic. Brut. 56 
fin. : studia, of the same, id. de Or. 1. 43, 
193: jus, a code of laws, noiv lost, compiled 
by Sext. JElius Poztus, in the sixth century 
A.U.C., Dig. 1, 2, 2, § 7 ; cf. Teullel, Rom. 
Lit. § 114. 

t aelinOS, i, ^-, =a'i\ivos (from the 
interj. al and At'voc; cf. Suid. II. p. 449 
Kust.), a song of lament, a dirge: aelinon 
in silvis idem pater, aelinon, altis Dicitur 
invlta concinuisse lyra, Ov. Am. 3, 9, 23. 

AellUS, a. I. The name of a Roman 
gens. — II. Adj., Aelian ; hence, \ m Lex 
Aelia de comitiis, named after Q. Aelius 
Paetus, by whom it was proposed, A. U.C. 
590, Cic. Sest. 15, 33; id.Vatin. 9; id. Pis. 4; 
id. Att. 2, 9 al. — 2. Lex Aelia Sentia, pro- 
posed by the consuls Sext. Aelius and C. 
Sentius, A. U.C. 757, containing regulations 
concerning the limitation of manumission; 
cf. Ulp. Fragm. tit. 1; Dig. 40, 2, 12; 15 and 
10, etc. ; Zimmern, Hist, of Law, 1, 81, and 
761 sq. 

Aello, *"s, f.,—\\e\\w. I. The name 
of a harpy (from acAAa, tempest, because 
she came like it upon her prey) : ales Aello, 
Ov. M. 13, 710. — II, The name of a swift- 
running dog. Ov. M. 3, 219. 

taelurus. i> m -i ^aiXovpos, a cai,Gell. 
20, 8; Hyg. Astr. 2, 28; cf. Rupert. Excur. 
Juv. 15, 7. 

+ aemidum : tumidum, Paul, ex Fest. 
p. 24,4 \alfjia, blood]; cf. aemidus: 7T€</wti- 
/ueVor, Gloss. Labb. 

Ae mil ianus, a , um, adj. [Aemilius], 
relating to the JEmilian gens, ^Emilian. 
Thus Scipio Africamis Minor, the son of 
Paulus Aemilius, was called Aemilianus, 
Veil. 1. 10; Flor. 2, 15. — In neutr. plur.: 
JLemiliana ( sc - aedificia or loca), a place 
just out of Rome, not far from the Campus 
Martius, peril, thus named in honor of 
Scipio Aemilianus, Varr. R. R. 3, 2. There 
was also, in the seventh region of the city 
of Rome, an Aemilian street, Sext. Kuf. de 
Beg. Urb. Rom. ; from 

Aemilius, a * um - adj. [aemulor], the 
name of a Roman gens, greatly distinguished 
for the illustrious men whom it furnished. 
The most celebrated of them was L. Aemi- 
lius Paulus, the conqueror of Perseus, and 
the father of Corn. Scipio Africanus Minor : 
domus, Manil. 1, 794: tribus, Cic. Att. 2, 14; 
Liv. 38, 36.— Aemilia Via, tfie name of 
three several public roads. '1, One, con- 
structed by JI. Aemilius Lepidus, as consul. 
A. U.C. 567, began at Placentia, and passed 



AEMU 



through Parma, Kegium, Mutina, Bononia, 
Forum Cornelii, Faventia, Forum Livii, and 
€aesena to Ariminum, where it joined the 
Via Flamiuia, Li v. 39.-2. One, construct- 
ed A.U.C. 645. bv M. Aemilius Scaurus, as 
censor led from*Bononia, through Pisa and 
Luna, to Dertona, Strab. 1, 5.-3. One ex- 
tending from Ariminum to Aquileia (some, 
however, consider this as the same with 
the first), Mart. 3, 4. — Sometimes absol., 
Aemilia instead of Via Aemilia: in ipsa 
Aemilia diu pugnatum est. Galba ap. Cic. 
Fam. 10, 30. — From the public way, Mar- 
tial call's the region between Ariminum 
andPlacentia (commonly Gallia Cispadana) 
regio Aemilia, Mart. 6. 85.— Aemilius pons, 
so called after its builder, M. Aemilius 
Scaurus, Juv. 0, 32 Rupert.— P o e t. : Aemi- 
lia ratis, the ship on which the booty ac- 
quired by L. JEmilius Paulus, in the war 
with Perseus, was conveyed to Borne, Prop. 
4, 2, 8.— Aemilius ludus, a gladiatorial ex- 
hibition introduced by P. JEmilius Lepidus, 
Hor. A. P. 32. 

AemillUS Macer, of Verona, a poet, 
the friend of Virgil and Ovid, who wrote 
De Serpent ibus et Volucribus (and peril. 
De Virtutibus Herbarum), of which nothing 
is extant, Ov. Tr. 4, 10, 43 ; Serv. ad Verg. 
E. 5, 1. * « 

Aemonia, Acmonidcs, Aemo- 
nis ? Aemdnius, v. Haemonia, etc. 
aemula. v. aemulus. 
aemulanter, adv., v. aemulor /w. 
aemulatio, 6nis, / [aemulor], an as- 
.siduous striving to equal or excel another 
in any thing, emulation (it denotes rather 
the mental effort, while imitatio regards 
more the mode of action ; but rivalitas is 
a jealous rivalry, and therefore used only 
in a bad sense, while aemulatio is em- 
ployed both in a'good and bad sense). Cic. 
thus explains this word: aemulatio dupli- 
cator ilia quidcm dicitur, ut et in laude et 
in vitio nomcn hoc sit; nam et imitatio 
virtutis aemulatio dieitur . . . et est aemu- 
latio aegritudo, si eo, quod concupierit, 
alius potiatur, ipse careat, Cic. Tusc. 4, 8, 
17 gn ¥ Tn a erood sense, emulation : 
laudis, Nep. Att. 5 ; Veil. 1, 17 : gloriae, 
Just, praef. ; Tac. A. 2, 44 ; id. Agr. 21; 
Suet.Calig.19; id. Tib. 11: secundum aemu- 
lationem,in zeaZ, Vulg. Phil. 3,6.— Trans f., 
of the imitation of nature in painting: pic- 
tura fallax est et in aemulatione naturae 
multum degenerat transcribentium sors 
varia, Plin. 25, 2, 4, § 8— H. In a bad sense, 
jealousy, envy, malevolence, dva£r\\ia : ae- 
mulatio vitiosa, quae rivalitati similis est. 
Cic Tusc. 4, 26, 56: infensa. Tac. A. 13, 19: 
municipals, id. H. 3, 57 : adversariorum, 
Suet. Ner. 23; cf. id. 33: aemulatio nasci- 
tur ex conjunctione, alitur aequalitate, ex- 
ardescit invidia,cujus finis est odium, Plin. 
Pan. 84 al.: ad aemulationem eum provo- 
caverunt, to jealousy (said of God), Vulg. 
Psa. 77, 58: contentiones, aemulationes, ri- 
valries, ib. 2 Cor. 12. 20. 

aemulator, Oris, to. [id.], a zealous 
imitator, emulator (in a good sense), £«\w- 
T ; /?; ejus (sc. Catonis), * Cic. Att. 2, 1 Jin.: 
animus aemulator Dei, Sen. Ep. 124 Jin.: 
virtutum aemulator fait, Just, 6, 3: aemu- 
latores sunt legis, Vulg. Act. 21, 20; 1 Cor. 
14. 12. — Eccl., of God as jealous of his 
honor : Deus est aemulator, (the Lord) is a 
jealous God, Vulg. Exod. 34, 14. 

aenralairix, 5c is,/ [aemulator], a fe- 
male emulator (late Lat. ), Cassiod. Var. 7, 5. 
aemulatus. «s, to. Perh. only in Tac. 
for the class acmulatio, emulation, rivalry, 
Hist. 3, 66.— In plur., Ann. 13, 46. (But in 
Agr. 46, aemulatu is only a conjecture of 
Heinsius ; Orell. and Halm read similitu- 
dine). 

* aemulo, *" ire , v - a - An active Iorm 

for aemulor (q. v.), App. M. 1, p. 112. 

aemulor, atus, 1, v. dep. [aemulus], to 
rival, to endeavor to equal or to excel one, 
to emulate, vie with, in a good and bad 
sense; hence (as a consequence of this ac- 
tion), to equal ow by emulating. I. In a 
good senfee. constr. with ace. v. II.: quo- 
niam aemulan non licet, nunc invides, 
Plaut. Mil. 3. 2. 26: omnes ejus instituta 
Iaudare facilius possunt quam aemulari, 
Cic. Fl. 26; Nep. Epam. 5; Liv. 1, 18; cf. 
Tac. H. 3 81 : Pindarum quisquis studet 



A E N E 

aemulari, *Hor. C. 4, 2, 1; Quint. 10, 1. 62: 
severitatem alicujus, Tac. H. 2, 68: virtutes 
majorum, id. Agr. 15 et saep. — T r a n s f. of 
things- Basilicae uvae Albanum vinum 
aemulantur, Plin. 14, 2, 4, § 30. — Pro v.: 
aemulari umbras, to fight shadows, Prop. 
3, 32, 19 (cf. Cic. Att. 15, 20 : qui umbras 
timet).— II. In a bad sense, to strive after 
or vie with enviously, to be envious of, be 
jealous of, %n\oTVKelv\ constr, with dat, 
while in the first signif. down to Quint, 
with ace; v. Spald. ad Quint. 10, 1, 122; 
Rudd. II. p. 151 : iis aemulemur, qui ea ha- 
bent, quae nos habere cupimus, Cic. Tusc. 
1, 19; cf 4, 26; Just. 6. 9.— Also with cum : 
n'e mecum aemuletur, Liv. 28, 43: inter se, 
Tac. H. 2, 81. —With inf. : aemulabantur 
corruptissimum quemque pretio inlicere, 
Tac. H. 2, 62. — Hence, * aemulanter* 

adv. , evmlously, Tert. c. Haer. 40. 

aemulus, a , um , ad J- [ cf - apiwdofiat 
and a M a, imitor, imago, Germ, ahmen (Eng. 
aim) in nachahmcn = to imitate], striving 
after another earnestly, emulating, rivalling, 
emulous (cf. aemulatio and aemulor), in a 
good and bad sense ; constr. with dat. or as 
most, with gen. I, In a good sense, Att, 
ap. Auct. Her. 2, 26, 42: laudum, Cic. Phil. 
2, 12 : laudis. id. Cael. 14 : aemulus atque 
imitator studiorum ac laborum, id. Marc. 
1 : Timagenis aemula lingua. Hor. Ep. 1, 19, 
15*. itinerum Hercuhs, Liv. 21, 41. —With 
ne and subj.: milites aemuli. ne dissimiles 
viderentur, Aur. Vict. Caes. H, 3. — H. In a 
bad sense, both of one who, with a hostile 
feeling, strives after the possessions of an- 
other, and of one who, on account of his 



A E N U 

Venus and Anchises, the hero of VirgiVs 
epic poem, and ancestor of the Romans, 
worshipped after his death as Juppiter In- 
diges ; cf. Xieb. K6m. Gesch. 1, 207 sq. 
Aeneates, ium, v. 2. Aenea, A. 
Aeneaticns. a, urn, v. 2. Aenea. B. 
aeneator, Oris, m. [aes], one who blows 
a horn in ivar, a trumpeter: Aeneatores 
cornicines dicuntur, id est cornu canc-ntes, 
Paul, ex Fest. p. 20 Mull. ; Suet. Caes. 32. 

Aeneis, Wis or idos, / [Aeneas], the 
JEneid, VirgiVs celebrated epic, the hero of 
which is JEneas, the progenitor of the Ro- 
mans : Aeneidos auctor. Ov. Tr. 2, 533 : nee 
tu divinam Aeneida tenta. Stat. Th. 12 fin. : 
morbo oppressus (Vergilius) petivit a suis, 
ut Aeneida quam nondum satis elimavissct, 
adolerent, Gell. 17, 10. 

Aeneius, a, nm (quadrisyl.), adj. [id], 
of or pertaining to JEneas : nutrix. Verg. 
A. 7, 1: virtus, Ov. M. 14, 581^ pietas, id. 
F. 4,' 799 : fata, his death, Stat. S. 5, 3, 37. 

aeneolus, a, urn, adj. dim. [aeneus], 
made of bronze: aeneoli piscatores, little 
figures of fishermen in bronze, Petr. S. 73 ; 
cf. Paul ex Fest. p. 28 Mull. 

t AdlCSi orum, to., the companions of 
JEneas, Paul, ex Fest. p. 20 Mull. 

aeneus ( less fre( i ahen-), a, um , <«#•> 
of bronze [aes], I. Of copper or bronze : 
equus, Cic. Off. 3, 9: statua, id. Phil. 9, 6: 
candelabra, id. Verr. 2, 4, 26 : loricae, Nep. 
Iphicr. 1; Hor. C. 3, 3, 65; 3, 9, 18; 3, 16, 1; 
id. Ep. 2. 1, 248: ahenea proles, the brazen 
age, Ov. M. 1, 125 : aeneus ( quadrisyl. ) ut 
; stes i. e. that a bronze statue may be erect- 
i ed to thee. id. Sat. 2, 3, 1H3.— II. Of the color 



strong desire for a thing env.es him who | ~ - - • b arba7suet Nen^cf ^Veno- 
possesses it; envious, jealous, grudging.— ! °J orunzK u ' ' 

With gen.: Karthago aemula imperii Ro- 
mani, Sail. C. 10 ; Veil. 2, 1 : Triton, Verg. 
A. 6, 173: quern remoto aemulo aequiorem 
sibi sperabat, Tac. A. 3, 8: Britannici, Suet. 
Ner. 6. —HI. Subst., a rival — rivalis : 
mihi es aemula, you are my rival (i. e. you 
have the same desire as I), Plaut. Rud. 1, 4, 
20; Ter. Eun. 4, 1, 9; cf. id. ib. 2, 1, 8: si non 
tamquam virum, at tamquam aemulum 
removisset, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 31 : et si nulla 
subest aemula, languet amor, Ov. A. A. 2, 
436.— By meton. (eccl.), an enemy : vide- 
bis aemulum tuum in templo. Vulg. 1 Reg. 
2, 32 : affligebat earn aemula, ib. 1, 6. — 
In gen., mostly of things without life, 
vying with, rivalling a thing, i. e. compar- 
able to, similar to; with dat.; v. Rudd. II. 
p. 70 (poet., and in prose after the Aug. 
ner.L tibia tubae Aemula, Hor. A. P. 203 : 
labra rosis, Mart. 4, 42: Tuscis vina cadis, 
id. 13, 118 ; Plin. 9, 17, 29, § 63 ; id. 15, 18, 
19, § 68 al. : Dictator Caesar summis ora- 
toribus aemulus, i. e. aequiparandus, Tac. 
A. 13, 3. . 

4®= Facta dictaque ejus aemulus ior 
aemulans, Sail. Fragm. Hist. 3 (cf. celatum 
indagator for indagans in Plaut. Trin. 2, 1, 

15, unless celatum be here a gen.). 

Aenaria ae i /■■> an is ^ an ^ on the west- 
ern coast of Campania, the landing-place of 
JEneas, now Ischia, Cic. Att. 10, 13; Liv. 8, 
22; Suet. Aug. 92; Paul, ex Fest. p. 20 Mull. 

1. Aenea, ae, v. Aeneas. 

2. Aenea or Aenia, ae, /, = AlWia, 

a city of Chalcidice, in Macedonia, opposite 
Pydna, Liv. 40. 4; 44. 10; 32. — Hence, A. 
Aeneates u!m > m -- tl,e inhabitants of 
JEnea, Liv. 40, 4, 4— B. AcncatlCUS, a, 

urn, adj., belonging to JEnea: abies, Plin. 

16, 39, 76 J , § 197. 
AeneadeS, ae {gen. plur. Aeneadum, 

Lucr. 1, 1; Ov. Tr. 2, 2(M),patr. m. [Aeneas]. 
I A descendant of JEneas ; his son Asca- 
nius, Verg. A. 9, 653 (Aenides, Rib.).— H. 
In gen., those who are related in any 
manner to JEneas ; hence, A. A Trojan, 
Verg. A. 7, 616; 1, 565; but oftener, B. A 
Roman, Verg. A. 8, 648; Ov. M. 15, 682, 695 
al.— C An adulatory epithet of Augustus, 
Ov. P. 1, 1, 35; ofScipio, Sil. 13, 767. 

Aeneae PortuS, a harbor near To- 
rone arid Mount Athos, Liv. 45, 30. 4. 

Aeneas ae, w. (also in the nom. Aenea, 
Varr. ap. Charis. p. 50 P. ; cf. Quint. 1, 5. 61 ; 
gen. sometimes Aenea, Apul. Orth. § 23 
Osann. : ace. Aenean often, after the Gr. 
A^veiav', Ov. F. 5, 568 ; id. H 7, 36 ; voc. 
Aenea, Poet. ap. Varr. L. L. 6, § 60 Mull. ; 
Ov. H. 7, 9), = Aivtmf, JEneas, son of 



barbus. 

Aenianes, urn, to., a people oj Thessa- 
lia, west of the Sinus Maliacus, Cic. Rep. 2, 
4- Liv. 28, 5, 15 (the 'Ev^ver of Homer, II. 
2>9). 

Aenides, ae, patr. m. I. A son of 
JEneas, Verg. A. 9, 653.— II. A descendant 
ofJEneus, king on the Propontis.—In the 
plur., the inhabitants of Cyzicus, because a 
son of jEneuswas the founder of that city, 
Val. Fl. 3, 4. 

aenigma, * Lis , n., = aU n i±a. {dat. 
and abl. plur. aenigmatis, Charis. p. 38 P.), 
that which is enigmatical or dark in a fig- 
uralive representation, an allegory; ace. 
to Quintilian's expl.: allegoria, quae est ob- 
scurior, Inst. 8, 6, 52; Cic. de Or. 3, 42.— H. 
Of other things. A. That which is dark, 
obscure, or inexplicable ; a riddle, enigma, 
obscurity : regina Saba venit temptare eum 
in aenigmatibus,Vulg. 3 Reg. 10, 1: obscu- 
ritates et aenigmata somniorum. Cic. Div. 
2 64: acnigma numero Platonis obscurius, 
id. Att. 7, 13: legum, Juv. 8, 50: palam et 
non per aenigmata Dominum videt, Vulg. 
Num. 12, 8; 1 Cor. 13, 12.— B. A mystery; 
a mystical tenet or dogma in religion, 
Arn/3, p. 109. 

aenig-maticus, a, urn, adj. [aenig- 
ma], like an enigma, obscure, enigmatic: 
ille clarum esse somnium dixit, et nihil 
aenigmaticum, nihil dubium continere, 
Cassiod. H. Eccl. 9, 4. 

t aenig-matista and -tes, ae, m., 

= a\viynaTt<ni]v, one that proposes riddles, 
one that speaks in riddles, an enigmatist, 
Sid. Ep. 8, 6; Aug. Qua_est. in Num. 4, 45. 

aenipes or ahenipes, 5dis, adj. 

[aeneus-pes]. that has feet of bronze, bronze- 
footed, xa^noirow : boves, Ov. H. 6, 32: 
equi, Prud. adv. Symra. 1, 531. 

aenitologium, i. «• In m ctre ^ a dac - 
lylic verse with an iambic penthemimeris, 
e. g. Carmina bella magis vellcm sonare, 
Serv. in Centim. 1825 P. 

Aenobarbus (earlier, Ahen-), \ f^ 

[aeneus. II. , and barba. Red-beard], a fam- 
ily name of the Domilian gens, Suet. Ner. 
1 Oud.; Inscr. Orell. 3793. 

aenulUHi, i. n - dim - [aenus], a smaU 
bronze vessel, Paul, ex Fest. p. 28_ Miill. 

1. Aenus or -os, I /, = AtVo?, a city 

of Thrace, south-east of the Palus Stentoris, 
through which one of the mouths of the He- 
brus falls into the sea, now Enos, Mel. 2, 2, 
8; Plin. 4, 11, 18, § 43; Cic. Fl 14; Liv. 31, 
K 5i 4.— Hence. H. Aenii, orum, to., tht 
inhabitants of JEnus, Liv. 37, 33; 38, 41 r 
45, 27. 

55 



A EQU 

2. Aenus, i, m., the river Inn, Tac. H. 

3,5. 7 

3. aenus (trisyl. ; less freq. a hen-) a, 
urn, adj. [aes], of copper or bronze (oulv ooet. 
tor aheueus ; yet Hor. uses the latter oftener 
than the former). I. Li t. : signa, the bronze 
images of the gods., Lucr, 1, 316: ahenis in 
scaphiis, id. 6, 1045: falcis, id. 5, 1293; cf. 
Verg. A. 4, 513: lux, i. e. armorum a^no- 
rum, id.jb. 2,470: erateres, id. ib. 9,165.— 
Hence, aenum (sc. vas), a bronze vessel : 
litore aena locant, Verg. A. 1, 213; so Ov. 
M. 6, 645 ; Juv. 15, 81 al. ; of the bronze 
vessels in which the purple color was pre- 
pared, Ov. F. 3, 822; Sen. Here. Oet. 663; 
Stat. S. 1, 2, 151 (hence, aenulum). — H^ 
Trop. A. Firm, invincible {cf. adaman- 
tinus) : mamis, Hor. C. 1, 35, 18,— 3. Hard. 
rigorous, inexorable : corda, Stat. Th. 3, 380. 

Acolcs (AeolIS ? v arr.), urn, m.,=Alo- 
Aek, the sEolians, orig. in Thessaly, later in 
the Peloponnesus, on the coast of Asia Mi- 
nor, in Lesbos, and other nlace.s Varr L L 
5, § 25; 102 Mull. ; id. R. R. 3, 1, 6; 3, 12, 6; 
Cic. Fl. 27. Their more usual name' is 
Aeolii; v. Aeolius. 

Aedlia, as,/ , = AioXt'a. I, A group of 
islands near Sicily, so called after Molus, 
who is said to have once reigned there now 
the Lipari Islands, PI in. 3, 8, 14, § 92 sq.— 
II. In my thol. , the abode of Molus the gnrf 
oj the winds. Verg. A. 1, 52.— HI. A coun- 
try of Asia Minor, Nep. Con. 5. 

AedllCUS, a, urn, adj., =a\o\lk6?, per- 
taining to the JEolians, jEolian, Molic ■ 
gens, Plin. 6, 2, 2, § 7 : digamma, Quint. 1, 
4, 7: httera, id. 1, 7, 27: dicta, id. 8, 3, 59. 

Aeolides, ae, patr. <m., =A.oAid»jp, a 
male descendant of ^Eohis : his son Sisy- 
phus, Ov. M. 13, 26 ; Athamas, id. ib. 4 
511; Sahnoneus, Ov. lb. 473; his grandson 
Cephalus, id. ib. 7, 672; also Ulysses, whose 
mother, Anticlea, is said to have had in- 
tercourse with Sisyphus before her mar- 
riage with Laertes, Verg. A. 6, 529 ; also 
Phrixus, Val. Fl. 1, 286. 

* aedlipllae. arum. / [aeolus-pilaj, 
vessels (or instruments) for investigating the 
nature of the wind, eolipiles, Vitr. 1, 6. 

1. Aedlia, idis,/,=AioXtV, a country 
in Asia Minor, north of Ionia, Liv. 33, 38 
3; 37, 8, 12; Plin. 5, 29, 27. § 103. 

2. AcdllS, idis, patr. f, = A]oXh, a 
female descendant of jEoius ; so his daugh- 
ters : Halcyone, Ov. M. 11, 579 ; Canace s id. 
H. 11, 34. ' 

Acdlius, a, um, adj., ~ A}6\ t0 f, per- 
taining to ^b'olus, Molia, or JEolis, jEo- 
lian. I. Pertaining to Molus, the god of 
the winds, or to his posterity: Euri Ov 
Am. 3, 12, 29: venti, fib. 4, 1, 58: aurum" 
the golden fleece (of the ram) on which 
Phnxus and Helle, the grandchildren of 
Molus, ^fled, Val. Fl. 8, 79: virgo, i. e. Arne 
or Canace, Ov. M. 6, 116 : postes, i. e. fores 
domus Athamantis Aeoii lilii, id. ib. 4, 486. 
—II. Pertaining to JEolia or jEolis : insu- 
lae, Plin. 36. 21, 42, § 154 : pontus, Sil. 14, 
233.— Aeolii, orum, »?., = AeoIes, theMo- 
lians, the inhabitants of Molia, in Asia 
Minor, Veil. 1, 4; Mela, 1, 18, 1.— Hence 
III. Pertaining to the Molians : puella,' 
i. e. Sappho, as a Lesbian woman, Hor. C. 
4, 9, 12: carmen, a Sapphic or Alcaic ode, 
id. ib. 4, 3, 12; cf.: Aeoliis fidibus queren- 
tem Sappho, id. ib. 2, 13, 24: lyra, Ov H 
15, 200 : plectrum, Prop. 2, 3, 19. 

AcblllS, i, m. 7 = A'ioXos. I. The god 
of the winds., son of Jupiter {or Hippotas) 
and of Menalippa, ruler of the islands be- 
tween Italy and Sicily, where he kept the 
winds shut up in caverns, and, at the bid- 
ding of Jupiter, let them loose or recalled 
them, Verg. A. 1, 52 : Aeolon Hippotaden, 
cohibentem carcere ventos, Ov. M. 14 224. 
—II. A king in Thessaly, soji ofHellen and 
Doras, grandson of Deucalion, father of 
Sisyphus, Athamas, Salmoneus, etc. Serv 
ad Verg. A. 6. 585. ' 

t aeon, onis, m., = a :& v (age, eternity). 
Often used by Tert. adv. Haer. 33; 34- 49 
and adv. Valentin., who invented much 
concerning the Thirty Mons, whom he 
maintained to be gods. 

Aepy, n.,=Aliru, a city of Elis, men- 
tioned by Homer (II. 2, 592), Stat. Th. 4, 180. 

aequabllis, e, adj. [aequo], thai can 
5G 



AEQU 

be made equal, equal, similar, like ('» aequa- 
lis alterius staturae par; aequabile quodae- 
quari potest," Front. Differ. 2198 P.) ; class. ; 
in Cic. very freq. (syn. : aequalis, aequus,' 
planus, par, similis). I. Lit.: vis hostilis 
cum istoc fecit meas opes aequabiles, has 
made my property equal to his, Plant. Gapt. 
2, 2, 52: par (sc. est jus), quod in onines 
aequabile est, Cic. Inv. 2, 22, 68: praedae 
partitio, id. Off. 2, 11 : m descriptione ae- 
quabili sumptus, id. Fl. 14; so id. N. D, 1 
19 et saep.: mixtura vitiorum atque virtu - 
turn, Suet. Dom. 3— H. T r a n s f. A 
Equal, consistent, uniform, equable : ut 
haec patientia dolorum ... in omni ffenere 
so aequabilem praebeat, may appear as 
constantly equal to itself Cic. Tusc. 2 27; 
motus certus et aequabilis, id. N. D. 2, 9-. 
moderati aequabilesque habitus, id. Fin. 5, 
12: fluvius, which always continues with 
the same current, id. Rep. 2, 5 ; so. pulvis, 
Sail. J. 53: aequabilior liimitas, Sen. Ep! 
74: ver aequabile, Lact. 2, 11, 2.— Hence, 
of discourse : aequabile et temperatum ora- 
tionis genus, even and moderate style (opp. 
vis dicendi major in orationibus, Cic. Off. 
1, 1) : tractus orationis lenis et aequabilis, 
id. de Or. 2, 13, 54: genus orationis fusum 
atque tractum et cum leiiitate quadam ae- 
quabile profluens, id. ib. 15, 64. — B. In 
relation to morals, equitable, just, right; 
constr. with in and ace. or absol. : status rei 
publicae . . . non in onines ordines civita- 
tis aequabilis, Cic. Rep. 2, 37: fidus Roma- 
nis, aequabilis in suos, Tac. A. 6, 31: jus 
aequabile, that deals alike with all, Cic. 
Inv. 1,2: aequabiliumlegum conditor, Aur 
Vict. Caes. 20, 23.--.Comp., Cic. Att. 5, 20.— 
Adv. : acquabllltcr, uniformly, equally, 
in like manner, Cato. R. R. 103; Varr. R r' 
1, 6, 6; Cic ; Off. 2, 11; id. N. D. 2, 45 et saep. 
—Co-Dip., Sail. C. 2.— Sup. docs not occur 
eitner in the adj. or adv. 

acquabllltas, iitis,/ [aequabilis], the 
qualify of aequabilis, equality, uniformity 
evenness, equability (in the class, per peril' 
only in Cic. ; Lact. 5, 14). I.Inge n'.: mo- 
tus, Cic. N. D. 2, 5 : universae vitae, turn sin- 
gularum action um, id. Off. 1, 31. Ill; cf. id. 
ib. 26.— II. Of law, equity, justice, imparti- 
ality (cf. aequabilis, II. B.) : in rebus causis^ 
que civium aequabilitatis conservatio im- 
partiality. Cic. de Or. ] . 42, 188 : in laude jus- 
titiae explicandum est quid cum fide quid 
cum aequabilitate factum sit, id. ib. 2, 85. 
—Of the administration of the state, an 
equal claim or title of all to the same po- 
litical equality: ipsa aequabilitas est ini- 
qua, cum habeat nullos gradus dignitatis 
Cic. Rep. 1, 27. -HI. Of discourse, uniform- 
ity of style (cf. aequabilis, II. ) : elaborant alii 
in ienitate et aequabilitate et puro quasi 
quodam et candido genere dicendi, Cic. Or 
16, 53. 
acquabllltcr, adv., v. aequabilis /n. 
acquacvus, a, um, adj. [aequas-ae- 
vum], of equal age, just as old. coeval (in 
gen. only poet.; esp. freq. in Claudian}- 
amicus, Verg. A. 5. 452 : so id. ib. 2 561 : 
aequaevi gregis, Sen. Agam. 673: majestas 
Claud. IV. Cons. Hon. 121 : urbs aequaeva 
polo, id. Bell. Get. 54 et saep. — In prose- 
lotos aequaeva Urbi intellegitur. Plin. 16 
44, 86, § 236: auditor. Suet. Vit. Pers. ' 

aequalis, e, adj. [aequo], that can be 
put on an equality with ; conseq. equal 
like; constr. with dat, absol. and as subsi. 
with gen. (syn. : aequus. aequabilis planus 
par, similis). I. Lit.: partem pedis esse 
aequalem alteri parti, Cic. Or. 56, 188* pau- 
pertatem ciivitiis etiam inter homines ae- 
qualem esse, id. Leg. 2, 10, 24: aequalem so 
faciens Deo.Vulg. Juan. 5,18: aequales an- 
gelis sunt, like, ib. Luc. 20, 36: nee enini 
aut lingua aut moribus aequales abhorrere 
(Bastarnas a Scordiscis), Liv. 10, 57, 7: ut 
sententiae sint membris aequalibus.Quiut. 
9, 3, 80: aequalis ponderis erunt omnes 
Vulg. Exod. 30. 34 ; ib. Deut. 19, 7; ib.Apoc.' 
21, 16.— As subst. with gen. : Creticus et eius 
aequalis Paeon, Cic. Or. 64, 215 (Another 
°o nstr - , v. II. ) — Hence, H. Transf. A 
That can be compared in respect to age, of 
the same age, equally old. J. Of persons. 
a. Of the same age, equal in years : cum 
neque me asp i cere aequales dignarent 
meae. Pac. ap. Non. 470, 20 (Trag. Rel. 
I p. 97 Rib.): patris cognatum atque aequa- 
i lem, Archidemideiii, nostine? Tor. Eun. 2. 



A K Q U 

3, 35: adulescens ita dilexi senem, ut ae-- 
qualem, Cic. Sen. 4, 10 : P. Orb i us, meus 
fere aequalis, id. Brut 48 init: Aristides 
aequalis fere fuit Themistocli, Nep. Arist. 
1 al.— 1>. In gea, contemporary, coeval; 
and subst., a contemporary, without defi- 
nite reference to equality in age: Livius 
(Andronicus) Ennio aequalis fuit, Cic. Brut. 
18: Philistus aequalis illorum temDorum 
id. Div. 1, 20; Liv. 8,40— c . In the' comic 
poets, esp. in connection with amicus of 
the same age: O amice salve mi atque 
aequalis, ut vales? Plaut. Trim 1 2 10 • 
2, 2, 50; Ter. Heaut. 3, 1, 8; so id. Ad.' 3, 4,' 
26: ne cuiquam suorum aequalium siip- 
plex siet, id. Phorm. 5. 6, 47. —2 Of things 
coeval, coexistent, etc.:' Deiotan benevolen- 
tia in popuium Romanum est ipsius ae- 
qualis aetati, i* as old as himself, has grown 
up with Mm, Cic. Phil. 11. 13: in memoriam. 
notam et aequalem incurro, i. e. which be- 
longs to our time, id. Brut. 69; id. Leg. 1, 2: 
ne istud Juppiter sierit urbem in aeler- 
nuni conditam fragili huic et mortal i cor- 
pora aequalem esse, i. e. should exist for an 
equally short time, Liv. 28, 28. — Rarely 
with cum : aequali tecum pubesceret aevo, 
Verg. A. 3,491: fuit cum ea cupressus ae- 
? Ua A is '. Plin -, 1 ^ 4i ' 86 ' § 236 -— B. That can 



^.„, ^.j., ^.j^ a ^w, ^^ j ItUL Ctlrt 

be compared in respect to size ov form • of 
equal size, looking alike, resembling, sim- 
ilar: florentes aequali corpore Nvniphae 
Verg. Cir. 435: chorus aequalis Dryaduni' 
a chorus of Dryads alike, id. G. 4. 460.— 
C. Uniform, equable, unvarying: virtutes 
sunt inter se aequales et pares, Cic. do Or. 
1,18; 3,14, 55; nil aequale homini fuit illij 
Hor. S. 1, 3, 9: imber lentior aequaliorque 
and more uniform, Liv. 24, 46: aequali ictu 
freta scindere, Ov. M. 11, 463: Euphranor 
in quocumque genere excellens ac sibi ae- 
qualis, always equal to himself Plm. 35. 11, 
37, § 128: opus aequali quadam mediocri- 
tate. Quint. 10, 1, 54.— Hence, but rarely 
= aequus, of place, equal, uniform, hrel 
smooth, even, plain, both in a horizontal 
and ascending direction: loea Sail J "<)■ 
terra, Ov. jr. 1, 34: gentes esse miio nanbus 
aequali totius oris planitie, Plm. o, 30. 35, 
§ 187 :_mons aequali dorso contiuuue. Tac! 
A. 4, 47. — Comp. prob. not used.— * Sup. ■ 
aequalissima porticus, Tert. Anim. 17. — 
Adv.: ae qua] Her, equally, uniformly, 
in the same manner, Cic. Verr. 2 3 70- 
id. Ac. 2, 11; id. Lael. 16, 5S; Caes B G 2 
18; Vulg. Deut. 19, 3; ib. 1 Par. 24 31- ib' 
Sap 6, 8.— Comp., Tac. A. 15, 21.— Sup. not 
used. J 

aequali tas, at is, / [aequalis], equal- 
ity, similarity, uniformity (syn.: Mmili- 
tudo, planities, aequitas). I. I n gen : 
similitudo aequalitasque verborum, Cic. 
Part. Or. 6: fraterna. id. Lig. 12; Vulg 2 
Cor. 8,13; 14.— H. In Tac. freq. of political 
equality, = ^on/jita: omnes exuta aequali- 
tate jussa pnncipis aspectare, Tac. ill 
3, 74 ; ci id. ib. 26 and id H. 2 38.— Hi' 
Of equality in age (cf. aequalis, II.) : et ae- 
quali tas vestra et pares honorum gradus 
Cic. Brut. 42.— IV. The equality, evenness 
of a place: maris, i. e mare trauquillum 
a calm, la \i } i,, h Sen. Ep. 53 : (Oesy])um) 
carnes excrescentes ad aequalitatem redu- 
cit, Plin. 30, 13, 39, § 113. 
aequali ter , adv., v. aequalis fin. 

* aequamen, i ni s, n. [aequo], an in- 
strument for levelling or smoothing, as ex- 
planation of amussis, and syn. to levamen- 
tum, Varr. ap. Non. 9, 18. 

* aequamentum, i, «■ [Id.], an equal- 
ling, requiting, translation of hostimen- 
tum, Non. 3, 26. 

Acquana, 6mm. n. (sc. juga), a moun- 
tain range near Sorrentum, Sil. 5, 466. 

+ aequaUlUlis [aequus-animus], adj., 
in Vet. Onomast. = eiyvtinav, kind, mild, 

— Adv. : aequanimiter, calmly, with 

equanimity (only in later Lat.) Macr S 
2,4; Sulp. Dial. 1, 14; Amm. 19, 10: Tert" 
Patient. 8 al. 

aequanimitas, atis, / [aequanimis 
(rare for aequus animus). ¥. Before the 
class, iter., favor, good-iuill (favor et pro 
pitius animus, Don. ad Ter. Ad. prol. 24 r 
bomtas vestra atque aequanimitas Tor 
Phorm. prol. 34' id. Ad. prol. 24. — H In 
the post -Aug. oe*\, calmness, patinue 
equanimity, Plin. 18, 12, 31, § 123 : pat Sen.' 



AEQU 

eia est malorum cum aequanimitate per- 
latio. Lact. 5, 22. 3. 

aequanimiter, ^ u - ; v. aequanimis. 
aequ animus. a, um [aequus- animus], 

adj. . even-tempered, patient, composed, calm : 
aequanimus fmm. Aus. Sept. Sap. 3: nulla 
fuit res parva umquam aequanimis, id. 
Idyll. 3, 9. 

acquatlO, ums, /. [aequo], an equaliz- 
ing, equal distribution : gratiae dignitatis 
suflragiorum, Cic. Mur. 23; cf. Liv. :U, 31: 
bononmi, community of goods, communism, 
Cic. Oil". 2. 21. 73: juris. Liv. 8, 4 al. 

+ aequator monetae, one who, in 
the coining of money, examines the equality 
of its v:eiqhL tin assizer, Inscr. Orell. 3228. 

aequatus. a, urn, Part, of aequo. 

aeque, «'*«-■.. v. aequusym. 

Aequi, Oram, vj<. I. A warlike people 
of ancient Italy, in the neighborhood of the 
Latins and Volsci, on both sides of the Anio, 
whrwe cities were Alba, Tibur. Pracneste, 
Carscoh. ttc They were almost entirely 
destroyed bv the dictator Cincinnatus. Cic. 
Rep. 2, 20 ;" Liv. 1, 9 ; 4. 30 al. ; cf. Nieb. 
Riim.Gesch.l, 81.— Hence, H. A. Aequi- 
CUS. a . um. adj., sEquian : bellum, with 
the ^Equi, Liv. 3. 4, 3; 10. 1. 7.— B. Ae- 
quiculus, a ^ um, a c1 j-, slLquian: gens, 
Verg. A. 7, 747 : rura, Sil. 8, 371. — Hence, 
subst: AeauiCulllS, i, ™-< °ne of the 
JEqui; asper, Ov. F. 3. 93; so Suet.Vit. 1. 
— C. Aequiculani = Aequiculi, Plin. 

3, 12. 17, § 107. 

* aequiCrUllUS, a, um, adj. [aequns- 
crus] = KroffKeXi'i?, of equal legs, isosceles, 
in geom. of the triangle, Mart. Cap. 0, 
p. 230. 

AequiCUS, a, um, v. Aequi. 

+ aequidiale, is, n. [aequus-dies], old 
form for aequinoctiale, the equinox : 
"aequidiale apud antiquos dictum est, 
quod nunc dicimus aequinoctiale, quia nox 
diei potius quam dies nocti annumerari 
debet. Graeci quoque in hoc consentiunt, 
\anp-tpiav, id est aequidiale, dicentes,' 3 
Paul, ex Fest. p. 24 Mull. 

* aequidianus, a, um, adj. [aequidi- 
ale], i. q. aequinoctialis, equinoctial: ex- 
ortus, App. de Mundo, p. 62 (270 ed. min. 
Hildebr.). 

aequidici ( sc - versus) [aequns-dico], 
verses containing corresponding words or 
expressions (uvT^txoi/r), as (Verg. E. 2, 18): 
alba ligustra cadunt, vaccinia nigra legun- 
tur: "Albis enim nigra opposuit, ligustris 
anteni vaccinia attribuit, et cadentibus le- 
genda assignavit.'' Dioin. p. 498 P. 

aequidistans, antis, adj. [aequus- 

disto]. In math, parallel, equidistant : cir- 
culi. Mart. Cap. 3, p. 276. 

aequifbrmis, e > <*>& [aequus- forma], 

uniform ; versus, composed of single, un- 
connected ivords, as (Verg. A. 7, 171) : urbe 
fuit media Laurentis regia Pici, where no 
two successive words are connected, Diom. 
p. 498 P. 

aequilanx, lancis [aequus-Ianx], with 
equal scale : trutina aequilance ponderare, 
Fulg. Cont. Verg. 

* aequilatatio^^nis,/ [aequus latus], 
the equal distance of two parallel lines from 
?ach other, Vitr. 9, 8. 

* aeqilllateralis, e, adj. [ id. ], equi- 
lateral, Censor, de D. Nat. 8. 

aequilaterus, a, um, adj. [id.], m 

math, equilateral : triangulus, Mart. Cap. 
6, p. 229 and 230. 

aequilatus, Sris, adj. [id.]. In 
math, equilateral : regula, Aus. Idyll. 11 
50. 

$ aequflavium, h n - [aequus-lavo], a 
half of the whole ; said of wool, when half 
of the weight remains after washing, Paul. 
ex Fest. p. 24 Mull. 

* aequilibratus, a, um, adj. [acquus- 
libra], — aequihbns. Tert, c. Hermog. 41. 

* aequillbris. e, adj. [id.], in perfect 
equilibrium or equipoise, level, horizontal, 
Vitr. 5. 12. 

* aequillbritas, utis. / [aequilibris] 
(a word coined by Cic. as a transl. of the 
Epicurean ,aovoiua), the equal distribution 
vfthe powers of nature : confugis ad aequi- 



AEQU 

libritatem; sic enim \aovopiav, si placet, 
appellemus, Cic. N. D. 1, 39, 109 (cf. id. ib. 
19, 50, 1 : aovofitav appellat Epicurus, id 
est, aequabilem tributionem). 

aequillbrium, «, n. [aequilibris], a 
level or horizontal position, equilibrium: 
quaedam ligna ad medium submersa ad 
aequilibriuiu aquae. Sen. Q. N. 3. 25; so Col. 
Arb. 5, 2. — II. Trop., a perfect equality : 
rumpendi panter membri, Cell. 20. 1. 

Aequimaelium (better than Aequi- 

mel-)) ! ) w -> M ie open space in Rome below 
the Capitol, not far from the Career, where 
had stood the hous* of the turbulent tribune 
of the people, Sp. Mcelius, who was slain by 
Ahala during the dictatorship of Cincinna- 
ti, now in 'the Via di Marforio : Aequi- 
maelium, quod aequata Maeli (Meli) domus 
publico, quod reguum oecupare voluit is, 
Varr. L. L. 5, g 157 Mull. ; so Liv. 4, 16, 1; 

38, 28, 3. In Cicero's time a lamb-market 
seems to have been there, Cic. Div. 2, 17, 

39. Cf. on this locality, Nieb. Riim. Gesch. 
2, 474 ; Amni. 28 ; and Becker's Antiq. 1, 
p. 485 sq. 

aeqmmanus, a, um, adj. [aequus- 

manus], who can use both hands equally 
well, ambidextrous, anqndrttos, Aus. Idyll. 
12; Beda Orth. 2329 P. — Trop., of equal 
skill in two departments ov in two pursuits : 
ireptdtftos, Symm. Ep. 9, 101 (110). 

aequinoctialis, c adj. [aequinoc- 
tium], pertaining to the equinox, or the 
time of equal day and night, equinoctial: 
circulus. the equator. Varr. L. L. 9, § 24 
Miill.: aestns, Sen. Q. N. 3. 28 (cf. aequinoc- 
tium fin.): horae, Plin. 2. 97. 99, § 216: me- 
riclies, Col. l, 6. 2. 

aequinoctium, «, n - [aequus-nox], 

the time of equal days and nights. the equi- 
nox, Cic. Att. 12, 28. 3 ; Caes. B. G. 4. 30 ; cf. 
id. ib. 5, 23 ; Varr. L. L. 6, § 8 Mull.: am 
tumnale, Liv. 31. 47: vernum, id. 33. 3: 
aestus duobus aequinoctiis maxime tu- 
mentes et autumnali amplius quam verno, 
etc., Plin. 2,97,99, g 215. 

aequipar, Hris, adj. [aequus-par], per- 
fectly alike or equal ; only in later writers, 
e. g. Aus. Idyll. 12; App. Flor. 3. 

aequiparabilis ( better, aequi- 

per-)i c > aa J- [acquiparo], that maybe com- 
pared, comparable (pern, only in Plaut.); 
with dat. .• diis aequiperabile. Cure. 1, 3, 
11.— With cum, Trin. % 4. 65 (also in Non. 
304). 

aequiparantia (better, aequi- 
per-), ae, / [id.], a comp>arison (late 
Lat.), Tert. adv. Val. 16. 

aequiparatio (better, aequiper-), 
onis, / [id.], an eqiializing, a comparison: 
aequiperatio et parilita.s virtutum inter se 
consimilium, Gell. 14, 3 : rex de aequipera- 
tione aestimanda (whether his army could 
be put on an equality with) quaesierat, id. 
5, 5, 7. 

aequiparo (better aequiper-; cf. 
Dietrich in Zeitschr. fur vergl. Sprachf. 1, 
p. 550) ; avi, utura, 1, v. a. and n. [aequipar]. 

I. Act. , to put a thing on an equality with 
another thing, to compare, liken; with ad, 
cum, or dat. : suas virtutes ad tnas, Plaut. 
Mil. 1, 1, 11: aequiperata cum P. fratre glo- 
ria, Cic. Mur. 14, 31 : Jovis Solisque equis 
dictatorem, Liv. P. 23 : Hadriauus Numae 
aequiperandus, Frontin. Princ. Hist. p. 317 
Rom.— II, JSfeutr., to place one 1 s self on an 
equality ivith another in worth, to become 
equal to, to equal, come up to, attain to (cf. 
aequo and adaequo) ; constr. with dat. , but 
more frequently with ace, and absol. (a) 
With dat. : nam si qui, quae eventura sunt, 
provideant, aequiperent Jovi, Pac. ap. Gell. 
14, 1, 34. — (/3) With ace. : nemo est qui fac- 
tis me aequiperare queat, Enn. ap. Cic. 
Tusc. 5. 17, 49 ( Epigr. 8, p. 162 Vahl ) : ur- 
bem dignitate, Nep. Them. 6, 1; fo id. Ale. 

II, 3 ; Liv. 37, 55 : voce magistrum, Verg. 
E. 5. 48; Ov. P. 2, 5, 44. — (7) Absol, Pac. 
ap. Non. 307. 11. 

aequipedus, a, um, and aequipes, 

edis, adj. [aequus-pes], having equal feet, 
isosceles (of a triangle). App. Dogm. Plat. 1, 
p. 5, and Diom. p. 472 P. 

aequipero, v. aequiparo. 

aequipollens, entis, adj. [aequus-pol- 
leo], of equal value or significance, equiva- 



AEQU 

lent, a dialectic word, used several times \T3? 
App. de Dogm. Plat. 3, p. 36 and 39. 

* aequipondium, i, «■ [aequus-pon- 

dus], an equal weight, a counterpoise, Vitr. 
10,8. 

acquit CVS, atis, / [aequus], the quality 
of being aequus (syn. : aequalitas. jut-, jus- 
t'itia, fas). I, The uniform relation of one 
thing to others, equality, conformity, sym- 
metry : portionum aequitate* turbata. Sen. 
Q. N. 3. 10: commoditas et aeqtntas {pro- 
portion, symmetry) membrorum, Suet. 
Aug. 79.— II. Trop. A. J^ or equitable 
conduct toward others, justice, equity, fair- 
ness. k-KieiKtta (governed by benevolence, 
while justitia yields to another only what 
is strictly due) : pro aequitate contra jus di- 
cere, Cic. de Or. 1, 56, 240: belli aequitas 
sanctissime fetiali jure perscripta est, id. 
Off. 1, 11, 36: a verbis recedere el aequitate 
uti, id. Caecin. 13; Nep. Arist. 2, 2 Br. ; cf. 
id. Milt. 2 ; Suet. Claud. 15. But it is some- 
times used for justitia: sumuia bonitas et 
aequitas causae, Cic. Att. 16, 16: quam ha- 
bet aeqmtatem, ut agrum qui nullum ha- 
buit, habeat? id. Off. 2, 12 Jin.— Eccl., right- 
eousness, (a) of men, Vulg. Deut. 9. 5; ib. 
Mai. 2,6.— (/S) Of God. Vulg. Psa. 9, 9; ib. Act. 
17, 31. — B. A quiet, tranquil state of mind, 
evenness of temper, moderation, calmness, 
tranquillity, repose, equanimity ; often with 
animus: qnis banc animi maximi aequita- 
tem in ipsa morte laudaret, si? etc., Cic. 
Tusc. 1. 40. 97: novi moderationem animi 
tui et aequitatem, id. de Sen. 1; so id. Agr. 
1, 5: ut animi aequitate plebem contine- 
ant, Caes. B. G. 6, 22; so Nop. Thras. 4: uhi 
pax evenerat aequitate. Sail. C. 9, 3. 

aequiter, adv -, v - aequus fin. 

aequiternus, a, um, adj. [aeque- 

aetornus]. equally eternal, coeternal, Claud. 
Mam. Anim. 2, 4 : Sid. Ep. 8, 13. 

* aequi-Valeo, ere, v. a. [aequus], to 
have equal power, be equivalent, Auct. 
Carm. de Phil. 6. 

aequi VOCUS, a, um, adj. [aequus voco] ; 
in gram.: verba aequivoca, of like signifi- 
cations, ambiguous, equivocal, Isid. Orig. 2, 
26 ; so Mart. Cap. 4, 97. 

aequo, avi, fitum, 1, v. a. and n. [ae- 
quus], I. Act., to make one thing equal to 
another; constr. with cum and (in gen. in 
the histt.) with dat. , and with cop. conj. (cf. 
adaequo ). (a) With cum: inventum est 
temperamentum, quo tenuiores cum prin- 
cipibus aequari se putarent, Cic. Leg. 3, 10: 
cum suas quisque opes cum potentissimis 
aequari videat. Caes. B. G 6, 22: numerum 
(corporum) cum navibus, Verg. A. 1. 193. — 
(3) W\thdat: Insedabiliter sitis arida. cor- 
pora mersans. Aequabat multum parvis 
umoribus imbrcm, an unquenchable, burn- 
ing thirst. . . made the most copious stream 
seem to them as only a few drops. Lucr. 6, 
1176: per somnum vinumque dies nocli- 
bus aequare, lav. 31, 41: aeqnavit togatus 
armati gloriam collegae, id. 4. 10, 8: cujus 
magnitudini semper animum aequavit, id. 
33. 21, 3 (but in id 6, 20. 8. facta dictis ae- 
quando,dictis is abl; v. Weissenb.ad h.l.); 
Veil. 2. 127: aequare solo templum, to level 
with the ground. Tac. A. 1, 51; so domum, 
Quint. 3, 7. 20, and Aur. Vict. Vir. Illustr. 
17, 5; and in an extended sense: Scipio 
Numantiam excisam aequavit solo, Veil 2. 
4. — Hence, trop.: solo aequandae sunt 
dictaturae consulatusque, entirely abolish- 
ed, Liv. 6. 18. — (7) With cop. conj.: Curios 
aequare Fabriciosque, Aur. Vict. Caes. 18, 2. 
— Poet.: si protinus ilium Aequasset 
nocti ludum, had played through the whole 
night, Verg. A. 9, 338.— Hence also, B. In- 
comparison, to place a thing on an equality 
with, to compare; in Cic. with cum; later 
with dat. : aequare et conferre scelera ali- 
cujus cum aliis, Cic.Verr. 1, 1, 8: ne aequa- 
veritis Hannibali Philippum, ne Carthagi- 
niensibus Macedonas: Pyrrho certe aequa- 
bitis. Liv. 31, 7: Deum homini non aequa- 
bo, Vulg. Job, 32, 21 : quis in nubibos ae- 
quabitur Domino, ib. Psa. 88, 7. — C. Of 
places, to make level, even, or smooth : 
aequata agri planities, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 48; 
and trop.: aequato discrimine. at an 
equal distance. Lucr. 5, 690: aequato omni 
um periculo, Caes. B. G. 1, 25 : aequato 
Marte. Liv. 1, 25: aequato jure omnium, 
id. 2, 3. — Poet.: ibant aequati numero* 

57 



AEQU 

tlwided into equal parts, Verg. A. 7, 698 : 
foedcra rcgum Vel Gabiis vel cum rigidis 
aequata Sabmis, i. e. aequis legibus icta, 
Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 25; cf.: si foedus est, si so- 
cietas aequatio juris est . . . cur non omnia 
aequantur ? placed in the same circum- 
stances? Liv. 8, 4 — D. T - t- 1. Aequare 
frontem, milit, t, £o mate aw egwaZ front 
Liv. 5, 38 : aequatis frontibus, Tib. 4, 1, 102 ; 
v. frons. — 2. Aequare sortes, to see that the 
lots are equal in number to those who draw, 
of the same material, and each with a dif- 
ferent name. The classical passage for this 
phrase is Plaut. Cas. 2, 6, 35 : conicite sor- 
tes : uxor, aequa (sc. eas) ; v. the preceding 
verses. So Cic. Fragm. Or. Corn. 1, p. 449 
Orell.: dum sitella defertur, dum aequan- 
tur sortes, dum sortitio fit, etc. — H. 
Neutr. or act, to become equal to one, to 
equal, come up to, attain to (mostly in the 
histt.}; constr. with dat, but oftener with 
ace. (cf. adaequo and aequipero, and Zumpt, 
§ 389, 1) : qui jam illis fere aequarunt, Cic. 
Off. 1, 1, 3 ; Ov. M. 6, 21 : ea arte aequasset 
superiores reges, ni, etc., Liv. 1, 53; so, 
cursu equum, id. 31, 35; for which Curtius: 
cursum alicujus, 4, 1: gloriam alicujus, 
Suet. Caes. 55: earn picturam imitati sunt 
multi, aequavit nemo, Plin. 35, 11, 40, § 126; 
Luc. 3, 456. — Po e t. : sagitta aequans ven- 
tos, like the winds in swiftness, Verg. A. 10, 
248: valet nondum munia comparis Aequa- 
re (juvenca), i. e. cannot yet draw even with 
her mate, Hor. C. 2, 5, 2. 

aequcr, oris, n, [aequusl f. In gen.. 
an even, level surface (ante-Aug. poet. ; only 
once in Cic. and once in Sallust) : speculo- 
rum aequor, a plane surface, as of a mirror, 
Lucr. 4, 106; 291: in summo aequore saxi, 
upon the polished, smooth marble surface, 
id. 3, 905: camporum patentium aequora, 
* Cic. Div. 1, 42 : campi, Verg. A, 7, 781 ; 
and without campus : Daren ardens agit 
aequore toto, id. ib. 5, 456 : at prius igno- 
tum ferro quam scindimus aequor, id. G. 1, 
50; 1, 97; of the desert, id. ib. 2, 105: im- 
mensum spatiis confecimus aequor, id. ib. 
541: primus in aequore pulvis, Juv. 8, 61; 
and once of the heavens: aequora caeli 
Sensimus sonere, Att. ap. Non. 505, 8 (Trag. 
Rel. p. 139 Rib.). — H. Esp., the even sur- 
face of the sea in its quiet state, the calm, 
smooth sea (" aequor mare appellatum, quod 
aequatum, cum commotum vento non est," 
Varr. L. L. 7, § 23 Mull. : quid tarn planum 
videtur quam mare? ex quo etiam aequor 
illud poetae vocant, Cic. Ac. Fragm. ap. 
Non. 65, 2 (cf. tt6vtov ^a? , Pind. P. 1, 24).— 
Also, in gen., the sea, even when agitated 
by storms, Lucr. 1. 719 : turbantibus aequo- 
ra ventis, id. 2. 1: silvaeque et saeva quie- 
rant aequora, Verg. A. 4, 523 et saep. : per 
undosum aequor, id. ib. 313: contracta pi- 
sces aequora sentiunt, Hor. C. 3, 1, 33 : ju- 
ventus Infecit aequor sanguine Punico, id. 
ib. 3, 6, 34 al. — Sometimes pleonast. with 
mare or pontus : vastum maris aequor 
. arandum, Verg. A. 2, 780 : tellus et aequora 
ponti, id. G. 1, 469.— Of the surface of the 
Tiber, Verg. A. 8, 89 and 96 (so, mare of the 
Timavus, id. ib. 1, 246; and unda of rivers, 
as of the Simo'is, id. ib. 1, 618).— In prose 
writers after the Aug. per. : placidum ae- 
quor, Tac. A. 2, 23 : penetrare aequora, Val. 
Max. 9, 1, 1; so Curt. 4, 7; Plin. 4, 12, 24, 
g 76; Mel. 1, 2. Once even in Sallust: ae- 
quore et terra, Sail. Fragm. ap. Don. ad Ter. 
Phorm. 2, 1, 13 (p. 390, n. 81 Kritz. ) dub. 

aequdreus, a, urn, adj. [aequor], of or 
pertaining to the sea (only poet.) : rex, 
Neptune, Ov. M. 8, 604: Britanni, the Brit- 
ons surrounded by the sea, id. ib. 15, 753: 
genus, the ocean kind, fish, Verg. G. 3, 243 : 
aquae, Mart. 10, 51 al. 

aequus (aecus. Pac. 32 Rib. ; Lucr. 
5, 1023 Lachm. and Munro ; aiqvos, S. C. 
de Bacch. 1. 26), a, um, adj. [formerly re- 
ferred to EIKii, eoiKu, but Pott connects 
it with Sanscr. eka=r one, as if properly, 
one and uniform; others consider it as 
akin to aemulor, q. v.], I. A. Of place, 
that extends or lies in a horizontal direc- 
tion, plain, even, level, flat (esp. freq. in the 
strategic descriptions of the histt. ; syn. : 
planus, aequalis, aequabilis. par, similis, 
Justus): locus ad libellam aequus, level, 
Varr. R. R. 1, 6 fin. : aequus et planus lo- 
cus, Cic. Caec. 17 fin. : in aequum locum se 
demittere, Caes/B. G. 7, 28: legio, quae 



A E Q U 

paulo aequiore loco constiterat, id. ib. 7, 51 : 
in aequum locum deducere, Sail. J. 42 (cf. 
in Gr. eir to 'iaov Karapatvttv, Xen. Anab. 
4, 6, 18).— Trop.: sive loquitur ex inferi- 
ore loco sive aequo sive ex superiore, i. e. 
before the judges, sitting on raised seats, or 
in the Senate, or in the assembly of the 
people from the rostra, Cic. de Or. 3, 6, 23: 
meos multos et ex superiore et ex' aequo 
loco sermones habitos cum tua summa 
laude, from the tribune, and on private 
matters, id. Fam. 3, 8. — In the histt., some- 
times subst. : aequum. h n -, witn a 9 m -i 

level ground, a plain : facilem in aequo 
campi victoriam fore, Liv. 5, 38: ut pri- 
mum agmen aequo, ceteri per acclive ju- 
gum insurgerent, Tac. Agr. 35 : in aequum 
digredi, id. ib. 18: in aequo obstare, id. ib. 
36 ; id. H. 4, 23. — Also, an eminence, if it 
rises without inequalities: dum Romanae 
cohortes in aequum eniterentur, up the 
slope, Tac. A. 2, 80. — As a level place is 
more favorable for military operations 
than an uneven one, aequus has the signif., 
B. Favorable, convenient, advantageous (as 
its opp., iniquus, uneven, has that of unfa- 
vorable, etc. ). 1, O f place: locum se ae- 
quum ad dimicandum dedisse, Caes. B. C. 3, 
73: etsi non aequum locum videbat suis, 
Nep. Milt. 5, 4: non hie silvas nee paludes, 
sed aequis locis aequos deos, Tac. A. 1, 68. 
— 2. Of time: judicium aequiore tem- 
pore fieri oportere, more propitious, Cic. 
Corn. Fragm. ap. Ascon. p. 72 : et tempo- 
re et loco aequo, Liv. 26, 3: tempore ae- 
quo. Suet. Caes. 35. — 3. I n g en i of per- 
sons or things (freq. and class. ), favorable, 
kind, friendly, benevolent, etc. ; constr. ab- 
sol. with dat, or xn and ace. (in poets in 
with abl). ( a ) Absol. : consequeris, ut eos 
ipsos, quos contra statuas, aequos placatos- 
que dimittas, Cic. Or. 10, 34: nobilitate ini- 
mica, non aequo scuatu, id. Q. Fr. 2, 3 med. : 
meis aequissimis utuntur auribus, id. Fam. 
7. 33 : oculis aspicere aequis, Verg. A. 4, 372: 
O dominum aequum et bonum, Suet. Aug. 
53: boni et aequi et faciles domini, id. Tib. 
29.— (/3) With dat: aequa Venus Teucris, 
Pallas iniqua fuit, Ov. Tr. 1, 2, 6; id. A. A. 
2, 310. — (<y) "With in and ace: quis hoc sta- 
tu it, quod aequum sit in Quintium, id ini- 
quum esse in Maevium, Cic. Quint. 14.— 
(3) "With in and abl.: victor erat quamvis, 
aequus in hoste fuit, Prop. 4, 18, 28. — Hence. 
4. aequUS. h m - subst, a friend : ego ut 
me tibi amicissimum esse et aequi et ini- 
qui intellegant, curabo, both friends and ene- 
mies, Cic. Fam. 3, Qfin. : aequis iniquisque 
persuasum erat, Liv. 5, 45. 

II. That is equal to another in any qual- 
ity, equal, like; and of things divided into 
two equal parts, a half: aequo censu cen- 
seri, Plaut. Trin. 2, 4, 92 : partis, Lucr. 3, 
125 ; so Aur. Vict. Orig. 19, 1 ; and Vulg. 1 
Reg. 30, 24: aequa erit mensura sagorum, 
ib. Exod. 26, 8 : pondera, ib. Lev. 19, 36 : 
portio, ib. 2 Mach. 8, 30 : aequa dementia, 
Lucr. 1, 705 al. : aequa manu discedere, to 
come off with equal advantage, Sail. C. 39 ; 
so, aequo Marte pugnare, with equal suc- 
cess, Liv. 2, 6; Curt. 4, 15, 29; Flor. 4, -2, 48 
al. : urbs erat in summo nubibus aequa 
jugo, Ov. P. 4, 7, 24: aequum vulnus utri- 
que tulit, id. M. 9, 719 (cf. id. ib. 7, 803 : ae- 
quales urebant pectora flamraae) : sequitur- 
que patrem non passibus aequis, Verg. A, 
2, 724: pars aequa mundi, Plin. 2, 19, 17, 
§ 81: utinam esset mini pars aequa amoris 
tecum, i. e. aeque vicissim amaremus, Ter. 
Euh. 1, 2, 12 : non tertiam portionem, ve- 
rum aequam, Plin. 3, 1, 1, § 5 al. — Hence 
the adverbial phrases, 1. Ex aequo, in like 
manner, in an equal degree, equally (= ef 
'Lvov, Hdt., Dem.), Lucr. 1, 854: dixit et ex 
aequo donis formaque probata, etc., Ov. H. 
1G, 87 ; 20, 123 ; id. Am. 1, 10, 33; id. A. A. 2, 
682; id. M. 3, 145; 4, 62; Liv. 36, 37 : adver- 
sarum rerum ex aequo socii sunt (Fosi Che- 
ruscis), cum in secundis minores fuissent, 
Tac. G. 36 fin. — 2. In aequo esse or stare, 
to be equal : qui cogit mori nolentem, in 
aequo est, quique properantem impedit, 
Sen. Phoen. 98: ut naturam oderint, quod 
infra decs sumus, quod non in aequo illis 
stetimus, id. Ben. 2, 29: in aequo ponere 
aliquem alicui, to make equal, to put on an 
equality, to compare : in aequo eum (Philo- 
poemenem) summis imperatoribus posue- 
runt, Liv. 39, 50 fin.—'B, Morally. 1, f 



AEQU 

persons, fair, equitable, impartial in con* 
duct toward others ( cliff, from Justus, just; 
v. aequitas, II.); constr. absol, with dat; 
more rarely with gen.: praetor aequus et 
sapiens, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 65; 2, 5, 59: aequis- 
simus aestimator et judex, id. Fin. 3, 2: 
praebere se aequum alicui, id. Fam. 2, 1: 
absentium aequi, praesentibus mobiles, 
benevolent toward, Tac. A. 6, 36. — 2. O f 
t h i ngs, fair, right, equitable, reasonable : 

ITA. SENATVS. AIQVOM. CEXSVIT. , S. C. de 

Bach. 1. 26 : et aecum et rectum est, Pac. 
ap. Non. 261, 13 (Trag. Rel. p. 84 Rib. ) : ae- 
qua ethonestapostuiatio, Cic. Rose. Am. 2: 
quod justum est et aequum, servis prae- 
state, just and fair, Vulg. Col. 4, 1: postulo 
primum id, quod aequissimum est, ut, etc., 
Cic. Clu. 2: aequa lex et omnibus utilis. id. 
Balb. 27 : aequissimis legibus monere, Aur. 
Vict. Caes. 9, 5 : aequae conditiones.Vell. 2, 
25 ; see Fischer, Gr. II. 611.— Hence, 3. ae- 
quum. i* n - subst, what is fair, equitable, 
or jits i; fairness, equity, ov justice, etc. : jus 
atque aequum, Enn.ap. Non. p. 399. 10 (Trag. 
v. 224 Vahl.): utilitas justi prope mater et 
aequi, Hor. S. 1, 3, 98: aequi studium. Aur. 
Vict. Caes. 24,6. — Often with comparatives, 
more than is right, proper, reasonable : la- 
mentari amplius aequo, Lucr. 3, 966: inju- 
rias gravius aequo habere, to feel too deeply, 
Sail. C. 50: potus largius aequo, Hor. Ep. 2, 

2, 215. — Hence, aequum est. it is reasonable. 
proper, right, etc. ; constr. with ace. and 
inf., in good prose also with dat. pers. and 
ut, Rudd. II. p. 235, n, 21 : nos quiescere ae- 
quom est, Enn. ap. Diom. p. 382 P. (Trag. v. 
199 Vahl.): quae liberum scire aequom est 
adulescentem, Ter. Eun. 3, 2,25: significant 
Imbecillorum esse aecum misererier omnls, 
Lucr. 5. 1023: non est aequum nos derelin- 
quere verbum Dei, Vulg. Act. 0, 2; aequius 
est mori quam auctoritatem imperii foeda- 
re, Aur. Vict. Epit. 12, T : ut peritis '{ Ut 
piscatorem aequomst (sc. perire). fame si- 
tique speque, Plaut. Rud. 2, 2, 7; so, sicut 
aequum est homini de potestate deorum 
timide et pauca dicamus, Cic. Imp. Pomp. 
16, 47. — In Plaut., with abl. : plus vidissem 
quain med atque illo aequom foret, would 
be becoming in me and him, Plaut. Bacch. 

3, 3, 84; id. Rud. prol. 47. — 4. Aequum as 
subst very freq. with bonum = aequitas, 
equitable conduct toward others, fairness, 
equity, etc.: neque quidquam queo aequi 
bonique ab eo impetrare, what is right and 
just, Plaut. Cure. 1, 1, 65: cum de jure ci- 
vili, cum de aequo et bono disputaretur, 
Cic. Brut. 38: ex aequo et bono, non ex 
callido versutoque jure rem judican opor- 
tere, id. Caecin. 23: fit reus magis ex aequo 
bonoque quam ex jure gentium, in accord- 
ance with justice and equity. Sail. J. 35. — 
Also without et: illi doluih malum, illi 
fidem bonam, illi aequum bonum tradide- 
runt, Cic. Top. 17. — So also, aequius melius, 
according to greater equity, Cic. Off. 3, 15 ; 
id. Top. 17. — C. Of a state of mind, even, 
unruffled, calm, composed, tranquil, patient, 
enduring (cf. aequitas, II. B.); esp. freq. 
with animus or mens: animus aequos op- 
tumum estaerumnae condimentum. Plaut. 
Rud. 2, 3, 71: concedo et quod animus ae- 
quus est et quia necesse est. Cic. Rose. Am. 
50 : quodadest memento Componere aequus, 
Hor. C. 3, 29, 32 : tentantem majora, fere 
praesentibus aequum. id. Ep. 1, 17. 24; and 
so, aequam memento rebus in ardnis Serva- 
re mentem, etc., id. C. 2, 3, 1.— Esp. freq. in 
the adv. abl. : aequo (aequiore, aequissimo) 
animo, imth even mind, with equanimity, 
patiently, calmly, quietly .with forbearance : 
ego, nisi Bibulus adniteretur de triumpho, 
aequo animo essera. nunc vero al<rxpov 
c-ioojrav, Cic. Att. 0,8: carere aequo animo 
aliqiia re, id. Brut. 6: fcrre aliquid. Nep. 
Dion. 6, 7; Aur. Vict. Orig. 6, 3: accipere, 
Sail. C. 3, 2 : tolerare, id. J. 31 : quo aequi- 
ore animo Germanicus celerem succession 
nem operiretur, Suet. Tib. 25 : testem se in 
judiciis interrogari aequissimo amino pa- 
tiebatur, id. Aug. 56. — In eccl. Lat. = bono 
animo: aequo animo esto. be of good cheer, 
Vulg. 3 Reg. 21, 7: aequo' animo (aliquisj 
est? Psallat. ib. Jacob. 5, 13.— Hence: aequi 
bonique facere aliquid, to regard as fair and 
reasonable ( prop. , a gen. of value. Roby, 
§ 1191), to put up with, be content with, sub- 
mit to, acquiesce in, etc.: istuc aequi lioni- 
que facio, Ter. Heaut. 4. 5, 40: tranquillis- 
simus animus meus totum istuc aequi bom 



AEQU 

tacit, Cic. Att. 7, 7; Liv. 34, 22 fin. : aequi I 
istuc faciam, it will be all the same to me, 
Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 189.— So also: aequi boni- 
que dicere, to propose any thing reasonable, 
Ter. Phorm. 4, 3, 32. — Hence, aequC, 
adv. , in like manner, equally, just as = ex 
aequo, pariter, Gr. iVwr, ojuoiur (indicating 
the entire equality of two objects com- 
pared, while similiter denotes only like- 
ness) : ea (benevolentia) non pariter omnes 
egemus . . . honore et gloria fortasse non ae- 
que omnes egent, Cic. Off. 2, 8, 30: non pos- 
sum ego non aut proxime atque ille aut 
ctiam aeque laborare, id. Fam. 9, 13 T 2: uni- 
versa aeque eveniunt justo et impio.Vulg. 
Eccl. 9, 2. 1, In the comic poets with cum 
or the comp. abl. (cf. adaeque); in Cic. and 
good class, authors gen. with et, atque, ac, 
ac si ; less class, with quam, ut. quam ut; 
in Petr. with tamquam. (a) Aeque— cum: 
animum advorte, ut aeque mecum haec 
scias, Plaut. As. 2, 2, 66 ; id. Poen. prol. 47 : 
novi aeque omnia tecum, Ter. Phorm. 5, 9, 
43. But in Plaut. As. 4, 1, 26, tecum una 
postea aeque pocla potitet, una belongs 
with tecum to potitet, and aeque is put 
absol. {sc. ut tu). — (/i) Aeque with comp. 
abl.: nullus est hoc meticulosus aeque, 
as this person, Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 137 : qui 
me in terra aeque fortunatus erit, id. 
Cure. 1, 2, 51.— (7) Aeque — et or aeque— 
que (as in Gr. 'iaov nai, 'lea nai, Soph. Oed. 
Tyr. 611; Thuc. 3, 14): nisi aeque amicos 
et nosmet ipsos diligamus, equally as our- 
selves, Cic. Fin. 1, 20, 67: versus aeque pri- 
ma et media ot extrema pars attenditur, 
id. de Or. 3. 50, 192; id. Rose. Com. 1, 2; so 
id. Mur. 13, 28; id. Clu. 69, 195; id. Tusc. 2, 
26, 62 al. : quod Aeque neglectum pueris 
senibusque nocebit, Hor. Ep. 1,1, 26. — (6) 
Aeque— atque, — ac, — ac si, as ... as ; as 
much as, as : vide ne, quern tu esse hebetem 
deputes aeque ac pecus, is, etc., Att. ap. 
Cic. Div. 1, 22, 45: pumex non aeque aridus 
atque hie est senex, Plaut. Aul. 2, 4, 18; 
Ter. Phorm. 1, 2, 43; Varr. R. R. 3. 8, 2: nisi 
haberes, qui illis aeque ac tu ipse gauderet, 
Cic. Lael. 6, 22: sed me colit et observat 
-aeque atque patronum suum, id. Fam. 13, 
69; 2, 2; so id. Brut. 71. 248; id. Rose. Am. 
40, 116; Cels. 6, 15; Tac. H. 4, 5 ; Suet. Caes. 
12 al.: aeque ac si, with the subj.,just as 
if, altogether as if: Egnatii absentis rem 
ut tueare, aeque a te peto ac si mea nego- 
tia essent, Cic. Fam. 13, 43, 3; Auct. Her. 2, 
13, 19: quo factum est, ut jumenta aeque 
nitida ex castellis educeret ac si in cam- 
pestribus ea loci.s habuisset, Nep. Eum. 5, 
6; Liv. 10. 7, 4; 44. 22, 5 al.— (e) Aeque — 
quam (only in Plaut. and prose writers 
from the Aug. per. ; neither in Cic. nor in 
Caes.), as ... as, in the same manner as, 
as well . . .as, like, Plaut. Mil. 2, 5, 55 : nul- 
lum esse agrum aeque feracem quam hie 
-est, id. Epid. 2, 3, 1 : nihil aeque eos terruit 
quam robur et color imperatoris, Liv. 28, 
26, 14 ; 5, 6, 11 ; so 5, 3, 4 ; 31, 1,3: in navi- 
bus posita aeque quam in aedificiis, Plin. 
2 81, 83, § 196 ; so 2, 70, 72, § 180 ; Tac. A. 14, 
38; id. H. 2, 10; 4, 52; Suet. Aug. 64. 89; id. 
Galb. 4 al.— (O Aeque— ut; a rare combi- 
nation, and unworthy of imitation (in au- 
thors of the class, per. its reception rests, 
for the most part, upon false readings for 
aeque et or aeque ac), as much as, like : cui 
nihil aeque in causis agendis ut brevitas 
placet, Plin. Ep. 1, 20, 1 Keil: accinctus ae- 
que ut discinctus, Vulg. 3 Reg. 20, 11 : Pos- 
sidentis earn (terram) singuli aeque ut 
frater suus, ib. Ezech. 47, 14: idemque pro- 
ficeret aeque ut rosaceum, Plin. 23, 4, 45, 
§ 89, where Jan reads: proficeret quod ro- 
saceum. — In Plaut. once aeque — quasi 
for the class, aeque ac: quern videam ae- 
•que esse maestum quasi dies si dicta sit, 
Plaut. As. 5, 1, 11 Fleck.— (n) Sometimes ae- 
que— aeque, as well as, as much as: aeque 
pauperibus prodest, locupletibus aeque, 
Hor. Ep. 1. 1, 25 : aeque discordiam prae- 
positorum, aeque concordiam subjectis ex- 
itiosam, Tac. Agr. 15. — 2. Ttie comparison 
is often to be supplied from the whole sen- 
tence or context; hence, aeque stands 
absol. for aeque ac, etc. (ante-class, freq. ; 
also in Cic. and Liv.), equally, as much as. 
as : eadem oratio non aeque valet, Enn. ap. 
<3ell. 11, 4 (from Eurip. Hec. 295: Ao 7 or . . . 
oit raurnv aOevei): satin habes, si femina- 
rum nullast quam aeque diligam? Plaut. 
Am. I, 3, 11 : Aetna mons non aeque altus, 



AERA 

id. Mil. 4, 2, 73; 4, 7. 10; id. Most. 1, 3, 85, 
etc. ; Ter. Phorm. 3, 3, 32; Cic. Fam. 4, 6, 1 ; 
so id. ib. 5, 21; id. Fin. 4, 33, 62: aeque 
sons, Liv. 29, 19, 2 ; so 29, 19, 4 al. : aeque 
non est dubium, it is as little doubtful, 
Plin. 2, 15, 13, § 68.-3. With omnes, uter- 
que, and definite numerals, to indicate that 
a thing applies equally to all the objects 
designated, equally : non omnia eadem ae- 
que omnibus suavia esse scito, Plaut. As. 3, 
3, 51; Ter. Hec. 2, 1, 2; so Cic. Off. 2, 8, 31; 
id. Fin. 4, 27, 75 al. : etsi utrique nostrum 
prope aeque gratae erant (litterae), id. Fam. 
13, 18; so id. Quint. 28, 86; Verg. G. 3, 118; 
Ov. Tr. 3, 8, 33 ; id. Fast. 1, 226 : aeque ambo 
pares, Plaut. Men. 5, 9, 60 : duae trabes ae- 
que longae, Caes. B. C. 2, 10 ; Suet. Aug. 101. 
—4. Sometimes absol., with several sub- 
stantives, alike, equally : Tragici et comi- 
ci Numquam aeque sunt meditati, Plaut. 
Pers. 4, 2, 4: imperium bonus ignavus ae- 
que sibi exoptant. Sail. C. 11.— 5. I n ? laut - 
Capt. 3, 5, 42, nee est mihi quisquam, me- 
lius aeque cui velim, melius velle is, per- 
haps, to be taken together as a phrase, and 
the comp. considered as used in a restricted 
sense, as in melius est. Others consider the 
comp. as used for the simple positive; cf. 
adaeque.— B. Justly 7 with equity: mihi id 
aeque factum arbitror, Plaut. Mil. 5, 22 dub. 
(Ritschl: jureque id factum arbitror). — 
Comp.: ferroquam fame aequius perituros, 
more willingly, Sail. H. Fragm.— Sup.: ae- 
quissime jus dicere, Aur. Vict. Epit. 11, 2; 
judicas ut qui aequissime, Sid. 15, Ep. 11. 

jg®= An old adverb, form, aequiter, 
also occurs; praeda per participes aequiter 
partita est, Liv. Andr. ap. Non. 512, 31 ; so 
Pac. ib., Att. ib., and Plaut. ace. to Prise. 
1010 P. 

aer aeris m - ( m Enn. once/ewi.,Gell. 
13, 20, 14, as also ai]p in Gr.. in the earliest 
per., w&sfem.; Gr. gen. aiiros, Stat. Th. 2, 1 
693; Gr. ace. aera, Cic, Sen., Plin.; pure 
Lat. form, fierem, Varr. L. L. 5, 10, 65 ; Cato 
ap. Serv. ad Verg. A. 10, 184; Plin. 18, 1, 1, 
§ 3; plur. nom. and ace. aeres, Vitr. 11; 
later aEra, Ven. Fort. Carm. 9, 1, 141 ; dat. 
aeribus, Lucr.4, 289; 5, 643), = an P , the air, 
properly the lower atmosphere (in distinc- 
tion from aether, the upper pure air): istic 
est is Juppiter quem dico. quern Graeci vo- 
cant Aerem, qui ventus est et nubes, im- 
ber postea, Atque ex imbre frigus, ventus 
post fit, aer denuo. Enn. ap. Varr. L. L. 5, 
§ 65 Mull. (Epicharm. v. 9 Vahl.): terra cir- 
cumfusa undique est hac animali spirabi- 
lique natura, cui nomen est aer, Graecum 
illud quidem, sed perceptum jam tamen 
usu a nostris; tritum est enim pro Latino, 
Cic. N. D. 2, 36, 91: itaque ae'r et ignis et 
aqua et terra primae sunt, id. Ac. 1, 7, 26 : 
Anaximenes ae'ra Deum statuit, id. N". D. 1, 
10: aerem in perniciem vertere, Plin. 18, 1, 

1, § 3 al.— Also mplur. : aeribus binis, Lucr. 
4, 291: acres locorum salubres aut pesti- 
lentes, Vitr. 1, 1 fin. — II. T r a n s f. A. 
Poet.: aer summus arboris, the airy sum- 
mit, for the highest point, Verg. G. 2, 123; 
cf. Juv. 6, 99.— B. Also poet, for a cloud, 
vapor, mist: Venus ob.-euro gradientes acre 
sepsit, Verg. A. 1. 411: acre septus, Val. Fl. 
5 7 401.— C. With limiting adj. = the weather : 
crassus, Cic. Ac. 2, 25, 81: fusus et extenua- 
tus, id. N. D. 2, 39 : purus et tenuis, id. ib. 

2, 16: temperatus, id. Div. 2, 42. 

1. t acra (dispyl.), ae, /., = alpa., a 
weed among grain ; darnel, tare, or cockle, 
Lolium temulentum, Linn. ; Plin. 18, 17, 
44, § 156. 

2. aera ae ) /• [from aera, counters ; v. 
aes, 2. E.], later Lat. I. In math., a given 
number, according to which a reckoning or 
calculation is to be made, Vitruvius (Vetru- 
bius) Rufus ap. Salmas. Esercc. I. p. 483. — 
II. An item of an account (for the class, aera, 
plur. of aes, Ruf. Fest. in Breviar. init. The 
passage of Lucil. cited by Non. 2, 42, aera 
perversa, is also prob. plur.).— HI. An era 
or epoch from which time is reckoned, Isid. 
Orig. 5, 36 ; cf. Inscr. Orell. 11. p. 371. 

aeramen, inis, n. [aes], a late form for 
aes, copper, bronze : aeramen aut marmo- 
ra, Cod. Th. 15, 1, 37 : ferri vel aeraminis 
purgamenta, Theod. Prise. 1, 9. 

acramentum, L "• C id -]> that is P re ' 

pared from copper or bronze; hence, a 
cower or bronze vessel or utensil, Plin. 33, 
5,30, §94; 35, 15, 51, § 182. 



AERA 

aeraria and aerarium, v. aerarius, 
under B. and C. 

aerarius, a , um, adj. [aes]. I. Thai 
pertains to or is made of copper, bronze, 
etc.: aerarium metallum, a copper-mine, 
Vitr. 7, 9 ; Plin. 33, 5, 26, § 86 : fornaces, 
smeltiitg-furnaces, id. 11, 36, 42, § 119 : fa- 
brica, the preparation of copper, id. 7, 56, 
57, § 197 : faber, a coppersmith, id. 34, 8, 19, 
6, § 61 (also aerarius alone; v. below).— H, 
Of or pertaining to money : propter aera- 
riarn rationem non satis erat in tabulis in- 
spexisse quantum deberetur, on account of 
the standard of coin, Cic. Quint. 4: nine di- 
cuntur milites aerarii, ab aere quod stipen- 
dia facerent,Varr. L.L. 5, § 181 Mull.: tribu- 
nus, who superintended disbursements of the 
public treasury : aerarii tribuni a tribu- 
endo aere sunt appellati, Paul, ex Fest. p. 2 
Mull. ; or, ace. to Varr. : ab eo, quibus at- 
tributa erat pecunia, ut militi reddant, tri- 
buni aerarii dicti, Varr. L. L. 5, § 181 Mull. ; 
v. tribunus. — Hence, subst. : aerarius, 
1) m - 1. (Sc faber.) One who works in cop- 
per, etc. , a coppersmith : in aerariorum 
offlcinis, Plin. 16, 6, 8, § 23 : aerariorum 
marculi. Mart. 12, 57, 6 ; so Inscr. Orell. 
4140. — 2. ( Sc - civis.) A citizen of the lowest 
class, who paid only a poll-tax (aera pende- 
bat), and had no right of voting. Other 
citizens, upon the commission of great 
crimes, were degraded by the censors into 
this class, and deprived of all previous dig- 
nities. (Cf. Gell. 4, 12 and 29; Drak. ad 
Liv. 24, 18, 6; Smith's Diet. Antiq., and 
Nieb. Rom. Gesch. 2, 63 and 452.) Referre 
aliquem in aerarios, Cic. Clu. 43: eximere 
aliquem ex aerariis, id. de Or. 2, 66 ext; 
Liv. 24, 18: omnes, quos senatu moverunt, 
quibusque equos ademerunt ( censores ) 
aerarios fecerunt et tribu moverunt, id. 

42, 10 al.— B. aeraria, ae >/- 1. ( Sc - f °- 
dina, like argentaria and ferraria, Liv. 34, 
21: auraria, Tac. A. 6, 19 al.) A mine : mul- 
tis locis apud eos (sc. Aquitanos) aerariae 
structuraeque sunt, Caes. B. G. 3, 21 Herz. 
— 2. ( Sc - offlcina.) A smelting or refining 
hous'e,V&VT. L. L. 8, 33.-3. ( Sc - fornax.) A 
smelting-fumace, Plin. 34, 13, 33, § 128.— C. 
aeraHlim, '^ n - ( sc - stabulum), the place 
in the temple of Saturn at Rome, where the 
public treasure was kept, the treasury: T 6 
Tap.ielov, to kolvov : Aerarium sane popu- 
lus Romanus in aede Saturni habuit, Paul. 
ex Fest. p. 2 Mull. ; cf. Plin. Pan. 92; refer- 
re pecuniam in aerarium, Cic. Agr. 2, 27 
(for w T hich deferre is often used in Liv. 
q. v. ) : dare alicui pecuniam ex aerario, id. 
Verr. 2, 3, 70. — Also for the public treasure 
or finances : C. Gracchus, cum largitiones 
maximas fecisset et effudisset aerarium, 
Cic. Tusc. 3, 20, 48; Nep. Arist. 3, 1; id. 
Att. 8. — In the time of the emperors the 
aerarium (public treasure) was distin- 
guished from fiscus (the wealth of the em- 
peror): bona Sejani ablata aerario. ut in 
fisco cogerentur. Tac. A. 6, 2 ; Plin Pan. 
36; Suet. Vesp. 16; v. fiscus. In the treas- 
ury the public archives were kept : factum 
senatus consultum, ne decreta patrum ante 
diem decimum ad aerarium deferrentur, 
Tac. A. 3, 51; cf. id. ib. 13, 28; Suet. Aug. 
94; id. Caes. 28; and also the standards: 
signa ex aerario prompta, Liv. 4, 22. — The 
Quaestores aerarii (under Augustus and his 
immediate successors the Praetores) pre- 
sided over the aerarium, with whom the 
Tribuni aerarii were associated as assist- 
ants; cf. Quaestor and Tribunus. — The ae- 
rarium contained also a fund, established 
after the invasion of Gaul, and augmented 
by the immense booty acquired in tbe wars 
with Carthage, Macedonia. Corinth, etc., as 
well as by the tribute of the manumissi, 
which could be used only in cases of ex- 
treme public necessity, hence with the epi. 
thet sanctius, Caes. B. C. 1. 24: aurum vi- 
cesimarium, quod in sanctiore aerario ad 
ultimos casus servaretur, promi placuit, 
Liv. 27, 10; cf. Cic. Att. 7, 21; id. Verr. 2, 
4, 63 (of the Syracusans). Hence trop., 
Quint. 10, 3, 3: aerarium militare, destined 
by Aug. for defraying the expenses of war, 
Tac. A. 1, 78; Suet. Aug. 49; Plin. Pan. 
92, 1. 

aeratUS, a - um i P- «■ [from aero, Hre, 

found in no example, and only mentioned 

in Priscian : a metalloruin quoque nomini- 

bus solent nasci verba, ut ab auro, auro, as. 

59 



AERO 

ab aere, aero, as: unde auratus et aeratus, 
p. 828 P.]. J, Furnished or covered with 
copper or bronze : ratis, Naev. ap. Varr. h. 
L. 7, § 23 Miill. (Bell. Punic, v. 59 Vahl.): 
lecti, having bronze feet, Cic. Verr, 2, 4, 26, 
§ 60 : naves, Hor. C. 2, 16, 21 : porta, Ov. F. 
2, 785. — Poet. : acies, armed ranks, Verg. 
A. 9, 463. — If, Made of bronze : catenae, 
Prop. 3, 13, 11.—* HI. Sarcastic, of a rich 
man: tribuni nontam aeratiquam aerarii, 
Cic. Att. 1, 16, 8. 

1. aereUS { trisyl. ), a, um, adj. [aes]. 
I. Made of copper : connia, Verg. A. 7, 615 : 
clavus, Plm. 16, 10, 20, § 51: tabulae, Suet. 
Vesp. 8: vasa,Vulg. 2 Reg. 8, 10.— H. Fur- 
nished or covered with copper or bronze : 
clipeus, Verg. A. 12, 541; so {with copper) 
Vuig. 1 Reg. 17, 6 : puppis, Verg. A. 5, 198 
(cf. : aeratae naves, Hor. C. 2, 16, 21).— 
aereilS. i, ^- (sc. nummus), a bronze coin: 
aereos signatos constituere, Vitr. 3, 1. — 
aeretim, h n - a copper color, Plin. 8, 52. 
78, g 212. 
2. aereUS, a, um, v. aerius. 
* aerifer (trisyl.), ftra. fSrum, adj. 
[ aes - fero ], bearing copper or bronze, i. e. 
bronze cymbals, of the attendants of Bac- 
chus: inanus, Ov. F. 3, 740. 

aenfice, adv. [aes facio]. with the art 
of the worker in bronze: Musae (i. e. Musa- 
rum statuae). quas aerifice duxti, Varr. ap. 
Non. 69. 30, and 283. 31. 

t aerificiumi dictum, quod fit ex 
aere, Non. 69. 28. 

(aerifodina a e. a false read, in Varr. 
L. L, 5, g 7. ) 

aerinUS, a, um, adj. [I. aera], of darnel 
or cockle, Plin. 22, 25, 58, § 125; 24, 11 59, 
§ 100. ' • 

aeri-pes, pedis, adj. [aes]. I. Bronze- 
footed (poet,): tauri, Ov. H. 12, 93: eerva, 
Verg. A. 6, 802 (since, ace. to fable, they had 
feet of bronze; hence we need not, with 
Charis. p. 249; Diom. p. ±37 P., and Pomp, 
p. 449 Lind.,take aeripedes for aoripedes 
from aer. the air, and pes).— H. Metaph., 
strong of foot ; hence, swift of foot, swift- 
footed (as in Or. xa \K07rouc sometimes = 
lo-xvpoTTuw): cervi, Aus. Idyll. 11, 14. 

aeri-SOntlS (quadrisyl.), a, um, adj. 
[aes], sounding with bronze: antra, i. e. in 
which the Guretes beat their bronze shields, 
Sil 2, 93: moiis, Val. Fl. 3, 28 al. 

aeriUS (quadrisyl.), more rar. aere- 
US, a , UI ", adj., = dtepio?. I. Pertaining 
to the air, aerial (a poet, word, which Cic. 
uses only in higher flights of speech) : vo- 
lucres, Lucr. 5, H25 ; Cic. Univ. 10 : vblatus 
avium atque cantus, id. Top. 20 : aerias vias 
carpore, their way in the air, Ov. A. A. 2, 
44: aerias tentasse domos, the heavens, 
* Hor. C. 1, 28, 5 al.— Hence aerium mel, 
because the bee was believed to collect 
its honey from falling dew, Verg. G. 4, 1. 
—II. Rising aloft, airy, high.— So esp. of 
mountains: Alpes, Verg. G. 3, 474; Ov. M. 
2, 226 : aerio vertice Taurus, Tib. 1, 7, 15 
(aetherio, Mull.): cacumen, Cat. 64, 240 al. 
—Of trees: quercus, Verg. A. 3, 680:' nlmus, 
id. E. 1, 59. — Of other things: arces, Verg. 
A. 3, 291: (capra) cornibus ae'riis, Ov. F. 5, 
119. — * B. Aeria spes, airy, i, e. quickly 
flying away, vain, fleeting, transitory, Arn. 
2, p. «6. 

t aeriZUSa, ae,/, = bepi&vtra {Part 
from aepi^a), to imitate or resemble air, to 
be as pure as air), a kind oj precious stone, 
ace. to Salmas., the turquoise, Plin. 37, 8 
37, § 115. 

1. aero, "re, v. aeratus. 
t 2. aero (also written ero) 5 onis, m., 
= a'ipiv, a braided or wicker basket, hamper ': 
aerones ex ulva palustri facti, Vitr. 5, 12: 
aeronibus harenae plenis, Plin. 36, 14, 21, 
§ 96 ; Dig. 19, 2, 31 ; cf. Don. ad Ter. Phorm. 
1, 2, 72. 

I aeroidis. ae, m,, = hepoeidn?, of the 
color of the air, like air, sky-blue : berylli, 
Plin. 37, 5, 21, § 77. 

t aero man tia, ae,/,= iepo^avTeia, 

divination from the state of the at>, aero- 
mancy, Isid. Grig. 8, 9. 

Aerope, es, ana Aeropa, ae, /:, = 

'Aepoir,], che wife of Atreus. Ov. Tr. 2, 391; 
Hyg. Fab 86, 88. 

t aerophobus, i, m., = aepo^dfios, 

one that fears the air. Cael. Aur. Acut. 3, l'_>. 
aerdsUS, a, um, adj. [aes], full of cop- 
60 



AERU 

per : Cyprus, Paul, ex Fest. p. 20 Miill. : 
aurum, gold that contains many parts of 
copper, Plin. 33, 5, 29, § 93 : ferrum, id. 34, 
14, 41, § 143 : pecunia, Dig. 46, 3, 102. 

aeruca, ae,/. [aes], a kind of verdigris, 
Vitr. ,, 1-2. 

aerugino, avi, atum, 1, v. n. [aerugo], 
to become rusty, cankered (eccl.): aurum et 
argentum vestrum aerugmavit, Vuig. Jac. 
5,3. — II. Trop. : sicut aeramentum, aeru- 
ginat nequitia illius, Vuig Eccli. 12, 10, 

aeruginosas, a , um, adj. [\&.\fiui 

of copper -rust, rusty (perh. only in Seneca) : 
manus, Contr. 1, 2 fin. : lamellae, id. Brut. 
Vit. 12._ 

aerugfO, mis, / [aes, as ferrugo from 
ferrumj. J. Rust of copper : aes Corinthi- 
um in aeruginem incidit, * Cic. Tusc. 4, 14- 
Pliu. 15, 8, 8, § 34; 34, 17, 48, § 160. — u' 
T r a n s f. \ m The verdigris prepared from 
the same : Aeruginis quoque magnus usus 
est, Plin. 34, 11, 26, § 110. —2, In gen., 
rust of gold and sihxr : aerugo eorum (auri 
et argenti) in testiinonnnn vobis erit, \ ulg. 
Jac. 5. 3. —3. P o e t. (as pars pro toto. and 
sarcastic. ), money, Ju v. 13, 60. — H. Tr o p. 
A. Envy, jealousy, ill-will (which "seek to 
consume the possessions of a neighbor, as 
rust corrodes metals): haec est Aerugo 
mera, Hor. S. 1, 4. 101: versus tincti viridi 
aerugine, Mart. 10, 33. 5; 2, 61, 5.— B. Ava- 
rice, which cleaves to the mind of man like 
rust : animos aerugo et cura peculi Cum 
semel imbnerit, Hor. A. P. 330. 

aettimna,ae (pleb. er-)-/ [contr. from 
aegnmonia; as to the suppressed g, cf. ju- 
mentum from jugum. Doed. Syn. IV. p. 420. 
Others explain aerumua (with Paul, ex Fest. 
s. v. aerumnula, p. 24 Miill.) orig. for a frame 
for carrying burdens upon the back; hence 
tvovXneed, luant, trouble, toil hardship, dis- 
tress, tribulation, calamity, etc, (objectively; 
while aegnmonia, like aegritudo, deuotes, 
subjectively, the condition of mind, Doed, 

I. c; for the most part only ante-class., ex- 
cept in Cic, who uses it several times, in or- 
der Lo designate by one word the many mod- 
ifications and shadmgs of the condition of 
mental suffering; in Quintilian's time the 
word was obsolete, v. Quint. 8, 3, 26): tibi 
sunt ante ferendae aerumnae, Enn. ap. Cic. 
Div. 1, 20, 40 (Ann. v. 47 Vahl); cf: lliadia 
nepos, quas erumnas tetulisti, id. ap. Cha- 
ris. p. 70 P. (Ann. v. 56 ib.): quantis cum 
aerumms exantlavi diem, id. ap. Non. 292, 
8 (Trag. v. 127 ib. ) : uno ut labore absolvat 
aerumnas duas (of the pains of parturi- 
tion), Plaut. Am. 1, 2, 26 : animus aequos 
optimum est aerumnae condimentum, id. 
Rud. 2, 3, 71; id. Ep. 2, 1, 10; so, id. Capt. 
5, 4, 12; id. Cure. 1, 2, 54; id. Pers. 1, 1, 1 : 
lapit cor cura, aerumna corpus conficit, 
Pac. ap. Non. 23, 8 ; Ter. Hec. 3, 1, 8 ; Lucr. 
3,50: aerumna gravescit, id. 4, 1065 : quo 
pacto adversam aerumnam ferant, Ter. 
Phorm. 2, 1, 12 : maeror est aegritudo fiebi- 
lis: aerumna aegritudo laboriosa: dolor 
aegritudo crucians, Cic. Tusc. 4, 8, 18: Her- 
cuiis aerumnas perpeti : sic enim majores 
nostri labores non fugiendos tristissimo ta- 
men verbo aerumnas etiam in Deo nomi- 
naverunt, id. Fin. 2, 35; cf. id. ib. 5, 32, 95: 
mors est aerumnarum requies, Sail. C. 51, 
20; so id. J. 13, 22: Luculli miles collecta 
viatica multis Aerumnis, ad assem Perdi- 
derat, with much difficulty, * Hor. Ep. 2, 2, 
26 : multiplicabo aerumnas tuas, Vuig. Gen! 
3, 16: in labore et aerumnu (fui), ib. 2 Cor. 

II, 27.— II. In later Lat. for defeat (of an 
army), Amrn. 15, 4; cf. id. is, 8 al. 

4Eg=* At a later period, also, trumna was 
written with short e, Paulin. Petric. Vit. 
D. Mart. 1, 66. Hence, Enn. ap. Charis. 
p. 76 P. derives it from eruere (quod men- 
tern eruat). Cf Doed. Syn. IV. p. 420. 

aerumnabllis, e, adj. [aerumna], that 
may 6e regarded as wretched or miserable, 
fall of trouble, calamitous, * Lucr. 6, 123 ; 
App. M. 1, p. 102 ; 8, p. 205. 

aerumndsus. a, um, adj. [id.], full of 
trouble or misery, suffering, wretched, mis- 
erable : salnm. Att. ap. Cic. Tusc. 3, 28, 67 : 
mopes, aerumuosae, Plaut. Rud. 1, 4, 39; 
so id, Ep. 4, 1, 32: miseros, afflictos, aerum- 
nosos. calamitosos, Cic. Tusc. 4, 38, 82; so 
id. Par. 2; id. Att. 3, 23 fin.; once also in 
his Orations: infelix et aerumnosus, id. 
Verr. 2, 5, 62: nihil est aerumnosius, Sen. 
de Ira, 2, 7.— Sup. : non huic aeruninosissi- 



AES 

mo venenum illud fuisset Cic. Clu. 71, 201; 
id. Att. 3, 23. 

$ aerumnula, ae, / dim. [aerumna, 
q. v.]. a traveller's stick for carrying a bun- 
dle, Paul, ex Fest. p. 24 Mull. 

* aeruscator, oris, m. (aerusco], one 
who roves about the country, and obtains his 
living by exhibiting sleight-of-hand tricks; 
an itinerant juggler, Cell. 14, 1, 2. 

aerUSCO, tire, v. a. [aes], to get money by 
going aboid and exhibiting tricks of leger- 
demain, to play the juggler : aeruscare: aera 
undique. id est pecunias, colligere, Paul, ox 
Fest. p. 24 Mull.— Esp., of mendicant phi- 
losophers, Cell. 9. 2 ; so Sen. Clem. L, 7, 2. 

aes, aeris (often used in plur. nom. and 
ace; abl. aeribus, Cato ap. Paul. ex Fest. p. 
27 Mull., and Lucr. 2, 636 ; gen. aervjt, Inscr. 
Orell. 3551), n. [cf. Germ. Eisen = iron, Erz 
= copper; Goth, alz ^copper, gold; Angl.- 
Sax. ar, ser =^ore, copper, brass; Eng. iron, 
ore: Lai. aurum; with the com. notion of 
brightness; cf. aurora, etc,]. I, Any crude 
metal dug out of the earth, except gold and 
silver; esp., a. Aes Cyprium, whence cu- 
prum, copper ; scoria aeris, copper dross or 
scoria, Plin. 34, 11, 24, § 107 : aeris flos. ./tow- 
ers of copper, id. 34, 11, 24, § 107: squama 
aeris, scales of copper, Cels. 2, 12 init. : aes 
fundere, Plin. 33. 5. 30. § 94: conflare et 
temperare, id. 7, 56, 57, § 197: India neqne 
aes neque plumbum habet, id. 34, 17, is. 
§ 163: aurum et argentum et aes, Vuig. Ex. 
25, 3. — b. An alloy, for the most part of 
copper and tin, bronze (brass, an alloy of 
copper and zinc, was hardly known to tlie 
ancients. For their bronze coins the Greeks 
adhered to copper and tin till B.C. 400, after 
which they added lead. Silver is rare m 
Greek bronze coins. The Romans admitted 
lead into their bronze coins, but gradually 
reduced the quantity, and, under Calig., 
Nero, Vesp., and Domit , issued pure cop- 
per coins, and then reverted to the mixture 
of lead. In the bronze mirrors now exist- 
ing, which are nearly all Etruscan, silver 
predominated to give a highly reflecting 
surface. The antique bronze had about HI 
parts of copper to 13 of tin. An analysis 
of several objects has given the following 
centesimal parts: 

Copper. Tin. Lead. Zinc. 

Roman coin, B.C. 500 "63 7 30 

Etruscan vessel 85 14 .. 1 

Old Attic coin 89 10 1 

Coin oi Alexander, B.C. 335 . . 87 13 

Coin of Ptolemy IX., B.C. 70. 85 15 

Egyptian dagger &5 15 

Celtic weapon 86 13 1 

Gallo-Roman axe 78 20 



1): 



statua ex aere, Cic. Phil. 9, 6: simulacrum 
ex aere factum, Plin. 34, 4, 9, § 15 : valvas ex 
aere factitavere, id. 34, 3, 7, § 13.— Hence : 
ducere aliquem ex aere, to cast one^s image 
in bronze id, 7, 37, 38, § 125; and in the- 
same sense poet. : ducere aera, Hor. Ep. 2, 
1, 240: aes Corinthium,Plin. 34, 2. 3. §§ 5-8; 
v. Cormthius.— II. Met on. A. (Ksp. in 
the poets. ) For everything made or pre- 
pared fi-om copper, bronze, etc. {statues, 
tables oflaivs, money), and (as the ancients 
had the art of hardening and tempering 
copper and bronze) weapons, armor, uten- 
sils of husbandry : aes sonit, franguntur ha- 
stae, the trumpet sounds, Enn. ap. Xon. 504, 
32 (Trag. v. 213 Vahl.): Et prior aeris erat 
quam ferri cognitus usus: Aere solum ter- 
rae tractabant,aereque belli Miscebant flue- 
tus et vulnera vasta serebant, etc., Lucr. 5, 
1287: quae ille in aes incidit, in quo populi 
jussa perpetuasque leges esse voluit, Cic. 
Phil. 1, 17 ; cf. id. Fam. 12, 1 ; Tac. A. 11, 14; 
12, 53; id. H. 4, 40: aere {with the trumpet, 
horn) cicre viros, Verg. A. 6, 16o : non tuba 
directi, non aeris cornua flexi, Ov. M. 1, 98 
(hence also rectum aes, the tuba, in contr. 
with the crooked buccina, Juv. 2, 118); a 
brazen prow, Verg, A. 1, 35 ; the brazen 
age, Hor. Epod. 16, 64. — In plur. : aera, 
Cato ap. Paul, ex Fest. p. 27 Mull. ; Verg 
A. 2, 734 ; Hor. C. 4, 8. 2 al — B. Money : 
the first Roman money consisted of small 
rude masses of copper, called aes rude, 
Plin. 33, 3, 13, § 43; afterwards as coined : 
aes signatum, Cic. Leg. 3, 3; Plin. 33, 3, 13, 
§ 43 ; so aes alone : si aes habent, dant 
mercem, Plaut. As. 1, 3, 49 : ancilla aere 
suo empta, Ter. .Phorm. 3, 2, 26 : aes cir- 
cumforaneum, borrowed from the brokers 
in the forum, Cic. Att. 2, 1: Hie meret aera 
liber Sosiis, earns them money, Hor. A. P 



A ESC 

345: gravis aere dextra, Verg. E. 1, 36: ef- 
fustim est aes tuum, Vulg. Ez. 16, 36: ne- 
que in zona aes (tollerent), ib. Marc. 6, 8: 
etiam atireos nummos aes dicimus, Dig. 
50, 10, 159. — Hence, 1. Aes alienum. lit. 
the money of another; hence, in reference 
to him who has it, the sum owed, a debt, 
Plant. Cure. 3, 1, 2 : habere aes alienum, 
Cic. Fam. 5, 6: aes alienum amicorum sus- 
cipere, to take upon one's self id. Off. 2, 16: 
contrahere, to run up, id. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 8: fa- 
cere, id. Att. 13, 46: conflare, Sail. C. 14, 2; 
24. 3: in aes alienum incidere, to fall into 
debt. Cic. Cat. 2, 9: in acre alieno esse, to 
be in debt. id. Vcrr. 2. 2, 4, § 6; so. aere alie- 
no oppressum esse, id. Font. 1; so Vulg. 1 
Reg. 22, 2: iaborare ex aere alieno, Caes. B. 
C. 3, 22: liberaro se aere alieno, to get quit 
of, Cic Att. 6. 2: so. aes alienum dissolvere, 
id! Snll. 56: aere alieno exire, to get out of 
id. Phil. 11, 6.-2. In acre meo est, trop., 
he is. as it were, among my effects, he is 
my friend (only in the language of com- 
mon conversation): in animo habui te in 
aere meo esse propter Larniae nostri con- 
junctionem, Cic. Fam. 13, 62; 15, 14. — * 3. 
Alicujus aerts esse, to be of some value, 
Cell. 18, 5. — * 4. In aere suo censeri, to 
be esteemed according to its own worth, 
Sen. Ep. 87.— C. Sometimes = as, the unit 
of the standard of money (cf. as); hence, 
aes grave, the old 'he aw / money (as weighed, 
not counted out): denis milibus aeris gra- 
vis reos condemnavit, Liv. 5, 12: indici- 
bus dena milia aeris gravis, quae turn di- 
vitiue habebantur, data. id. 4, 60; so, aes 
alone and in the gen. sing , instead of assi- 
um : aen> milieus, triciens, a hundred mill- 
ions, three millions, Cic. Rep. 3. 10: qui 
milibus aeris quinquaginta census fuiisset, 
Liv. 24. 11. — Also for coins that are small- 
er than an as (quadrans, triens. etc.): nee 
pueri credunt, nisi qui nondum aere, i. e. 
quadrante, lavantur (those who bathed 
paid each a quadrans), Juv. 2, 152 (cf. : dum 
tu quadrant e lavatum Rex ibis, Hor. S. 1, 
3, 137). — D. Wages, pay. 1. A soldier's 
jt>ay = stipendiuih: negabant danda esse 
aera militibus, Liv. 5, 4. And soon after: 
annua aera habes: annuam operam ede.— 
Hence in plur., = stipendia, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 
13. § 33. — 2. Reward, payment, in gen., 
Juv." 6, 125: nullum in bonis numero. quod 
ad aes exit, that has in view or aims at pay, 
reward. Sen. Ep. 8S.— E. In. plur.: aera, 
,. counters; hence also the items of a comput- 
ed sum (for which, later, a sing, form aera, 
ae (q. v.), came into use): si aera singula 
proba>ti. sum mam, quae ex his confecta 
sit. non probare? Cic. ap. Non. 3, 18. 

AesaCUS, i. and Gr. -os ? b m., = AiW 
kos, a son of Priam, Ov. M. 11, 762. 

t aesalon, onis i m -> = atad\cov, a spe- 
cies of falcon or hawk ; ace. to Billerbeck. 
the rust-kite, moor-buzzard, Falco aerugi- 
nosus, Linn.. Plin. 10, 74, 95, § 205. 

Aesar. I. A name of God among the 
Etruscans', Suet. Aug. 97. — H. Aesar, 
aris, m., a river in Lower Italy, in the 
neighborhood of C^'otona, now Esaro, Ov. 
M. 15, 23.— Hence, Aesareus, a , H m, adj., 
pertaining to the JEsar, Ov. Al. 15, 54. 

Aeschines, is, m., = a1o-x""fp. I. ^ 

disciple of Socrates, Cic. Inv. 1, 31; Quint. 
5, 11, 27. — Rut more celebrated, H. The 
orator jEschines. rival to Demosthenes, Cic. 
de Or. 2. 23 ; 3 r 56; Quint. 2, 1, 17 ; 10, 1, 22. 
—III. A physician of Athens, Plin. 28, 4, 
10, § 44. 

t aeschrologia, ae. /. = aia-xpoXo- 

7 ia, in rhet.. an erjiressinn improper on 
account of its ambiguity, Diom. p. 445 P. 

AcSChyluS, ,', »«-. — K'trx^os. I. The 
first great tragic poet of Greece, the origi- 
nator of the Greek drama, Hor. A. P. 278; 
Cic. Tusc 2. 10. — H, A rhetorician of Cni- 
dos, a contemporary of Cicero. Cic. Brut. 95. 

t acschynomene, es. /. = aia X wo- 

Ht-vn (ashamed), a plant which shrinks 
when touched, a sensitive plant, Mimosa 
pudica, Linn.. Plin. 24, 17, 102, § 167. 

Aesculanus, b m -, sc - dcus [aes]. the 

god of copper or copper money, Aug. Civ. 
Dei. 4, 21. 

AeSCUlapiUm, b n.,='AarK\nirUtov 

and ' \ah\>iirtuv, a temple of jEsculapius, 
Vitr. 7 praef.— From 

Aesculapius, '• m -, =' A^K-Xn-wio^, ace. 
to fable, the son of Apollo and the nymph 



AESO 

Coronis, deified after his death on account I 
of his great knowledge of medicine, Cic. N. j 
D. 3, 22 ; Cels. 1 praef. He had a temple 
at Rome, on the island in the Tiber. Upon j 
the kind of worship paid to him. and hi^ I 
attributes, v. Festus, p 82. Huic gallinae 
immolabantun id ib. The principal seat 
of his worship in Greece was Epidaurus. j 
In his temple there was a magniiicent | 
statue of ivory and gold, the work of Thra- t 
symedes, in which he was represented as a 
noble figure, resembling that of Zeus. He 
was seated on a throne, holding in one 
hand a staff, and with the other resting on 
the head of a dragon (serpent), and by his 
side lay a dog. There were also other rep- 
resentations, one even as beardless, very 
common at an earlier period, Miill. Arch- 
aeol. d. Kunst, S. 5:<4 and 535. Serpents, 
prob. as symbols of prudence and renova- 
tion, were everywhere connected with his 
worship; cf. Spreng. Gesch. d. Medic. 1. 205. 
jg®= Adj. : anguis Aesculapius, Plin. 29, 
4, 22, § 72. 

acsculetura (not csc=)- I n - [acscu- 

lus], a forest of winter or Italian oaks, and 
poet., in gen , an oak-forest, Hor. C. 1, 22, 

14. — II. Esp. : Aesculetum, i, «-, « 

place in Rome, ace. to Varr. L. L. 5, § 152 
Miill. ; Plin. 16, 10. 15, § 37. 

aesculeus ( not esc-), a , un b ad J l l± l 

of the Italian oak. and poet., in gen., of 
oak : aesculeae capiebat frondis honorem, 
i.e. an oaken garland, Ov. M. 1, 449 ; so 
Pall. 1, 9. 

* aescuhnus ( R °t esc-), a > u m, ad J- 

[id ], = aesculeus, Vitr. 7, 1. 

aeSCUluS (not esc-), ',/ [may be con- 
nected with edo — to eat, as fagus = beech, 
f iy6c — oak. with yajeiv, but the diph- 
thong presents a difficulty; v. Curt. p. 187]. 
the tallest species of oak, the winter or Ital- 
ian oak (with edible acorns), sacred to Ju- 
piter, Verg. G. 2, 16 ; 291 ; cf. Toss, ad h. 1. : 
nee mollior aesculo, Hor. C. 3, 10. 17 al. 

Aesernia (Es<), ae ,/, a tmun in ^V 1 ' 

nium on the river Vulturnus, now Isernia, 
Cic. Att. 8, 11, D. § 2; Veil 1, 14; Liv. Epit. 
72, 73 al— Hence, Aeserninus, a, um , 
adj. pertaining to or a native of JEsernia : 
ager, Liv. 10, 31: turma, id. 44, 40.— Also a 
surname of M. Marcellus, who was taken 
prisoner there by the Sammies, Liv. Epit. 
73; Plin. 12, i, 5, § 12 — Aesernini, orum, 

m., the inhabitants of yEsernia, Liv. 27, 10. 
— Aeserninus was also fhe name of a re- 
nowned gladiator; hence the proverb: 
Aeserninus cum Pacidiano, one champion 
against another, when two equally great 
men are compared together or engaged in 
mutual conflict, Lticil. ap. Non. 393, 28; Cic. 
Q. Fr. 3, 4; id Opt. Gen. Orat. 6 (cf. : cum 
Bitho Pacchius. Hor. S. 1, 7, 20). 

1. Aesis, ^ s , m ) a i° lver i n Utnbria, 
Plim 11, 42. 97, § 241. 

2. Aesis is, / , a town in fimbria on 
the river JEsis : col. aesis, Inscr. Orell. 
3899. — Whence, I. Aesinas, ritis, adj., 
of or pertaining to JEsis : caseus. Plin, 11, 
42, 97. § 241. — II. AC sin at CS, ium. m., 
the inhabitants ofsEsis, Plin. 3, 14, 19, § 113. 

Aeson, cuts. m. , = A'ic-av, a Thessalian 
prince, brother of king Pelias, and father 
of Jason, who, according to fable, was in 
extreme old age transformed by the magic 
arts of Medea into a youth, Ov. M. 7, 2. — 
Whence, I, AcsonidcS, ae, patr. m.,~ 
Alaovidw, a male descendant of JEson, i. e. 
Jason, Ov. M. 7, lf>4: Phasias Aesoniden, 
Circe tenuisset Ulixem, id. A. A. 2, 103 : 
mobihs Aesonide. id. H. (3, 109 al. — II, 
AesdniUS, a. um, adj., JEsonian : he- 
ros, i. e. Jason, Ov. M. 7, 156: domus, id. H. 
12, 134. 

AesoplCUS, a, um, adj. [Aesopus]. 
JEwpic. Ace. to Isid. Orig. 1, 39, fables are 
either yEsopic or Libystic (from Libys. a 
writer of fables mentioned by Hesych.); 
_^Esopic, when hrute beasts or things in- 
animate are represented as discoursing 
together; Libystic when the discourse is 
between men and brutes. 

Aesopius or Aesopeus, a, um, adj. 
[id.], JEsopic, jEsopian : fabulac, Phaedr. 4 
prol. : trimetria, Aus, Ep. 16. 74. 

Aesopus, i, w i = AiVwTTOp. I. jEsop. the 
Greek fabulist of Phrygia, in the tim" of 
Crcesus ; cf. Phaedr. 5 prol. The difference 



AES T 

between jEsopic and Libystic fables, v. un- 
der Aesopicns.— Cf. Quint. 5, 11, 19; Gell. 
2,29.— II, A tragic actor ^friend of Cicero : 
noster Aesopus. Cic. Fam. 7, 1 ; Hor. Ep. 2, 
1, 82; cf Cic. Tusc. 4. 25; id. Div. 1, 37. 

Aesquiliae, v- Esquiliae. 

aestas, atis,/ [akin to aittio = to burn, 
Varr. L. L.(),^ 9; cf. : aestus. aether, aethra; 
Sauscv. indh —to kindle, lddhas — kindled; 
O. H. Germ, eiten ~ to heat ; Germ. Hitze = 
heat], in an extended sense, the summer 
season, as one half of the year, from March 
twenty-second to September twenty-second 
(the other half was hiems, the winter sea- 
son); cf Dig. 43, 19: aestas et hiems, nox et 
dies, Vulg. Gen. 8, 22: in a restricted sense, 
the summer, the three months from the en- 
trance of the sun into Cancer to the autum- 
nal equinox (the entrance into Libra) : Ara- 
bes campos et montes hieme et aestate 
peragrantes, Cic. Div. 1, 42: (formica) pa- 
rat in aestate cibum sibi, Vulg. Prov. 6. 8: 
aestate ineunte, at the beginning of sum- 
mer, Cic. Att. 4, 2 : nova, Verg. A. 1, 430 : 
media, midsummer, Cic. Imp. Pomp. 12. 35: 
jam adulta, Tac. A. 2, 23 ; so Aur. Vict. 
Cacs. 32, 3 Arntz. : snmma, the height of 
summer. Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 31 : exacta, Sail. 
J. 65: finita, Vulg. Jer. 8, 20: cum af recta 
jam prope aestate uvas a sole mitescere 
tenipus est, Cic. Oecon. ap. Non. 101, 2. — 
With anni, summer-time. Gell. 2, 21 : aestate 
anni flagrantissima, id. 19, 5. —Since war 
among the ancients was carried on only 
in summer, aestas is sometimes (like 0e/jot 
in Gr.) used by the histt. for, II. A year, 
Veil 2,47; 82: quae duabus aestatibus ge- 
sta, Tac. A. 6. 39; «o. te jam septuma por- 
tat omnibus errantem terris aestas, Verg. 
A. 1, 756.— B. Summer air: per aestatem 
liquidam, Verg. G. 4, 59; id. A. 6, 707.— C, 
Summer heat : ignea, Hor. C. 1, 17, 3. — 
* D. Freckles as caused by heat: aestates, 
Plin! 28, 12, 50, § 185, where Jan. reads te- 
stas. 

aestlfer, Kra., ferum. adj. [aestus-fero]. 
I. Act., bringing, causing, or producing 
heat : ignis, Lucr. 1, 663 ; 5, 612 : cams, 
Verg. G. 2, 353; Cic. Arat. Ill; Sil. 1, 194; 
14, 585 al. — II, Pass., heated, sultry, hot : 
Libyum arva, Luc. 1, 206: campi Garaniau- 
tum, Sil. 17, 448. 

Aestii (the correct read., not Aestui)- 
orum, m.. a Germanic people on the south- 
east or east of the Baltic, the Esthen, Tac. G. 
45 Halm. 

* aestimabilis, % ad J- i aestimo ], 

worthy of estimation, valuable, estimable : 
aestimabile esse dicitur id. quod . . . ali- 
quod pondus habeat dignum aestimatione, 
contraque inaestimabile, quod sit superio- 
ri contrarium, Cic. Fin. 3, 6, 20. 

aestimatlO, oms,/ [id.]. _ I. The es- 
timating a thing according to its extrinsic 
(money) value, valuation, appraisement : 
in censu habendo potestas omnis aestima- 
tionis habendae censori permittitur, Cic. 
Verr. 2, 2, 53: aestimatio frumenti, the de- 
termination of the prator (legate or quae- 
stor), how much ready money one should 
pay, instead of the corn which he was to 
furnish, id. ib. 2, 3, 92 : erat Athenis 
reo damnato, si fraus non capital is esset, 
quasi poenae aestimatio, i. e. a commuta- 
tion of corporal punishment for a fine, id. 
de Or. 1, 54, 232. — So esp litis or litium 
aestimatio. in Roman civil law, an estimat- 
ing, valuation of the contested matter; in 
criminal law also, the stating how much the 
convicted person had to pay, an assessment 
of damages, Cic. Clu. 41, 116; id. Verr 2, 2, 
18, § 45 (cf. lis aestimata, id ib. 1, 13): lex 
de' multarum aestimatione. Liv. 4, 30. — 
After the civil war, Caesar, in order to en- 
able debtors to cancel the demands against 
them, decreed an aestimatio possessionurn, 
i.e an estimation or appraisement of real 
estate, according to the value which it had 
before the war, and compelled the creditors 
to take this in payment instead of money; 
they were also obliged to deduct from the 
sum demanded any interest that had been 
paid; v. Cars B, C. 3, 1; and Suet CaeS. 42. 
Hence, in aostiniationem accipere, to accept 
or agree to such a valuation, or payment by 
real est lit at a high price : a Marco Laberio 
C. Albinius praedia in aestimationem acce- 
pit Cic. Fam. 13, 8. — And meton., with an 
allusion to thelawofCsesar: aestimationes 
61 



AEST 

= praedia. the real estate received in pay- 
ment : quando aestimationes tuas vendere 
non potes, Cic. Fam. 9, 18. Since the cred- 
itor was a loser by this regulation, aesti- 
mationem accipere, to suffer injury or loss, 
id. ib. 16. — H. T r o p. A. ^ valuation, i. e. 
an estimation of a tiling according to its in- 
trinsic worth (while existimatio denotes the 
consideration, regard due to an object on 
account of its nominal value): bonum hoc 
est quidem plurimi aestimandum, sed ea 
aestimatio genere valet, non magnitudine, 
Cic. Fin. 3, 10. 34; so 3, 13, 44; 3, 6: semper 
aestimationem arbitriumque ejus honoris 
penes senatum fuisse, Li v. 3, 63: semper 
infra aliorum aestimationes se metiens, 
Veil, l, 127 ; 97 ; Plin. 3, 5, 9, § 67 : aestima- 
tione recta severus, deterius interpretanti- 
bus tristior habebatur, Tac. H. 1, 14 al.— B. 
Poet, the worth or value of a thing : Quod 
me non movet aestimatione, Cat, 12, 12. 

aestimator, or\s y m. [aestimo], I. One 
that estimates a thing according to its ex- 
trinsic value, a valuer, appraiser ; frumen- 
ti, Cic. Pis. 35 Jin. : callidi rerum aestima- 
tores prata et areas quasdam magno aesti- 
mant, id. Par. 6, 3. — II, T r o p., an estimator 
or valuer of a thing according to its intrin- 
sic worth (while existimator is a judge): 
nemo erit tam injustus rerum aestimator, 
qui dubitet, etc., Cic. Marcell. 5: Justus re- 
rum aestimator, id. Or. 41 : immodicus 
aestimator sui, Curt. 8, 1 al. 

aestimatdr£us, a, um, adj. [aestima- 
tor], regarding a valuer or taxer, only in 
the jurists : actio, Dig. 19, 3, 1 ; and absol. : 

aestimatoria, ae, Dig. 21, 1, 43, § 6: 

aestimatorium judicium, ib. Fragm. 18 al. 

aestimatnS, l ~ s , m - [aestimo], = aesti- 
matio; found only in the abl. : aetatis, in 
valuing, considering, the time, Macr. S. 1, 
16 : in aestimatu est mel e thymo, in value, 
i.e. much esteemed, Plin. 11, 15, 15, § 38 (cf. 
in pretio habere, Tac. G. 5). 

$ aestimia, ae, / [ id.], — aestimatio, 
ace. to Paul, ex Fest. p. 26 Mull. 

aestimium, i, n - [id.], — aestimatio 
(late Lat.), Hyg. de Limit, p. 152 Goes. ; so 
besides only Front, de Colon, p. 127 ib. 

aestimo (arch, aestu- ^vi, ittum, 1, 
v. a. [from aes, with the termination -tumo, 
which also appears in autu mo; cf. : legitu- 
mus, flnitumus, maritumus ; later, legiti- 
mus, tinitimus, maritimus ; compare the 
Goth, aistjan, to estimate]. I. To determine 
or estimate the extrinsic (money) value of a 
thing, to value, rate, appraise ; constr. with 
gen. or abl. (v. of price, Zumpt. §§ 444 and 
456) ; domum emit prope dimidio carius 
quam aestimabat, Cic. Dom. 44 : frumen- 
tum III denariis, id. Verr. 2, 3, 92: aliquid 
tenuissime, id. ib, 2, 4, 16: prata maguo, 
id. Par. 6, 3: perfecit (Aratus) aestimandis 
possessionibus, ut, etc., id. Off. 2, 23, 82; 
hence, litem alicui or alicujus, to estimate 
the value of an object in question, and thus 
determine hotu much the convicted person 
shallpay, to estimate or assess the damages ; 
cf. Ascon. ad Cic. Verr. 1, 13, 38, and Beier 
ad Cic. Oratt. Fragm. Exc. IV. p. 265; Cic. 
Verr. 1. 1. — H. T r p. , to estimate the in- 
trinsic (moral) worth of a thing, to weigh, 
value, hold, etc. ( while existimare, as a 
consequence of aestimare, signifies to judge 
a thing in any way after estimating its 
value: ex pretio rei judicare; cf. Burm. ad 
Phaedr. 3, 4; Herz. ad Caes. B. G. 2, 17; 
Corte and Kritz ad Sail. C. 8, 2; Gronov. 
ad Liv. 4, 41 ; 34, 2 ; and aestimator).— 
Constr. (a) That which serves as a stand- 
ard by which a thing is estimated with ex 
or the abl. : vulgus ex veritate pauca, ex 
opinione multa aestimant, Cic. Rose. Com. 
10 : aliquem ex artificio comico, id. ib. : 
cum in Aquitaniam pervenisset, quae pars, 
ex tertia parte Galliae est aestimanda,etc, 
i. e. is to be reckoned as a third part, Caes. 
B. G. 3, 20: amicitias inimicitiasque non ex 
re, sed ex commodo, Sail. C. 10. 5. — With 
si nple abl. : virtutem annis, Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 
48: aliquid vita, to measure a thing by life, 
i. e. to hold it as dear as life, Curt. 5, 5 : nee 
Macedonas veteri fama, sed praesentibus 
viribus aestimandos. Just. 30, 4, — (/?) The 
value attached to a thing in estimating it, 
in the gen. or abl. pretii ( cf. I.); poet. 
also with ace. nihil: auctoritatem alicujtis 
magni, Cic. Att. 7, 15: quod non minoris 
aestimamus quam quemlibet triumphum, ] 

62 



A E S T 

Nep. Cat. 1 : aliquid unius assis, Cat. 5, 2 : 
aliquid permagno, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 7, § 13: 
non magno, id. Fin. 3, 3, 11 ; so id. Tusc. 3, 

4, 8 : non nihilo aestimandum, id. Fin. 4, 
23, 62 : magno te aestimaturum, Liv. 40, 
55 : magno aestimantibus se, id. 40, 41. 
And with definite numerals which give the 
price-current for which a thing may be 
had ; cf. Zumpt. § 456 ; Sail. Fragm. p. 974 
Corte : denis in diem assibus ammam et 
corpus aestimari, Tac. A. 1. 17 : ernori nolo, 
sed me esse mortuum nihil aestimo, Cic. 
Tusc. 1, 8, 15. — (7) Among the histt. with a 
rel. clause. : aestimantibus, quanta futuri 
spe tam magna tacuisset, Tac. Agr. ltifn. : 
quantopere dilectus sit, facile est aesti- 
mare, Suet. Aug. 57 (but in Sail. J. 31, 19, 
the correct read, is existumabitis , Dietsch). 

aestiva, orum, v. aestivus, II. 

aestivalis, e, adj., — aestivus, per- 
taining to summer, summer-like: circulus, 
i.e. the tropic of Cancer , Hyg. Astr. 3, 24. 

ae Stive, adv., v. aestivus Jin. 

aestlVO, avi> iitum, 1, v. n. [aestivus], 
to spend or pass the summer in a place (like 
hiemo, to pass the winter; so in Gr. Oeptt,io 
and xe<M«*», Varr. R. R. 2. 1: mini greges 
in Apulia hibernabant, qui in Reatinibus 
montibus aestivabant, id. ib. 2, 2: intra sae- 
pem aestivant pastores opacam, Plin. 12, 5, 
11, § 22; Suet. Galb. 4: id. Vesp. 24: Stat. 

5. 4, 4, 22. 

aestivus, a, um, adj. [aestas], of or 
pertaining to summer, summer-like, sum- 
mer (freq. and class. ) : Quo pacto aestivis e 
partibus Aegocerotis Brumalis adeat flexus, 
turns from the hot region of heaven to the 
wintry sign of Capricorn, Lucr. 5, 615 ; so 
id. 5.639 : aestivos menses rei militari dare, 
hibernos jurisdiction!, Cic. Att. 5, 14: tem- 
pora, dies, summer time, summer days, id. 
Verr. 2, 5, 31 : sol,Verg. G. 4, 28: aura, Hor. 
C. 1, 22, 18 : umbra, Ov. M. 13, 793 : rus, 
Mart. 8, 61 : per aestivos saltus deviasquc 
calles exercitum ducimus, through woods, 
where flocks were driven for summer pas- 
ture, Liv. 22, 14: aves, summer birds, id. 5, 
6: animalia, the insects of summer, Plin. 9, 
47, 71, § 154 : expeditiones, which were un- 
dertaken in summer. Veil. 2. 114 : castra, a 
summer camp (constructed differently from 
a winter camp), Suet. Claud. 1. — Hence. II. 
Subst. : aestiva, orum, n. A. For a 
summer camp, -ra Vepivd: dum in aestivis 
essemus, Cic. Att. 5, 17 ; id. Fam. 2, 13 : aesti- 
va praetoris, of a pleasure-camp, pleasure- 
house, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 37. — B. The time ap- 
propriate for a campaign (cf. aestas; often 
continuing until December; v. Manut. ad 
Cic. Fam. 2, 7) ; hence, a campaign, Cic. 
Pis. 40 : aestivis confectis. after the cam- 
paign was ended (which did not take place 
until the Saturnalia, XIV. Ral. Januar.), id. 
Fam. 3, 9 Jin. : perducere aestiva in men- 
sem Decembrem, Veil. 2, 105.— C. Summer 
pastures for cattle : per montium aestiva, 
Plin. 24, 6, 19, § 28. — M e t n. for the cattle 
themselves : Nee singula morbi Corpora cor- 
ripiunt, sed tota aestiva, Verg. G. 3, 472. — 
Hence, * adv. : aestlVCj in a summer-like 
manner, as in summer : admodum aestive 
viaticati sumus, we are furnished in a very 
summer-like manner with money for our 
journey, i. e. we have but little ( the figure 
taken from the light dress of summer; or, 
ace. to others, from the scanty provisions 
which soldiers took with them in sum- 
mer), Plaut. Men. 2. 1, 30. 

* aestuabundus, a, um, adj. [ae- 
stuo], foaming, fermenting : confectio, Pall. 
11, 17. 

aeStuanS, autis, Part, of aestuo. 

acstuanum, i, n. [aestus], I. A part 
of the sea-coast which, during the Jlood-tide, 
is overflowed, but at the ebb-tide is left cov- 
ered with mud or slime, a marsh, avdxvct?: 
tiestuaria sunt omnia, qua mare vicissim 
turn accedit, turn recedit, Gloss, ap. Fest. 
p. 3S0 Mull.: pedestria esse itinera concisa 
aestuariis, Caes. B. G. 3, 9 : adfunditur 
autem aestuarium e mari flexuoso mea- 
tu, Plin. 5, 1, 1, § 3; Plin. Ep. 9, 23.— 
Also, II, A channel extending inland from 
the sea, and only filed with water at flood- 
tide, a, creek, inlet, Varr. R. R. 3, 17 : in ae- 
stuaria ac paludes, Caes. B. G. 2, 28 Herz. ; 
Tac. A. 2, 8; cf. id. .\gr. 22. -HI, In mining 
t. t., an air-hole, air-shaft: secundum pu- | 



AEST 

teum dextra ac sinistra fodiunt aestuaria 
Plin. 31, 3, 28, § 49; cf. Vitr. 8, 7; Pall. 9, 9. 

aestuatlO, onis,/ [aestuo], a boiling- 
up, foaming ; trop., trouble or agitation of 
mind, Plin. 18, 1. 1, § 5, where Jan reads 
aestimatione. 

aestuo, avi, atum, 1, v. n. [aestusj, to 
be in agitation or in violent commotion, to 
move to and fro, to rage, to toss, to boil up. 
I. L i t- A. Of Are, to rage, burn : aestuat 
ut clausis rapidus fornacibus ignis, as the 
fire heaves and roars in the closed furnaces, 
Verg. G. 4, 263 : tectus magis aestuat ignis, 
Ov. U. 4, 64. — Hence, 2. Of the effect of 
fire, to be warm or hot to burn, glow ; both 
objectively, / am warm (Fr.je suis chaud), 
and subjectively, it is warm to me, I feel 
warm (Fr. j'ai chaud). a. Object. : nunc 
dum occasio est. dum scribilitae aestuant 
(while the cakes are warm) occurrite, Plaut. 
Poen. prol. 43 ; Verg. G. 1, 107 : torridus 
aestuat aer, glows, Prop. 3, 24, 3 ; Luc. 1, 16. 
— b. Subject., to feel warmth or heat (weaker 
than sudare, to sweat, and opp. algere, to 
be cold, to feel cold; v. Doed. Syn. 3, 89): 
Lycurgi leges erudiunt jnventutem esu- 
riendo, sitiendo, algendo, aestnando. Cic. 
Tusc. 2, 14, 34: ille cum aestuaret, unibram 
secutus est. id. Ac. 2. 22: sub pondere, Ov. 
M. 12, 514; Juv. 3, 103.— B. Of the undulat- 
ing, heaving motion of the sea, to rise in 
waves or billows (cf. aestus): Maura unda, 
Hor. C. 2, 6, 4: gurges, Verg. A. 6, 296.— C. 
Of other things, to have an undulating' 
waving motion, to be tossed, to heave : in 
ossibus umor,Verg. G. 4,308: ventis pulsa 
aestuat arbor, Lucr. 5, 1097; Gell. 17, 11, 5. 
—Of an agitated crowd, Prud. 11, 228. — II, 
Trop. A. Of the passions, love, desire," 
envy, jealousy, etc., to burn with desire, to 
be in violent, passionate excitement, to be 
agitated or excited, to be injlamed : quod 
ubi auditum est, aestuare (hist, inf.) illi, 
qui dederant pocuniam, Cic. Verr. 2. 2. 23: 
quae cum dies noctesque aestuans agitaret, 
Sail. J. 93 : desiderio alicujus, Cic. Fain. 7, 
18: invidia, Sail. C. 23: ingens in corde 
pudor, Verg. A. 12, 666 : at rex Odrysius in 
ilia Aestuat, Ov. M. 6, 490 (cf. uri in id. ib. 
7, 22; and ardere in id, ib. 9. 724); Mart. 9, 
23: aestuat (Alexander) infelix angusto li- 
mite mundi (the figure is derived from the 
swelling and raging of the sea when con- 
fined), Juv. 10, 169; so Luc. 6, 63.-B. Esp. 
in prose, to waver, to vacillate, to hesitate, 
to be uncertain or in doubt, to be undecided : 
dubitatione, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 30: quod petiit, 
spernit; repetitquod nuper omisit; Aestuat 
et vitae disconvenit ordine toto, Hor. Ep. 
1, 1, 99: sic anceps inter utramque animus 
aestuat, Quint. 10, 7, 33; Suet. Claud. 4: 
aestuante rege, Just. 1, 10. 

aestUOSUS, a , um, adj. [aestus], full 
of agitation or heat. J m Very hot : aura, 
Pac. ap. Prise, p. 710 P. : aestuosa et pulve- 
rulenta via, Cic. Att. 5, 14; Hor. Epod. 16, 
62: auster.Plin.2,47,48, § 119: aestuosissi- 
mi dies, id. 34, 12, 28, § 116 : Syrtes. the burn- 
ing Syrtes, Hor. C. 1, 22, 5 ; hence, Oraclum. 
Jovis inter aestuosi, i.e. of Jupiter Ammon 
in the Libyan desert, Cat. 7, 5.— H. Great- 
ly agitated, in violent ebullition : freta, 
Hor. C. 2, 7, 16.— Hence, adv. : aestuose, 
hotly, impetuously, Plaut. Bacch. 3, 3, 67. — 
Comp., Hor. Epod. 3, 18. — Sup. prob. not 
used. 

aestUS. u s (archaic gen. aesti, Pac. 97 
Rib. ; rare form of nom. plur. aestuus). m. 
[kind, with aestas and Gr. a'iOw; v. aestas], 
an undulating, boiling, waving, tossing; a 
waving, heaving, billowy motion. I, Lit. 
A. Of fire; hence, in gen., fire, glow, heat 
(orig. in relation to its flashing up; while- 
fervor denotes a glowing, ardor a burning, 
and r.aJor a warming heat; yet it was early 
used for warming heat; v. the following 
example) : nam fretus ipse anni permiscet 
frigus et acptum, heat and cold are blrnded, 
Lucr. G, 364 (for which calor, id. 6, 368. 371 
al.) : multa aestu victa per agros, id 5, 1104: 
exsuperant flammae, furit aestus ad auras, 
Verg A. 2, 759: caniculae, Hor. C. 1, 17. IS; 
so id Kp. 1,8, 5: labore et aestu languidus, 
Sail. J. 51.— In plur. : neque frigora neque 
aestus facile tolerabat, Suet. Aug. 81. — So 
of midday heat : aestibus at mediis umbro- 
sam exquirere vallem, Verg. G. 3, 331 (cf. 
Cic. Ac 2, 22: ille cum aestuaret, umbram 
secutus est). — And of the heat of disease (of 



A E T A 

wounds, fever, inflammation, etc.) : ulceris 
aestus, Att. ap. Cic. Tusc. 2, 7, 19: homines 
aegn cum aestu febrique jactantur, Cic. 
Cat. 1, 13. — B. The undulating, heaving 
motion of the ±ea, tfte swell, surge. : fervet 
aestu pelagus, Pac. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 39; 
hence, meton. for the sea in agitation, 
waves, billows : delphines aestum seca- 
bant, Verg. A. 8, 674 : fur it aestus harenis, 
id. Lb. 1. 107 : aestus totos campos inunda- 
verant, Curt. 9, 9, 18. — In Verg. once of the. 
boiling up of water in a vessel: exsultant 
aestu latices, Aen. 7, 464. — G. Esp., the 
periodical flux and reflux or ebb and flow 
of t he sea, the tide (cf.Varr. L. L. 9, 19; Mel. 
a, 1 : aestus maris accedere et reciprocare 
niaxime mirum, pluribus quidem modis, 
sed causa in sole lunaque, Plin. 2, 97, 9<J) ; 
Plaut. As. 1, 3, 6: quid de fretis au't de ma- 
nms aestibus clicam? quorum accessus et 
recessus (flow and ebb) lunae motu guber- 
nantur, Cic. Div. 2, 14 fln. : crescens, Plin. 
2, 100. 97, § 219 : decedens, id. ib. : rece- 
dens. id. 2, 98, 101, § 220: secundus, in our 
favor. Sail. Fragm. ap. Gell. 10. 26, 2: ad- 
versus, against us, id. ap. Non. 138. 8, — 
II. Trop. A. Th e passionate ferment or 
commotion of tne mind, the fire, glow, ardor 
of any (even a good) passion (cf. aestuo, II. 
A.) : et belli magnos commovit funditus 
aestus (genus humanum), has stirred up 
from their very bottom the waves of dis- 
cord, Lucr. 5,1134: civilis belli aestus, Hor. 
P.p. 2, 2, 47 (cf. id. C. 2, 7, 15) : repente te 
quasi quidam aestus ingenii tui procul a 
terra abripuit atque in altum abstraxit, 
Cic. de Or. 3, 36 : hunc absorbuit aestus 
quidam gloriae, id. Brut. 81: stultorum re- 
gum et populorum continet aestus. Hor. 
Ep. 1. 2, 8: perstet et, ut pelagi, sic pecto- 
ris adjuvet aestum, the glow of love, Ov. H. 
16, 25. — B. A vacillating, irresolute state 
of mind, doubt, uncertainty, hesitation, 
trouble, embarrassment, anxiety : qui tibi 
aestus, qui error, quae tenebrae, Cic. Div. 
in Caecin 11: vario fiuctuat aestu, Verg. A. 
12, 486 : amor magno irarum fluctuat aestu, 
id. ib. 4, 532; cf. id. ib. 8, 19: aestus curae- 
que graves, Hor. S. 1, 2, 110.— C. In tne 
Epicurean philos. iang. of Lucretius, the un- 
dulatory flow or stream of atoms, atomic 
efflux, as the cause of perception (cf. affluo, 
L): Perpetuoque fiuunt certis ab rebus 
odores, Frigus ut a fluviis, calor ab sole, 
aestus ab undis Aequoris, exesor moero- 
rurn litora propter, etc. , Lucr. 6, 926; and in 
id. 6, 1002 sq., the magnetic fluid is several 
times designated by aestus lapidis. 

Aesula (Aesol-) a e,/, a town in the 
neighborhood of Txbur, Hor. C. 3, 29, 6 (Ae- 
fula, Mull.); cf. Mull. Roms Campagn. 1, 
272. — Hence, AcSUlanUS, a, um, adj., 
pertaining to &sida : arx, Liv. 26,9 Madv. ; 
and subst. : Acsdiani, orum, m. , the in- 
habitants of jEsula, Plin. 3, 5, 9, § 69 Jan. 

aetas, ^i 8 - / [contr. from the ante- 
class, aevitas from aevum, q. v. ; Prise. 595 
P. ; cf. Welsh oet] (gen. plur. aetatum ; but 
freq. also aetatium, Liv. 1, 43; 9, 17; 26, 9; 
cf. Oud. ad Suet. Aug. 31; Veil. 2,89; sen. 
Brev. Vit. 12, 2 ; Gell. 14, 1). I. The period 
of life, time of life, life, age (divided, ace. 
to Varr. ap. Censor. 14, into pueritia, from 
birth to the 15th year; adulescentia, from 
that time to the 30th ; juventus, to the 
45th ; the age of the seniores, to the 60th ; 
and, finally, senectus, from that time till 
death. Others make a different division, 
v. Flor. 1 prooem. ; Isid. Orig. 11, 2; Gell. 
10, 28; 15, 20): a primo tempore aetatis, 
Cic. Leg. 1, 4, 13 : prima aetas, id. Off. 2, 
13 : ineuntis aetatis inscientia, id. ib. 1, 
34 ; so 2, 13 : fios aetatis, the bloom of life, 
id. Phil. 2, 2 • Liv. 21 ; Suet. Caes. 49 ; so, 
bona aetas, Cic. Sen. 14 ; and poet, in the 
plur. : ambo florentes aetatibus, Verg. E. 
7, 1 : quamquam aetas senet, satis habeo 
tarn en vinum, ut te ara arceam, Pac. ap. 
Prise. 1, 10 ; id. ap. Non. 159, 19 : mala aetas, 
old age, Plaut. Men. 5, 2, 6; and absol. : ae- 
tas, aevitas = senectus, old age, si morbvs 
aevitasvb vitivm escit, Fragm. of the XII. 
Tab. ap. Gell. 20, 1, 25: aetate (through age) 
non qms obtuerier, Plaut. Most. 3, 2, 154; 
1. 3, 130; id. Bacch. 3, 3. 5: sed ipse morbo 
atque aetate confectus, Sail. J. 9 : graves 
aetate, Liv. 7, 39.— Sometimes also absol.— 
adulescentia, youth : fui ego ilia aetate et 
feci ilia omnia, Plaut. Bacch. 4, 10, 4 ; id. 



A E T E 

Most. 5, 2, 27 : damna, dedecora aetas ipsius 
pertulit, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 12: tua autem aetas 
(of his son), id. Off. 2, 13 : (mulier) non for- 
ma, non aetate, non opibus maritum in- 
venerit. Tac. G. 19 : expers belli propter 
aetatem, Suet. Aug. 8: aetas consularis, the 
legal age for the consulship, i. e. the 43d 
year, Cic. Phil. 5, 17 : id aetatis jam sum us, 
we have now reached that time of life, id. 
Fam. 6, 20, 3.— II. Transf. A. I n g en -: 
the lifetime of man, without reference to its 
different stages; life, Enn. ap. Gell. 18, 2, 
16 : aetas acta honeste et splendide, Cic. 
Tusc. 3, 25; gerere, id. Fam. 4, 5 al. : tem- 
pus aetatis, id. Sen. 19: aetatem consume- 
rs in studio aliquo, id. Off. 1, 1: conterere 
in litibus, id, Leg. 1, 20: degere omnem in 
tranquillitate, id. Fin. 2, 35 ; cf. id. Rose. 
Am. 53 al— In Ov. M. 12, 188, aetas — cen- 
tum annos.— B. ^ space of time, an age, 
generation, time : heroicae aetates, Cic. 
Tusc. 5, 3, 7: haec aetas, id. ib. 1, 3, 5; id. 
Rep. 1, 1 : alia, id. Lael. 27, 101 Beier : no- 
stra aetate, in our times, Quint. 1, 4, 20: 
cum primis aetatis suae comparabatur, 
Nep. Iphicr. 1 ; Veil. 1, 16 : incuriosa suo- 
rum aetas, Tac. Agr. 1 : omnia fert aetas, 
time, Verg. E, 9, 51 ; so Hor. C. 4, 9, 10 : 
crastina aetas, the morrow, Stat. Th. 3, 562. 
— 0/ the four ages of the world (the golden 
age, silver age, etc.), Ov. M. 1, 89 sq. ; v. 
aureus, argenteus, etc. — C, Abstr. pro 
concreto, the time or period of life, for 
the man himself; the age, for the men liv- 
ing in it (mostly poet. , and in prose after 
the Aug. per. ; cf. saeculum) : sibi inimicus 
magis quam aetati tuae, i. e. tibi, Plaut. 
Men. 4, 3, 1 : vae aetati tuae, id. Capt. 4, 2, 
105: quid nos dura refugimus Aetas? Hor. 
C. 1, 35. 34: impia, id. Epod 10, 9: veniens, 
Ov. F. 6, 639: omnis aetas currere obviam, 
Liv. 27, 51 : omnis sexus, omnis aetas, Tac. 
A. 13, 16 : innoxiain liberorum aetatem 
miserarentur, i. e. innocentes liberos, id. 
H. 3, 68 : sexnm, aetatem, ordmem om- 
nem, Suet. Calig. 4. — D. Also of things 
without life, e, g. of wine, its age : bibite 
Falernum hoc: annorum quadraginta est. 
Bene, inquit, aetatem fert, it keeps well, 
Cic. ap. Macr. S. 2, 2, 3 ; Plin. 23, 1, 20, § 33 ; 
15, 2, 3, § 7.— So of buildings: aetates aedi- 
ficiorum, Dig. 30, 58. — E. Aetatem, ad- 
verb, (ante-class.). 1. = semper, perpe- 
tuo, through the whole of life, during life- 
time, continually : ut aetatem ambo nobis 
sint obnoxii, Plaut. As. 2, 2, 18 : at tu aegro- 
ta, si lubet, per me aetatem quidem, id. 
Cure. 4, 3, 22 : Quid, malum, me aetatem 
censes velle id adsimularier, Ter. Heaut. 4, 
3. 38.— 2 = = diu, longo tempore, an age, a 
long time, a long 'white : an abiit jam a mi- 
lite ? Jamdudum aetatem, Ter. Eun. 4, 5, 
8: quod solis vapor aetatem non posse vi- 
detur efflcere, what the heat of the sun can- 
not perhaps effect for years, Lucr. 6, 236. — 
p. In aetate, adverb, (ante- class.), i. 
At times, sometimes, now and then, Plaut. 
Trin. 1, 1, 2,-2. At any time, always, ever, 
Plaut. Trin. 2, l.'oi. 

aetatula, ae./ dim. [aetas], a youth- 
ful, tender, or effeminate age: m munditiis, 
mollitiis deliciisque aetatulam agere, Plaut. 
Ps.l, 2, 40: integra, Caecil.ap. Gell. 2, 23, 10 
(Com. Rel. p. 52 Rib.) : in primis puerorum 
aetatulis, Cic. Fin. 5, 20, 55 : monuit, ut par- 
cius aetatulae indulgeret, Suet. Claud. 16 
(cf. Galb. 20 : cupide f'ruaris aetate tua). 

aeternabltis, e , ad J- [aeterno], that 
can last forever, everlasting: divitia, Att. 
ap. Non. 475, 24 (Trag. Rel. p. 143 Rib.): 
urbs, i. e. Rome, Cod. Th. 11, 20, 3 (cf. aeter- 
nus, II. A.). 

aeternalis, e ? ad J- [aeternus], endur- 
ing forever, everlasting (often in inscrr.): 
aeternali somno sacrum, i. c. to death, Inscr. 
Grut. 752, 3: domus, Inscr. Orell, 4518 : luc- 
tus, ib. 4604: memoria, ib. 200: lex tempo- 
ralis et aeternalis, Tert. adv. Jud. 6. — Adv.: 
adOVHaMtCV. forever (late Lat.), Ad. ad 
H. Prud. March, p. 245. 

aeternitas, r»tis, / [id.], eternity. I. 

L i t. A. Of the past and future : fuit quae- 
dam ab "infinito tempore aeternitas, quam 
nulla temporum circumscriptio metieba- 
tur, Cic. X. D. 1, 9 : Tempus generate, quia 
nee Lnitium nee finem habet, aeternitas 
est, quam Graeci a.^vu appellant, Victorin. 
in Lib. 1. 26: Temp us est pars quaedam 
aeternitatis, Cic. Inv. 1, 26, 39: immutabi- 
lis aeternitas, id. Tim. 5: deum nihil aliud 



A E T E 

in omni aeternitate cogitantem, id. Div. I, 
41: haec dicit excelsus et sublimis (Deus} 
habitans aeternitatem, Vulg. Isa. 57, 15 aL 

B. Of the past: ex or ab aeternitate, 

from eternity : hoc est verum ex aeterni- 
tate, Cic. Fat. 14 : quod semper ex omni 
aeternitate rerum fuerit, id esse fatum (di- 
citis), id. N. D. 3, 6: si negas esse fortunam 
et omnia, quae fiunt quaeque futura sunt, 
ex omni aeternitate definita dicis esse fa- 
tal iter, id. Div. 2, 7 : ex omni aeternitate 
fluens Veritas, id. ib. 1, 55 : si nihil fieri 
potest, nisi quod ab omni aeternitate cer- 
tum fuerit, quae potest esse fortuna, id. ib. 
2, 7 : egressus ejus ab initio, a diebus aeter- 
nitatis (fuerunt), Vulg. Mich. 5, 2.— C. Of 
the future : aeternitas animorum, Cic. Tusc. 
1, 17, 39 (cf. : immortalitas animorum, id. 
ib. 50): de aeternitate (animorum) dicere, 
id. ib. 33, 81: quorum (sc. Herculis, etc.)> 
cum remanerent animi atque aeternitate 
fruerentur, rite di habiti sunt, id. N. D. 2, 
24, 62 ; id. Sen. 21 : Confer nostram longis- 
simarn aetatem cum aeternitate, id. Tusc. 
1, 39, 94: in diem aeternitatis, Vulg. 2 Pet. 
3, 18 ; and plur. : in perpetuas aeternita- 
tes, ib. Dan. 12, 3 : in domum aeternitatis- 
suae, to his everlasting home (of death), ib. 
Eccl. 12, 5. —II, Meton., of the future., 
duration, durability, immortality : cedrl 
materiae aeternitas, Plin. 13, 5, 11, § 53. — 
III. Trop., of the future. A. I n ge n. : 
mihi populus Romanus aeternitatem im- 
mortalitatemque dorian it, Cic. Pis. 3: so id. 
Phil. 14, 13. Quidquid ex Agricola amavi- 
mus, manet mansurumque est in aeterni- 
tate temporum, fama rerum, Tac. Agr. 46: 
cupido aeternitatis perpetuaeque famae, 
Suet. Ner. 55 al. — B. Spec, in the time 
of the emperors, a title of the emperor (like 
divmitas, majestas, and the like), Eternity: 
rogatus per aeternitatem tuam, ut, etc., 
Plin. Ep. 10, 87 ad Trajan.: adoratus aeter- 
nitatem nostram, Imp. Const. Cod. 11, 9, 2: 
Quae nostra sanxit aeternitas, Nov. 3d fln. 
1. aeternd, adv., v. aeternus fin. 3. 
2*. aeterno, " re , v - a - [ aeternus ], h 
perpetuate, to immortalize (rare, pern, ex- 
tant only in the two foil, exs.): litteris ac 
laudibus aeternare, Varr. ap. Non. 75, 20 : 
virtutes in aevum, * Hor. C. 4, 14, 5. 

aeternus, a > urn > <"#• [contr. from 
aeviternus, Varr. L. L. 6, g 11 Mull., from, 
aevum, with the termination -ternus as^ 
in sempiternus, hesternus], without be- 
ginning or end, eternal (sempiternus de- 
notes what is perpetual, what exists as 
long as time endures, and keeps even pace- 
with it; aeternus, the eternal, that which is 
raised above all time, and can be measured 
only by aeons (alfiii/er, indefinite periods); 
for Tempus est pars quaedam aeternita- 
tis, Cic. Inv. 1, 27, 39. Thus the sublime* 
thought, without beginning and end, is 
more vividly suggested by aeternus than, 
by sempiternus, since the former has more- 
direct reference to the long duraton of the 
eternal, which has neither beginning nor 
end. Sempiternus is rather a mathemat- 
ical, aeternus a metaphysical, designation, 
of eternity, Doed. Syn. I. p. 3). I. L i t. A~ 
Of the past and future, eternal: deusbeatus- 
et aeternus, Cic. Fin. 2, 27, 88 : nihil quod 
ortum sit, aeternum esse potest, id. N. D. 
1, 8: O Pater, o hominum rerumque aeter- 
na Potestas, Verg. A. 10, 18 : di semper fue- 
runt, nati numquam sunt, siquidem aeterni 
sunt'futuri, Cic. N. D. 1, 32, t'O: idem legis- 
perpetuae et aeternae vim Jovem dicit 
esse, id. ib. 1, 15, 40 : nomen Domini Dei 
aeterni. Vulg Gen. 21, 33; ib. Kom. 16, 26: 
aeternum tempus, Lucr. 1, 582 : causae im- 
mutabiles eaeque aeternae, Cic. Fat. 12, 48. 
B. Of the future, everlasting, endless, im- 
mortal : natura animi . . . neque nata certe^ 
est et aeterna est, Cic. Tusc. 1, 23: virorum 
bonorum mentes divinae mihi atque aeter 
nae videntur esse, id. Kab. 29: aeternam 
timucrunt noctem, Verg. G. 1, 468: Quod 
semper movetur, aeternum est, Cic. Tusc. 1, 
■23 : Quidquid est illud quod sentit . . . caele- 
ste et divimim ob eamque rem aeternum 
sit, necesse est, id. ib. 1, 27 : ut habeam vi- 
tam aeternam, Vulg. Matt. 19, 16 ; ib. Joan. 
:;, 15; ib. Rom. 2, 7: in sanguine testamen- 
tj aeterni, ib. Heb. 13, 20: tu Juppiter bo- 
norum inimicos aeterms suppliciis vivos 
mortuosque mactabis, Cic. Cat. 2. 13: ibunt 
in supplicium aeternum, Vulg. Matt. 25. 46; 
63 



A E T H 

-aeternas poenas in morte timendumst, 
Lucr. l, ill : mitti in ignem aeternum' 
Vulg. Matt. 18, 8. — C. Of the past: ex ae' 
ierno tempore quacquc Nunc etiam supe- 
rare necessest corpora rebus, from eternity, 
Lucr. 1, 578 : motum animorum nullo a 
principio, sed ex aeterno tempore intellegi 
convenire, Cic. Fin. 1, 6. — I). Spec, of 
objects of nature, which the ancients re- 
garded as stable and perpetual, everlasting, 
eternal: aeterna templacaeli, Poet. ap. Varr! 
L. L. (i, 11, p. 77 Mull. : neternam lampada 
mundi, Lucr. 5, 402: micant aeterni sidera 
mundi. id. 5, 514: aeterna domus, i. e. cae- 
lum, Cic. Rep. 6, 23: donee vemret desideri- 
•uni collium aeternorum, the everlasting hills 
Vulg. Gen. 49, 26; ib. Ps. 75,5 ; cf. ib. Ps. 103,' 
fi -— II, M e t o n. , of indef. long time. A. 
Of the future, lasting, enduring, everlast- 
ing, perpetual : aeterni parictes, Plin. 05, 
14, 49, § 172: dehinc spero aeternam inter- 
nes gratiam fore,Ter. Eun.5,2,33: aeternus 
luctus. Lucr. 3, 924: dolor, id. 3, 1003- vul- 
nus, id. 2, 369; so Verg A. 1, 36: aerumna, 
Cic. Sen. 34; mala, Verg Cul. 130: bellum, 
Cic. Cat. 4, 22: dedecus, id. Font, 88: impe- 
rium, id, Rab. 33; so Verg A. 1, 230: ver- 
sus. Lucr. l, 121 : ignis sacerdotis. Cic. Font. 
47 : gloria, id. Cat. 4, 21 : laus, id. Plane 26 ■ 
memoria, id. Verr. 4, 69: non dubitat Len- 
tulum aeternis tenebris vinculisque man- 
dare, id. Cat. 4, 10. — Comic. : spero me ob 
hunc nuntium aeternum adepturum cibum 
Plaut. Capt. 4, 1, 13. Esp. of Rome ; aeterna 
urbs, the Eternal City, Tib. 2, 5 23- Ov F 
3, 72; Cod. Th. 10, 16, 1; Svmm. Ep. 3, 55- 
Inscr. Orell. 2, 1140.— Com'p. : nee est ulli 
ligno aeternior natura, Plin. 14, 1 2, § 9: 
aeterniora mala, Lact. Epit. 9. — B' Of the 
past, of yore, of old : ablue corpus alluvii 
aeternisque sordibus squalidum, Curt. 4, 1 
22.— III. Adv. phrases. 1. i n aeter- 
num. A. Lit, , former, everlastingly : et 
Tivat in aeternum, Vulg. Gen. 3, 22 ; hoc 
Jiomen mihi est in aeternum, ib. Exod. 3, 
15: Dominus in aeternum permanet, ib. 
Psa. 9, 8 : vivet in aeternum, ib. Joan. 6, 
52: Tu es sacerdos in aeternum, ib. Heb. 5. 
6; non habebit remissionem in aeternum 
ib. Marc. 3, 29. — B. Me ton., of indef.' 
long time, forever, always: urbs in aeter- 
num condita, Liv. 4, 4: leges in aeternum 
latae, id. 34, 6: (proverbia) durant in aeter- 
num, Quint. 5, 11, 41: delatores non in 
praesens tantum, sed in aeternum repres- 
sisti, Plin. Pan. 35: (famulos) possidentis 
in aeternum, Vulg. Lev. 25, 46: (servus) 
serviet tibi usque in aeternum, ib. Deut. 
15, 17 : ut sceleris memoria maneat in 

aeternum Lact. i, H.-2. aeternum. 

A. L 1 1. , forever : sedet aeternumque se- 
debit Infelix Theseus, Verg. A. 6, 617 : ut 
aeternum ilium reciperes, Vulg. Phil. 15 
(prob. here an adv.). — B. Me ton., of in- 
def. long time, forever, always : serviet 
aeternum, Hor. Ep. 1, 10, 41. — C. Of what 
is continually repeated, constantly, again 
and again (as in colloq. Engl., everlastingly, 
eternal!^/) : glaebaque versis Aeternum fran- 
genda bidentibus, Verg. G. 2, 400 : ingens 
janitor Aeternum latrans {of Cerberus), id. 
A. 6, 401. — 3. aeterno, m eton., of in- 
def. long time, forever, perpetually: viret 
aeterno hunc fontem igneum contegens 
fraxinus, Plin. 2, 107, 111, § 210 : bvsta 
tvta aeterno MANEANT, Inscr. Orell. 4517. 

aethahis, U »»., = a ie«An, a sort of 

grape in Egypt, the soot-grape, Plin. 14, 7, 9 
§ 74. 

aether, C^is (sometimes Gr. gen. aelhe- 
ros; ace. reg. Gr. aethera; and so Stat. S. 4 
225 ; id. Th. 3, 525 ; but poetry and prose 
-of that per. also use aetherem Tert. adv. 
Marc. 1, 13 ; cf. Serv. ad Verg. A. 1. 58; plur. 
in late Lat. aethera, Ven. Port. Carm. 3, 9, 
7), m., — cuOn^ [v. aestas], the upper, pure 
bright air, the ether. I. I n g o n. ^ Lit! 
(opp. aer, the lower atmospheric air): re- 
stat ultimus omnia cingens et coe'reens 
caeli complexus, qui idem aether vocatur, 
extrema ora et determinatio mundi ; in 
quo cum admirabilitate maxima igneae 
foraiao cursus ordinatos defhiiunt, Cic. N 
D. 2,40: (astra) oriuntur in ardore caele- 
sti. qui aether vel caelum nominatur, id 
lb. 2, 15. — B. Transf., in the poets 1 
Heaven : Id, quod nostri caelum memo- 
rant, Graii perhibent aethera, Pac. ap. Varr 
L. L. 5, § 17 Mull. (Trag. Rel. p. 87 Rib.)- 

64 



AETH 

fama super aethera notus. Verg. A. 1, 379 : 
rex aetheris altus Juppiter, id. ib. 12, 140- 
regna profundi aetheros. Stat. Th. 3, 524. 
—2. Air, in gen.: clamor ad caelum vol- 
veudus per aethera vagit, Enn. ap. Varr. 
L. L. 7, g 104 Mull. (Ann. v. 520 Vahl.)- 
ignem ignes procudunt aetheraque aether, 
Lucr. 2, 1115: ferar per liquidum aethera 
Vates, * Hor. C. 2, 20, 2 : nudoque sub 
aetheris axe, Verg. A. 2, 512; 8, 28: apes 
liquidum trans aethera vectae, id. ib 7 
65; Sil. 2, 513 al. — * 3, In opp. to the 
lower world, the upper world, the earth : 
aethere in alto duros perferre labores 
Verg. A. (>, 436. — * 4, The brightness sur- 
rounding a deity : aethere plena corusco 
Pallas, Val. Fl. 5, 183— H. Aether per- 
son if ietl, son of Chaos, and father of 
Cesium, Cic. N. D. 3, 17 al. ; also Jupiter, 
Cic. Ac. 2, 41. So in the poets often: pater 
Aether, Lucr. 1, 250 : pater omnipotens 
Aether, Verg. G. 2, 325. 

aetherius (not aethereus), a, um, 

adj., — u^tpm? [aether], pertaining to the 
ether, ethereal. I. Lit.: sidera aetheriis 
afflxa cavornis. Lucr. 4, 391 : (truncus) vivit 
et aetheriasvitalis suscipit auras, id. 3 405: 
altissima aetheriaque natura, Cic. N.'d. 2 
24,/m.; post ignem aethcria domo Subduc- 
tum, * Hor. C. 1, 3, 29. — H. T r a n s f. A 
Pertaining to heaven, heavenly, celestial': 
arces, Ov. M. 15, 858 ; umbrae, the shade 
spread through the leavens, Cat. 66 55 • 
pater, Mart. 9, 36: Olympus, id. 9, 4: 'Tau- 
rus mons aetheno vertice, i. e. which touch- 
es heaven, Tib. 1, 8, 15 : aetherios animo 
conceperat ignes, i. e. heavenly inspiration 
(Gr. <-vVov(rta.ciJi6\), Ov. F. 1, 473.— B. Per- 
taining to the air in gen. : nubes, Lucr. 4, 
182: aurae, id. 3. 40(3: aqua, i. e. rain, Ov. 
F. 1, 682. — C. Pertaining to the upper 
world: vesci aura Aetheris, Verg. A. 1, 
546.— Comp. : aetherior, Jul. Val. Res Cost! 
Alex. XI". 3, 68 Mai. 

Aethiopia, ae, /, = Ai^oTrm [v. 

Aethiops], Ethiopia, a country in Africa 
on both sides of the equator. Its limits 
cannot be accurately donned ; cf. Plin. 6 
30, 35; 6, 5, 8; Vulg. Gen. 2, 13; ib. Isa. ll' 
11.— Hence, AethldpiCUS, a , um, adj.', 
Ethiopian, Plin. 6, 30, 35, § 196. 

_ t aethiopis, idis, / , = a \HioirU, a spe- 
cies of sage, prob. Salvia Aethiopis, Linn., 
Ethiopian sage, Plin. 27. 4, 3, § 11. 

Aethidpissa, ae , /, an Ethiopian 
woman, Vulg. Num. 12, 1 ; Hier. ad Eust 
Ep. 22, 1 ; from 

Aethiops (i long, AethTops, Sid, Carm. 
11, 18), opis, ?»., — sSloxI, [the Gr. geogra- 
phers derived this word from niBu-ih^ and 
applied it to all the sunburnt, dark-com- 
plexioned races above Egypt]. I Subst. 
an Ethiopian, Plin. 2, 78, 80. § 189; Vulg 
2 Par. 12, 3; ib. Act. s, 7. — B. Appel. \ 
A black man, negro : derideat Aethiopem 
albus, Juv. 2, 23 : Aethiopas videri, Plin. 
32, 10, 52, § 141. — 2. A coarse, dull, awk- 
ward man, a blockueud : cum hoc homine 
an cum stipite Acthiope, Cic. Sen. 6; Juv 
6, 600; Flor. 4, 7— H. Adj., Ethiopian; in 
the masc. : Aethiopes Iacus, Ov. M. 15, 320- 
vir Aethiops, Vulg. Act. 8, 7. 

Aethiopus, i, »»., = Aethiops: rhino- 
ceros velut Aethiopus. Lucil. ap. Prise 
p. 689 P. 

Aethdn, onis, m.,~ aWav (burning). 
In mythology, the name of a horse. \ In 
the chariot of Phoebus, Ov. M. 2, 153.— JJ 
In that of Pallas, Verg. A. 11, 89. — \\\ t In 
that of Aurora, Serv. ad Verg. A. 1. a— IV 
In that of Pluto, Claud. Rapt. Pros. Ifm. 

1. aethra, ae,/, — a i#pa [v. aestas], 
the upper, pure air, the bright, clear, serene 
sky: aetheris splendor, qui sereno caelo 
conspicitur, Serv. ad Verg. A. 3, 585 (poet.) : 
flammea, Jul. ap. Marr. G, 4 (Trag Rel, 
p. 228 Rib.): siderea, Verg. A. 3, 585.— H 
T r a 11 s f. , like aether, the sky, air, heavens ' 
surgere in aethram, Lucr. 6, 467 : volans 
rubra ales in aethra, Verg. A. 12, 247 • so 
Sil. 4, 103; Stat. S. 1, 2. 135 al. (but in Cic. 
N. D. 2, 15, 42, the correct read, is aethere 
B. andK.). 

2. Aethra, ae - / * = \W pa . I. Daugh - 
ter of Oceanus and Tethys, mother of liyis 
(in Hyg. Fab. 192 called Pleione), Ov. F. 5, 
171.— II. Daughter of Pittheus and mother 



AEVU 

of Theseus, ace. to Ov. H. 10, 131, and Hve 
Fab. 37. h 

t aetidldgia, ae , /, = antoXofia, an 

allegation of reasons, a bringing of proofs 
Isid. Orig. 2, 21. 

t aetltes, ae , f, = uen'Tn? (from u £ t6? 
eagle), a stone found in the nest of the eagle] 
eagle-stone, to us unknown, Plin. 10 3 4 
§ 12_; 30, 14, 44, § 130. ' ' ' ' 

"t" aetitis, idis, /, = aeri-r^, a precious 
stone of the color of the eagle, Plin. 37, 11, 
72, % 187. 

Aetna, ae (in Gr. form Aetne, <5s, 
in good MSS. of Ov.),/, = Al rvn [aiBco, 
to burn]. f m The celebrated volcano of Sic- 
ily, now Mongibello or ^Etna, in the inte- 
rior of which, ace. to fable, was the forge 
of Vulcan, where the Cyclopes forged thun- 
derbolts for Jupiter, and under which the 
latter buried the monster Typhoons.— Form 
Aetna, Cic. Div. 2. 19; Ov. F. 4,590: id Tr 



0, 275.— Form Aetne, Ov. F. 4, 491 Kiese.- 
II. A nymph in Sicily, ace. to Serv. ad 
Verg A. 9, 584. — Hf. A town at the foot 
oj Mt. jEtna, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 23; 2, 3, 44. 

AetnaeilS, a, um, adj. [Aetna]. I, 
Pertaining to ^Etna : ignes, Cic. >,". D. 2, 3(s" 
fratres, the Cyclopes who forged in Mt. Ait- 
na, Verg. A. 3, 678: fulmen, Prop. 4, 16, 21: 
Deus. i. e. Vulcan, who is said to have had 
his forge in Mt. ^Etna, Val. Fl. 2, 420. — 
Subst.: Aetnaei, Orum, in., those who 
dwell on or near Mt. jEtna, Just. 22, 1.— 
Hence, H. Poet., pars pro toto, Sicilian: 
triumphi, Sil. 9, 196. 

Aetnensis, e, adj. [id.], pertaining to 
the town of J£tna (at the foot of Mt. iEtna 
v. Strab. 6, p. 185) : ager, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 18.' 
— Hence, Aetnenses, ium, ?n.. the in- 
habitants of Mtna, Plin. 3, 8, 14, § C J1. 

Aetdlia, ae, /, — AinoAm, a province 
in Middle Greece, between Locri and A carna - 
nia, south of Thessaly, Cic. Fis. 37.— Hence, 
1. AetdliCQS, a. urn, ndj.. JEtnlian ■ aper. 
the Calydonian boar, Plaut. Pers. 1, 1, 3 (cf. 
Ov. M. 8, 270 sqq.): bellum, Liv. 37, 6.—* Q 
AetollS, idis, /, = Ai-coA/?, an JEtolia.n 
woman : pulsa Aetolide Dejanira, Ov. H. 9, 
131.—* 3 t Aetollus, ^ um, adj., poet, for 
^Etolicus : heros, i. e. Diomedes, who first 
reigned in JStolia, Ov. M. 14,461.-4, Ae- 
tolus, a, um, adj., = AixwXor, jEtolian : 
arma, i. e. of Diomedes, who first reigned in 
jEtoha, Ov. M. 14, 528 ; so id. R. Am. 159 ; 
Sil. 7, 484: urbs, 1. e. Arpi in Apulia, built 
by Diomedes, A r erg. A. 11, 289; hence: Arpi 
Aetoli. id. ib. 10, 28 : plagae, hunting-nets, 
with reference to Meleager and the Caly- 
donian chase, Hor. Ep. 1, 18, 46 Schmid.— 
Hence, Aetoli, orum, m., the inhabitants 
of'JEtolia, Paul. Capt. prol. 24 Fleck. ; Liv. 
37, 6; Verg. A. 11, 308. 

aevitas, atis,/ [aevum] (an old word, 
= aetas, which is contr. from it), the time 
through which a person lives or a thing 
lasts, the time of existence. J. Lit.: qua 
voluptate aevitatis extimam attigit metam 
aevitas, Varr. ap. Non. p. 193, 7: censores 
populi aevitates, suboles, familias pecuni- 
asque censento, Cic. Leg. 3, 7 : si morbvs 
aevitasvb vitivm escit, Leg. XII. Tab. ap 
Gell. 20, 1, 25; Arn. 5, 8. — H. Trop. & t 
Of the future, time unending, immortality' 
sed etiam mortales deos ad aevitatem tem- 
poris edidit, for endless ages, to endure for- 
ever, A pp. Dogm. Plat. 1, 120. — B. Of the 
past: quid operis aut negotii celebrans an- 
teacti temporis decurrerit aevitatem, the 
time of yore, Arn. 2, 22. 
aeviternilS, = aeternus, q. v. 
aevum (archaic aevom) h n.; but 
m., Plaut. Poen. 5, 4, 14; Lucr. 2, 561; 3, 
603 [atwv; cf. ait's or aUv, aet. aidio?\ 
Goth, aivs = time, aiv = ever, aiveins = 
everlasting ; Germ, ewig, Ewigkoit ■ Eng 
aye, ever], I. Lit. A. In gen., un- 
interrupted, never-ending time, eternity: 
per aevom, Lucr. 1, 634; 1, 950 al.— Hence, 
of the future : in aevum. for all time 
Hor. C. 4, 14, 3; so Plin. 35, 2, 2, and Vulg. 
Eccli. 41, 16 : nos peribimus in aevum 
ib. Bar. 3, 3. — B. Esp. in a more re- 
stricted sense of a definite time, period, 
lifetime, life, age : aevom agitare En 11 ap' 
Gell. 12, 2, 3 (Ann. v. 80S Vahl.): in armis 
aevom agere, Pac. ap. Cic Tusc 2 21 P) 
(Trag. Rel. p. 110 Rib.); so, aevom degerr 



AFFA 

Lucr. 5, 1439 : consumere, id. 5, 1430 : meum 
si qais te percontabitur aevum, my age or 
time of life, Hor. Ep. 1,20, 26: aevum omnc 
et breve et fragile est, PI in. Pan. 78, 2: flos 
aevi, the bloom of life (cf. aetas, I.), Ov. M. 
9, 435 : integer aevi, Verg. A. 9, 255 : pri- 
mnm aevum, Val. Fl. 7, 338. — Also (like 
aetas, q. v. I) for old age : aevo confectus, 
Verg. A. 11, 85: obsitus aevo, id. ib. 8, 307 : 
annis aevoque soluti, Ov. M. 8, 712. — H, 
Transf. A, Age or generation. Ov. P. 1, 
3, 83: ter aevo functus (of Nestor), Hor. C. 
2, 9, 13: ingenia nostri aevi, Veil. 2. 36: in 
nostro aevo, Plin. 2, 25, 23, § 92 : nostro 
aevo, id. 2, 13. 10, § 57: simulacrum tot ae- 
vis incorruptum, id. 14, 1, 2, § 9. — Hence, 
B. The men, living in the same age (cf. 
aetas, II. r ) .- de quibus consensus aevi 
judicaverit, Plin. 14. 0. 8, § 72. — C. In a 
wider sense, time, in gen.: vitiata dentibus 
aevi omnia, Ov. M. 15, 235 : quae per tan- 
tum aevi occulta. Tac. A. 16, 1. 

t AeX ? = at'f (Goat), the name of a rocky 
island in the JEgean Sea, between Chius 
and Tenus : Aex nomine a specie caprac, 
Tepente e medio mari exsiliens, Plin. 4, 11, 
18.J 51. 

AieF, f ra, frum, adj. [v. Africa], Afri- 
can : litus, Ov. H. 7, 169 : aequora, the sea 
between Africa and Sicily , id. F. 4, 289 : 
avis, i. e. a Numidian hen, in high estima- 
tion on account of its size and rareness, 
Hor. Epod. 2, 53: Afro Murice tiuctae la- 
nae, i. e. of Gmtulia, id. C. 2, 1(5, 35 ; cf. id. 
Ep. 2, 2. 181, and Ov. F. 2, 318. — Hence, 
mbst. : Afer, an African, and Afri. orum, 
m., Africans, Cic. Balb. 18 : sitiente's Afri, 
Verg. E. 1, 65; discincti, ungirded, \. e. un- 
warlike, id. A. 8, 724: dirus Afer, i. e. Han- 
nibal, Hor. C. 4, 4, 42. — Poet.: medius li- 
quor Secernit Eurooen ab Afro. i. e. from 
Africa, Hor. C. 3, 3, 47. 

afcfaber (better ad£)> bra. brum, adj. 

I. Made or prepared ingeniously or with art, 
ingenious; aftabrum : fabrefactum. Paul, ex 
Fest. p. 28 Mull.— Hence, adv : adfabre, 
ingeniously, skilfully : adfabre atquc anti- 
quo artiQc'io fact us, Cic. Verr. 1, 5. 14 ; Prise. 
1009 P. — II. In act. sense, skilled in art, 
skilful, ingenious : litteras adfabra rerum 
vel natura vel industria peperit, Symm. 
Ep. 3, 17. 

affabllis (better adf-), G , adj. [adfari], 
that can be easily spoken to, easy of access, 
courteous, affable, kind, friendly, Tor. Ad. 
5, 6, 8: cum in omni serraone omnibus ad- 
fabilem esse se vellet, *Cic. Off. 1, 31, 113: 
adfabilss, blandus. Nep. Alcib. 1, 3: nee dic- 
tu adfabihs ulli, Verg. A. 3, 621 (cf. Att. ap. 
Macr. S. 6, 1: quem nee adfari queas): ad- 
fabilior, Sen. Ep. 79 : adfabilom te facito, 
Vulg. Eccli. 4, l.—Sup. prob. not used.— 
Adv. : adfabiliter, courteously, kindly, 
Macr. S. 7,2; Spart. ap. Carac. 3: adfabilis- 
sime, Gell. 16, 3. 

*affabiiitas (better a df-), fitis, / 
[adfabilis], the quality of affabihs, affabil- 
ity, courtesy, kindness; comitas adfabilitas- 
que sermonis, Cic. Off. 2, 14, 48. 

aftabiliter, adv., v. affabiiis. 

afifabre, adv. , v. affaber, I. 

* affabricatus (better adf-), a, urn 
[Part., as if from adfabrico],^fe<i or added 
to by art : consuetudo quasi adfabricata 
natura, Aug. Mus. 6, 7. 

affamen (better adfc). tnis, n. [ad- 
fari], an accosting, address (in App. forthe 
usual adfatus) : blando adfamine, App. M. 

II, p. 260, 23 Elm.; id. ib. 11, p. 272, 39. 
affaniae,anim,/ [perh. adfari], empty, 

trifling talk, chatter, idle jests : dicta futi- 
lia, gerrae; only in two passages in App.: 
ananias adblaterare, App. M. 9, p. 221, 25 
Elm.: effutire, id. ib. 10, p. 243, 14 ib. 

aftatim (also adfc), adv. [Serv. ad 
Verg A. 1, 123, cites fatim — abundanter; 
cf. : fatiscor, defatiscor, fatigo ; Corss, 
Ausspr. I. p. 158, refers fatim to the same 
root as X' iT 'r> x> P°?)- X. To satisfaction, 
sufficiently, abundantly, enough (so that one 
desires no more, therefore subjective ; while 
satis signifies sufficient, so that one needs 
nothing more, therefore objective, Doed. 
6yn. I. p. 108 sq.}: adfatim edi, bibi, lusi, Li v. 
Andron. ap. Paul, ex Fest. p. 11 Miill., after 
Horn. Od. 15, 372 (Com. Rel. p. 4 Rib.) : edas 
de alieno quantum velis. usque adfatim, till 
you have enough. Plaut. Poen. 3, 1, 31: mi- 
seria una uni quidem homini est adfatim, 
5 



AFFE 

id. Trin. 5. 2, 61 (where adfatim. as some- 
times also satis, abunde, frustra, is constr. 
as an adj.): cisdem seminibus homines 
adfatim vescuntur, Cic. N. D. 2, 51 : adfatim 
satiata (aquila). id. Tusc. 2, 10, 24: adfatim 
satisfacere alicui, id. Att. 2, 16: parare com- 
meatum adfatim, Sail. J. 43: de cytiso adfa- 
tim dixhnus, Plin. 18. 16. 43, § 148. — Ace. 
to Fest. p. 11, Terence uses it (in a passage 
not now extant) for ad las&itudincm, to 
weariness, satiety, which may be derived 
from the etym. above given. — Sometimes, 
like abunde and satis, as subst. with gen.; 
v. Roby, §§ 1294, 1296, and Rudd. II. p. 317: 
divitiarum adfatim est, Plaut. Mil. 4, 1, 33: 
hominum, id. Men. 3, 1, 10: copiarum, Liv. 
34,37 : vini. Just. 1, 8. — H. In later Lat. be- 
fore an adj. (cf. abunde). sufficiently, enough : 
adfatim onustus. App. M. 9, p. 221, 31 Elm. : 
feminae adfatim multae, Aram. 14, 6. 

j$gf The poet and gram. Annianus, in 
Gell. 7, 7, 1, accented the word adfatim, 
while at an earlier period it was pro- 
nounced adialim, since it was considered 
as two words; cf. Doed. Syn. 1. p. 110. 

1. affatus (better adf-). Part, of ad- 
fari. 

2. affatus (better adf-), iis, m. [ad- 
fari], a speaking to or addressing, address 
( class, only in the poets ; later also in 
prose): quo nunc reginam ambire fure li- 
tem Audeat adfatuy Verg. A. 4. 284: adfa- 
tus reddorc, Stat. S. 2. 4, 7; Sen. Med. 187: 
ora solvere ad adfatus, Sil. 17, 340 al. — In 
prose. Cod. Just. 5, 4, 23 ; Cod. Imp. Leo, 1, 
26, 6 al. 

affectatlO (better adf-), onis, /. [ad- 
fecto J, a striving after something ( in a 
good or bad sense; for the most part only 
m post- Aug. prose). I, In gen.: philoso- 
phia sapientiae amor est et adfectatio. Sen. 
Ep. 89: magna caeli adfectatione comper- 
tum, i.e. per&crutatione, investigation. Vim. 
2. 20, 18, § 82 (but Jan reads adsectatio) : de- 
cons, id. 11, 37, 56, § 154: Nervii circa ad- 
fectationem Germanicae originis {in the en- 
deavor to pass for Germans), ultro ambi- 
tiosi sunt, Tac. G. 28 : imperii, aspiring to 
the empire, Suet. Tit. 9. — H, E sp., in rhet- 
oric, a striving to give a certain character 
or quality to discourse without possessing 
the ability to do it, also an inordinate de- 
sire to say something striking, affectation, 
conceit: (ad malam adfectationem) perti- 
nent, quae in oratione sunt tumida, exsilia, 
praedulcia, abundantia, arcessita, exsultan- 
tia, Quint. 8, 3, 56: nihil est odiosius adfec- 
tatione, id. 1, 6, 11; 8, 3, 27; 9, 3, 54; 10, 1, 
82; Suet. Gram. 10; id. Tib. 70. 

affectator (better adf-), oris, m. [id.], 
one that strives for something: justi anio- 
ns, Eutr. 10, 7. — In a bad sense: nimius ri- 
sQs, Quint. 6, 3, 3 al. 

* aftectatrix ( better adf- ), icis, / 
[adfectator], she that strives for a thing: sa- 
pientia adfectatrix veritatis, Tert. Praescr. 
1, 7. 

affect at us (better adfc), a > um , P- a., 

from aftecto. 

affecte (ad£), adv. , v. afficio, P. a. jin. 

affectio (adf-),onis,/ [adflcio]. I, Tlie 
relation to or disposition toward a thing 
produced in a person by some influence (in 
this and the two foil, signif. almost pecu- 
liar to the philos. lang. of Cic ) : comparan- 
tur ea,quae aut majora aut minora autpa- 
ria dicuntur; in quibus spectantur haec: 
numerus, species, vis, quae dam etiam ad 
res aliquas adfectio. relation, Cic. Top. 18, 
68, and § 70; cf. id. ib. 2, 7. — jj. A. A 
change in the state or condition of body or 
mind, a state or frame of mind, feeling (only 
transient, while habitus is lasting): adfec- 
tio est animi aut corporis ex tempore ali- 
qua dc causa commutatio ut, laetitia. cu- 
piditas, metus, molestia, morbus, debilitas, 
et alia, quae in eodem genere reperiuntur, 
Cic. Inv. 1, 25, 36; 1, 2, 5; cf. 1, 2, 5, g 19. 
In Gellius = adfectus, as transl. of the Gr. 
Trdti or, Gell. 19, 12, 3. — J3. A permanent 
state of mind, a frame of mind, a state of 
feeling, Gr. btaOecns : virtus est adfectio 
animi constans conveniensque, Cic. Tusc. 
4, 15, 34 Kiihn (cf. in ur. duWeais ^vxh? 
au/Ji<pwvr)<; auTtj, Stob. Eel. Eth. 2. p. 104); 
id. Fin. 3. 26, 6o Goer. : non mihi est vita 
mea utilior quam animi talis adfectio. ne- 
minem ut violem commodi mei gratia, id. 
Off. 2, 6 5 29 Reier. — Also of body, a S anal 
to the mind, a fixed, permanent const itu- 



AFFE 

Hon: tu qui definieris summum bonum 
firma corporis adfectione contineri, etc., 
Cic. Tusc. 5, 9. 27. — And metaph. of the 
stars, their position in respect to one an- 
other : astrorum, a constellation, Cic. Fat. 
4: ex qua adfectione caeli primum spiri- 
tum duxerit, id. Div. 2, 47 (cf. affectus, a, 
um, B.). — C. E s P- j a favorable disposition 
toward any one, love, affection, good -will 
(post-Aug. pro&e) : simiarum generi prae- 
cipua erga fetum adfectio, Plin. 8, 54, 80: 
egit Nero grates patribus laetas inter audi- 
entium adfectiones, Tac. A. 4, 15: argentum 
magisquam aurum sequuntur, nulla adfec- 
tione animi, sed quia, etc., id. G. 5; Just. 
24, 3: Artemisia Mausolum virum amasse 
fertur ultra adfectionis humanae fidem, 
Gell. 10, 18, 1. — Conor., the loved object: 
adfectiones, children, Cod. Th. 13, 9, 3.— J). 
In the Eat. of the Pandects, ability of wilt- 
ing, will, volition, inclination (cf. 2. affectus, 
II. D.) : furiosus et pupillus non possunt in- 
cipere possidere, quia adfectionem tenendi 
non liabent, Dig. 5, 16. 60. 

*afifectiosus (adf-), a, urn. adj. [Bffec- 
tio],Jul( of attachment or affection, Tert. 
Anim. 19. — *Adv.: adfcctldse, affec- 
tionately, Serv. ad Verg. E. 9, 27. 

affecto (better adf-^ »vi. atum, 1, v. 
freq. [adticioj; constr. aliquid. I. To strive 
after a thing, to exert one's self to obtain, to 
pursue, to aim to do : adfectare est pronum 
animum ad faciendum habere, Paul, ex 
Fest. p. 2 Midi. — So, adfectare viam or iter, 
trop., to enter on or take a way. in order to 
arrive at a destined point (very freq. in 
Plaut. and Ter.): ut me defraudes, ad earn 
rem adfectas viam, you are on your way to 
this, Plaut. Men. 4, 3, 12 ; id. Aul. 3, 6, 39 : hi 
gladiatorio animo ad me adfectant viam, set 
upon me, Ter. Phorm. 5, 7. 71; so id. Heaut. 
2, 3, 60: quam viam munitet, quod iter ad- 
fectet, videtis, Cic. Rose. Am. 48. — So in 
other cases: cur opus adfectas novum? Ov. 
Am. 1, 1, 14 : adfectare spem, to cling to or 
cherish, Liv. 28,18; cf. Ov. M. 5, 377 : navem, 
to seize or lay hold of: verum ubi nulla da- 
tur dextra adfectare potestas (of the giant 
Polyphemus), Verg. A. 3, 670.— H, To en- 
deavor to make one's own, to pursue, strive 
after, aspire to, aim at, desire: munditiem, 
non adfluentiam adfectabat, Nep. Att. 13, 5 ; 
Cic. Her. 4, 22: diligentiam, Plin. 17, 1, 1: 
magnificent iam verborum, Quint. 3, 8, 61 : 
elegantiam Graecae orationis verbis La- 
tinis, Gell. 17, 20: artem, Val. Max. 8, 7, n. 1 
extr. — Pass.: morbo adfectari, to be seized 
or attacked by disease, Liv. 29, 10 init. — B. 
In a bad sense, to strive after a thing pas- 
sionately, to aim at or aspire to: domina- 
tiones, Sail. Fragm. ap. Aug. Civ. Dei, 3, 
17: caelum, Ov. Am. 3, 8, 51 : uniones, Plin. 
9, 35, 56: regnum, Liv. 1, 46, 2; 2, 7, 6: 
imperium in Latinos, id. 1, 50, 4: cruorem 
alicujus, Stat. Th. 11, 539: immortalitatem, 
Curt. 4, 7. — Also with inf. as object, Plaut 
Bacch. 3, 1, 9 : non ego sidereas adfecto tan- 
gere sedes, Ov. A. A. 2, 39; Stat. Th. 1, 132: 
Sil. 4, 138; Quint 5, 10, 28: qui esse docti 
adfectant, id. 10, 1, 97.— C. In the histt., to 
seek to draw to one's self, to try to gain over: 
civitates formidine adfectare, Sail. J. 66: 
Gallias, Veil. 2, 39: Galliarum societatem, 
Tac. H. 4, 17; 1, 23; 4, 66; id. G. 37, 9; Flor. 

2, 2, 3. — p. To imitate a thing faultily, or 
with dissimulation, to affect, feign (only 
post-Aug.): crebrum anhehtum, Quint. 11, 

3, 56: imitationem antiquitatis, id. 11,3, 10 : 
famam clementiae, Tac. H. 2. 63: studium 
carminum, id. A. 14, 16; so Suet. Vesp. 23: 
Plin. Pan. 20. — Hence, adfectatUS, a, 
um, p. a.; in rhetoric, choice, select, or far- 
fetched; studied: subtiiitas, Quint 3,11.21: 
scurrilitas, id. 11, 1, 30; (gradatio) apertio- 
rem habet artem et magis adfectatam,id.9, 
3, 54: adfectata et parum naturalia, id. 11, 
3. 10 (but in 12, 10, 45 the correct read, is 
effecting, ace, to Spald.). — Adv.; adfec« 
tato. studiously, zealously, Lampr. Heliog. 
17. ? 

affector (adf-)- *~ ltu3 i l,verb. dep [ad- 
flcio]. * J.. To strive eagerly after some- 
thing : adfectatus est regnum, Varr. ap. 
Diom. p. 377 P.— 2. In later Lat., to have an 
inclination for, to become attached to : ad 
mulierem, App. Herb. 15. 

affectudSUS (adf-), a, um, adj. [adfec- 
tus]. in later Lat., full of inclination, affec- 
tion, or love; affectionate, kind : piam adfec- 
tuosainque rein fecisse, Macr. S. 2, 11; so 
65 



APFE 

Cassiod. Ep. 5, 2 ; Tert. c. Marc. 5, 14. — 
Adv. : adiectilOSe, affectionately, etc. , 
Cassiod.Jip. 3, 4. — Sup,, Sid. Ep. 4, 11. 

1. aflectus (adf-J^ a, um, P. a., worn, 
afficio. 

2 B aflectus (adf-), us, m. [afficio]. I. 
A state of body, and esp. of mind produced 
in one by some influence (cf, affectio, I. ), a 
state or disposition of mind, affection, mood : 
adfectuum duae sunt species': alteram Grae- 
ci irdOo? vocant. alteram j,0os. Quint. 6, 2, 
8: quaiis cujusque animi adfectus esset, ta- 
lem esse hominem, Cic. Tusc. 5, 16, 47 : du- 
biis adfectibus errat, Ov. M. 8, 473 : mentis, 
id. Tr. 4, 3, 32 : animi, id. ib. 5, 2, 8 : diver- 
sos adfectus exprimere, flentis et gauden- 
tis, Plin. 34, 8, 19, n. 10 : adfectu concitati, 
Quint. 6, 2, 8: adfectus dulciores, id. 10, 1 
101; 1, 11, 2; 6, 1, 7 al.— Of the body: su- 
persunt alii corporis adfectus, Cels. 3, 18; 

2, 15. — II. E s p. A. Love, desire, fond- 
ness, good-will, compassion, sympathy (post- 
Aug. ) ; opes atque inopiani pari adfectu 
concupiscunt, Tac. Agr. 30 : si res ampla 
domi similisque affectibus esset, Juv. 12, 
10: parentis, Suet. Tit. 8: adfectu jura cor- 
rumpere, Quint. Decl. 6, 11. — B. !n Lucan 
and in later prose, meton. for the beloved 
objects, the dear or loved ones (in plur.; cf. 
adfectio, II. C): tenuit nostros Lesbos ad- 
fectus, Luc. Phars. 8, 132 : milites, quorum 
adfectus (wives and children) in Albano 
monte erant, Capitol. Maxim. 23; id. Anton. 
Phil. 24; hence, adfectus publici, the judges 
as representatives of the people, Quint. 
Decl. 2, 17 al. — C. In Seneca and Pliny, 
low, ignoble passion or desire : adfectus 
sunt niotus animi improbabiles subiti et 
concitati. Sen. Ep. 75 : Plin. Pan. 79, 3. — 
J}, In the Latin of the Pandects, ability of 
willing, will, volition (cf. affectio, II. D.): 
hoc edicto neque pupillum, neque furiosuni 
teneri constat, quia adfectu carent, Dig. 43, 
4,1; 44,7,54; 3, 5, 19, § 2 al. 

af-fero (better adfr), attnii (aut-, bet- 
ter att-), allutum (adl), afferre (adf-), v. a.; 
constr. aliquid ad aliquem or alicui. I. 
In gen., to bring, take, carry or convey a 
thing to a place (of portable things, while 
adducere denotes the leading or conduct- 
ing of men, animals, etc.), lit. and trop. 
A. Lit.: lumen, Enn. Ann. 1, 40: viginti 
minas, Plaut. As. 1, 3, 78; 1, 3, 87 al. : adtuli 
nunc— Quid, adtulisti?— Adduxi volui di- 
cere, id. Ps. 2, 4, 21 : tandem bruma nives 
adfert, Lucr. 5, 746: adiatus est acipenser, 
Cic. ap. Macr. S. 2, 12 : adfer hue scyphos, 
Hor. Epod. 9, 33: nuces, Juv. 5, 144: cibum 
pede ad rostrum veluti manu, Plin. 10, 46, 

03, § 129 : pauxillum aquae, Vulg. Gen! 18, 
4: caput ejus, ib. Marc. 6, 28. — With de in 
part, sense: adferte nobis de fructibus ter- 
rae, Vulg. Num. 13, 21 ; ib. Joan. 21, 10 (as lit. 
rendering of the Greek). — So of letters: ad- 
ferre litteras, ad aliquem or alicui, Cic. Att. 

8, 6; id. Imp. Pomp. 2; Li v. 22, 11 al. : ad- 
ferre se ad aliquem locum, to betake one's 
self to a place, to go or come to (opp. auferre 
se ab aliquo, to withdraw from, to leave, 
only poet. ) : hue me adfero, Plaut. Am. 3, 4^ 
6; Ter. And. 4, 5, 12 Bentl.: Fatis hue te 
poscentibus adfers, Verg. A. 8, 477 : sese a 
moenibus, id. ib. 3, 345. — So pass, adferri: 
urbem adferimur, are driven, come, Verg. A. 
7, 217 ; and adferre pedem : abite illuc, unde 
malum pedem adtulistis, id. Cat. 14, 21.— 
To bring near, extend, =porrigo (eccl. Lat.) : 
adfer manum tuam, reach hither, V uig. Joan. 
20, 27. — B. Trop., to bring to, upon, in a 
good or bad sense. ( u ) In bon. part. : pa- 
cem ad vos adfero, Plaut. Am. prol. 32 : hie 
Stoicus genus sermonum adfert non liqui- 
dum. i. e. makes use of Cic. de Or. 2, 38, 159 : 
nihil ostentationis aut imitationis adferre, 
id. ib. 3, 12, 45: non minus adferret ad di- 
cendum auctoritatis quam facultatis, id. 
Mur. 2, 4 : consulatum in familiam, id. Phil. 

9, 2: animum vacuum ad scribendas res 
difflciles, id. Att. 12, 38 : tibi benedictionem 
Vulg. Gen. 33, 11 : Domino gloriam, ib. I 
Par. 16, 28; ib. Apoc. 21, 26: ignominiam, 
ib.Osee,4,18.— (/?) In mal. part.: bellum in 
patriam, Ov. M. 12, 5 : nisi etiam illuc per- 
veuerint (canes), ut in dominum adferant 
dentes, to use their teeth against their master, 
Varr. R R. 2, 9. 9 : adferam super eos mala, 
Vulg. Jer. 23. 12: Quam accusationem ad- 
fertis adversus hominem hunc? id. Joan. 
18, 29: quod gustatum adfert mortem, ib. 
Job, 6, 6 : vim adferre aiicui for inferre, to 

66 



A E F E 

use force against or offer violence to one, 
Cic. Phil. 2, 7; id. Verr*. 2, 1. 26; Liv. 9. 16; 
42, 29 Drak. ; Ov. H. 17, 21 Heins.; id. A. A. 

1, 679; Suet. Oth. 12 al.: manus adferre ali- 
cui, in a bad sense, to lay hands on, attack, 
assail (opp.: manus abstinere ab aliqUo): 
pro re quisque manus adfert (sc. ad pug- 
nam), Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 20: domino a familia 
sua manus adlatas esse, id. Quint. 27 : intel- 
legimus eum detrudi, cm manus adferun- 
tur, id. Caecin. 17: qui sit improbissimus, 
manus ei adferantur, effodiantur oculi, id. 
Rep. 3, 17 Creuz. al. : sibi manus, to lay 
hands on one's self to commit suicide : Qui 
quidem manus, quas justius in Lepidi per- 
niciem animasset, sibi adferre conatus est, 
Plane, ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 23. — Also of things: 
manus templo, to rob or plunder, Cic. Verr. 

2, 1, 18 : bonis alienis, id. Off. 2, 15 : ma- 
nus suis vulneribus, to tear open, id. Att. 3, 
15 (a little before: ne rescindam ipse do- 
lorem meum) : manus beneficio suo, to nul- 
lify, render worthless, Sen. Pen. 2, 5 exl. — 
II. Esp. A. To bring, bear, or carry a 
thing, as news, to report, announce, inform, 
publish; constr. alicui or ad aliquem ali- 
quid, or ace. with inf. (class.; in the histt., 
esp. in Livy, very freq.) : ea adferam eaque 
ut nuntiem, etc., Plaut. Am. prol. 9: istud 
quod adfers, aures exspectant meae, id. As. 
2, 2, 65 ; Ter. Phorm. prol. 22 : calamitas 
tanta fuit, ut earn non ex proelio nuntius, 
sed ex sermone rumor adferret, Cic. Imp. 
Pomp. 9, 25 : si ei subito sit adiatum pericu- 
lum patriae, id. Off. 1, 43, 154 : nihil novi ad 
nos adferebatur, id. Fam. 2, 14; id. Att. 6, 8: 
rumores, qui de me adferuntur, Cic. Fil.ap. 
Cic. Fam. 16, 21: Caelium ad illam adtulis- 
se, se aurum quaerere, id. Gael. 24; so id. 
Fam. 5, 2 al. : magnum enim, quod adfere- 
bant, videbatur, Caes. B. C. 3, 15 Dint. : cum 
crebri adferrent nuntii, male rem gerere 
Darium, Nep. 3, 3 : haud vana adtulere, Liv. 
4, 37 ; 6, 31 : exploratores missi adtulerunt 
quieta omnia apud Gailos esse, id. 8, 17 
Drak.: per idem tempus rebellasse Etru- 
scos adiatum est, word was brought id. 10, 
45 al. : idem ex Hispania adiatum, Tac. H. 

1, 76 • esse, qui magnum nescio quid adfer- 
ret, Suet. Dom. 16; Luc. 1, 475: scelus'ad- 
tulit umbris, Val. Fl. 3, 172 al. — So of in- 
struction: doctrinam, Vulg. prol. Eccli.; ib. 
2 Joan. 10. — B. To bring a thing on one, i. e. 
to cause,occasion,effect, give, impart ; esp. of 
states of mind : aegritudinem alicui, Ter. 
Heaut. 4,3 2: alicui molestiam, id. Hec. 3, 

2, 9: populo Romano pacem, tranquillita- 
tem, otium, concordiam, Cic. Mur. 1: alicui 
multas lacrimas, magnain cladem, id. N. D. 

2, 3, 7 : ipsa detractio molestiae consecu- 
tionem adfert voluptatis, id. Fin. 1, 11, 37 ; 
so, adferre auctoritatem et ndem orationi, 
id. Phil. 12, 7 : metum, id. Verr. 2, 5, 25 : do- 
lorem, id. Sull. 1: luctum et egestatem, id. 
Rose. Am. 5 ; consolationem, id. Att. 10, 4: 
delectationem, id. Fam. 7, 1 al. : detrimen- 
tum, Caes. B. C. 2, 82 : taedium, Plin. 15, 2, 3, 
§ 7 : dolorem capitis, id. 23, 1, 18: gaudium, 
Plin. Ep. 10, 2, 1 al.— C. To bring forwards, 
allege, assert, adduce, as an excuse, reason, 
etc.: quam causam adferam? Ter. Heaut. 4, 

3, 23: justas causas adfers, Cic. Att. 11, 15; 
also without causa: rationes quoque, cur 
hoc ita sit, adferendas puto, id. Fin. 5, 10, 
27 ; cf. id. Fam. 4, 13 : idque me non ad 
meam defensionem adtulisse, id. Caecin. 29, 
85 : ad ea, quae dixi, adfer, si quid habes, 
id. Att. 7 : nihil igitur adferunt, qui in re ge- 
renda versari senectutem negant, they bring 
forwards nothing to the pui^pose. who. etc. 
id. Sen. 6; id. de"Or. 2, 53, 215: quid enim 
poterit dicere? . . an aetatem adferet? i. e. 
as an excuse, id. ib. 2, 89, 364. — Also absol.: 
Quid sit enim corpus sentire, quis adferet 
umquam . . .? will bring forwards an expla- 
nation, Lucr. 3, 354 (cf. reddo absol. in same 
sense, id. 1, 566): et, cur credam, adferre 
possum, Cic. Tusc. 1, 29, 70; 3, 23, 55. — D. 
Adferre aliquid = conducere, conferre ali- 
quid, to contribute any thing to a definite 
object, to be useful in any thin? to help, as- 
sist ; constr. with ad, with dot., or absol.: 
quam ad rem magnum adtulimus adju- 
mentum hominibus nostris, Cic. Off. 1, 1 : 
negat Epicurus diuturnitatem temporis ad 
beate vivendum aliquid adferre, id. Fin. 2, 
27, 87: quidquid ad rem pubiicam adtuli- 
mus, si modo aliquid adtulimus, id. Off. 1, 
44, 155; ilia praesidia non adferunt oratori 
aliquid, ne, etc., id. Mil. 1: aliquid adtuli 



AEPE 

mus etiam nos, id. Plane. 10, 24: quid enim 
oves aliud adferunt, nisi, etc., id. N. D. 2, 
63.— E. Very rare in class, period, to bring 
forth as a product, to yield, bear, produce, 
= fero: agri fertiles, qui multo plus adfe- 
runt, quam acceperunt, Cic, Off 1, 15 : her- 
bam adferentem semen, Vulg. Gen. 1, 29 : 
arva non adferent cibum, ib. Hab. 3, 17 : lig 
num adtulit fructum, ib, Joel, 2, 22; ib. 
Apoc. 22, 2: ager fructum, ib. Luc. 12, 16 al. 
af-flClO (better ad£), afleci (adf-), af- 
fectum (adf-), 3, v. a. [facio], to do something 
to one, i. e. to exert an influence on body or 
mind, so that it is brought into such or such 
a state ( used by the poets rarely, by Hor. 
never). 1, Aliquem. A. Of the body rare- 
ly, and then commonly in a bad sense : ut 
aestus, labor, fames, sitisque corpora adfice- 
rent, Liv. 28, 15: contumeliis adficere cor- 
pora sua, Vulg. Rom. 1, 24: non simplex Da- 
masichthona vulnus Adficit, Ov. M. 6, 255 : 
aconitum cor adficit, Scrib. Comp. 188: cor- 
pus adficere M. Antonii,Cic. Phil. 3: pulmo 
totus adficitur, Cels. 4, 7 ; with abl. of spec, r 
stomacho et vesica adfici, Scrib. Comp. 186. 
— In bon. part. : corpus itaadticiendum est,. 
ut oboedire rationi possit, Cic. Off. 1, 23.— 
B. More freq. of the mind: litterae tuae sic 
me adfecerunt. ut, etc., Cic. Att. 14, 3, 2: is 
terror milites hostesque in diversum adfecit, 
Tac. A. 11, 19 : varie sum adfectus tuis iitte- 
ris, Cic. Fam. 16, 2 : consules oportere sic ad- 
fici, ut, etc. . Plin. Pan. 90 : adfici a Gratia aut 
a Voiuptate, Cic. Fam. 5, 12; id. Mil. 29, 79: 
sollicitudo de te duplex nos adficit, id. Brut. 
92, 332: uti ei qui audirent, sic adficerentur 
animis, ut eos adfici vellet orator, id. de Or. 

1, 19, 87 B. and K.: adfici animos in diver- 
sum habitum, Quint. 1, 10, 25. — 2. With 
ace. and abl., to affect a person or (rarely) 
thing with something ; in a good sense, to 
bestow upcm, grace with ; in a bad sense, to 
visit with, inflict upon; or the ablative and 
verb may be rendered by the verb corre- 
sponding to the ablative, and if an adjective 
accompany the ablative, this adjective be- 
comes an adverb. — Of inanimate things 
(rare) : luce locum adfici ens. lighting up the 
place, Varr. ap. Non. p. 250, 2 : adficere me- 
dicamine vultum, Ov. Med. Fac. 67 : factum 
non eo nomine adflciendum, designated, Cic. 
Top. 24, 94 : res honore adficere, to honor, 
id. N. D. 1, 15, 38: non postuio, ut dolorem 
eisdem verbis adflcias, quibus Epicurus,, 
etc., id. Tusc. 2, 7, 18. — 3, Very freq. of 
persons. ( a ) In a good sense: Qui praeda 
atque agro adoreaque adfecit populares suos t 
Plaut. Am. 1, 1. 38 : quern sepultura adfi- 
cit, buries, Cic. Div. 1, 27, 56 : patres adfece- 
rat gloria, id. Tusc. 1, 15, 34: admiratione, 
id. Off. 2, 10, 37 : voiuptate, id. Fin. 3, 11, 37 : 
beneficio, id. Agr. 1, 4, 13: honore, id. Rose. 
Am. 50, 147: laude, id. Off. 2, 13, 47: nomi- 
ne regis, to style, id. Deiot. 5, 14 : bonis nun- 
tiis, Plaut. Am. prol. 8 : muneribus, Cic. 
Fam. 2, 3; Nep. Ages. 3, 3: praemio, Cic. 
Mil. 30, 82 : pretio, Verg. A. 12, 352 : stipen- 
ds, Cic. Balb. 27, 61.— (/3) In a bad sense; 
injuria abs te adficior indigna., pater, am 
wronged unjustly, Enn. ap. Auct.' ad Keren, 

2, 24, 38 ; so Ter. Phorm. 5, 1, 3 : Quanta 
me cura et sollicitudine adficit Gnatus, id. 
ib. 2, 4, 1 ; so Cic. Att. 1, 18 : desiderio, 
id. Fam. 2, 12: timore, to terrify, id. Quint. 
2, 6: difficultate, to embarrass, Caes. B. G. 
7, 6 : molestia, to trouble, Cic. Att. 15, 1 : tan- 
tis malis, Vulg. Num. 11, 15: macula, Cic. 
Rose. Am. 39, 113: ignominia, id. ib. 39, 123: 
contumeliis, Vulg. Ezech. 22,7; ib. Luc. 20, 
11: rerum et verborum acerbitatibus. Suet. 
Calig.2: verberibus, Just. 1,5: supplicio,Cic. 
Brut. 1, 16 ; so Caes. B. G. 1, 27 : poena, Nep. 
Hann. 8, 2: exsilio, to banish, id. Thras. 3: 
morte, cruciatu, cruce, Cic. Verr. 3, 4, 9: 
morte,Vulg. Matt. 10, 21: cruce, Suet. Galb, 
9 : uitimis cruciatibus, Liv. 21, 44 : ieto, 
Nep. Regg. 3, 2. — And often in pass. : solli- 
citudine et inopia consilii, Cic. Att. 3, 6 : ad- 
fici aegritudine, id. Tusc. 3, 7, 15: doloribus 
pedum, id. Fam. 6, 19 : morbo oculorum, 
Nep. Hann. 4, 3 : inopia rei frumentariae, 
Caes. B. G. 7, 17 : calamitate et injuria, Cic. 
Att. 11, 2: magna poena, Auct. B. G. 8, 39: 
vulneribus, Col. R. R. 4, 11 : torminibus et 
infiationibus, Plin. 29, 5, 33, § 103 : servi- 
tute, Cic. Rep. 1, 44.^ Hence, aflectus 
(adf-)! a, um. P. a. I. In a peculiar sense, 
that on which we have bestowed labor, that 
which we are now doing, so that it is nearly 
at an end ; cf. : Adfecta, sicut M. Cicero et 



AFFI 

veterum elegant issime locuti sunt, ea pro 
prie dicebantur, quae non ad finem ipsum, 
sed proxime finem progressa deductave 
erant, Gell. 3, 16 : bellum adfectum vide- 
mus et paene confectum, Cic. Prov. Cons. 
8, 19 : in provincia (Caesar) commoratur, ut 
ea. quae per eum adfecta sunt, perfecta rei 
publicae tradat, id. ib. 12, '29 : cum adfecta 
prope aestate uvas a sole mitescere tem- 
pus, etc., near the end of summer, id. ap. 
Gell. 1. c: Jamque hieme adfecta mitescere 
coeperat annus, Sil. 15, 502 : in Q. Mucii in- 
firmissima valetudme adfectaque jam aeta- 
te, Cic. de Or. 1,45, 200 ; id. Verr. 2, 4,43, § 95.— 
II. In nearly the same sense as the verb, 
absol. and with abl. £i, Absol. (u) Of 
persons laboring under disease, or not yet 
quite recovered : Qui cum ita adfectus esset, 
ut sibi ipse difflderet, was in such a state, 
Cic. Phil. 9, 1, 2 : Caesarem Neapoli adfec- 
tum graviter videam, very ill, id. Att. 14, 
17 ; so Sen. Ep. 101 : quem adfectum visu- 
ros crediderant, ill, Liv. 28, 26 : corpus ad- 
fectum, id. 9, 3: adfectae vires corporis, re- 
duced strength, weakness, id. 5, 18 : puella, 
Prop. 3, 24, 1: aegra et adfecta mancipia, 
Suet. Claud. 25: jam quidem adfectum, sed 
tamen spirantem,id.Tib.21.— (/3) Of things, 
weakened, sick, broken, reduced : partem 
istam rei publicae male adfectam tueri, 
Cic. Fam. 13, 6S: adfecta res publica, Liv. 
5, 57 : Quid est enim non ita adfectum, ut 
non deletum exstinctumque esse fateare? 
Cic. Fam. 5, 13, 3 : sic mihi (Sicilia) adfecta 
visa est, ut hae terrae solent, in quibus bel- 
lum versatum est, id. Verr. 5, 18, 47 : ad- 
fecta res familiaris, Liv. 5, 10: opem rebus 
adfectis orare, id. 6, 3 ; so Tac. H. 2, 69 : 
fides, id. ib. 3, 65: spes, Val. Fl. 4, 60.— ( 7 ) 
Of persons, in gen. sense, disposed, affected, 
moved, touched : Quonam modo, Philumena 
niea, nunc te offendam adfectam? Ter. Hec. 
3, 1, 45 : quomodo sim adfectus, e Lepta 
poteris cognoscere, Cic. Fam. 14, 17 : ut 
eodern modo erga arnicum adfecti sim us, 
quo erga nosmetipsos, id. Lael. 16, 56; id. 
Fin. 1,20, 68; cum ita simus adfecti, ut non 
possimus plane simul vivere, id. Att. 13, 
23; id. Fin. 5, 9, 24: oculus conturbatus 
non est probe adfectus ad suum munus 
fungendum, in proper state, id. Tusc. 3, 7, 
15 : oculi nimis arguti, quem ad modum 
animo adfecti simus, loquuntur, id. Leg. 1,9, 
27 ; id. Off. 3, 5, 21 ; id. Att. 12, 41, 2.— (6) As 
rhet. t. t. : affectus ad, related to, resem- 
bling: Turn ex eis rebus, quae quodam modo 
affectae sunt ad id, de quo quaeritur, Cic. 
Top. 2, 8 Forcellini. — 3. With abl. chiefly 
of persons, in indifferent sense, in good or 
bad sense (cf. : Animi quem ad modum ad- 
fecti sint, virtutibus,vitiis, artibus, inertiis, 
aut quem ad modum commoti, cupiditate, 
metu, voluptate, molestia, Cic. Part. Or. 10, 
35). («) In indifferent sense, furnished 
with, having : validos lictores ulmeis affec- 
tos lentis virgis, Plaut. As. 3, 2, 29 : pari fllo 
similique (corpora) adfecta figuru, Lucr. 2, 
341 : Tantane adfectum quemquam esse ho- 
minem audacia ! Ter. Phorrn. 5, 7, 84 : om- 
nibus virtu libus, Cic. Plane. 33, 80.— (/?) In 
bad sense: aegritudine,morbo adfectus, Col. 
R. R. 7, 5, 20: aerumnis omnibus, Lucr. 3, 
50: sollicitudine, Caes. B. G. 7, 40: difficult 
tatibus, Cic. Fam. 7, 13 : fatigatione, Curt. 
7, 11 : frigore et penuria, id. 7, 3 : adfecta 
sterilitate terra, Col. R. R. praef. 1, 2: vitiis, 
Cic. Mur. 6, 13 : ignominia, id. Att. 7, 3: 
supplicio, Tac. A. 15, 54 : verberibus, Curt. 
7, 11: vulnere corpus adfectum, Liv. 1, 25: 
morbo, Ter. Hec. 3, 3, 6: dolore, Cic. de Or. 

2, 49, 201: febre. Suet. Vit. 14: pestilentia, 
Liv. 41, 5 : desperatione, Cic. Att. 14, 22 : 
clade, Curt. 10, 6: senectute, Cic. de Or. 3, 
18, 68 : aetate, id. Cat. 2, 20 ; id. Sen. 14, 
47 : morte, Serv. ad Cic. Fam. 4, 12. — Sup. : 
remiges inopia adfectissimi, Veil. 2, 84.— 
(j) In good sense: beneficio adfectus, Cic. 
Fam. 14, 4 : aliquo honore aut imperio, id. 
Ofl: 1, 41, 149: valetudine optima, id. Tusc. 
4, 37, 81 : laetitia, id. Mur. 2, 4, and ad Brut. 
1, 4: munere deorum, id. N. D. 3, 26, 67: 
praemiis, id. Pis. 37, 90. — Adv.: aflfecte 
(adfc)- with ( a strong) affection, deeply: 
oblectamur et contnstamur et conterre- 
mur in somniis quam adfecte et anxie et 
passibiliter. Tert. Anim. 45. 

amciicius (adf-) or -tius,a, um , 
adj. [afflngo], added to, annexed, Varr. R. R. 

3, 12. 1. 

affictllS (adf-)' a , uin , Part., v. affingo. 



AFFI 

a£flg"0 (better adf-)) ixi , ixura, 3, v. a. 
(afflxet lor aifixisset, Sil. 14, 536), to fix or 
fasten to or upon, to affix, annex, attach to; 
coustr. with ad or dat. I. Lit.: sidera 
aetherieis adfixa caverneis, Lucr. 4, 392: 
corpus, id. 4, 1104; 4, 1238: litteram ad ca- 
put, to affix as a brand, Cic. Rose. Am. 20 
Jin. : Minerva, cui pinuarum talaria adfi- 
gunt, id. N. D. 3, 23; Prometheus adfixus 
Caucaso, id. Tusc. 5, 3, 8 : aliquem patibulo, 
Sail. Fragm. ap. Non. 4, 355: aliquem cu- 
spide ad terrain, Liv. 4, 19: aliquem cruci 
adfigere, id. 28, 37 : signa Punicis Adfixa de- 
lubris, Hor. C. 3, 5, 19: lecto te adfixit, id. 
S. 1, 1, 81 (cf. Sen. Ep. 07 : senectus me lec- 
tulo adfixit) : radicem terrae, Verg. G. 2, 
318: fiammam lateri (turris), id. A.9,536 al. 

— II. Trop., to fix on, imprint or impress 
on : aliquid animo, to impress upon the 
mind, Quint. 2, 7, 18, and Sen. Ep. 11: litte- 
ras pueris, to imprint on their memory, 
Quint. 1, 1, 25. — Hence, a diJX US, a, um, 
P. a. A. Fastened to a person or thing, 
joined to ; constr. alicui or ad rem : jubes 
eum mihi esse adfixum tamquam magistro, 
Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 1, 6: me sibi ille adfixum ha- 
bebit, id. Fam. 1, 8 : nos in exigua parte 
terrae adfixi, id. Rep. 1, 17: anus adfixa fo- 
ribus, Tib. 1, 6, 61 : Tarraconensis adfixa 
Pyrenaeo, situated close to, Plin. 3, 2, § 6. 

— Trop., impressed on, fixed to : causa in 
animo sensuque meo penitus adfixa atque 
insita, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 53 : quae semper ad- 
fixa esse videntur ad rem neque ab ea pos- 
sunt separari, id. Inv. 1, 26 al. — B. In the 
Latin of the Pandects : adfixa, orum, n. , 
the appendages or appurtenances belonging 
to a possession: domum instructam legavit 
cum omnibus adfixis, with all pertaining 
thereto, all the fixtures, Dig. 33, 7, 18 fin. 

*a£flffUrO (better adf-), avi, atum, 
1, v. a., to form or fashion after the analo- 
gy of something else : disciplinosus, consi- 
Hosus, victoriosus, quae M. Cato ita (i.e. like 
vinosus, for moms, etc.) adfiguravit, Gell. 4, 
9, 12. 

at-ntlgO (better adf- 1 mxi, ictum, 3, 
v. a. , to form, fashion, devise, make, or invent 
a thing as an addition or appendage to an- 
other. I. Lit. (esp. of artists), (a) With 
dat: nee ei manus adfinxit, Cic. Tim. 6: 
saepta, adficta villae quae sunt. Varr. R. R. 
3 3, 2. — (/3) Absol : Nullam partem corpo- 
ris sine aliqua necessitate adfictam repe- 
rietis, Cic. Or. 3, 45, 179. — II. Trop., to 
make up, frame, invent, to add falsely or 
without grounds : faciam ut intellegatis, 
quid error adfinxerit, quid invidia confia- 
rit, Cic. Clu. 4: vitium hoc oculis adfingere 
noli, Lucr. 4, 386 : neque vera laus ei de- 
tracta oratione nostra, neque falsa adficta 
esse videatur, Cic. Imp. Pomp. 4, 10 ; so id. 
Phil. 1, 3 ; id. Or. 22 ; id. Tusc. 3, 33 : ad- 
dunt ipsi et adfingunt rumoribus Galli, 
Caes. B, G. 7, 1: cui crimen adfingeretur, 
might be falsely imputed, Tac. A. 14, 62. — 
III. In a general signif. A, To a( id or join 
to, to annex (always with the accessory 
idea of forming, fashioning, devising): sint 
cubilia gallinarum aut exsculpta aut adfic- 
ta firm iter, Varr. R. R. 3, 9, 7: multa natu- 
ra aut adfingit (creating, she adds thereto) 
aut mutat aut detrahit, Cic. Piv. 1, 62, 118: 
tantum alteri adfinxit, de altero limavit, 
id. de Or. 3, 9, 36.— B. To feign, forge : lit- 
teras, App. M. 4, 139, 34 Elm. 

at- finis (better adf-) e , ad J- i a ° l - adfi- 
ni, Cic. de Or. 1, 15. 66; once adfine, Ter. 
Hec. 5, 3, 9 ; cf. Schneid. Gram. II. 222). I, 
Lit., that is neighboring or a neighbor to 
one (adfines : in agris vicini, Paul, ex Fest. 
p. 11 Mull. ), bordering on, adjacent, contig- 
uous : gens adfinis Mauris, = confinis, Liv. 
28, 17 : saevisque adfinis Sarmata Moschis, 
Luc. 1, 430 ; also, near by family relation- 
ship, allied or related to by marriage, utide- 
(TTei? ; and subst. , a relation by marriage 
(opp. consanguinei, crw) 7 eveis), as explained 
by Modestin. Dig. 38, 10, 4: adfines dicun- 
tur viri et uxoris cognati. Adfinium autem 
nomina sunt socer, socrus, gener, nurus, 
noverca, vitriens, privignus. privigna, glos, 
levir, etc. : ego ut essem adfinis tibi, tuam 
petii gnatam, Att. ap. Paul, ex Fest, s. v. nu- 
mero, p. 170 Mull. ( Trag. Rei. p. 201 Rib. ) : 
Megadorus meus adfiuis, my son-in-law, 
Plaut. A ul. 3, 4, 14; Ter. Heaut. 5, 1, 63: tu 
me, adfinem tuum, repulisti. Cic. Red. in 
Sen. 7: ex tarn multis cognatis et adfini- 



AFFL 

bus, id. Clu. 14 ; id. ad Quir. 5 : Caesarem 
ejus adfinem esse audiebant, Auct. B. Afr. 
32: quanto plus propinquorum, quo major 
adfinium numerus, Tac. G. 20, 9 : per pro- 
pinquos et adfines suos, Suet. Caes. 1 : ad- 
finia vincula, Ov. P. 4, 8, 9.— H. Fig., par- 
taking, taking part in, privy to, snaring, 
associated with; constr. with dat. or gen.; 
in Pac. with ad : qui sese adfines esse ad 
causandum volunt, Pac. ap. Non. 89, 11 (Trag. 
Rei. p. 80 Rib): publicis negotiis adfinis, 
i. e. implicitus, particeps, taking part in, 
Plaut. Trin. 2, 2, 55 ; Ter. Heaut. 2, 1, 1 : duos 
solos video adfines et turpitudini judicari, 
Cic. Clu. 45: huic facinori, id. Cat. 4, 3 : cul- 
pae, id. Rose. Am. 7, 18; id. Inv. 2, 44, 129; 

2, 10 : noxae, Liv. 39, 14. 

afiinitas (adf-), atis,/ [affinis] (gen. 
plur. adfinitatium, Just. 17, 3), the state or 
condition of adfinis. I. Relationship or alli- 
ance by marriage, esp. between a father and 
son-in-law, Ter. And. 1, 5. 12 Ruhnk. (cf. af- 
finis): adstringere inter aliquos, Plaut. Trin. 

3, 2, 73 : effugere, Ter. And. 1, 5, 12 ; so id. 
Hec. 4, 4. 101 : cari tas generis humani serpit 
sensim foras, cognationibus primum. turn 
adfinitatibus, deinde amicitiis, post vicini- 
tatibus. Cic. Fin. 5, 23, 68: adfinitate se de- 
vincire cum aliquo, id. Brut. 26: cum ali- 
quo adfinitate conjungi, Nep. Paus. 2, 3: in 
adfinitatem alicujus pervenire, id. Att. 19, 
1: contrahere, Veil. 2, 44: facere inter ali- 
quos, id. 2, 65 : jungere cum aliquo, Liv. 1, 
1 : adfinitate conjunctus, allied by marriage, 
Suet. Ner. 35: in adfinitatis jura succedit,' 
Just. 7. 3. — Meton., the persons so related, 
like kindred in Engl. : patriam deseras, 
cognatos, adfinitatem, amicos, Plaut. Trin. 
3, 2, 75. — II. Fig., relationship, affinity, 
union, connection (rare), Varr. R. R. 1, 16 : 
litterarum, Quint. 1, 6, 24: per adfinitatem 
litterarum, qui <j>u>p Graece, Latine fur est, 
Gell. 1, 18, 5 : tanta est adfinitas corporibus 
hominum mentibusque, id. 4, 13, 4. 

affirmanter (adf-), and ami mate 

(adf-), advv., v. affirmo^n. 
affirmatio (adf-), onis,/ [affirmo], an 

affirmation, declaration, confirmation, or 
averment of a fact or assertion : est enim 
jus jurandum adfirmatio religiosa, Cic. Off. 
3, 29 ; so Plane, ap. Cic. Fain. 10, 21. and Cic. 
ib. 7: in spem venire alicujus adfirmatione 
de aliqua re, Caes. B. G. 7, 30: constantis- 
sima annalium adfirmatione, Plin. 28, 2, 4, 
§ 15 : multa abfirmatione abnuere, Curt. 6, 
11. 

affirmativns (adf-), a, um, adj. 

[id], in gram., affirming, affirmative : spe- 
cies verborum, Diom. p. 390 P. 

affirmator (adf-), oris, m. [id.], one 
who asserts or affirms a thing (only in late 
Lat.), Dig. 27, 7, 4; Tert. adv. Marc. 4, 7; 
Min. Fel. Oct. 31. 

af-firmo (better adf-)' avi i atum, 1, 
v. a. I. To present a thing in words, as 
fixed, firm, i. e. certain, true ; to assert, 
maintain, aver, declare, asseverate, affirm : 
dicendum est mihi, sed ita, nihil ut adfir- 
mem, quaeram omnia, Cic. Div. 2, 3 ; so id. 
Att. 13, 23; id. Brut. 1,1: jure jurando, Liv. 
29, 23 : quidam plures Deo ortos adfirmant, 
Tac. G. 2; cf. id. Agr. 10: adfirmavit non 
daturum se, he protested that he would give 
nothing, Suet. Aug. 42. — Impers. : atque af- 
firmatur, Tac. H. 2, 49.— Hence, H, To give 
confirmation of the truth of a thing, to 
strengthen, to confirm, corroborate, sanc- 
tion: adfirmare spem alicui, Liv. 1, 1: opi- 
nionem, id. 32, 35: dicta alicujus, id. 28, 2: 
aliquid auctoritate sua, id. 26, 24 : populi 
Romani virtutem armis, Tac. H. 4, 73: se- 
cuta anceps valetudo iram Deum adfirma- 
vit, id. A. 14, 22.— Hence. * affirmanter 
(adfOi a d v - (°f tue absol. P. a. afhrmans), 
with assurance or certainty, assuredly : 
praedicere aliquid, Gell. 14, 1, 24; and: af* 

firmate (adf-); adv - ( of tlie absol p. a. 

aftirmatus), with asseveration, with assur- 
ance, certainly, assuredly, positively : quod 
adfirmate, quasi Deo teste promiserit, id 
tenendum est, Cic. Off. 3, 29.— Sup.: adfir- 
matissime scribere aliquid, Gell. 10. 12, 9. 

affixiO (adf-), onis,/ [afflgo], a joining 
or fastening to, an addition (only in late 
Lat.): continua, Non. 1, 327. — Hence, a 
zealous, ardent attachment to a thing : phi- 
lologiae, Capell. 1, p. 14. 

affixUS (adf- a , um, P. a. , from affigo. 

affiasrrans (adf-), antis, p. a. [af- 

fiagro], blazing or jiaming up; fig.: in tern- 

67 



AFFL 

pore adflagranli, i. e. in an unquiet or tur- 
bulent time, Amin. 21, 12 fin. 

afflator (adf-)j ° ris , m - [afflpj, one, who 
bloivs on or breathes into (late Lat), Tert. 
adv. Herm. 32. 

1 = afflatus (adf-), a, um, Pari., of 
afflo. 

2. afflatus (adf-), us, m. [afflo]. I. ^ 

blowing or breathing on, a breeze, blast, 
breath, etc., as o/ Me mrsd, mm, or animals : 
afflatus ex terra mentem itamovens ut,etc, 
Cic. Div. 2, 57, 117 : adflatu nocent, by the 
effluvia, Ov. M. 7, 551 : ambusti adflatu va- 
poris, Liv. 28. 23: ignes caelestes adussisse 
icvi adflatu vestimenta, id. 39, 22: Favonii, 
Plin. 6, 17, 21, § 57: noxius, id. 4, 12. 26 al. 

— Of animals: frondes adflatibus (apri) ar- 
dent, by his breath, Ov. M. 8, 289 : serpents, 
Stat. Tb. 5, 527: polypus adflatu terribili 
canes agebat, Plin. 9, 30, 48, § 92. — And of 
the aspiration in speech: Boeotii sine ad- 
flatu vocant col lis Tebas, i. e. without the 
h Varr. R. R. 3, 1, 6.— B. Esp., a Jlash or 
glow of light (cf. afflo, I.): juncturae leni 
adflatu simulacra refovent, Plin. 36, 15, 22, 
§ 98. — II, Fig., afflation of the divine spirit, 
inspiration : nemo vir magnus sine aliquo 
adflatu divino umquam fuit, Cic. X. D. 2, 
66: sine inflammatione animorum et sine 
quodam adflatu quasi furoris, id. de Or. 2, 
46. 

* af-flectO (better adf-), cxi, 3, v. a. , to 
turn, incline, or direct to or toward : huic 
si sol adflexent axes, Avien. Arat. 734. 

a£>flC0 (better adf-)? ^ re , v - w., to weep 
at a thing: ut adfleat, quom ea mcmoret, 
Plaut. Pers. 1, 3, 72 : ut adflet ! id. Poen. 5, 
2,148: fientibus adfiat Humani voltus, Hor. 
A. P. 101, where Keller reads adsunt. 

afflictatio (adf-), onis, / [afflicto], 

pain, torture, torment of body, ace. to Cice- 
ro's explanation : adfiictatio (est) aegritudo 
cum vexatione corporis, Tusc. 4, 8, 18: sol- 
licitudo, molestia, adfiictatio, desperatio, id. 
ib. 7, 16. 

afflictator (adf-), «ris, m. [id.], one 
who causes pain or suffering, a tormentor 
(late hat), Tert. adv. Marc. 5, 16. 

afflictlO (adf-), onis,/ [affligo],.pai« f 
suffering, torment : irrita, Sen. Cons, ad 
Helv. 16. 

afflictp (better adf-), avi i » tu m, 1, v. a. 
[ad, intensive], to disquiet greatly, to agi- 
tate, toss ; to shatter, damage, harass, injure, 
lit. and trop. I, L i t. (rare) : naves tempe- 
stas adflictabat, uaes. B. G. 4, 29: quod mi- 
nuente aestu (naves) in vadis adfiictaren- 
tur, were stranded, id. ib. 3, 12 : Batavos, 
Tac. H. 4, 79. — Far oftener, H. Trop., to 
trouble, disquiet, vex, torment, distress : ad- 
flictari amore, * Lucr. 4, 1151: homines 
aegri febri jactantur. . . deinde multo gra- 
vius adflictantur, Cic. Cat. 1, 13 ; so Suet. 
Tit. 2 : adflictatur res publica, id. liar. Resp. 
19: equites equosque adflictare, Tac. H. 3, 
19: adflictare Italiam luxuria saevitiaque, 
id. A. 13, 30. — Hence, adflictare se or adfiic- 
tari aliqua. re, to grieve, to be greatly troubled 
in mind about a thing, to be very anxious or 
uneasy, to afflict one^s self; ne te adflictes, 
Ter. Eim. 1, 1, 31: cum se Alcibiades adflic- 
iaret, Cic. Tusc. 3, 32; 3, 27: de domesticis 
rebus acerbissime adflictor, id. Att. 11, 1: 
mulieres adflictare sese, manus supplices 
ad caelum tendere, Sail. C. 31, 3. 

* afflictOr (adf-), oris, m. [affligo], one 
who strikes a thing to the ground, and trop., 
one who destroys or overthrows, a subvert- 
er: adflictor et perditor dignitatis et auc- 
toritatis (senatus), Cic. Pis. 27 init. 

1. a ffl ictUS (adfc), a , um, P. a., from 
affligo. 
*2. afflictus (adf-), us, m. [id.], a 

striking on or against, a collision : nubes 
adflictu ignem dant, App. de Mund. p. 63, 
36 Elm. 

af-fllffO (better adfc), ixi, ictum, 3. v. a. 
(afflixint^afflixerint, Front, ad M. Caes. 

3, 3). I. Lit, to strike or beat a thing to 
some point, to cast or throw down or against, 
to dash somewhere by striking; esp. of ships 
which are driven or"cast away by the wind. 

— C o n s t r. with ad or dat. : te ad ter- 
ram, seel us, adfiigam. / will dash thee to 
the earth, Plaut. Pers. 5, 2, 15, and id. Rud. 

4, 3, 71: nolo equidem te adfligi, id. Most. 
1, 4, 19 : stat nam, to throw down, over- 
throw, Cic. Pis. 38 ; so, monumentum, id. 
Cael. 32: domum, id. pro Dom. 40: (alces) 
gi quo adflictae casu conciderint, Caes, B. G. 

68 



AFFL 

6, 27 : infirmas arbores pondere adfligunt, 
id. ib. : tempestas naves Rhodias adflixit, 
ita ut, etc., dashed them about, shattered 
them, id. B. C. 3, 27. — So in descriptions of 
a battle: equi atque viri adflicti, etc., Sail. 
J. 101, 11 ; ubi scalae eomminutae.qui super- 
steterant, adflicti sunt, were thrown down, 
id. ib. 60, 7: ubi Mars communis et victuin 
saepe erigeret et adfiigeret victorem, Liv. 
28, 19: imaginem solo. Tac. H. 1, 41: caput 
saxo, to dash against.' id. A. 4, 45 : aquila 
duos corvos adflixit et ad terrain dedit, 
Suet. Aug. 96 Ruhnk. ; so id. Dom. 23. — 
Poet, Ov. M. 12, 139; 14, 206; Sil. 9, 631.— 
II. Fig- A. T° ruin, weaken, cast down, 
prostrate : cum prospero flatu ejus (fortu- 
nae) utimur, ad exitus pervehimur opta- 
tos; et cum reflavit, adfligimur, Cic. Off. 2, 
6 : virtus nostra nos adflixit. has ruined, 
id. Fam. 14, 4; id. Sest 7: Pompeius ipse 
se adflixit, id. Att. 2, 19 : senectus cner- 
vat et adfligit homines, id. Sen. 70 : opes 
hostium, hiv. 2, 16: aiiquem bollo, id. 28, 
39 : Othonianas partes, Tac. H. 2, 33 : amici- 
tias, Suet Tib. 51 ; so id. Aug. 66 et saep.— 
B. To reduce, lower, or lessen in value (syn. 
minuo): hoc oratoris esse maxime propri- 
um, rem augere posse laudando, vituperan- 
doque rursus adfligere, to bring down, Cic. 
Brut. 12. — Trop., of courage, to cast down, 
dishearten, to diminish, lessen, impair : ani- 
mos adfligere et dcbilitare metu, Cic. Tusc. 
4, 15, 34. — C. Adfligere causam susceptam, 
to let a lawsuit which has been undertaken 
fall through, to give up, abandon, Cic. Sest. 
41, 89.— Hence, afflict lis (adf-), a, um, 
P. a. A. Cast down, ill used, wretched, 
miserable, unfortunate, distressed; lit and 
trop.: naves, damaged, shattered, Caes. B. 
G. 4, 31 : Graecia perculsa et adflicta et per- 
dita, Cic. Fl. 7 : ab adflicta amicitia trans- 
fugere et ad florentem aliam devolare, id. 
Quint. 30: non integra fortuna, at adflicta, 
id. Sull. 31 : adflictum erigere, id. Imp. 
I'omp. 29. — Comp. : adfiictiore condicione 
esse, id. Fam. 6,1; hence: res adflictae (like 
accisae and adfectae), disordered, embar- 
rassed, ruined circumstances, affairs in a 
bad state, ill condition, Sail. J. 76, 6 ; so hue. 
1, 496; Just 4, 5: copiae, Suet. Oth. 9.— B. 
Fig- 1. Of the mind: cast down, dejected, 
discouraged, desponding: aegritudine adflic- 
tus, debilitatus, jacens, Cic. Tusc. 4. 16 : luc- 
tu, id. Phil. 9, 5: maerore, id. Cat. 2, 1: ad- 
flictus vitam in tenebris luctuque trahe- 
bam, Verg. A. 2, 92; Suet. Oth. 9.-2. Of 
character, like abjectus, abandoned, 'out- 
cast, depraved, low, mean, base, vile : homo 
adfiictus et perditus, Cic. Phil. 3, 10: nemo 
tarn adflictis est moribus, quin, etc., Macr. 
S. 6, 7. — Sup. and adv. not used. 

af-flo (better ad£), uvi, utum, 1, v. a. 
and n. J m hit., to blow or breathe on ; 
constr. with ace. or dat — Of the air: 
udam (fabam) ventus adflavit, Plin. 18, 17, 
44, § 155: adflantur vineta noto, Stat. S. 5, 
1, 146: crinem spars um cervicibus adflare, 
Ov. M. 1, 542: adflatus aura, Suet Tib. 72. 
— Also of other things which exert an in- 
fluence upon bodies, like a current of air; 
e. g. fire, light, vapor, etc.: et calidum 
membris adflare vaporem, and breathe a 
glow (lit. a warm vapor) upon our limbs, 
hucr. 5.508: velut illis Canidia adflasset, 
Hor. S. 2, 8,95: nos ubi primus equis ori- 
ens adflavit anhelis, Verg. G. 1, 250; cf. 
id. A. 5, 739: ignibus (fulminum) adflari, 
Ov. Tr. 1, 9, 22 : adflati incendio, touched, 
scorched, hiv. 30, 6 : flam ma ex Aetna raon- 
te, id. Fragm. Serv. ad Verg. G. 1, 472.— So, 
adflari sidere=;siderari, to be seized with 
torpor or paralysis (v. sideror and sidera- 
tio), Plin. 2, 41, 41, § 108: odores, qui adfia- 
rentur e fioribus, were wafted, exhaled, Cic. 
Sen. 17; Prop. 3, 27, 17. — n. Trop., to 
blow or breathe to or on. A. As v - act, to 
bear or bring to; constr. alicui aliquid : 
sperat sibi auram posse aliquam adflari 
voluntatis. Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 13: rumoris ne- 
scio quid adflaverat, frequentiam non fu- 
isse, id. Att. 16, 5: alicui aliquid mali fauci- 
bus adflare, Auct. ad Her. 4, 49.— So poet : 
adfiare alicui honores, to breathe beauty 
upon one, i.e. to impart to. Verg. A. 1, 591 : 
indomitis gregibus Venus adflat amores, 
Tib. 2, 4, 57. — B, As v. neutr., to be favor- 
able to, to be friendly ov propitious to : Fe- 
lix, cui placidus leni ter adflat Amor, Tib. 2, 
1, 80. 

affluens ( ad£) entis, P. a., of affluo. 



a r r r 

affluenter (adt), adv. , v. affluo, p. a, 

fin. 

affluentia (adf-)- ae, f [affluo], a 

flowing to, Plin. a6, 10, 61, § 94. — Trop., 
affluence, abundance, copiousness, fulness, 
profusion : ex hac copia atque rerum om- 
nium adfluentia, * Cic. Agr. 2, 35: annonae, 
Plin. Pan. 29.— Hence also, immoderate 
pomp or splendor in the management of 
one's household, extravagance (opp. mundi 
ties): munditiem, non adfiuentiam affecta- 
bat, Nep. Att. 13, 5. 

af^fluo (better adf-), x ', xum, 3, v. a. 
and n., to flow or run to or toward ; with 
ad or dat. I. Lit, of water: aestus bis 
adfiuunt bisque remcant, Plin. 2, 97, 99, 
§ 212: Rheims a() (iallicam ripam placidior 
adfluens, Tac. A. 4. 6.— In the lang of the 
Epicurean philos., of the flow of atoms 
from an object, as the cause of perception 
(cf. aestus, II. C), Cic. N. D. 1, 19, 49.— 
P o e t , of time : Maecenas meus adfluentes 
Ordinal imnos, flowing on. increasing, =rac- 
crescentes, Hor. C. 4, 11, 19. — H, Trans f. 
A. Of persons, to come to in haste, to hasten 
to, to run ov flock to or toward (only poet 
and in the histt. from the Aug. per.) : iugen- 
tem comitum adfluxisse Invenio numerum, 
Verg. A. 2, 796: copiae adfluebant, Liv. 39, 
31: adfluentibus auxiliis Gallorum, Tac. 
H. 4, 25: multitudo adfluens, id. A. 4, 41. — 
Of food, to flow dotvn : cibo adfluente, Suet. 
Claud. 44. — Trop.: si ea sola voluptas es- 
set, quae ad eos (sensus) cum suavitate ad- 
fiueret et inlaberetur, Cic. Fin. 1, 11 : nihil 
ex istis locis litterarum adfluxit,id.Q. Fr. 3, 
3 : incautis amor, Ov. R. A. 14^ : opes adfiu- 
unt subito, repente dilabuntur, Val. Max. 6, 
Sfln, — B. Aliqua re, to flow with a thing 
in rich abundance, to overflow with, to 
abound in, to have in abundance (more ele- 
vated than abundo; hence adfluens in Cic. 
Oratt. is much more freq. than abundans): 
frumento, Plaut Ps. 1, 2,57: divitiis hono- 
re et laude, Lucr. 6, 13: voluptatibus, Cic. 
Fin. 2, 2S, 93; cui cum domi otium atque 
divitiae adfluerent, Sail. C. 36, 4: ubi efluse 
adfiuunt opes, Liv. 3, 26. — Hence, afflu- 
ens (adf-). entis, P. a., flowing abun- 
dantly with a thing, having in abundance or 
superfluity; abounding in; abundant, rich, 
copious, numerous: Asiatico ornatu, Liv. 
Andron. ap. Prise. 1, 10: unguentis, Cic. 
Sest. 8: urbs eruditissimlshominibus, libe- 
ralissimisque studiis adfluens, id. Arch. 3; 
so id. Rose. Com. 10 ; id. Verr. 2, 5, 54 ; id. 
Clu. 66; id. Agr. 2, 30; id. de Or. 3, 15; id. 
Off. 1, 43; id. Lael. 16 al.: uberiores et ad- 
fiuentiores aquae, Vitr. 8, 1.— Po et: homo 
vestitu adfluens, in ample, flowing robes, 
Phaedr. 5, 1, 22 : ex adfluenti, in abundance] 
profusely, Tac. H. 1, 57 &\.—Sup., Sol. c. 50; 

Aug. Conf. 2, 6.— Adv. ; affluente (adf-), 

richly, copiously, App. M. 4. — Comp. , Cic. 
Tusc. 5. 6; Nep. Att 14; Tac. A. 15, 54. 

* af-fddio (better adf-), Sre, v. a., to 
dig in addition to: vicini caespitem nostro 
solo, Plin. 2, 68, 68, § 175. 

af-fbr (better adf-) iitus, 1, v. dep. (used 
only in the pres. indie!, but not in first per- 
son sing. ; in the perf part, the inf., and in 
the imper., second person); in gen. only 
poet : a.\\quem,tospeakto,toaccost,or address 
one : quern neque tueri contra neque affari 
queas, Att. ap. Macr. 6, 1 : licet enim versibus 
eisdem mini adfari te, Attice, quibus adfa- 
tur Flamininum ille, * Cic. Sen. 1: aiiquem 
nomine, id. Brut. 72, 253; so id. ib. 3, 13; 
Verg. A. 3, 492: hostem supplex adfare su- 
perbum, id. ib.4, 424: aiiquem blande, Stat 
Achill. 1, 251: ubi me adfamini, Curt. 4, 
11 : adfari deos, to pray to the gods, Att. ap 
Non. Ill, 27; Verg. A. 2, 700: precando Ad- 
famur Vestam, Ov. F. 6, 303: adfari mortu- 
um, to bid farewell to the dead at the burial, 
to take the last adieu : sic positum adfati 
discedite corpus, Verg. A. 2, 644.— So also: 
adfari extremum, Verg. A. 9.484.— H. Esp.. 
in augurial lang., to fix the limits of the 
auspices: effari templa dicuntur ab augu- 
rihus; adfantur qui in his fines sunt. Varr. 
L. L. 6, § 53 Mull, (where the pass, use of 
the word should be observed; cf. App. M. 
11, p. 265, 39 Elm. ). 

affore (better adf-) and afforem 

(better adf-) v. adsum. 

* af-formldo (better adf-), are, v. n., 

to be afraid : magis cura'st magisque ad- 

formido, ne is pereat, Plaut. Bacch. 4, 10, 3. 

af-fraugO (better adf-), 'Te (or ad"- 



A F H I 

tring'O ^ re )T v - a -i to strike upon or against 
something, to break against, break in pieces 
(very rare. perh. only in Statius) : duris ad- 
frangunt postibus ungues, Stat. Th. 10, 47: 
plenis parvos uberibus, id. ib. 5, 150 ; hie- 
mes bustis, id, S. 5, 1, 36. 

af-fremo ( better adf- ), £ re , 3 ? v - «• , t0 

roar, rage, growl, or murmur at ( only in 
post-Aug. poets): adfremit his (Mars), Val. 
FL 1, 528 : Boreas stridentibus adfremit 
alis, Sil. 14, 124. 

affricatlO (adf-)- onis./ [affrico]. a 
rubbing on or against a thing, Cael. Aur. 
Morb. A nut. praof. n. 131; id. ib. 1. 14. 106. 

af-frlCO (better ad£), are, ui, fitum, 
v. a., to rub on or against a thing: ahcui 
(onlv in post-Aug. prose). I, Lit.: hcrbac 
se adfneans, Plm. 8. 27, 41, § 99; so id. 29, 
6, 38, § 122: unguedine diu palnmlis suis 
adfncata, App. M. 3, 138 Elm.— H. Trop., 
to communicate or impart by rubbing : ru- 
bigmem suam alieui, Sen. Ep. 7. 

* affrictus (adf-), f.s, m. [affrico], a 
rubbing on or against : Spuma aquae ad- 
frictu verrucas toll it, PI in. 31, 6, 38, § 72. 

affringO, v. affrango. 

* af-frio (better adf-), are, v. a., to 
rwo or crumble to pieces, or to crumble over : 
alius aliud adfriat aut adspergit, ut Chalci- 
dicam aut Caricam cretam, Varr. R. R 1, 
5-7. 

af-fulgeo (better ad£), ulsi , 2, v. n., 
to shine on a thing (poet., and in the Aug. 
and post Aug. histt.). I, Lit.: Non Venus 
adfulsit, non ilia Juppiter hora, Ov. Ib. 213: 
nitenti Adfulsit vultu ridens Venus, Sil. 7, 
467 : mstar vens vultus tuus Adfulsit, Hor. 
C. 4, 5, 6. — II. Fig., to shine, dawn, ap- 
pear : defensurum se urbem prima spes 
adfulsit, Liv. 27, 28; cf. id. 23, 32: mihi ta- 
lis fortuna, id. 30, 30: lux civitati, id. 9, 10: 
Cretensibus nihil praesidii, Val. Max. 7, 6, 
1 ext : occasio, Flor. 4, 9 al. 

af-fundo (better adf-), /<di, fisum,3, 
v. a. I, To pour to, upon, or into, to sprin- 
kle or scatter on (poet, and in post-Aug. 
prose). A. Lit.: adfusa eis aqua calida, 
Plin. 12, 21, 46, § 102: adfuso vino, id. 28, 9, 
38, § 144 ; cf. id. 16, 44, 91. § 242 : Rhenum 
Oceano, Tac. H. 5, 23: adfundere alieui ve- 
nenum in aqua frigida, id. A. 13, 16. —Hence : 
amnis adfusus oppidis, that flows by, Plin. 

5, 29, 31; and: oppidum adfusum amne, 
washed by a river, id. 3, 3, 4, § 24. — B. 
Trop., to add to, to send or despatch to some 
place in haste: equorum tria milia corni- 
bus adfunderentur, Tac. Agr. 35: adfundere 
vitam alieui, to give life, vitality, to, id. A. 

6, 28.— II, Adfundere se or adfundi, poet., 
to cast one's self to the ground : adfusa 
(stretched out, prostrate) poscere vitam, Ov. 
M. 9, 605: adfnsaeque jacent tumulo, pros- 
trate upon the tomb, id. ib. 8, f>39 ; so Stat. 
Th. 686. — In prose: Cleopatra adfusa geni- 
bus Caesaris, throwing herself at, Flor. 4, 2. 

afore and aforem, for abfore and ab- 
forem, v. absum. 

AfraniUS, a, um > aa J- , name of a Ro- 
man gens. — I. As adj. : Afrania fabula, i.e. 
written by the poet Afranius, Cic. Cael. 30. 
— II. As subst. A. Lucius Afranius, a cel- 
ebrated Roman comic poet, contemporary 
with Terence or a little later, of whose works 
we possess only a few fragments. Cf. con- 
cerning him, Cic. Brut. 45 ; id. Fin. 1, 3 ; 
Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 57 ; Quint. 10, 1, 100 ; Bahr, 
Rom. Lit. Cesch. S. 70, and Tcuffel, ROm. 
Lit. §§ 121, 135. — B. Afranius, a general 
of Pompey in Spain, Cic. Fam. 16, 12; Caes. 
B. C. 1, 37 ; Veil. 2, 48.— Hence, Afrania- 
I1US, a - um , adj-, of or pertaining to Afra- 
nius: Iegio,Auct. B.Hisp.7.— Subst.: Afra- 
niani, 6rum, m., soldiers of Afranius. 
Caes. B C. 1, 43. 

Afri, 6rum, v. Afer. 

Africa, ae / [ tri e Romans received this 
name from the Carthaginians as designat- 
ing their country, and in this sense only 
the Gr. h 'A<ppti<t) occurs]. I. In a restricted 
sense, designated by the Greeks /, Aififn, 
Libya, the territory of Carthage : Nilus 
Afri cam ab Aethiopia dispescens, Plin. 5, 
9, 10, § 53; 5. 4. 3 : regio. quae soquitur a 
promontorio Metagonio ad aras Philaeno- 
rum, propne nomen Africae usurpat, Mel. 
1,7; cf. Cic. Imp. Pomp. 12. and id. Lig. 7. — 
II. In an extended sense, the whole of that 
quarter of the globe south of the Mediterra- 
nean Sea, Mel. 1, 4. — By meton. for its in- 



AGAS 

habitants: Africa, quae procul a mari in- 
cultius agebat, Sail. J. 89, 7 (cf. id. ib. 19, 5 : 
alios incultius vagos agitare). — Hence, 1. 
Africanus, a, um ^ ad J-, pertaining to 
Africa, African : bellum Africanum, the 
war of Ccesar with the partisans of Pompey 
in Africa, Cic. Deiot. 9: rumores, of the 
African war, id. ib. : causa, id. Fam. 6, 13: 
possessiones, in Africa, Nep. Att. 12 : galli- 
na, a guinea-hen, Varr. R. R. 3, 9: cf. Plm. 

io, 26, 38, § 74. — Subst : Africanae, 

arum, sc. ferae, panthers, Liv. 44, 1«; so 
Plin. 8, 17, 24, g 64; Plm. Ep. 6, 34; Suet. 
Cat. 18; id. Claud. 21 al.— Esp., Africa- 
nus, surname of the two most distinguished 
Sctpios. A. Of P- Cornelius Scipio major, 
who defeated Hannibal at Zama (201 B.C.). 
— B, Of his grandson by adoption, P. Cor- 
nelius Scipio Aemilianus minor, who con- 
ducted the third Punic war, destroyed Car- 
thage (146 B.C.), and subjected the whole 
Carthaginian territory to the Romans. — 
2. AfriCUS, ;l um, adj., African (mostly 
poet, for the prose Africanus): terra, Enn. 
ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 42. 107 ; so Liv. 29, 23 fin. : 
bella, Sil. 17, 11: Vicus. a place in Rome, 
on the Esquiline Hill, where the Carthagi- 
nian hostages were held in custody, Varr. 
R. R. 5, 32, 44.— But esp. freq., AfrlCUS 
ventus, or subst : Africus, i, m - • the 
south-west wind, Gr. Xi^, blowing between 
Auster and Favonms (\i{36votov and t,t<pv- 
pov), opp- Vulturous (MiiKt'cu). now called, 
among the Italians, Affrico or gherbino ; 
cf. Plin. 2, 47, 46, § 119, and Sen. Q. X. 5, 
16: creberque procellis Africus, Verg. A. 1, 
86: praeceps, Hor. C. 1, 3, 12: luctans, id. 
ib. 1, 1, 15 : pestilens, id. ib. 3, 23. 5 : pro- 
tervus, id. Epod. 16, 22. — Adj. : procellae, 
the waves or storms caused by the Africus, 
Hor. C. 3, 29, 57. — In Propert , Africus, as 
the god of this wind, is called pater, 5, 3, 
48, but Miill. here reads Aetheris. 

afili, afuturus, for abf-, v. absum. 

Agamedes, ae, w., ~ 'A-ya^^r, a 

brother of Trophonius, with whom he built 
the temple to the Delphic Apollo, Cic. Tusc. 

1, 47, 114. 

Agamemnon, onis, m. (nom. Aga- 
memno, Enn. ap, Cic. Att. 13, 47 ; Cic. Tusc. 
4, 8, 17; Stat. Achill. 1, 553), — 'A^a^^vcov, 
king ofMycence, son of At reus and of Alrope, 
brother of Menelaus, husband of Clytoemnes- 
tra, father of Orestes, Iphigenia, and Elec- 
tra, commander-in-chief of the Grecian 
forces before Troy, and murdered by his 
wife, with the aid of JEgisthus, her pa?~a- 
mour.— Poet., for his time: vixere fortes 
ante Agamemnona Multi, Hor. C. 4, 9, 25- 
28— Hence, i. Agamemndnidcs, ae, 

patr. m., ='A'ya[jLefxiovtStv, a mate descend- 
ant of Agamemnon ; his son Orestes: par 
Agamemnonidae crimen, i. e. the matricide 
of Orestes, Juv. 8, 215.— 2. Agamem- 

ndniUS, a i um - a dj , ^^ 'AjtxfXefjLvonoi, (f 

or pertaining to Agamemnon (poet.): pha- 
langes, i. e. the Grecian troops before Troy, 
commanded by Agamemnon. Verg. A. 6, 489: 
Mycenae, ruled by Agamemnon, id. ib, 6, 838 : 
Orestes, son of Agamemnon, id. ib. 4, 471: 
puella, daughter of Agamemnon, i. e. Iphi- 
genia, Prop. 5, 1, ill. 

agamus, a ^ urn - adj., — aya.noe, un- 
married, Hier. adv. Jovian 1 and 15. 

Aganippe, 0B.f.. = 'a^um'tttth. I. A 

fountain in Bazotia. on Mount Helicon, sa- 
cv>0 to the Muses, and giving poetical inspi- 
ration : Aonie Aganippe. Verg. E. 10. 12; 
Claud. Ep. ad Per. 61.— Hence, 1. Aga- 

nlppCUS, a - um < OUJj.. = 'Ayavi7i7ieiv<>, of 
ov pertaining to the fountain of Aganippe . 
lyra, i. e. Musarum, Prop. 2, 3, 20; Claud. 
Laud. Ser. 8.-2. * Aganippis. idis,/, 
that is sacred to the Muses : fontes Aganip- 
pidos Hippocrenes, Ov. F. 5, 7. — II. The 
wife of Acrisius and mother of Dana'e, Hyg. 
Fab. 63. 

t agape, es, /, — a^<inn (love). I, 
Christian love or charity, Tert. ad Martyr. 

2. — II. The love-feast of the early Chris- 
tians^Tert. Apol. 39 Jin. 

t agarictini, ^ n-, = a-)aptKi'yv, larch 
fungus, tinder fungus, Plin. 25. 9, 57, §103; 
26. 8. 48. 

agaso, ( ~ )n i s i m - [ a g°! as Panscr. agas 
from ag; v. ago], a driver, but esp. one who 
drives and takes care of horses, a hostler. 



A G E R 

groom, Plaut. Merc. 5, 2, 11: duo equi cum 
agasonibus, Liv.43,5: agasonem cum equo, 
Plin. 35, 11, 40, n. 29. — II. Contemptu- 
ously, a low servant, lackey: si patinam 
Irangat agaso. Hor. S. 2, 8, 72; Pers. 5, 76. 

Agathocles, is > m -, ^'a^ixOokx^. I. 
A king of Sicily, son of a potter, celebrated 
for his war with the Carthaginians for the 
possession of the island; cf. Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 
55; Val. Max. 7, 4, 1 ext; and esp. Just. 22, 
1 sq— Hence, Agathocleus, a, um, adj., 
— AjaOdnAeiQ?, of or pertaining to King 
Agathocles : tropaea, Sil. 14, 652.— H. The 
author of a history of Cyzicus, Cic. Div. 
1,24. 

t agat ho daemon, ^n ls - »t- , = u-raOo- 

datpwv (good genius), a kind of serpent in 
Egypt to which healing power icas ascribed, 
Coluber Aesculapii, Linn. ; Lampr. Heliog. 

28. ^ ~ ' 

Agathyrna, &&./■,— AfdOvpvov, strab., 

a town on the northern coast of Sicily, 
between Tyndaris and Calacta, Liv. 26, 40; 
27,J2; Sil. 14, 259; Mel. 2,5. 

Agathyrsi, orum, m., = 'Ayddvpcoi, 
a Scythian people (in what is now Tran- 
sylvania, and the Bannat of Temeswar) 
who commonly painted their faces and 
limbs ; hence Vergil: picti Agathyrsi, A. 4, 
146; cf. Plin. 4, 12, 26; and Mel. 2, 1. 

Agave or Agaue, es,/. , ='A T a ( '. n . I. 

A daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, wife 
ofEchion, king of Thebes, who tore in pieces 
with her own hands her son Pentheus, be- 
cause he cast contempt upon the orgies of 
Bacchus, Ov. M. 3, 725 ; Hyg. Fab. 184 and 
240.— II. One of the Nereids, Hyg. praef. ad 
Fab. — III, One of the Amazons, Hyg. Fab, 
163. 

age au d agedum, v. ago, n. 12. 

t agea. ae , / ? « gangway in a ship, so 
called, ace. to Festus, quod in ea maxime 
quaeque res agi solet, p. 9 Miill. 

t AgelaStllS, i, W., = a^eXao-roc (not 
laughing), a surname of M. Crassus, grand- 
father of the triumvir of the same «awe, 
Plin. 7, 19, 18, § 79 ; cf. Lucil. ap. Cic. Fin. 5, 
30, 92, and Tusc. 3, 15, 31. 

agellulus, i, »»■ [ a double dim. of ager; 
cf. asellulus], a very small field, Symm. Ep. 
2, 30. 

agellus, '1 m - di m - [age^]. « small piece 
of ground, a little field; Agelli est hie sub 
urbe paulum quod Iocitas foras, Ter. Ad. 5, 
8, 26: agellus non sane major jugero uno, 
Varr. R. R. 3, 16: minora dii neglegunt, 
neque agellos singulorum nee viticnlas 
persequuntur, Cic. N. D. 3, 35. 

"I agezna, »tis, n., = ay^a, in the 
Macedonian army, a corps or division of 
soldiers : addita "his ala mille ferme equi- 
tuin : agema earn vocabant, Liv. 37, 40 ; 
42, 51; so id. 42, 58; Curt. 4, 13, 26. 

Agendicum. i, n., a town in Gallia 
Lugdunensis. ace. to the Tabul. Peuting. 
Agedicum, now Sens, Caes. B. G. 6, 44 ; 7, 10. 

Agenor, oris, m., =' A-ytinop, a son of 
Belus, king of Phoenicia, father of Cadmus 
and Europa, and ancestor of Dido ; hence, 
poet.. Agenoris urbs, i. e. Carthage, Verg. 
A. 1, 338.— Agenore natus, i. e. Cadmus, Ov. 
M. 3 L 51 ; 97 ; 257. — Whence, derivv. 1. 
Agenoreus, a 5 um , ad J--> pertaining to 
Agenor : bos, i. e. Jupiter, who, in the form, 
of a bull, carried off Europa, the daughter 
of Agenor, Ov. F. 6, 712: aena, Phoenician, 
Sil. 7, 642; cf. Mart. 10, 16.— Also for Car- 
thaginian (cf. Agenor), Sil. 1, 14: nepotes, 
i.e. the Carthaginians, id. 17,404: ductor, i.e. 
Hannibal, id. 17, 392.-2. Agcnorides. 
ae, patr. m., a male descendant of Agenor. 
I, His son Cadmus,0v. M.3,8; so id. ib.3,81; 
90 ; 4, 562 ; id. P. 1, 3, 77.— H. Perseus, whose 
grandfather, on the mothers side, Danaus, 
was descended from Agenor, Ov. M. 4, 771. 

agens, entis, v. ago, P. a. 

ager,g ri , m - [«tp i >?; Germ. Acker, Eng. 
acre, Sanscr. agras = surface, floor; Grimm 
conjectured that it was connected with ago, 
a-yw, a pecore agendo, and this was the 
ancient view; cf. Varr. L. L. 5, § 34 Mull., 
and Don. ad Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 47 ; so the Germ. 
Trift — pasture, from treiben, to drive]. I, 
In an extended sense, territory, district, 
domain, the whole of the soil belonging to 
a community (syn. : terra, tellus. arvum, so- 
lum, rus, humus; opp terra. which includes 
69 



AGGE 

many such possessions taken together; cf 
Nieb. K>,ra. Gosch. 2. 694 sq.): Ager Tuscu- 
lanus, . . . non terra, Varr. L. L. 7 2, 84 : 
praeda atque agro adfecit familiares suos, 
Plaut, Am. 1, 1, 38: abituros agro Achivos, 
id. ib. 1, 53, 71: ut melior fundus Hirpinus 
sit. sive ager Hirpinus (totum enim possi- 
det), quam, etc., Cic. Agr. 3, 2: f'undum ha- 
bet in agro Tburino, id, Fragm. ap. Quint. 
4, 2, 131 (pro Tull. 14) : Rhenus. qui agrum 
Helvetium a Germanis dividit, Caes. B. G. 
1, 2 Herz. : ager Xoricus, id. ib. 1, 5 : in 
agro Troade, Nep. Paus. 3: in agro Areti- 
no. Sail. C. 36, 1: his civitas data agerque, 
Liv. 2, 16 : in agro urbis Jericho, Vulg. 
.Josue, 5, 13. — In the Roman polity: ager 
Komanus. the Roman possessions in, land 
(distinguished from ager peregrinus. for- 
eign territory) was divided into ager pub- 
licus, public property, domains, and ager 
privat us, private estates; v. Smith's Diet. 
Antiq., and Nieb. Rcim. Gesch. 2, 695 and 
696; cf. with 153 sq. — H. In a more re- 
stricted sense. £^ m Improved or productive 
land, afield, whether pasture, arable, nur- 
sery ground, or any thing of the kind; cf. 
Doed. Syn. 3, 7 sq.; 1, 71 ; Hab. Syn. 68, and 
Herz. ad Caes. B. G. 7, 13 : agrum nunc mer- 
catus sum : hie me exerceo, Ter. Heaut. 1, 
1, 94 : agrum de nostro patre colendum 
habebat, id. Fhorm. 2, 3, 17: ut ager quam- 
vis fertilis. sine cultura fructuosus esse 
non potest, Cic. Tusc. 2, 5 ; id. Fl. 29 : agrum 
colere, id. Rose. Am. 18 : conserere, Verg. 
E. 1, 73: agrum tuum non seres, Vulg. Lev. 
19, 19: (homo) peminavit bonum semen in 
agro suo, ib. Matt. 13, 24; ib. Luc. 12, 16. 
— * Of a piece of ground where vines or 
trees are planted, a nursery : ut ager mun- 
dus purusque flat, ejus arbor atque vitis fe- 
cundior, Cell. 19, 12, 8.— Of a place of habi- 
tation in the country, estate, villa : in tuos- 
ne agros confugiam, Cic. Att. 3, 15 (so uypo?, 
Horn. Od. 24, 205).— B. The yields, the open 
country, the country (as in Gr. uyp6?or u-ypot). 
like rus, in opp. to the town, urbs (in prose 
writers generally only in the plur.), Ter. 
Eun. 5, 5, 2: homines ex agris concurrunt, 
Cic. Verr. 2, 4. 44 : non solum ex urbe, sed 
etiam ex agris. id. Cat. 2, 4, 8: annus pesti- 
lens urbi agrisque, Liv. 3, 6 ; id. 3, 32 : in ci- 
vitatem et in agros, Yulg. Marc. 5, 14. — And 
even in opp. to a village or hamlet, the open 
Jield ; sanum hominem modo ruri esse 
oportet. modo in urbe, saepiusque in agro, 
Cels. 1, 1. — C. Poet., in opp. to mountains, 
plain, valley, champaign : ignotos montes 
agrosque salutat, Ov. M. 3, 25. — J} m As a 
measure of length (opp. frons, breadth) : 
mille pedes in fronte, trecentos cippus in 
agrum Hie dabat, in depth, Hor. S. 1, 8, 12. 

t ag'eraton, i, «., = uvjpaTov (not 

growing old), a plant that does not readily 
wither, perhaps Achillea Ageraton, Linn. ; 
Plin. 27, 4, 4, § 13. — Ag'eratOS, i, m., a 
designation of one of the Moris of Valenti- 
nus, Tert. adv. Val. 8. 

Ag'eSllaiiS, i, m -, = 'A<yn<ri\aov. I. 
One of the most valiant of the Spartan 
kings, who conquered the Persian satrap 
Tissaphernes, and the Athenians and Bozo- 
tians at Coronea. Plutarch and also Nepos 
wrote his life. — *H, An epithet of Pluto 
(from his driving (a->o>) all people into his 
kingdom), Lact. 1, 11, 31. 

ag*esis, i- e - age sis , v - a s°> TI - 12 - 

ag--g-audec (adg*-), ere, v. «., to be 
delighted with, to delight in (late Lat.): ego 
eram, cui aggaudebat, Lact. 4, 6; transl. of 
e-)0) tjfxriv i] irpocrexaipev, LXX. Pi'OV. 8, 30. 

ag"-g"emO (adg"-)) Sre, v. n., to groan, 
wait, lament at a thing; absol. or with dat. 
(only poet. ) : Adgernit Alcides, Ov. F. 5, 400, 
where Riese has Et gemit : Adgernit et no- 
stras ipsa carina ma 1 is, id. Tr. 1, 4, 10: uter- 
que loquenti adgernit, Stat. Th. 11, 247. 

ag'-g'enero (adg"-)> are, v - a - > to be 9 et 

in addition to (late Lat.); alicui, Tert. adv. 
Marc. 4, 19. 

ag-g-eniciilor (adg--), an, v. dep. 
[genu, geniculumj, to bow the knee before, to 
kneel before (late Lat. ) : alicui, Tert. Poen. 9. 

ag"g"er, ^ s , m - [ad-gero]. I, Things 
brought to a place in order to form an eleva- 
tion above a. surface or plain, as rubbish, 
stone, earth, sand, brushwood, materials for 
a rampart, etc. (in the histt. , esp. C<es. , 
freq. ; sometimes in the poets): ab opcre 
revocandi milites, qui paulo longius agge 

70 



AGGE 

ris petendi causa processerant, Caes. B. G. 
2, 20: aggere paludem explere, id. ib. 7, 58; 
cf. id. ib. 7 7 86 : longius erat agger peten- 
dus, id. B. C. 1, 42; 2, 15 al.: superjecto ag- 
gere terreno, Suet. Calig. 19 ; cf. id. ib. 3'< : 
implere cavernas aggere, Curt. 8, 10, 27 : 
fossas aggere complent, Verg. A. 9, 567 : 
avis e medio aggere exit, from the midst 
of the pile of wood, Ov. M. 12, 524. — 
But far oftener, H. Esp. A. The pile 
formed by masses of rubbish, stone, earth, 
brushwood, etc., collected together ; ace. to 
its destination, a dam, dike, mole, pier ; a 
hillock, mound, wall, bulwark, rampart, etc. ; 
esp. freq. in the histt. of artificial elevations 
for military purposes: tertium militare se- 
pimentum est fossa et terreus agger, a clay 
or mud wall, Varr. R. R. 1, 14, 2 : aggeribus 
niveis {with snow-drifts) informis Terra, 
Verg. G. 3, 354: atque ipsis proelia miscent 
Aggeribus murorum, pleon. for m^ris. id. 

A. 10. 24 ; cf. id. ib. 10, 144 : ut coctc /olleret 
aggere opus, of the walls of Babylon, Prop. 
4, 10, 22. — A dike of earth for the protection 
of a harbor (Ital. molo), Vitr. 5, 12, 122 ; Ov. 
M. 14, 445; 15, 690. — A causeway through a 
swamp: aggeres umido paludum et falla- 
cibus campis imponere, Tac. A. 1, 61. — A 
heap or pile of arms: agger armornm, Tac. 
H. 2, 70. — Poet., for mountains : aggeres 
Alpini, Verg. A. 6, 830; so, Thessalici agge- 
res, i. e. Pelion, Ossa, Olympus, Sen. Here. 
Oet. 168. — A funeral pile of wood, Ov. M. 9, 
234, and Sen. Here. Fur. 1216.—^ heap of 
ashes: ab alto aggere, Luc. 5, 524 Weber.— 
A high wave of the &ea: ab alto Aggere de- 
jecit pelagi, Luc. 5, 674: consurgit ingens 
pontus in vastum aggerem, Sen. Hippol. 
1015 (cf. : mons aquae. Verg. A. 1, 105). — 

B. In milit. lang. 1, A mound erected 
before the walls of a besieged city, for the 
purpose of sustaining the battering engines, 
and which was gradually advanced to the 
town; cf. Smith's Diet. Antiq.. and Herz. 
ad Caes. B. G. 2, 12: aggere, vincis, turri- 
bus oppidum oppugnare, Cic. Fam. 15, 4; 
id, Att. 5, 20 : esset agger oppugnandae Ita- 
liae Graecia, id. Phil. 10, 9 : celeriter vi- 
neis ad oppidum actis, aggere jacto turri- 
busque constitutis, etc., Caes. B. G. 2, 12; 
jacere, to throw up, Sail. J. 37, 4; so Vulg. 
Isa. 29, 3 : aggerem exstruere, Caes. B. G. 
2,30: instruere. id. ib. 8,41: promovere ad 
urbem, to bring near to the city, Liv. 5, 7. — 
Hence, poet. : stellatis axibus agger Erigi- 
tur, geminasque aequantis moenia turres 
Accipit, a mound is built provided with 
wheels (for moving it forwards), Luc. 3, 455; 
imitated by Sil. 13, 109.— Since such agge- 
res consisted principally of wood, they 
could be easily set on fire, Caes. B. C.2. 14: 
horae momento simul aggerem ac vineas 
incendium hausit, Liv. 5, 7.— Trop.: Grae- 
cia esset vel receptaculum pulso Antonio, 
vel agger oppugnandae Italiae, rampart, 
mound. Cic. Phil. 10, 4: Agger Tarquini, 
the mound raised by Tarquinius Superbus 
for the defence of the eastern part of the 
city of Rome, in the neighborhood of the 
preseut Porta S. Lorenzo, Plin. 3, 5, 9, 
§ 67; cf. id. 36. 15, 24, n. 2; *Hor. S. 1, 
8, 15; Juv. 5, 153; so id. 8, 43; Quint. 12, 
10, 74.— Suet, uses agger for the Tarpeian 
rock : quoad praecipitaretur ex aggere, 
Calig. 27. — 2. The mound raised for the 
protection of a camp before the trench 
(fossa), and from earth dug from it, which 
was secured by a stockade (vallum), con- 
sisting of sharpened stakes ( valli ) ; cf. 
Hab. Syn. 68, and Smith's Diet. Antiq.: 
in litore sedes, Castrorum in morem pinnis 
atque aggere cingit, Verg. A. 7, 159; Plin. 
15, 14,14, § 47. — 3. The tribunal, in a camp, 
formed of turf, from which the general ad- 
dressed his soldiers : stetit aggere saltus 
Cespitis, intrepidus vultum meruitque ti- 
med, Luc. 5, 317 :• vix ea turre senex, cum 
ductor ab aggere coepit, Stat. Th. 7, 374; 
cf. Tac. A. 1, 18 Lips. — 4. A military or 
public road, commonly graded by embank- 
ments of earth (in the class, per. only in 
Verg. and Tac, and always in connection 
with viae, agger alone belonging only to 
later Lat.): viae depreiisus in aggere ser- 
pens, Verg. A. 5, 273: Aurelius agger, i. e. 
via Aureha, Rutil. Itiner 39: aggerem viae 
tres praetoriae cohortes obtinuere, Tac. H. 
2, 24 and 42 ; 3, 21 and 23. 

* aggcratim, adv r a g£ er L ^ n heaps, 
— acervatim, App. M. 4, p. 146, 2 Elm. 



AGGR 
ag-greratio (adg--). onis,/ [i. aggero], 

a heaping up; in concr. , that which is heap- 
ed ap, a mole, dike (not before the Aug. 
per.): naves supra adgerationem, quae fu- 
erat sub aqua, sederunt, Vitr. 10, 22, 263; 
Just. 2, Ifin. 

1. ag"g"ero (adg"-)? avi, Atum, 1, v. a. 
[agger]. I. Lit., to form an agger, or to 
heap up like an agger; hence, in gen., to 
heap up, pile up (cf. cumulare; only poet, 
and in post- Aug. prose): aggerat cadavera, 
Verg. G. 3. 556: Laurentis praemia pugnae 
aggerat, id. A. 11, 79: ossa disjecta vel ag- 
gerata, Tac. A. 1, 01 ; 1, 03.— H. Trans f. 
A. To heap up, i. e. to augment, increase : 
inceuditque animum dictis atque aggerat 
iras, Verg. A. 4, 197, and 11, 342 : omne 
promissum, Stat. Th. 2, 198. — B, To Jill, 
fill up : spatium, Curt. 4, 2.— C. Aggerare 
arborem, in gardening, to heap up earth 
around a tree in order to protect the roots, 
Col. 11, % 46. 

2. ag--g"ero (adg--), gessi, gestum, 3, 
v. a. I. To bear, carry, cotivey, bring to or 
toward a place; with ad or dat. (in Plaut. 
freq. ; in the class, per. rare; in Cic. perh. 
only once ; more freq. in Tac. ) : quom eorum 
aggerimus bona, quin etiam ultro ip&i ag- 
gerunt ad uos, Plaut. True. 1, 2, 16 : mihi 
his a^gerunda etiam est aqua, id. Rud. 2, 
5, 27;"so id. Cas. 1, 1, 36; Varr. R. R 3, 17, 
6: luta et limum aggerebant, Cic. ap. Non. 
212, 16 : ingens Aggeritur tumulo tellus, 
Verg. A. 3, 63 : quadrantes patrimonio, 
Phaedr. 4, 19 (20): aggesta fluminibus ter- 
ra, Plin. 17, 4, 3, § 28 : aggerebatur caespes, 
Tac. A. 1, 19.— Trop. , to bring forwards, 
lay to one's charge : probra, Tac. A. 13. 14: 
falsa, id. ib. 2, 57. — *H. To stick together 
soft masses : haec genera (laterum ex ter- 
ra cretosa factornm) non sunt ponderosa et 
faci liter adgeruntur, Vitr. 2, 3. 35. 

* ag-g-estim (adg--), adv. [aggero], in 
heaps, abundantly, Vulg. 2 Mace. 13, 5. 

ag-g-estlO (adg 1 -), onis./. [id.], a bear- 
ing to a place, a heaping up; in concr., 
a mass of mud, heap of sand, etc., Pall. 2, 
13; 12,15. 

1. ag-g-estus (adg*-) > " s , »»• D d -1, « 
bearing or carrying to a place, a collecting, 
an accumulation, collection (post-Aug. and 
rare): pabuli, materiae, lignorum, Tac. A. 
1. 35: copiarum, id. H. 3, 60: harenae, Aur. 
Vict. Ep. 3. 

2. ag^estus, ', ™ , or agrg-estum 

(adg"-)j *i n - t 1Q, -L an elevation formed like 
a dike or mound : prunas unius aggesti in- 
seruere juncturis, Amm. 20, 11 ; 19, 8. 

ag'-glomero (adg - -), avi, atum, l, v. 
a., lit., to wind on {as on a ball); only 
poet., to add or join to, to annex , and se, 
to join one's self to : et (se) lateri adglome- 
rant nostro, Verg. A. 2, 341: cuneis, id. ib. 
12, 458 : Sigeaque pestis adglomerare fre- 
turn, liaises it up (as a ball), i. e. heaps it 
up, Val. Fl. 2, 499. 

ajr-glutino (adg"-)> ^ vi 5 atum, 1, v. a., 
to glue, paste, solder, or cement to a thing, 
to Jit closely to, to fasten to, I. Lit., tu 
illud (prooemium) desecabis, hoc adgluti- 
nabis, you may remove that introduction, 
and add this instead of it, *Cic. Att. 16, 6: 
aliquid fronti, Cels. 6, 6, n. 1; so id. 7, 26, 
n. 4; Vitr. 10, 13, 245: adglutinando auro, 
Plin. 33. 5, 29. § 93 : Fragmenta teporata 
adglutinantur, id. 36, 26, 67, § 11)9 : adglu- 
tinabo pisees fluminum tuorum squamis 
tu is, Vulg. Ezech. 29, 4— H. Fig : ita mihi 
ad malum malae res plunmae se adgluti- 
nant. Plaut. Aul. 4, 10, 71; id. Men. 2, 2, 67: 
adglutinavi mihi omnom do mum Israel, 
Vulg. Jer. 13, 11. 

ag--gravesco (adg--), ere, 3, v. inch., 
to become heavy. X. Lit.: propinquitate 
parti, Pac ap. Non. 486, 5 (Trag. Rel. p. 85 
Rib.). — II. Fig., of sickness, to become 
violent, severe, dangerous : ne Philumcnae 
magis morbus adgravescat, grow worse, be 
aggravated, Ter. Hec. 3, 2, 2. 

ag'-gravo (adff-)i riVi , atum, l, v. a. 

(first used in the Aug. per., and only in 
prose writers; perh. formed by Livy, who 
uses it very often), to add to the weight of 
to make heavier. I. L i t : adgravatur pon- 
dus, Plin. 18, 12, 30, § 117: adgraviivit ju- 
gum nostrum, Vulg. 3 Reg. 12, 10: compe- 
dem meum, ib. Thren. 3, 7— H, Fig. ^L 
In gen., to make worse or more dangerous, 



AGGK 

•to aggravate : quo {bello) si adgravatae res 
•eesent, Liv. 4, 12 : odor adgravans capita, 
Plin. 12, 17, 40, § 79: ictus, id. '28, 4, 7, g 37 : 
vulnera, id. 28, 3, 6, § 31: dolorem, Curt. 8, 
10: proeli um, Vulg. 1 Par. 10, 3: quare ag- 
gravate corda vestra? i. e. harden, ib. 1 Reg. 
6. G. — B. Esp. , to oppress, to burden, an- 
noy, incommode : sine ope host is, quae ad- 
gravaret, Liv. 44, 7 fin. : morbo adgravante 
(euin), Suet. Caes, 1: beneficia rationes 
nostras adgravatura, Sen. Ben. 4, 13 : argu- 
menta, quae per se nihil reum adgrayare 
videantur, appear to be without weight, 
Quint. 5, 7, 18. 

ag"-gTedlO (adg*-)j Sre (act form of 
aggredior; cf. adono), 3, v. n., to go to, ap- 
proach : hoc si adgredias, Plaut. True. 2, 
1, 40 : scrupea saxea Bacchi templa prope 
adgredite, Pac. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 6 Mull. 
(Trag. Rel. p. 97, Ribbeck has adgreditur, but 
proposes adgreditor). — Pass.: ut adgrede- 
rer dolis, Cic. Fragm. ap. Prise, p. 792, 22 P. : 
facillimis quibutque adgressis, Just. 7, 6. 

ag*-gredior (adg--), gressus, 3, v. dep. 

[gradior] {second pers.pres. adgredire, Plaut. 
As. 3, 3, 124; inf. adgrediri, id. True. 2, 5, 7: 
adgredirier, id. Merc. 2, 1, 24, and id. Rud. 3, 

1, U ; part. perf. adgretus, Enn. ap. Paul, ex 
Fest. p. 6 Mull.), to go to or approach a per- 
son or thing (coinciding, both in signif. and 
const r.. with adire; Horace never uses ad- 
gredi ; Cic. and the histt. very freq.) ; constr. 
with ad or ace. (cf. Zumpt, § 387). I. In 
gen. : ad nunc Philemum adgredimur ? 
Plaut. As. 3, 3, 90: adgredior hominem, id. 
Cure. 2. 3, 59. — With toe. adv.: non enirn 
Tepelletur inde, quo adgredi cupiet, Cic. de 
Or. 3, 17, 63.— II. Esp. A. Aliquem, to go 
to or approach, for the purpose of convers- 
ing or advising with, asking counsel of, en- 
treating or soliciting something of; to apply 
to, address, solicit, etc.: quin ego hunc ad- 
gredior de ilia? Plaut. Merc. 2, 3, 50: Locu- 
stam ego Romae adgrediar atque, ut arbi- 
tror, commovebo, apply to, Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 1: 
Damasippum velim adgrediare. to solicit, 
id. Att. 12, 33: legatos adgreditu